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Graduate School Catalog Vanderbilt University 2015/2016

Containing general information and courses of study for the 2015/2016 session corrected to 20 June 2015 Nashville

The university reserves the right, through its established procedures, to modify the requirements for admission and graduation and to change other rules, regulations, and provisions, including those stated in this catalog and other publications, and to refuse admission to any student, or to require the withdrawal of a student if it is determined to be in the interest of the student or the university. All students, full- or part-time, who are enrolled in Vanderbilt courses are subject to the same policies. Policies concerning noncurricular matters and concerning withdrawal for medical or emotional reasons can be found in the Student Handbook, which is on the Vanderbilt website at vanderbilt.edu/student_handbook. NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT In compliance with federal law, including the provisions of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Executive Order 11246, the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, as amended, and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, Vanderbilt University does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their race, sex, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service, or genetic information in its administration of educational policies, programs, or activities; admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; athletic or other university-administered programs; or employment. In addition, the university does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression consistent with the university’s nondiscrimination policy. Inquiries or complaints should be directed to the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department, Baker Building, PMB 401809, Nashville, TN 37240-1809. Telephone (615) 322-4705 (V/TDD); FAX (615) 343-4969.

The text of this catalog is printed on recycled paper with ink made from renewable resources. This publication is recyclable. Please recycle it. Copyright © 2015 Vanderbilt University Produced by Vanderbilt University Creative Services Printed in the United States of America

Contents Calendar 6 Graduate Study at Vanderbilt 7 Life at Vanderbilt 11 Academic Programs 20 Admission 24 Financial Information 26 Academic Regulations 29 Programs of Study 35 Courses 75 Administration and Faculty

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Graduate School Calendar 2015/2016 FALL SEMESTER 2015 Classes begin / Wednesday 26 August Spring 2016 registration opens / Monday 12 October Fall break / Thursday 15 October–Friday 16 October Last day to withdraw from courses without academic penalty / Friday 16 October Last day to submit Intent to Graduate forms for December graduation / Friday 23 October Thanksgiving holidays / Saturday 21 November–Sunday 29 November Final day for submission of theses and dissertations to the Graduate School for graduation in December / Monday 23 November Reading days and examinations / Friday 11 December–Saturday 19 December Fall semester ends / Saturday 19 December SPRING SEMESTER 2016 Classes begin / Monday 11 January Last day to submit Intent to Graduate forms for May graduation / Monday 15 February Spring holidays / Saturday 5 March–Sunday 13 March Last day to withdraw from courses without academic penalty / Friday 18 March Final day for submission of theses and dissertations to the Graduate School for graduation in May / Monday 28 March Reading days and examinations / Tuesday 26 April–Thursday 5 May Commencement / Friday 13 May SUMMER SESSION 2016 Last day to submit Intent to Graduate forms for August graduation / Friday 17 June Final day for submission of theses and dissertations to the Graduate School for graduation in August / Friday 22 July

Graduate School / Graduate Study at Vanderbilt

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Graduate Study at Vanderbilt

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RADUATE education has held a central place in the program of Vanderbilt University since it opened in 1875. The first doctor of philosophy degree was granted in 1879; the 2,000th in 1975, the university’s centennial year. The 3,000th was given in 1985. As of 2015, more than 7,200 doctor of philosophy degrees have been awarded. By way of comparison, the first Ph.D. given by an American university was awarded in 1861, and the second American institution to offer the degree did so in 1870. A separate Graduate School was established at Vanderbilt in 1935 by action of the Board of Trust, with an official faculty selected from various schools of the university. Selection is based on the individual faculty member’s administrative responsibility or substantial participation in graduate instruction. Vanderbilt offers to able and serious students a faculty that is active in research and deeply committed to the development of scholars. Students participate in classroom, tutorial, and collegial modes of learning and in systematic independent inquiry, in a setting that allows them to see scholars at work, day in and day out, as an important means of learning the scholar’s art. Students are in situations in which they are known personally and well, and concern for what happens to them is very strong. Vanderbilt is a member of the Association of American Universities, a sixty-two-member organization of researchintensive universities. The doctor of philosophy especially, but also the master of arts and master of science, are research degrees, offered by a faculty of research scholars. The objectives of the Graduate School are to train scholars and to promote research. The faculty seeks to provide every student with thorough knowledge of a particular field and a mastery of the methods of productive scholarship. Wherever feasible, the faculty intends to provide opportunity for all Ph.D. candidates to have supervised teaching experiences. The Graduate School enrolls about 2,200 students. About 49 percent are women, and 24 percent come from foreign countries. The University Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, who gave a million dollars to build and endow Vanderbilt University in 1873, expressed the wish that it “contribute . . . to strengthening the ties which should exist between all geographical sections of our common country.” A little more than a hundred years later, the Vanderbilt Board of Trust adopted the following mission statement: “We reaffirm our belief in the unique and special contributions that Vanderbilt can make toward meeting the nation’s requirements for scholarly teaching, training, investigation, and service, and we reaffirm our conviction that to fulfill its inherited responsibilities, Vanderbilt must relentlessly pursue a lasting future and seek highest quality in its educational undertakings.” Today as Vanderbilt pursues its mission, the university more than fulfills the Commodore’s hope. It is one of a few independent universities with both a quality undergraduate program and a full range of graduate and professional programs. It has a strong faculty of more than 3,700 full-time

members and a diverse student body of more than 12,700. Students from many regions, backgrounds, and disciplines come together for multidisciplinary study and research. The 330-acre campus is about one and one-half miles from the downtown business district of the city of Nashville, combining the advantages of an urban location with a peaceful, parklike setting of broad lawns, shaded paths, and quiet plazas. The schools of the university offer the following degrees: Graduate School. Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Liberal Arts and Science, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy. College of Arts and Science. Bachelor of Arts. Blair School of Music. Bachelor of Music. Divinity School. Master of Divinity, Master of Theological Studies. School of Engineering. Bachelor of Engineering, Bachelor of Science, Master of Engineering. Law School. Master of Laws, Doctor of Jurisprudence. School of Medicine. Master of Education of the Deaf, Master of Health Professions Education, Master of Public Health, Master of Science in Applied Clinical Informatics, Master of Science in Clinical Investigation, Master of Laboratory Investigation, Master of Science in Medical Physics, Master of Science (Speech-Language Pathology), Doctor of Audiology, Doctor of Medical Physics, Doctor of Medicine. School of Nursing. Master of Science in Nursing, Doctor of Nursing Practice. Owen Graduate School of Management. Master of Accountancy, Master of Business Administration, Master of Management in Health Care, Master of Science in Finance. Peabody College. Bachelor of Science, Master of Education, Master of Public Policy, Doctor of Education. No honorary degrees are conferred.

Mission, Goals, and Values

Vanderbilt University is a center for scholarly research, informed and creative teaching, and service to the community and society at large. Vanderbilt will uphold the highest standards and be a leader in the • • •

quest for new knowledge through scholarship, dissemination of knowledge through teaching and outreach, creative experimentation of ideas and concepts.

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intellectual freedom that supports open inquiry, equality, compassion, and excellence in all endeavors.

In pursuit of these goals, Vanderbilt values most highly

Accreditation Vanderbilt University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award bachelor’s, master’s, professional, and doctoral degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane,

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Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Vanderbilt University. Facilities Vanderbilt has many special facilities for study and research in particular areas, as well as the traditional classroom and laboratory facilities associated with graduate instruction. Graduate instruction in the humanities, the biological sciences, and the social sciences is conducted in Benson, Buttrick, Calhoun, Furman, Garland, and Wilson halls. Graduate work in religion uses the full facilities of Vanderbilt Divinity School. The E. Bronson Ingram Studio Arts Center, opened in fall 2005, has studios for sculpture, ceramics, photography, computer arts, painting, and drawing. Gallery space is designated for exhibits primarily of students’ work. The Stevenson Center for the Natural Sciences, a complex of seven connected buildings, includes laboratory and lecture facilities for biological sciences, chemistry, geology, mathematics, and physics. Classrooms and laboratories of Peabody College are used for graduate instruction in education and psychology and human development. Laboratories for the biomedical sciences—biochemistry, bioinformatics, cancer biology, cell and developmental biology, cellular and molecular pathology, microbiology and immunology, molecular physiology and biophysics, and pharmacology—are in the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Medical Center North, Light Hall, Preston Research Building, Robinson Research Building, and Medical Research Building IV. The A. B. Learned Laboratories and Medical Research Building III provide additional facilities for biological sciences. Graduate students in neuroscience use facilities across campus with a home in the Vanderbilt Brain Institute. Graduate work in engineering uses the laboratories of the School of Engineering, including those in the Olin Hall of Engineering, Featheringill Hall, Jacobs Hall, as well as the Stevenson Center. The facilities of Owen Graduate School of Management are used for graduate study in management. Graduate students in nursing science use the facilities of Godchaux and Frist Halls, and those in hearing and speech sciences use classrooms and laboratories in the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center. The Libraries

The Jean and Alexander Heard Library System Vanderbilt University’s libraries are among the top research libraries in the nation, home to more than eight million items, including print publications, microfilm items, and digital collections. The libraries provide electronic access to tens of thousands of full-text journals and more than 800,000 e-books and other research resources accessible via the campus network, from workstations and circulating laptops in campus libraries, as well as authenticated access (VUnetID and e-password) from off campus. The libraries’ website offers searches for articles, books, electronic resources, and more, as well as links to subject liaisons and research guides in many areas of interest. The oldest manuscript in the collection dates from c. 1300 and new publications are being added every day. Among the libraries’ collection strengths are the W. T. Bandy Center for Baudelaire and Modern French Studies, a comprehensive collection of materials on Charles Baudelaire and French literature and culture; the Southern Literature and Culture

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Collection; Latin American collections for Brazil, Colombia, the Andes, Mesoamerica, and Argentina; the Television News Archive, the world’s most extensive and complete archive of television news covering 1968 to present; the Revised Common Lectionary, one of the first published Web-based resources of scriptural readings for the liturgical year; and the Global Music Archive, a multimedia reference archive and resource center for traditional and popular song, music, and dance of Africa and the Americas. In partnership with faculty, library staff teach students valuable skills for locating and evaluating the latest information in a complex array of sources. Campus libraries with discipline-specific collections are home to professional librarians who provide expert support in that area of study. Online reference is available through the homepage. Options for individual study are complemented by group study spaces and instructional rooms, as well as learning commons and cafes. Exhibits throughout the libraries offer intellectual and creative insights that encourage students to see their own work in new ways. Students, faculty, and staff may come to the library to read in a cozy nook, meet friends for group study, grab a quick meal, or see an exhibit. Information Technology Vanderbilt University Information Technology (VUIT) offers voice, video, data, computing, and conferencing services to Vanderbilt students, faculty, and staff. VUIT provides free antivirus downloads and malware prevention in many campus areas. VUIT maintains and supports VUnet, the campuswide data network that provides access to the Internet, and AccessVU, the authentication service that enables Vanderbilt users to securely identify themselves to many services on VUnet. Those services include YES, Your Enrollment Services; Blackboard; and Vmail, the university’s email system. VUIT also partners with Sprint, Verizon, and AT&T to offer discounts for cellular phone service. For discount information see it.vanderbilt.edu/cellphone. It is important to note that many wireless consumer electronic devices interfere with VUnet, and in worst-case circumstances, could even cause degradation to network service. These devices are prohibited and include, but are not limited to, routers, access points (APs), or AirPorts manufactured by companies such as Apple, Belkin, D-Link, and Linksys. Additionally, settings for smartphone hotspots and wireless connectivity for printers and other devices must be disabled to prevent interference with university wireless APs. Vanderbilt offers all students low-cost and free-of-charge software, including Microsoft Office and Microsoft Windows. See softwarestore.vanderbilt.edu for a complete product catalog and more information. Furthermore, VUIT provides various conferencing and collaboration services for students, including audio and video conferencing via a desktop or a Polycom bridge. Vanderbilt’s blog service offers Wordpress Blogs at my.vanderbilt.edu. See it.vanderbilt.edu/services/collaboration for more information. The Tech Hub is the help desk at Vanderbilt that provides information to students, faculty, and staff about VUnet and VUnet services. Its locations, hours, contacts, and other information can be found at it.vanderbilt.edu/techhub. For more information on IT services and computing at Vanderbilt, go to it.vanderbilt.edu.

Graduate School / Graduate Study at Vanderbilt

Official University Communications Certain federal statutes require that information be delivered to each student. Vanderbilt delivers much of this information via email. Official electronic notifications, including those required by statutes, those required by university policy, and instructions from university officials, will be sent to students’ Vanderbilt email addresses: [email protected] Students are required to be familiar with the contents of official university notifications, and to respond to instructions and other official correspondence requiring a response. Some messages will include links to the YES Communications Tool, which is a secure channel for official communication of a confidential nature. The university makes every effort to avoid inundating students with nonessential email (often called “spam”), and maintains separate lists from which students may unsubscribe for announcements of general interest.

Interdisciplinary Centers, Institutes, and Research Groups Vanderbilt actively promotes research and teaching that crosses disciplines, departments, and institutional lines through a multitude of centers, institutes, and research groups. Below is a sampling of interdisciplinary initiatives at the university and medical center. For more information, see research. vanderbilt.edu/centers-institutes. The Cal Turner Program for Moral Leadership in the Professions works to develop the leadership and ethical capacities of those serving in the professions. CTP brings together professionals from a range of disciplines to take on significant social challenges and fosters within Vanderbilt’s students and its broader constituents a deep sense of vocation, encouraging professionals to remember the deeper purposes that motivate their work. vanderbilt.edu/ctp The Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society provides leadership in education, research, and clinical service at Vanderbilt University Medical Center concerning the ethical, legal, and social dimensions of medicine, health care, and health policy. medicineandpublichealth.vanderbilt.edu The Center for Integrative and Cognitive Neuroscience investigates the relationship between brain function, behavior, and cognition, and promotes the development of new technologies like advanced prosthetics and autonomous robots. cicn.vanderbilt.edu The Center for Latin American Studies works to advance knowledge about and understanding of the region’s history, culture, political economy, and social organization. vanderbilt.edu/clas The Center for Medicine, Health, and Society integrates studies of the humanities, social sciences, and academic medicine in order to examine the role of health and health care in contemporary society. vanderbilt.edu/mhs The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience addresses a focused set of closely related problems at the intersection of neuroscience and criminal justice, including mental states, capacity, and evidence. lawneuro.org The Max Kade Center for European and German Studies fosters an international perspective on issues relating to Europe and transatlantic relations and seeks to prepare students for international careers or advanced study. as.vanderbilt.edu/europeanstudies The National Center on School Choice conducts scientific, comprehensive, and timely studies on school choice to inform policy and practice. vanderbilt.edu/schoolchoice The Owen Entrepreneurship Center brings together investors, entrepreneurs, and Vanderbilt business students to share innovative ideas. The OEC has spawned an active angel investor network and allows Owen

9 students to have easy access to a ready-made network of successful entrepreneurs. www2.owen.vanderbilt.edu/oec The Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities promotes interdisciplinary research and study in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Members of the Vanderbilt community representing a wide variety of specializations take part in the center’s programs, which are designed to intensify and increase interdisciplinary discussion of academic, social, and cultural issues. vanderbilt.edu/rpw_center The Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences is an integrated educational, research, and patient care center dedicated to serving individuals with otolaryngologic and communicative disorders. The center encourages interdisciplinary collaboration in all of the speech, language, and hearing sciences and otolaryngology specialties. vanderbilthealth.com/billwilkerson The Vanderbilt Brain Institute promotes and facilitates the discovery efforts of Vanderbilt neuroscientists, the training of undergraduate and graduate students, and the coordination of public outreach in brain sciences. Research endeavors in the VBI include more than three hundred scientists from fifty departments, centers, and institutes across the campus, spanning a spectrum of study from molecules to the mind. braininstitute.vanderbilt.edu. The Vanderbilt Initiative in Surgery and Engineering creates, develops, implements, and evaluates solutions to complex interventional problems. Physicians, engineers, and computer scientists work together to improve patient care. vanderbilt.edu/vise The Vanderbilt Institute for Energy and Environment considers social, economic, legal, and technical aspects of environmental and energy problems to find solutions that are practical, achievable, and cost-effective. A crucial part of its mission is to train the next generation of leaders in the energy and environmental arena. vanderbilt.edu/viee The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health is committed to advancing health and development in resource-limited regions with projects in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Vanderbilt faculty and staff provide leadership and expertise in establishing sustainable, scalable health development programs. globalhealth.vanderbilt.edu The Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education fosters and enhances interdisciplinary research in the biophysical sciences and bioengineering at Vanderbilt, integrated with a strong focus on undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral education. VIIBRE’s mission is to invent the tools and develop the skills that are required to understand biological systems across spatiotemporal scales. vanderbilt.edu/viibre The Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology provides research and training in the application of chemical approaches to the solution of important biomedical problems. Particular strengths of the institute include analytical methodology and molecular imaging, cellular responses to chemical stress, drug discovery, enzyme and receptor chemistry, proteomics, structural biology, and chemical synthesis. vanderbilt.edu/vicb The Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering engages in theoretical and experimental research in science and engineering at the nanoscale (from one millionth to one billionth of a meter in size). VINSE supports an extensive infrastructure of materials fabrication and analytical facilities for research in nanoscale science and engineering. vanderbilt.edu/vinse The Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development is one of fourteen Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Centers supported in part by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. It also is a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service in the national network of sixty-seven such centers in every U.S. state and territory supported by the U.S. Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Vanderbilt Kennedy Center facilitates discoveries and best practices that make positive differences in the lives of persons with disabilities and their families. vkc. mc.vanderbilt.edu

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The Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science aims to support and integrate advances in physics, engineering, chemistry, computing, and other basic sciences for the development and application of new and enhanced imaging techniques to address problems and stimulate new research directions in biology and medicine, in health and disease. vuiis.vanderbilt.edu

Other initiatives include: Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education African American Mental Health Research Scientist Consortium American Economic Association Arthritis and Joint Replacement Center Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center Carpenter Program in Religion, Gender, and Sexuality Center for Bone Biology Center for Child Development Center for Clinical Toxicology Center for Cognitive Medicine Center for Constructive Approximation Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement Center for Experiential Learning and Assessment Center for Health Services Research at Vanderbilt Center for Human Genetics Research Center for Intelligent Systems Center for Matrix Biology Center for Molecular Neuroscience Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy Center for Research on Rural Families and Communities Center for Science Outreach Center for Structural Biology Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions Center for Teaching Center for U.S.-Japan Studies and Cooperation Center in Molecular Toxicology Center on School Choice, Competition, and Achievement Child and Family Center Classroom Organization and Management Program Clinical Research Center Clinical Trials Center Cognitive Robotics Laboratory The Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy Digestive Disease Research Center Division of Sponsored Research eLab English Language Center Experimental Education Research Training (ExpERT) Program Family-School Partnership Lab Financial Markets Research Center Freedom Forum First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University Informatics Center Institute for Medicine and Public Health Institute for Software Integrated Systems Institute for Space and Defense Electronics Intelligent Robotics Lab Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical and Biological Sciences (IGP) IRIS Center for Training Enhancements Kelly Miller Smith Institute on Black Church Studies Lamb Center for Pediatric Research Laser Diagnostics and Combustion Group Latin American Public Opinion Project Law and Business Program

Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center Mass Spectrometry Research Center MIT Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Educational Technologies National Center on Performance Incentives National Research Center on Learning Disabilities Peabody Research Institute Peabody Research Office Poison Center Program in Quebec and Canadian Studies Radiation Effects and Reliability Group Research on Individuals, Politics, and Society Skin Diseases Research Core Center Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth Susan Gray School Tennessee Lions Eye Center Turner Center for Church Leadership and Congregational Development Vanderbilt Addiction Center Vanderbilt Breast Center Vanderbilt Burn Center Vanderbilt Center for Better Health Vanderbilt Center for Environmental Management Studies Vanderbilt Center for Human Nutrition Vanderbilt Center for Integrative Health Vanderbilt Center for Kidney Disease Vanderbilt Center for Nashville Studies Vanderbilt Center for Stem Cell Biology Vanderbilt Diabetes Research and Training Center Vanderbilt Engineering Center for Transportation Operations and Research (VECTOR) Vanderbilt Executive Development Institute Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Vanderbilt Programs for Talented Youth Vanderbilt Sleep Disorders Center Vanderbilt Transplant Center Vanderbilt Tuberculosis Center Vanderbilt Vaccine Center Vanderbilt Vision Research Center Vanderbilt Voice Center W. T. Bandy Center for Baudelaire and Modern French Studies

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Life at Vanderbilt

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ANDERBILT provides a full complement of auxiliary services to meet the personal needs of students, to make life on the campus comfortable and enjoyable, and to provide the proper setting for academic endeavor.

Graduate School Resources Graduate Student Council The Graduate Student Council (GSC) exists to enhance the overall educational experience at Vanderbilt University by promoting the general welfare and concerns of the Graduate School student body. This is achieved through the creation of new programs and initiatives to provide opportunities for growth and interaction, as well as through communication with the Vanderbilt faculty and administration on behalf of graduate students. The GSC consists of elected representatives, standing committees, and an annually elected executive board. In the recent past, the GSC has helped change policies involving campus dining, free bus transportation, parking, and student health insurance. The GSC is also a member of the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS). In addition to its representative function, the GSC also organizes a number of events and hosts/sponsors various projects during the year, including co-sponsoring seminars and panels with individual departments, organizing the Vanderbilt 3 Minute Thesis competition (spring semester), facilitating the Graduate Student Honor Council, planning community outreach activities, and offering many social opportunities. The GSC also awards travel grants to graduate students who wish to present their research at conferences throughout the year. All Vanderbilt Graduate School students are welcome and encouraged to attend GSC’s monthly meetings and to get involved. For more information, visit studentorgs.vanderbilt.edu/gsc. Career Development for Graduate School Students The Dean’s Office of the Graduate School is dedicated to helping students navigate the transition from degree to career. Guidance and professional development opportunities are offered throughout a Graduate School student’s program, in the form of individual advising, workshops, seminars, and Webbased resources. Topics range from creating an effective CV/ resume, to interviewing skills, to establishing a network for both academic and non-academic career searches. For Ph.D.’s in the biomedical disciplines, the Office of Biomedical Research Education and Training (BRET) offers similar services. For Ph.D.’s in Peabody College, the Peabody Office of Professional and Graduate Education (POPGE) offers complementary resources. Additional resources for particular career interests are available through a campus partnership with the Center for Student Professional Development. Through these numerous services, students will find ample assistance for their career searches. For more information, visit my.vanderbilt.edu/gradcareer. Graduate Development Network The Graduate Development Network (GDN) is an informal network of faculty, administrators, and students at Vanderbilt University that seeks to facilitate the awareness and use of the

many programs that can help students become productive and well-rounded scholars. The network’s website (vanderbilt.edu/ gradschool/gdn) provides links to various offices and groups at Vanderbilt that support graduate student development. These offices and organizations also jointly sponsor a number of seminars, workshops, and similar events that support student development. The Center for Teaching The mission of the Center for Teaching is to promote university teaching that leads to meaningful student learning. The services of the center are available to all graduate students, including those teaching at Vanderbilt as teaching assistants (TAs) and instructors of record, as well as those who anticipate that teaching will be a part of their future careers. Fall TA Orientation introduces participants to teaching at Vanderbilt, focusing on the information and skills necessary to take on TA roles in the classroom. Workshops and practice teaching sessions are led by experienced graduate student teaching assistants. The Certificate in College Teaching has been designed to assist graduate students who wish to develop and refine their teaching skills. The certificate focuses on the research on how people learn and best teaching practices, and supports the university’s pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning. The certificate is ideal for graduate students whose goals are to become more effective educators and who want to prepare for future careers in higher education teaching. The Blended and Online Learning Design (BOLD) Fellows Program helps graduate students in the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) partner with faculty members to design and develop online modules for integration into a course. The teams implement these modules in existing classes and investigate their impact on student learning. The Mellon Certificate in Humanities Education is a program for humanities graduate students that comprises a sequential seminar and practicum in which participants explore humanistic pedagogies and teaching historically underrepresented populations. The Graduate Teaching Fellows and Teaching Affiliates Program provides graduate students the opportunity to work at the center, facilitating the programs offered to graduate students, consulting with TAs, and collaborating on teachingrelated projects. For more information and other services, please visit the Center for Teaching website at cft.vanderbilt.edu or call (615) 322-7290.

Other Campus Resources Barnes & Noble at Vanderbilt Barnes & Noble at Vanderbilt, the campus bookstore located at 2525 West End Avenue, offers textbooks (new, used, digital, and rental), computers, supplies, Nook e-readers, dorm accessories, licensed Vanderbilt apparel, and best-selling books. Students can order online or in-store and receive course materials accurately, conveniently, and on time. The bookstore features

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extended hours of operation and hosts regular special events. Visitors to the bookstore café can enjoy Starbucks coffees, sandwiches, and desserts while studying. Free customer parking is available in the 2525 garage directly behind the bookstore. For more information, visit vubookstore.com, follow twitter.com/ BN_Vanderbilt, find the bookstore on Facebook at facebook. com/VanderbiltBooks, or call (615) 343-2665. The Commodore Card The Commodore Card is the Vanderbilt student ID card. It can be used to access debit spending accounts, VU meal plans, and campus buildings such as residence halls, libraries, academic buildings, and the Vanderbilt Recreation and Wellness Center. ID cards are issued at the Commodore Card Office, 184 Sarratt Student Center, Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. For more information, go to vanderbilt.edu/ cardservices. Eating on Campus Vanderbilt Campus Dining operates several restaurants, cafes, and markets throughout campus that provide a variety of food. The two largest dining facilities are Rand Dining Center in Rand Hall (connected to Sarratt Student Center) and The Ingram Commons dining hall. Six convenience stores on campus offer grab-and-go meals, snacks, beverages, and groceries. All units accept the Vanderbilt Card and Meal Plans. Graduate student Meal Plans are offered at a discount. For more information, hours, and menus, go to campusdining.vanderbilt.edu. Housing To support the housing needs of new and continuing graduate and professional students, the Office of Housing and Residential Education provides a Web-based off-campus referral service (apphost1a.its.vanderbilt.edu/housing/Main/). The referral service lists information about housing accommodations off campus. The majority of listed rental properties are close to the campus. Cost, furnishings, and conditions vary greatly. For best choices, students seeking off-campus housing should visit the office or consult the website as early as possible for suggestions and guidance. The website includes advertisements by landlords looking specifically for Vanderbilt-affiliated tenants, as well as by Vanderbilt students looking for roommates. Listings are searchable by cost, distance from campus, number of bedrooms, and other parameters. Students may also post “wanted” ads seeking roommate or housemate situations. On-campus university housing for graduate or professional students is not available.

Change of Address Students who change either their local or permanent mailing address are expected to notify the University Registrar immediately. Candidates for degrees who are not in residence should keep the school and the University Registrar informed of current mailing addresses. To change or update addresses, go to registrar.vanderbilt.edu/academicrec/address.htm. International Student and Scholar Services International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS), located in the Student Life Center, fosters the education and development of nonimmigrant students and scholars to enable them to achieve their academic and professional goals and objectives. ISSS provides advice, counseling, and advocacy

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regarding immigration, cross-cultural, and personal matters. ISSS supports an environment conducive to international education and intercultural awareness via educational, social, and cross-cultural programs. ISSS provides immigration advising and services, including the processing of immigration paperwork, to more than 1,500 international students and scholars. The office works with admission units, schools, and departments to generate documentation needed to bring nonimmigrant students and scholars to the U.S. Further, ISSS keeps abreast of the regulations pertaining to international students and scholars in accordance with the Department of Homeland Security (Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services) and the Department of State. ISSS coordinates semiannual orientation programs for students and ongoing orientations for scholars, who arrive throughout the year. To help promote connection between international students and the greater Nashville community, ISSS coordinates the First Friends program, which matches international students with Americans both on and off campus for friendship and cross-cultural exchange. The weekly World on Wednesday presentations inform, broaden perspectives, and facilitate cross-cultural understanding through discussions led by students, faculty, and staff. International Education Week in the fall provides the campus with additional opportunities to learn about world cultures and to celebrate diversity. The International Lens Film Series (iLens) brings more than forty international films to campus each year. ISSS provides a range of programs and activities throughout the year to address a variety of international student needs and interests. These programs include International Orientation Leaders and a selection of holiday parties. The Southern Culture Series is an opportunity for students to experience Southern culture in nearby cities such as Memphis, Chattanooga, and Atlanta. Obtaining Information about the University Notice to current and prospective students: In compliance with applicable state and federal law, the following information about Vanderbilt University is available: Institutional information about Vanderbilt University, including accreditation, academic programs, faculty, tuition, and other costs, is available in the catalogs of the colleges and schools on the Vanderbilt University website at vanderbilt.edu/ catalogs. A paper copy of the Undergraduate Catalog may be obtained by contacting the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 2305 West End Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee 37203-1727, (800) 288-0432, (615) 322-2561, [email protected] Paper copies of the catalogs for the graduate and professional schools may be available from the individual schools. Information about financial aid for students at Vanderbilt University, including federal and other forms of financial aid for students, is available from the Office of Student Financial Aid on the Vanderbilt University website at vanderbilt.edu/ financialaid. The Office of Student Financial Aid is located at 2309 West End Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee 37203-1725, (615) 322-3591 or (800) 288-0204. Information about graduation rates for students at Vanderbilt University is available on the Vanderbilt University website at virg.vanderbilt.edu. Select “Factbook,” then “Student,” then “Retention/Graduation Rates.” Paper copies of information about graduation rates may be obtained by writing the Office of the University Registrar, Vanderbilt University, PMB

Graduate School / Life at Vanderbilt

407701, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7701 or by calling (615) 322-7701. The Vanderbilt University Annual Security Report on university-wide security and safety, including related policies, procedures, and crime statistics, is available from the Vanderbilt University Police Department on the university website at police.vanderbilt.edu/annual-security-report. A paper copy of the report may be obtained by writing the Vanderbilt University Police Department, 2800 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37212 or by calling (615) 343-9750. For more information, see “Vanderbilt University Police Department” in the following section of this catalog. A copy of the annual Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act Report on the Vanderbilt University athletic program participation rates and financial support data may be obtained by writing the Vanderbilt University Office of Athletic Compliance, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, P.O. Box 120158, Nashville, Tennessee 37212 or by calling (615) 322-7992. Information about your rights with respect to the privacy of your educational records under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is available from the Office of the University Registrar on the Vanderbilt University website at registrar.vanderbilt.edu/academicrec/privacy.htm. Paper copies of this information about educational records may be obtained by writing the Office of the University Registrar, Vanderbilt University, PMB 407701, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-7701 or by calling (615) 322-7701. For more information, see “Confidentiality of Student Records” in the following section of this catalog. The Writing Studio The Writing Studio offers graduate students personal writing consultations, fifty-minute interactive discussions about writing. Trained writing consultants can act as sounding boards and guides for the development of arguments and the clarification of ideas. The focus of a consultation varies according to the individual writer and project. In addition to the standard fifty-minute consultations, the Writing Studio also offers dissertation writers the possibility of having extended appointments with the same consultant on an ongoing basis. Fiftyminute appointments can be scheduled online at vanderbilt. edu/writing. Extended appointments must be arranged in advance through [email protected] and are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Information about other programs for graduate students, like the journal article writing workshop and the annual dissertation writer’s retreat, can also be found at vanderbilt.edu/writing. Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center The Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center (BJJBCC) represents one of Vanderbilt University’s numerous efforts at acknowledging and promoting diversity. It does so by providing educational and cultural programming on the black experience for the entire Vanderbilt community. Dedicated in 1984, the center is named for the first African American student admitted to Vanderbilt University in 1953, Bishop Joseph Johnson (B.D. ’54, Ph.D. ’58). One of the center’s aims is to provide cultural programming. It sponsors lectures, musical performances, art exhibitions, films, and discussions on African and African American history and culture. The center also provides an office space for a scholarly journal, the Afro-Hispanic Review, edited by Vanderbilt faculty and graduate students.

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Another of the center’s aims is student support and development. The center provides meeting spaces for numerous Vanderbilt student groups, including the Black Student Alliance, Every Nation Campus Ministries, and Vanderbilt Spoken Word. The center works with students on a wide range of campus projects and community service opportunities. The center also serves as a haven for students, with opportunities for informal fellowship with other students of all levels as well as with faculty and staff. One additional aim of the center is community outreach and service. To this end, the center reaches out to civic and cultural groups. The BJJBCC facilitates tutoring and mentoring activities for young people from the Metro Nashville Public Schools, the YMCA, and other community agencies. VU students serve as tutors and mentors to young people in the Edgehill community. The center also helps promote student recruitment by hosting various pre-college groups. The center houses a computer lab, a small library, a seminar room, an auditorium, a student lounge area, and staff offices. The center is open to all Vanderbilt students, faculty, and staff for programs and gatherings. Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center As part of the Office of the Dean of Students, the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center leads co-curricular campus initiatives related to women’s and gender issues. The center partners with many departments, programs, and individuals across campus to raise awareness about the ways in which gender shapes and is shaped by our lived experiences. Because its aim is to make the Vanderbilt community more inclusive and equitable, the center encourages all members of the Vanderbilt community to take part in its events and resources. The Women’s Center celebrates women and their accomplishments and fosters empowerment for people of all identities. The center offers individual support and advocacy around a variety of issues, including gender stereotyping, gender equity, leadership, parenting, body image, disordered eating, pregnancy and reproduction, sexual health, and more. The Women’s Center is open Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is located at 316 West Side Row. For more information, please call (615) 322-4843 or visit vanderbilt.edu/womenscenter. Office of LGBTQI Life As a component of Vanderbilt’s Office of the Dean of Students, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Intersex (LGBTQI) Life office is a welcoming space for individuals of all identities and a resource for information and support about gender and sexuality. LGBTQI Life serves the entire Vanderbilt community through education, research, programming, support, and social events. The office also serves as a comfortable study and socializing space, as well as a connection point to the greater Nashville LGBTQI community. In addition, LGBTQI Life conducts tailored trainings and consultations for the campus and community and coordinates the Safe Zone Ally program. The Office of LGBTQI Life is located in the K. C. Potter Center, Euclid House, 312 West Side Row. For more information, please visit vanderbilt.edu/lgbtqi.

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Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life The Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life provides opportunities to explore and practice religion, faith, and spirituality and to more deeply understand one’s personal values and social responsibility via educational programming, encounters with various faith perspectives, and engagement with religious and spiritual communities. The office welcomes and serves all students, faculty, and staff and provides an intellectual home and ethical resource for anyone in the Vanderbilt community seeking to clarify, explore, and deepen understanding of their lives and/or faith. Recognizing the importance of exploring one’s faith in community, the office facilitates opportunities for individuals of a shared faith to worship/practice their particular religious tradition. Whether guided by one of our affiliated chaplains or a student-run religious organization, these groups foster a sense of community and common values. For a complete listing of campus religious groups, resources, services, and programming opportunities, visit vanderbilt.edu/religiouslife. Schulman Center for Jewish Life The 10,000-square-foot Ben Schulman Center for Jewish Life is the home of Vanderbilt Hillel. The goal of the center is to provide a welcoming community for Jewish students at Vanderbilt and to further religious learning, cultural awareness, and social engagement. Vanderbilt Hillel is committed to enriching lives and enhancing Jewish identity. It provides a home away from home, where Jews of all denominations come together, united by a shared purpose. The Schulman Center is also home to Grin’s Cafe, Nashville’s only kosher and vegetarian restaurant. For further information about the Schulman Center, please call (615) 322-8376 or email [email protected] vanderbilt.edu. Parking, Vehicle Registration, and Alternative Transportation Parking space on campus is limited. Motor vehicles operated on campus at any time by students, faculty, or staff must be registered with VUPD Parking Services located in the Wesley Place garage. A fee is charged. Parking regulations are published annually and are strictly enforced. More information is available at vanderbilt.edu/parking. Bicycles must be registered with the Vanderbilt University Police Department. All Graduate School students can ride to and from the Vanderbilt campus free of charge on Nashville’s Metropolitan Transit Authority buses. To utilize this service, a valid student ID card is required for boarding the bus. Psychological and Counseling Center As part of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the PCC supports the mental health needs of all students to help them reach their academic and personal goals. Highly skilled and multidisciplinary staff collaborates with students to provide evidence-based treatment plans tailored to each individual’s unique background and needs. The PCC also emphasizes prevention through outreach and consultation focused on the development of the skills and self-awareness needed to excel in a challenging educational environment. The PCC’s psychologists, licensed counselors, and psychiatric medical providers are available to any Vanderbilt student and address a range of student needs including stress management, crisis intervention, substance abuse counseling,

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management of medications, individual counseling, group counseling, biofeedback, emergency assessments, and psychiatric assessment and treatment. The PCC provides a team approach to the care of students with eating disorders and students who have experienced trauma as well as students needing both counseling and medication management. There is an on-call provider after hours and on weekends for emergency calls. The PCC provides screening and full assessment when indicated for ADHD and learning disorders as well as assessment and support for reading and study skills. A prevention program regarding substance use called BASICS is provided by the PCC. Students who have questions about their level of use may request an assessment through BASICS to learn more about risk related to substance use. The PCC also houses a Mind Body Lab. This room is designed with the objective of enhancing mindfulness by providing tools to manage stress, increase personal resilience, and promote compassion and academic success. Students may book a forty-five-minute session in the PCC Mind Body Lab by calling the PCC at (615) 322-2571 or by stopping by the front desk. Students are encouraged to make contact with the PCC prior to the start of the school year if they have a history of mental health care needs. This will help facilitate the transition of care and ensure that students are fully aware of PCC resources. Contact the center at (615) 322-2571 for more information. There is no charge for services with the exceptions of reduced fees for LD/ADHD screening and assessment. Over the course of a year, approximately 20 percent of the Vanderbilt student population will seek out the services of the PCC. Throughout the year, the PCC outreach coordinator and other PCC staff also produce presentations, including educational programs, thematic presentations, and special events, focused on education of the Vanderbilt community about mental health issues and resources. The PCC is proud to provide a program focusing on suicide prevention and mental health awareness at Vanderbilt called MAPS: Mental Health Awareness and the Prevention of Suicide. For more information, visit medschool.vanderbilt.edu/pcc. Project Safe Center The Project Safe Center partners with students, faculty, and staff to create a campus culture that rejects sexual violence and serves as a resource for all members of the Vanderbilt community. Operating under the auspices of the Office of the Dean of Students, the Project Safe Center provides support to survivors of sexual violence and engages the campus community in bystander intervention efforts and sexual assault prevention. Green Dot, a bystander intervention program used by colleges and communities nationwide, an online education module addressing power-based violence, and a variety of programs and presentations on consent, healthy relationships, and violence prevention are available through the Project Safe Center. A 24-hour support hotline answered by Project Safe’s victim resource specialists is available at (615) 322-SAFE (7233). The Project Safe Center located at 304 West Side Row is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, please call (615) 875-0660 or visit vanderbilt.edu/ projectsafe.

Graduate Catalog / Life at Vanderbilt

Student Health Center The Student Health Center provides primary care services for students and is staffed by physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and a lab technician. The Student Health Center provides services similar to those provided in a private physician’s office or HMO, including routine medical care, specialty care (e.g. nutrition and sports medicine), and some routine lab tests. Most of the services students receive at the Student Health Center are pre-paid, but those services that are not are the responsibility of students to coordinate with their health insurance. When the university is in session, during fall and spring semesters, the Student Health Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Students should call ahead to schedule an appointment at (615) 322-2427. Students with urgent problems will be seen on a same-day basis. They will be given an appointment that day, or “worked in” on a first-come, first-served basis if no appointments are available. Emergency consultations services (at (615) 322-2427) are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week from on-call professionals. For more detailed information on the services available at the Student Health Center and information on other healthrelated topics, please visit the Student Health Center website at medschool.vanderbilt.edu/student-health.

Immunization Requirements The State of Tennessee requires certain immunizations for all students on university campuses. As such, Vanderbilt University will block student registration for those who are not in compliance with the requirements. The requirements include: 1. Varicella vaccine (two injections) is required for all students who have not had documented chickenpox. Any waivers for this vaccine are very strict, and include only certain religious or medical exemptions that must be approved by the medical director of the Student Health Center. For more information regarding this waiver, please call the director’s assistant at (615) 322-2254 or email [email protected] 2. Measles, mumps, and rubella (2 injections) for all incoming students. Any waivers for this vaccine are very strict, and include only certain religious or medical exemptions that must be approved by the medical director of the Student Health Center. For more information regarding this waiver, please call the director’s assistant at (615) 322-2254 or email [email protected] The Student Health Center requires all incoming students to complete a Health Questionnaire that includes further information regarding the state-mandated vaccinations, as well as information on other strongly recommended vaccinations. Information regarding this Health Questionnaire is communicated to students by email after admission to Vanderbilt University. This Health Questionnaire must be returned to the Student Health Center by May 15 with vaccination information. Students should go to medschool.vanderbilt.edu/ student-health/immunization-requirements in order to access more information regarding the immunization requirements. This site also contains links to the PDFs of the required forms. All vaccines can be administered at either a private provider office or at the Student Health Center.

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Student Injury and Sickness Insurance Plan All students registered in degree programs for 4 or more credit hours, or who are actively enrolled in research courses (including but not limited to dissertation or thesis courses) that are designated by Vanderbilt University as full-time enrollment are required to have health insurance coverage. The university offers a sickness and injury insurance plan that is designed to provide hospital, surgical, and major medical benefits. A brochure explaining the limits, exclusions, and benefits of insurance coverage is available to students online at gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt or medschool.vanderbilt.edu/ student-health/student-health-insurance. The annual premium is in addition to tuition and is automatically billed to the student’s account. Coverage extends from August 12 until August 11 of the following year, whether a student remains in school or is away from the university. A student who does not want to subscribe to the insurance plan offered through the university must complete an online waiver process at gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt. This process must be completed by August 1 for students enrolling in the fall for annual coverage. Newly enrolled students for the spring term must complete the online waiver process by January 4. The online waiver process indicating comparable coverage must be completed every year by August 1 in order to waive participation in and the premium for the Student Injury and Sickness Insurance Plan. Family Coverage: Students who want to obtain coverage for their families (spouse, children, or domestic partner) may do so at gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt. Additional premiums are charged for family health insurance coverage and cannot be put on a student’s VU account.

International Student Coverage International students and their dependents residing in the United States are required to purchase the university’s international student injury and sickness insurance. If you have other comparable insurance and do not wish to participate in the Student Injury and Sickness Insurance Plan offered through the university, you must complete an online waiver process (gallagherstudent.com/vanderbilt) indicating your other insurance information. This online waiver process must be completed no later than September 7 or you will remain enrolled in the plan offered by the university and will be responsible for paying the insurance premium. This insurance is required for part-time as well as full-time students. Services for Students with Disabilities Vanderbilt is committed to the provisions of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Americans with Disabilities Act as it strives to be an inclusive community for students with disabilities. Students seeking accommodations for any type of disability are encouraged to contact the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department. Services include, but are not limited to, extended time for testing, assistance with locating sign language interpreters, audiotaped textbooks, physical adaptations, notetakers, and reading services. Accommodations are tailored to meet the needs of each student with a documented disability. Specific concerns pertaining to services for people with disabilities or any disability issue should be directed to the Disability Program Director, Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department (EAD), PMB 401809, 2301 Vanderbilt Place,

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Nashville, Tennessee 37240-1809; phone (615) 322-4705 (V/ TDD); fax (615) 343-0671; vanderbilt.edu/ead. Nondiscrimination, Anti-Harassment, and Anti-Retaliation The Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department investigates allegations of prohibited discrimination, harassment, and retaliation involving members of the Vanderbilt community. This includes allegations of sexual misconduct and other forms of power-based personal violence. Vanderbilt’s Title IX coordinator is Anita Jenious, EAD director. If you believe that a member of the Vanderbilt community has engaged in prohibited discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, please contact the EAD. If the offense is criminal in nature, you may file a report with Vanderbilt University Police Department (VUPD). The EAD also facilitates interim accommodations for students impacted by sexual misconduct and power-based personal violence. Some examples of interim accommodations include stay-away orders, adjusted course schedules, and housing changes. Specific concerns pertaining to prohibited discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, including allegations of sexual misconduct and other forms of power-based personal violence, should be directed to the Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department (EAD), PMB 401809, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 372401809; phone (615) 322-4705 (V/TDD); fax (615) 343-0671; vanderbilt.edu/ead. Student Records (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) Vanderbilt University is subject to the provisions of federal law known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (also referred to as FERPA). This act affords matriculated students certain rights with respect to their educational records. These rights include: 1. The right to inspect and review their education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the University Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the University Registrar does not maintain the records, the student will be directed to the University official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of any part of their education records that a student believes is inaccurate or misleading. Students who wish to request an amendment to their educational record should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the student will be notified of the decision and advised of his or her right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records to third parties, except in situations that FERPA allows disclosure without the student’s consent. These exceptions include: • Disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A “school official” is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support-staff position (including University law enforcement personnel and health staff); contractors, consultants, and other outside service providers with whom the University has contracted; a member of the Board of Trust;

vanderbilt university or a student serving on an official University committee, such as the Honor Council, Student Conduct Council, or a grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. • Disclosure to parents if the student is a dependent for tax purposes. • Disclosure to appropriate individuals (e.g., parents/guardians, spouses, housing staff, health care personnel, police, etc.) where disclosure is in connection with a health or safety emergency and knowledge of such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. • Disclosure to a parent or legal guardian of a student, information regarding the student’s violation of any federal, state, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the institution, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the University has determined that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to the use or possession and the student is under the age of 21 at the time of the disclosure to the parent/guardian.

FERPA provides the University the ability to designate certain student information as “directory information.” Directory information may be made available to any person without the student’s consent unless the student gives notice as provided for, below. Vanderbilt has designated the following as directory information: the student’s name, addresses, telephone number, email address, student ID photos, major field of study, school, classification, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weights and heights of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student, and other information that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Any student who does not wish disclosure of directory information should notify the University Registrar in writing. No element of directory information as defined above is released for students who request nondisclosure except as required by statute. The request for nondisclosure does not apply to class rosters in online class management applications, or to residential rosters—or rosters of groups a student may join voluntarily— in online, co-curricular engagement applications, or rosters of other information on the websites of student organizations that a student may join. Neither class rosters in online class management applications, nor residential rosters in online cocurricular engagement applications, are available to the public. As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which students’ education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records—including Social Security Numbers, grades, or other private information—may be accessed without consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities (“Federal and State Authorities”) may allow access to student records and PII without consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is “principally engaged in the provision of education,” such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to education records and PII without consent, to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when the University objects to or does not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and

Graduate Catalog / Life at Vanderbilt

data security promises from the third parties that they authorize to receive PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over the third parties. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without student consent, PII from education records, and may track student participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems. If a student believes the University has failed to comply with FERPA, he or she may file a complaint using the Student Complaint and Grievance Procedures as outlined in the Student Handbook. If dissatisfied with the outcome of this procedure, students may file a written complaint with the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20202-5920. Questions about the application of the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act should be directed to the University Registrar or to the Office of General Counsel.

Vanderbilt Directory Individual listings in the online People Finder Directory consist of the student’s full name, Vanderbilt email address, and campus mailing address (if available). Students may elect to add additional contact information to their listings, including school, academic classification, local phone number, local address, permanent address, cellphone, pager, and fax numbers. Student listings in the People Finder Directory are available to the Vanderbilt community via logon ID and e-password. Students may choose to make their online People Finder listings available to the general public (i.e., viewable by anyone with access to the Internet), or to block individual directory items. Students who have placed a directory hold with the University Registrar will not be listed in the online directory. Directory information should be kept current. Students may report address changes, emergency contact information, and missing person contact information via the Web by logging in to YES (Your Enrollment Services) http://yes.vanderbilt.edu and clicking on the Address Change link. Vanderbilt Child and Family Center The Vanderbilt Child and Family Center supports the health and productivity of the Vanderbilt community by providing resource and referral services and quality early childhood education and care to the children of faculty, staff, and students. The center’s website at childandfamilycenter.vanderbilt.edu provides information concerning child care, elder care, summer camps, tutoring services, and school-age child care. Care.com and the Vanderbilt Sitter Service provide back-up care options for dependents of all ages and evening, night, and weekend care. The Child Care Center serves children ages six weeks through five years. Applications for the waiting list may be downloaded from the website. The Family Center offers a monthly lunchtime series, Boomers, Elders, and More, and a caregiver support group.

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Vanderbilt University Police Department The Vanderbilt University Police Department, (615) 322-2745, is a professional law enforcement agency dedicated to the protection and security of Vanderbilt University and its diverse community (police.vanderbilt.edu). The Vanderbilt University Police Department comes under the charge of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Administration. As one of Tennessee’s larger law enforcement agencies, the Vanderbilt University Police Department provides comprehensive law enforcement and security services to all components of Vanderbilt University including the academic campus, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt Health at One Hundred Oaks, and a variety of university-owned facilities throughout the Davidson County area. The Police Department includes a staff of more than one hundred people, organized into three divisions under the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor and Chief of Police: Operations Division (Main Campus, Medical Center, and 100 Oaks Precincts), Administrative Division, and Auxiliary Services Division. All of Vanderbilt’s commissioned police officers have completed officer training at a state-certified police academy and are required to complete on-the-job training as well as attend annual in-service training. Vanderbilt police officers hold Special Police Commissions and have the same authority as that of a municipal law enforcement officer, while on property owned by Vanderbilt, on adjacent public streets and sidewalks, and in nearby neighborhoods. When a Vanderbilt student is involved in an off-campus offense, police officers may assist with the investigation in cooperation with local, state, or federal law enforcement. The department also employs non-academytrained officers called community service officers (commonly referred to as CSOs) who lend assistance 24/7 to the Vanderbilt community through services that include providing walking escorts, providing jump starts, and unlocking cars. For nonemergency assistance from a community service officer, dial (615) 322-2745 (2-2745 from an on-campus extension). The Vanderbilt University Police Department provides several services and programs to members of the Vanderbilt community: Vandy Vans—The Vanderbilt University Police Department administers the Vandy Vans escort system at Vanderbilt University. The Vandy Vans escort system provides vehicular escorts to designated locations on campus. The service consists of vans that operate from 5:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. GPS technology allows students to track Vandy Vans on their route via computer or mobile phone, and to set up text message alerts to let them know when a van will be arriving at their stop. Stop locations were chosen based on location, the accessibility of a secure waiting area, and student input. Signs, freestanding or located on existing structures, identify each stop. A walking escort can be requested to walk a student from his/her stop to the final destination. A van is also accessible to students with mobility impairments. For complete information about the Vandy Vans service, including routes, stops, and times, please visit vandyvans.com or call (615) 322-2554. As a supplement to the Vandy Vans van service, walking escorts are available for students walking to and from any location on campus during nighttime hours. Walking escorts are provided by VUPD officers. The telephone number to call for a walking escort is (615) 421-8888, or 1-8888 from a campus phone, after which, a representative from VUPD will be dispatched to the caller’s location, or to a designated meeting point to accompany the caller to his or her destination.

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Emergency Phones—Emergency telephones (Blue Light Phones) are located throughout the university campus, Medical Center, and 100 Oaks. Each phone has an emergency button that when pressed automatically dials the VUPD Communications Center. An open line on any emergency phone will activate a priority response from an officer. An officer will be sent to check on the user of the phone, even if nothing is communicated to the dispatcher. Cooperation is essential to help us maintain the integrity of the emergency phone system. These phones should be used only for actual or perceived emergency situations. An emergency response can also be activated by dialing 911 from any campus phone. Cellphone users can dial (615) 421-1911 to summon an emergency response on campus. Cellphone users should dial 911 for off-campus emergencies. Callers should be prepared to state the location from which they are calling. Security Notices—In compliance with the U.S. Department of Higher Education and the Jeanne Clery Act, Security Notices are issued to provide timely warning information concerning a potentially dangerous situation on or near Vanderbilt University. This information is provided to empower our students and employees with the information necessary to make decisions or take appropriate actions concerning their own personal safety. Security Notices are distributed throughout Vanderbilt to make community members aware of significant crimes that occur at the university. They are distributed through Vanderbilt email lists and through the department’s webpage, police.vanderbilt.edu/crime-info/crime-alerts. Educational and Assistance Programs—The Crime Prevention Unit of Vanderbilt University Police Department offers programs addressing issues such as sexual assault, domestic violence, workplace violence, personal safety, RAD (Rape Aggression Defense) classes, and victim assistance. VUPD provides additional services including property registration (for bikes, laptops, etc.), lost and found, weapons safekeeping, and Submit a Crime Tip. For further information on available programs and services, call (615) 322-7846 or visit police.vanderbilt.edu. Additional information on security measures and crime statistics for Vanderbilt is available from the Vanderbilt University Police Department, 2800 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37212. Information is also available at police.vanderbilt.edu. Annual Security Report—The Vanderbilt University Annual Security Report is published each year to provide you with information on security-related services offered by the university and campus crime statistics in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Tennessee College and University Security Information Act. This booklet is prepared with information provided by the Nashville Metropolitan Police Department, the Department of Student Athletics, Office of the Dean of Students, the Office of Housing and Residential Education, and the Vanderbilt University Police Department. It summarizes university programs, policies, and procedures designed to enhance personal safety for everyone at Vanderbilt. A copy of this report may be obtained by writing or calling the Vanderbilt University Police Department, 2800 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37212 or by telephone at (615) 343-9750. This report may also be obtained on the website at police.vanderbilt.edu/annual-security-report.

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Extracurricular Activities Student Centers A variety of facilities, programs, and activities are provided in five separate student center locations—Alumni Hall, The Commons Center, Kissam Center, Sarratt Student Center|Rand Hall, and the Student Life Center. Sarratt Student Center|Rand Hall is the main student center hub, housing a 300-seat cinema, art gallery, art studios, multicultural space, rehearsal rooms, large lounge spaces, large and small meeting spaces, and a courtyard. The facility is also home to Vanderbilt Student Communications, radio station, TV station, Last Drop Coffee Shop, and the Pub at Overcup Oak restaurant. Rand Hall houses the Rand Dining Center, campus store, student-operated businesses, the Anchor (student organization space), a multipurpose venue, meeting and seminar rooms, plus large, open lounge space. Some of the offices located in Sarratt Student Center|Rand Hall include the Dean of Students, Greek Life, Leadership, and the Office of Active Citizenship and Service. Also included in this facility is a Ticketmaster™ outlet and a United States Postal Service office. The Vanderbilt Student Life Center is the university’s community keystone. It is both the fulfillment of students’ vision to have a large social space on campus and a wonderful complement to Sarratt Student Center|Rand Hall. The Student Life Center has more than 18,000 square feet of event and meeting space, including the 9,000-square-foot Commodore Ballroom, which is one of the most popular spaces to have events on campus. The center is also home to the Center for Student Professional Development, International Student and Scholar Services, Global Education Office, and Global Support Services. The Commons Center is the community crossroads of The Ingram Commons living and learning community. It has it all: the Dining Hall and great food; a living room with a concertgrade grand piano, and the occasional live musical performance; a small rec room with cardio equipment, free weights, and weight machines; meeting and study rooms; and academic support services like the Writing Studio, the Center for Student Professional Development, and the CASPAR premajor advising center. The third floor of The Commons Center is the home of the Department of Political Science. Alumni Hall is a recent addition to the Vanderbilt student centers family, although it was actually the original student center on campus when the building opened in 1925. Re-opened in fall 2013 after a yearlong renovation that transformed every space in the facility, Alumni Hall has returned to its role as a student center after serving other purposes over the years. In the newly renovated Alumni Hall, students now have access to an exercise room as well as several new meeting and event spaces and a new dining option known as Bamboo Bistro. Offices in the building include Alumni Hall Tutoring, Writing Studio, and the new Vanderbilt Institute for Digital Learning. Opened in fall 2014, Kissam Center is the fifth student center, and is part of the new Warren College and Moore College residential living-learning communities. A completely new facility, Kissam Center is home to more meeting and event spaces as well as the Kissam Market and Kissam Kitchen.

Graduate Catalog / Life at Vanderbilt

Recreation and Sports Physical education is not required for graduate and professional students, but almost two-thirds of Vanderbilt University students participate in sport clubs, intramurals, activity classes, or other programs offered by Campus Recreation at the Vanderbilt Recreation and Wellness Center (VRWC). The large variety of programs available for meeting students’ diverse interests include: forty-eight sports clubs with options from traditional such as baseball, volleyball, and ice hockey to nontraditional such as quidditch and capoeira; forty intramural sports (softball, flag football, basketball, table tennis, and soccer); an aquatics program offering swimming lessons for all ages and abilities as well as unique events like battleship. Red Cross lifeguarding and CPR are also available. If being outside is more your style, you can choose from one of more than twenty adventure trips offered each semester or create your own adventure and let Campus Recreation staff help with tips and gear. Need a good workout? Campus Recreation offers more than eighty group fitness classes a week and a variety

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of wellness offerings from “learn to box” to healthy eating through Vandy Cooks in the demonstration kitchen, Personalized Nutrition Coaching, and Nutrition Minute grab-and-go information on a variety of nutrition topics. The VRWC is a 289,000-square-foot facility that houses a 25 yard, 16 lane swimming pool; four courts for basketball, volleyball, and badminton; five racquetball and two squash courts; a four-lane bowling alley; five group fitness class rooms, more than 14,000 square feet of weight/fitness room space; rock-climbing wall; mat room; seven multipurpose rooms; locker rooms; and a 120 yard turf field surrounded by a 300 meter track in the indoor field house. Surrounding the VRWC is a sand volleyball court and more than seven acres of field space including three natural grass fields and one turf field. All students pay a mandatory recreation fee which supports the facilities, fields, and programs (see the chapter on Financial Information). Spouses must also pay a fee to use the facilities. For additional information, please visit vanderbilt.edu/ recreationandwellnesscenter.

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vanderbilt university

Academic Programs

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HE Graduate School accepts candidates for advanced degrees in more than fifty fields. The following table lists degree programs and the degrees available. Please note that many of the programs listed below awarding a master’s degree do not allow admission for a terminal master’s degree. Please check the particular program for further information. A page reference indicates the location in this catalog of the program description and course offerings.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

MASTER’S

Ph.D.

Page

Anthropology X* X 37 Astrophysics X* X 38 Biochemistry X* X 39 Biological Sciences X* X 39 Biomedical Engineering X X 40 Biomedical Informatics X X 40 Biostatistics X X 41 Cancer Biology X* X 42 Cell and Developmental Biology X* X 43 Cellular and Molecular Pathology X* X 66 Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering X X 43 Chemical and Physical Biology X* X 44 Chemistry X* X 44 Civil Engineering X X 45 Classics X 45 Community Research and Action X* X 46 Computer Science X X 46 Creative Writing (M.F.A.) X 49 Earth and Environmental Sciences X 47 Economic Development X 47 Economics X* X 47 Electrical Engineering X X 48 English X*+ X 49 Environmental Engineering X X 49 Epidemiology X 50 French X*+ X 50 German X*+ X 51 Hearing and Speech Sciences X* X 52 History X*+ X 52 Human Genetics X 53 Interdisciplinary, Individualized Degrees X X 22 Interdisciplinary Materials Science X X 54 Latin American Studies X,X+ 56 Law and Economics X 59 Leadership and Policy Studies X 59 Learning, Teaching, and Diversity X* X 60 Liberal Arts and Science (M.L.A.S.) X 61 Mathematics X+ X 61 Mechanical Engineering X X 61 Medicine, Health, and Society X,X+ 62 Microbiology and Immunology X* X 66 Molecular Physiology and Biophysics X* X 64 Neuroscience X* X 65 Nursing Science X 65 Pharmacology X* X 67 Philosophy X*+ X 68 Physics X X 68 Political Science X*+ X 69 Portuguese X* 73 Psychological Sciences X*+ X 69

Graduate Catalog / Academic Programs

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

MASTER’S

Ph.D.

Page

Religion Sociology Spanish Spanish-Portuguese Special Education

X X 71 X* X 72 X* X 73 X* X 73 X* X 73

** A master’s degree is awarded only under special circumstances. + A 4+1 master’s program open to VU students only

Courses of study on the graduate level are offered in a number of areas in which graduate degrees are not offered. Such courses are available as minor work and are described in this catalog’s Courses of Study section. Vanderbilt also offers professional degrees in business administration, divinity, education and human development, engineering, law, management, medicine, nursing, and public policy. Descriptions of these programs may be found in other Vanderbilt catalogs.

includes 16 hours of graduate workshops (one per semester for four semesters). Literature courses might consist of 3000-level courses taken for graduate credit, for which 3 hours would be given. M.F.A. students may petition the director of graduate studies in the Department of English for admission to 7000level courses or higher other than English 7430, 7440, 7450, 7460, or 7998.

Center for Latin American Studies The university offers a program of graduate instruction and specialized research that relates the disciplines of the social sciences and humanities to Latin America, with emphasis on Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, and Mexico. A joint degree program in which students may earn the M.B.A. and M.A. degrees is available through the Center for Latin American Studies and the Owen Graduate School of Management. For further information, see Latin American Studies in the Courses of Study section.

Master of Liberal Arts and Science The master of liberal arts and science (M.L.A.S.) degree offers part-time adult students the intellectual stimulation of post-baccalaureate course work at a time in their lives when they can contemplate great ideas and enduring questions and measure them against their own life experiences. In discussion with other adult students under the leadership of distinguished faculty members, they are encouraged to look beyond disciplinary boundaries and explore connections that more specialized undergraduate degrees and focused career responsibilities may have obscured. Students often discover important professional and career benefits as well as personal development in earning a master of liberal arts and science degree. The requirements and curriculum provide flexibility in program design and course selection, and the tuition, scheduling, admission, and registration procedures acknowledge the special circumstances of the part-time adult student. Courses are taught by tenured Vanderbilt faculty members (and, perhaps, some distinguished emeritus faculty) carefully selected for their recognized abilities as teachers and their special interest in the M.L.A.S. program. Each course meets one evening a week throughout the semester. Classes are limited in size to encourage optimal student-student and student-faculty interaction. The master of liberal arts and science is awarded by the Graduate School and administered by the Dean’s Office of the College of Arts and Science. For more information contact the director of the M.L.A.S. program in the College of Arts and Science.

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing The English department’s M.F.A. in creative writing offers writing workshops and supervision in the composition of creative work. Students are required to take a complement of literature courses along with their workshops. The goal of the M.F.A. program is to produce creative writers with a broad and deep knowledge of their genres. Applicants for the M.F.A. must submit scores in the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination, a college transcript, a manuscript of creative work, a statement of purpose, and three letters of recommendation. For more details see Vanderbilt’s M.F.A. website: vanderbilt.edu/english/mfa. Requirements for the M.F.A. include 42 to 48 hours of course work, a thesis of creative work (a novel, a book of short stories, a collection of poems, or a collection of personal essays), plus an oral defense of the thesis. The course work

Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D./Ph.D.) A combined course of study leading to the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees is offered through Vanderbilt School of Medicine and Vanderbilt Graduate School. The program facilitates the development of teachers and medical investigators in clinical and basic medical sciences. Six to seven calendar years are usually required for completion of the combined degree program. All candidates must meet both School of Medicine and Graduate School requirements for matriculation and graduation. Candidates are admitted into the program by the deans of the two schools upon the recommendation of the Medical Scientist Training Program Committee. After their acceptance in the program, students must select and be accepted into the graduate program of an affiliated department. The graduate programs currently affiliated with the Medical Scientist Training Program are biochemistry, biological sciences, biomedical

Special Programs Graduate Program in Economic Development The Graduate Program in Economic Development (GPED) is a professionally oriented master’s program in economics preparing students for both domestic and international careers in economic development. The curriculum contains five courses— microeconomics, macroeconomics, statistics, econometrics, and a one-semester research project—and five electives. The program offers courses on a wide range of subjects including: international trade, project evaluation, policy analysis, and development economics. Students may also take courses in other areas of economics, business, finance, and public policy.

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engineering, cancer biology, cell and developmental biology, cellular and molecular pathology, microbiology and immunology, molecular physiology and biophysics, neuroscience, and pharmacology. M.D./Ph.D. students must pass the qualifying examination for the Ph.D. degree and present an acceptable dissertation within their field of study in the usual manner. Most M.D./Ph.D. students begin full-time study and research for the Ph.D. degree after the second year in medical school and complete the dissertation research before entering the third year of medical study. Courses in Professional Degree Programs Students may include in their programs of study certain professional degree courses offered by other schools in the university. They register for these courses through the Graduate School and often do additional work appropriate for a research degree. Six hours of such credit may be applied to a master’s degree program and 12 hours to a Ph.D. program. Students must obtain written approval from their adviser, from the other school, and from the Graduate School. The courses may constitute part of the major or minor field, as approved by the student’s adviser. Individualized Programs Students with special course goals should inquire in the Graduate School office about the possibility of individualized, interdisciplinary programs of study leading to the master’s and Ph.D. degrees. The Graduate School may permit programs that combine several disciplines in unique ways. Financial support for individualized programs must be arranged with specific faculty members as there are no program or departmental financial awards available. Master’s and Ph.D. students may not apply for admission to the individualized program until they have been admitted to and enrolled in a department currently offering that degree. Except under extraordinary circumstances, interested students will be expected to apply, or make preliminary inquiry, to the Graduate School during their first year of graduate studies. Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Program The College of Arts and Science in collaboration with the Graduate School offers students in most departments and programs the opportunity to earn both the bachelor’s degree and the master’s degree in a shorter period of time and at less cost than is normally the case. Exceptional students in the College of Arts and Science can obtain both degrees in an expedited period, typically within but not less than five years. The usual period of study for both the bachelor’s and the master’s degree is six years. Through the 4+1 option, the student and her or his adviser plan a five-year program of study. It is important to note that there is no provision for obtaining both degrees in a period shorter than five years. The program is intended for selected students for whom the master’s degree is sufficient preparation for their career goals, is desirable as a goal in itself, or is viewed as additional preparation before pursuing a doctorate or a professional degree. The areas of study available for the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) option within Arts and Science are determined by individual departments and programs, who also determine the policies and guidelines to be followed. Students will be admitted to the Combined B.A./M.A. program only by approval of the department or program.

vanderbilt university

Programs of Study The 4+1 option is currently available in the following departments and programs: English; French; German; history; Latin American studies; mathematics; medicine, health, and society; philosophy; political science; and psychology. Students are welcome to discuss the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) option with any of these departments and programs.

Admissions Overview The Integrated B.A./M.A program allows Vanderbilt University students to study for both degrees often, but not necessarily, in the same department. Undergraduates with strong academic records may apply for admission to the program after the first semester of their junior year. Qualifying students are normally accepted into the program in the second semester of the junior year. To apply for admission, students will first consult with Associate Dean Martin Rapisarda, and then submit to the prospective graduate department or program a “Petition to Apply to the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Degree Program” (available at vanderbilt.edu/4plus1), a statement of purpose, a formal application to the Graduate School, a preliminary program proposal, two letters of recommendation from Vanderbilt faculty, and a current transcript. Application forms can be completed online at vanderbilt.edu/gradschool/prospective_students/apply_online. GRE scores or other admissions requirements may be specified by the prospective department. Admission to the 4+1 option is highly selective. An accomplished academic record, a demonstrated commitment to pursue graduate study, and a strong endorsement from Vanderbilt faculty are key elements to the successful applicant. Students will be provisionally accepted as Graduate School students, pending completion of all undergraduate requirements. Graduate student status will apply in the fifth year.

Scholarships and Financial Aid Students who are receiving scholarships or other forms of financial aid as a Vanderbilt undergraduate are advised that such aid applies in most cases only toward the completion of the bachelor’s degree or the first four years of their studies (which may include their taking some graduate courses during their senior year). Students wishing to pursue the 4+1 option should seek support for their fifth year of study through student loans and other financial aid. For additional information, consult the website vanderbilt. edu/4plus1. Accelerated Graduate Program in Engineering Students who enter Vanderbilt with a significant number of credits (20 to 30 hours), earned either through Advanced Placement Tests or in college courses taken during high school, may be eligible for the Accelerated Graduate Program in Engineering. Through this program, a student is able to earn both a bachelor’s degree and an M.S. degree in about the same time required for the bachelor’s degree. To be eligible for the program a student must complete 86 hours (senior standing) by the end of the sophomore year with at least a 3.5 grade point average. With the approval of the faculty in their major department, students apply through the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies for provisional admission and take one course approved for graduate credit each semester of the junior year. These courses will be credited toward the

Graduate Catalog / Academic Programs

M.S. degree. Upon successful completion of these courses, the student is admitted to the Graduate School. During the fourth year the student takes three courses (9 hours) for graduate credit each semester, and the remaining 6 to 10 undergraduate hours required for the bachelor’s degree. The student receives the bachelor’s degree at the end of the fourth year and spends the summer finishing a master’s thesis to complete the M.S. degree. Further information can be obtained from the chair of the student’s major department. Certificate Programs Overseen by the Graduate School A number of departments/programs offer graduate certificates. These are open to students already enrolled in a Vanderbilt University post-baccalaureate-degree program. Each certificate requires at least 12 credit/semester hours of interrelated graduate-level course work supporting a specified theme. The courses form an intellectually cohesive whole. The certificate

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programs include: Global Health, Latin American Studies, Jewish Studies, Latino and Latina Studies, Asian Studies, Gender Studies, American Studies, African American and Diaspora Studies, and Medicine, Health, and Society. If interested in one of these certificate programs, a student should contact the director of the program to be sure that the appropriate requirements have been met, and if so, then submit to the Graduate School an “Intent to Enroll” in the certificate program. Summer Session Information concerning the summer session may be found on the Graduate School webpages at vanderbilt.edu/gradschool and at vanderbilt.edu/summersessions. A summer session announcement in mid-March of each year will describe the registration procedures. Students may log in to YES (Your Enrollment Services) to view the schedule which lists the limited course offerings.

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vanderbilt university

Admission

Q

UALIFIED applicants with bachelor’s or comparable non-U.S. degrees are eligible for admission to the Graduate School. Applications from international students with three-year bachelor’s degrees will also be considered. Admission is competitive and students are selected on the basis of their scholastic preparation and intellectual capacity. Generally, minimum requirements for admission are these: an applicant should have completed or soon will complete a course of study equivalent to that required for the bachelor’s degree at an accredited institution, maintained a minimum of a B average in undergraduate work, and maintained a B average in the field of expected graduate concentration. Individual programs in the Graduate School have additional requirements for admission. Application for admission may be made electronically through the Graduate School website (vanderbilt.edu /gradschool). Those unable to use our online application should contact the Graduate School for a printable application. There is no application fee for electronic applications. Applicants must upload an unofficial copy of transcripts from prior undergraduate and graduate work as part of their online application for admission. Official transcripts are required only after an offer of admission is made and accepted. All admitted graduate students must submit all official transcripts prior to beginning their enrollment at Vanderbilt University. An official final transcript is required from all previously attended institutions of higher education (i.e., beyond high school). Incoming graduate students who do not provide all official transcripts prior to initial enrollment will have a registration hold placed on their records prohibiting registration until all official transcripts have been received. Deadlines for fall admission range between December and January 15. Applicants should verify the deadline for the program to which they wish to apply by checking the website for that department or program. Typically, admission decisions for fall semester will be communicated by March 31 to all applicants whose files are complete by January 15. The deadline for responses to offers of financial award and admission is April 15. If your reply is not received by April 15, the department may rescind the offer of admission and financial award. Most programs do not admit students for the spring semester. Please check with the program in which you are interested before applying for spring semester admission. Students seeking admission for the spring semester should file applications no later than November 1. Decisions are usually announced before December 1. Further information regarding the application and admissions process is available at vanderbilt.edu/gradschool.

Graduate Record Examination Submission of scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required as part of the application to the Graduate School. Some departments also require a report of the score on the Subject Test of the GRE before an application will be considered.

Information concerning the GRE may be obtained from Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 6000, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6000, U.S.A., or the GRE website at gre.org. Master of Liberal Arts and Science Candidates for admission to the M.L.A.S. degree program must present to the Graduate School a formal application, two letters of recommendation, a short essay on “Why this degree? Why now?” and a transcript indicating a completed course of study equivalent to that required for a bachelor’s degree at an accredited institution, with a minimum of a B average in all undergraduate work (or significant life/work achievement that could compensate for a lower grade point average). Graduate Record Examination scores are not required. After receipt of all materials, the director of the program will interview all prospective students. International Students Vanderbilt has a large international community representing approximately one hundred countries. The university welcomes the diversity that international students bring to the campus and encourages academic and social interaction at all levels. International applicants who are offered admission will be contacted by the Vanderbilt Office of International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) with instructions for initiating the visa process. English Language Proficiency. Proficiency in written and oral English is required for enrollment in an academic program. Applicants whose native language is not English must present the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with the application, unless they have earned a degree from an American or English-speaking institution. International students transferring from unfinished degree programs of other universities in the United States should present TOEFL scores. The International TOEFL is administered at test centers throughout the world at different times during the year. You may access information regarding the TOEFL exam, including registration and sample tests, at ets.org/toefl. Inquiries and requests for application forms should be addressed to TOEFL, Box 6151, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6151 USA. The minimum acceptable score on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language is 570, and for the Internetbased test, 88. Many programs, however, require a considerably higher level of proficiency. Although IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test scores are not required, applicants who have taken the IELTS can report their scores in the online application. English Language Instruction. Entering students who are not fully proficient in English may be required to take language support courses concurrently with their academic courses at the Vanderbilt English Language Center (ELC). Academic studies may continue after recommendation by the ELC in consultation with the student’s academic adviser. For information about Vanderbilt’s English language program, write to English Language Center, Vanderbilt University, Peabody #595, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37203-5721, USA; vanderbilt.edu/elc.

Graduate Catalog / Admission

Financial Resources. To meet requirements for entry into the United States for study, applicants must demonstrate that they have sufficient financial resources to meet expected costs of their educational program. Applicants must provide documentary evidence of their financial resources before visa documents can be issued. United States laws and regulations restrict the opportunity for international students to be employed. International students may work up to twenty hours per week on campus. Students may be allowed to work off campus only under special circumstances. Many spouses and dependents of international students are not allowed to be employed while in the United States.

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Injury and Sickness Insurance. International students are encouraged to purchase the university’s international student injury and sickness insurance. The student must provide proof of coverage that is equal to or greater than that in the university-sponsored policy. Information concerning the limits, exclusions, and benefits of this insurance coverage may be obtained from Student Health Services. Information. Assistance in nonacademic matters before and during the international student’s stay at Vanderbilt is provided by International Student and Scholar Services, Vanderbilt University, Student Life Center, 310 25th Avenue South, Suite 103, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, USA; vanderbilt. edu/isss.

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vanderbilt university

Financial Information

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UITION in the Graduate School for 2015/2016 is charged at the rate of $1,818 per semester hour with a minimum tuition charge of $200 per semester.

Tuition and fees are set annually by the Board of Trust and are subject to review and change without further notice.

Students who have completed the hours required and who are conducting research full time, register for thesis or dissertation research without hourly credit and are subject to a minimum tuition charge of $200 per semester. Master of Liberal Arts and Science Courses Students in the M.L.A.S. program pay one-half of the regular graduate tuition rate for M.L.A.S. courses and full tuition for courses selected from the regular curriculum. M.L.A.S. course tuition for 2015/2016 is $2,721 per 3-hour course. Supplemental Tuition and Continuous Registration Continuous registration is required of all full-time degree candidates until the required number of course work hours have been completed. Responsibility to maintain registration rests with the student. To retain student status, individuals must register each fall and spring semester or secure an approved leave of absence. A person is in student status only if: • registered, or • on authorized leave of absence A student who has completed the formal course work required for the degree may, with approval of the student’s department and the Graduate School, conduct full-time thesis or dissertation research away from the university and register for research hours needed for the degree. Tuition is charged at the current rate per semester hour, or $200 per semester if the student has completed the hours required for the degree. In general, individuals who have completed the number of hours required for the degree and who are employed full time are not eligible to register as full-time students. Such persons pursuing the Ph.D. degree may register as half-time students if they are devoting a minimum of 20 hours per week to dissertation research and their program offers the half-time research course (3995) for a $200 per semester fee. A former student wanting to re-enter the Graduate School must apply for reinstatement, which is granted only on the recommendation of the student’s graduate program and with approval of the Graduate School. Other Fees Student health insurance 2,721 Student activities and recreation fees per academic year (estimate) 430 Transcript fee (one time only) 30 Late registration 30 Audit fee for regular students (nonrefundable) 10 Ph.D. dissertation electronic publishing through ProQuest UMI Traditional publishing 25 Open Access Publishing Plus 120

Thesis or dissertation binding (per copy) Copyright fee for Ph.D. dissertation (optional)

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Payment of Tuition and Fees Tuition, fees, and all other university charges incurred prior to or at registration are due and payment must be received by August 19 for the fall semester and January 4 for the spring semester. All charges incurred after classes begin are due and payment must be received in full by the last business day of the month in which they are billed to the student. If payment is not made within that time, Commodore Cash and Meal Money may not be available and your classes may be canceled. Visit vanderbilt.edu/stuaccts for payment options. Students/Guarantors will be responsible for payment of all costs, including reasonable attorney fees and collection agency fees, incurred by the university in collecting monies owed to the university. The university will assess a $25.00 fee for any check or e-payment returned by the bank and reserves the right to invoke the laws of the State of Tennessee governing bad check laws. E-Billing and Access to a Student’s Vanderbilt Account Vanderbilt exclusively uses convenient and secure electronic billing (e-bills) for student account charges. Students may need to take action to enable parents, guardians, and other “invited payers” to receive e-bill notices and access to the e-bill website. Students may access their online invoices from their YES landing page at yes.vanderbilt.edu. Once they have signed in to YES, they may view invoices under the Billing Portal link. Students are responsible for granting access to parents, guardians, or other payers who should receive email billing notifications. To do this, students log in to YES and click the “billing portal link.” On your CashNet Account page, click “Add New” in the “Other Payers” section. Enter the information that is requested, and click “OK.” (You must enter the “login name” that your authorized payer will use as a username—the logon and password will be sent to your authorized payer in an email.) Tutorials are located online at vanderbilt.edu/stuaccts/ebill.html. Any month in which there is activity on the student’s account, an e-bill will be generated and an email notification sent to the student’s Vanderbilt email address, as well as to the email addresses of others they have invited (and have completed the activation process). The email notification will have the subject line “Your E-Bill Is Now Available for Viewing” and will contain a link to the secure e-bill website. Payments may be made electronically, or for those wishing to mail a payment, a payment coupon can be printed. When an electronic payment is made, a confirmation email will be sent. It remains the responsibility of the student to ensure that bills are paid on or before the due date.

Graduate School / Financial Information

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The Office of Student Accounts can be contacted at (615) 322-6693, toll-free at (800) 288-1144, or via email at student. [email protected] For additional information, please visit the Student Accounts website at vanderbilt.edu/stuaccts.

Late Payment of Fees All charges not paid by the specified due dates will be assessed a late payment fee of $1.50 on each $100 owed (minimum late fee of $5).

Refunds of Tuition Charges University policy for the refund of tuition charges provides a percentage refund based on the time of withdrawal. Students who withdraw officially or are dismissed from the university for any reason may be entitled to a partial refund in accordance with the established schedule below. Fees are nonrefundable.

Financial Clearance No transcript (official or unofficial) will be issued for a student who has an outstanding balance. Diplomas of graduating students will not be released until all indebtedness to the university is cleared.

Fall 2015 Withdrawal/Refund Schedule Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10

August 26–September 2 September 3–September 9 September 10–September 16 September 17–September 23 September 24–September 30 October 1–October 7 October 8–October 14 October 15–October 21 October 22–October 28 October 29–November 4

100% 90% 85% 80% 75% 65% 60% 50% 45% 40%

Fall Break October 15–16 No refund after November 4, 2015

Spring 2016 Withdrawal/Refund Schedule Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10

January 11–January 18 January 19–January 25 January 26–February 1 February 2–February 8 February 9–February 15 February 16–February 22 February 23–February 29 March 1–March 16 March 17–March 23 March 24–March 25

100% 90% 85% 80% 75% 65% 60% 50% 45% 40%

Spring Break March 5–13 No refund after March 25, 2016 Payment Options Direct Payment: Tuition, fees, and all other charges are paid directly to the university. Payment for the fall semester is due by August 19, 2015. Payment for the spring semester is due by January 4, 2016. Students can pay online after viewing their e-bill at vanderbilt.edu/stuaccts. There is no further action required for this option. Interest-Free Monthly Payment Plan: Students can spread payment over ten monthly installments, interest free, by enrolling in the VANDYPlan, currently administered by Higher One. The deadline to enroll in the VANDYPlan is August 31, 2015 (payments begin May 15). Enroll at tuitionpaymentplan.com/ vanderbilt. The current estimated charges for the 2015/2016 academic year are available at vanderbilt.edu/stuaccts to assist students in determining their annual expenses. For further information, please contact the Office of Student Accounts at (615) 322-6693 or (800) 288-1144.

Activities and Recreation Fees The required student activities and recreation fees entitle degree-seeking students to use the facilities of Sarratt Student Center and the Vanderbilt Recreation and Wellness Center. The fees also cover admission to certain social and cultural events and subscriptions to certain campus publications. The activities fee for graduate students also includes funding for activities sponsored by the Graduate Student Council. Specific information on these fees is published annually in the Student Handbook. By payment of an additional fee, students and their spouses may use their identification cards for admission to athletic events. The student activities fee and the student recreation fee will be waived automatically if the student is a part-time student registered for four or fewer semester hours and not registered in a thesis or dissertation research course. Students who reside beyond an approximate sixty-mile radius from campus as determined by ZIP code and students who want to have fees waived due to exceptional circumstances must petition in writing for a waiver through the Office of Recreation Administration, PMB 406206, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, Tennessee 37240-6206. For waiver requirements and for an online waiver request form, please visit our website at vanderbilt.edu /recadmin. A $10 late fee is assessed to eligible students who apply for waivers after August 14 for the fall semester and January 2 for the spring semester. No waivers are granted after the end of the semester in which the fee occurs, and per the Student Handbook, there are no waivers of the summer activity and recreation fees. For more information, please see vanderbilt.edu/recadmin. Transcripts Official academic transcripts are supplied by the University Registrar on authorization from the student. Transcripts are not released for students with financial or other university holds.

Honor Scholarships Harold Stirling Vanderbilt Graduate Scholarships and University Graduate Fellowships Each year several Harold Stirling Vanderbilt Graduate Scholarships and University Graduate Fellowships are awarded to students entering a Ph.D. program for the first time. Based solely on merit, they are offered to students nominated by departments or programs in recognition of exceptional promise for research and academic excellence. Harold Stirling Vanderbilt Graduate Scholarships. These scholarships provide a stipend of $6,000 per year in addition to regular assistantship or fellowship awards. Faculty committees review nominations from all graduate programs and make

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recommendations to the Graduate School which then selects the recipients. University Graduate Fellowships. These premier fellowships provide a stipend of $10,000 in addition to a departmental award (fellowship or assistantship). Recipients are selected in the same manner as for the Harold Stirling Vanderbilt Graduate Scholarships. Provost’s Graduate Fellowships Each year the Graduate School awards Provost’s Graduate Fellowships to outstanding students from under-represented groups showing academic promise who want to study for the Ph.D. These fellowships carry a stipend of $10,000 in addition to a departmental award. Normally all three of these awards run concurrently with the departmental awards. The status of these programs is presently under review.

Other Awards and Assistantships The university intends, within its resources, to provide adequate financial assistance to students with high academic potential who need help in meeting expenses. Some support is service free; most requires assigned service to the university. Duties are compatible with the student’s development and progress. All applicants to the Graduate School are considered for awards and assistantships available in their proposed area of study if they request such consideration and if the application for admission is complete by the application deadline. University Fellowships University fellowships with stipends up to $32,200 are available in some programs. A full Tuition Scholarship is normally provided in addition to the stipend. The fellowships are service-free and the student is expected to devote full time to graduate study and to have no other occupation. Teaching Assistantships Teaching assistantships are awarded for the twin purposes of attracting superior students and providing supervised assistance to faculty in the instruction of undergraduate students. Assistants receive a stipend ranging up to $22,200 for nine months or $28,996 for the calendar year and normally receive an additional service-free full tuition scholarship. Duties are assigned by the program director and require up to twenty hours of work each week. Appointments are made for one year with renewal in subsequent years dependent upon satisfactory performance of assigned duties, as evaluated by the program director and school deans. Graduate teaching assistants are expected to pursue graduate study full time. All persons who have responsibility for instruction, including graduate teaching assistants, are subject to university policies as outlined in the Faculty Manual, and any additional school and departmental policies that govern instruction. Graduate teaching assistants with major instructional responsibilities must have a master’s degree or the equivalent.

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Research Assistantships Research assistantships ranging up to $28,500 for twelve months are available in certain graduate programs. The holder is expected to assist an individual faculty member in research. Full or partial tuition scholarships may accompany a research assistantship. Traineeships Traineeships ranging up to $28,000 for twelve months are available in certain graduate programs. The recipient is expected to carry out research with an individual faculty member. Full or partial tuition scholarships usually accompany a traineeship. Tuition Scholarships Some departments or programs offer service-free full or partial tuition scholarships without an accompanying fellowship or assistantship. Programs offering such tuition scholarships include Biostatistics, Economic Development, the Graduate Department of Religion, Nursing Science, and Sociology. Other Graduate Fellowships Various types of financial assistance other than university assistantships and fellowships are available. A number of private foundations and business and industrial firms support fellowships. The U.S. Government provides training grants for Ph.D. programs through the U.S. Public Health Service, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and other agencies. Awards are allocated to specific departments and to interdepartmental graduate programs of study. Traineeships and fellowships provide stipends and cover tuition and fees.

Loan Assistance Loan assistance is available for graduate students in the form of the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan program, the Federal Graduate PLUS Loan program, and certain alternative/private loan programs. The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan is available regardless of need. The Federal Graduate PLUS Loan is not based on demonstrated need, but the student must be credit worthy. Alternative/private loans are available from private sources that are not based on financial need. Under the Federal Direct Loan program, a student may borrow up to a maximum annual limit of $20,500 a year, all of which is unsubsidized. The maximum aggregate amount of Federal Direct Loans an eligible student may borrow is $138,500 including any Federal Direct Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loans borrowed for undergraduate study. Under the Federal Graduate PLUS Loan program, a graduate/professional student may borrow up to the annual cost of attending Vanderbilt minus any other aid for which the student is eligible. There is no maximum aggregate limit. In order to be considered for the Federal Direct Loan programs and/or the Federal Work-Study program, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA application and additional information may be found on the Office of Student Financial Aid webpage, vanderbilt.edu/financialaid.

Graduate School / Academic Regulations

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Academic Regulations

V

ANDERBILT’S students are bound by the Honor System inaugurated in 1875. Fundamental responsibility for the preservation of the system inevitably falls on the individual student. It is assumed that students will demand of themselves and their fellow students complete respect for the Honor System. All work submitted as a part of course requirements is presumed to be the product of the student submitting it unless credit is given by the student in the manner prescribed by the course instructor. Cheating, plagiarizing, or otherwise falsifying results of study are specifically prohibited under the Honor System. The system applies not only to examinations but also to written work and computer programs submitted to instructors. The student, by registration, acknowledges the authority of the Graduate Honor Council. The university’s Graduate Student Conduct Council has original jurisdiction in all cases of non-academic misconduct involving graduate and professional students. Students are expected to become familiar with the Rules Governing the Graduate Honor Council of Vanderbilt University, available at the time of registration. It contains the constitution and bylaws of the Graduate Student Honor Council, Appellate Review Board, and related regulations. Detailed descriptions of Honor System violations and procedures are also available on the Web at studentorgs.vanderbilt. edu/gsc/honor-council.

Academic Requirements Candidates for graduate degrees must have satisfactorily completed all residency, academic course, and thesis or dissertation requirements, have passed all prescribed examinations, and be free of indebtedness to the university at the time of graduation. The academic requirements described on the following pages have been established by the Graduate faculty and are applicable to all graduate students at Vanderbilt. Individual degree programs may have additional requirements. Students are advised to refer to the various program descriptions listed in this catalog and to consult their major advisers for requirements in the specialty of interest. Students who were completing undergraduate or advanced degrees at the time of their admission must provide to the Graduate School, before initial registration, an official final transcript showing that the degree has been received and the date it was granted. Responsible Conduct in Research Vanderbilt University has an obligation to model, teach, and actively promote the responsible conduct of research in scholarship and science. Research integrity is fundamental to good research and crosses all disciplines and areas of focus. Vanderbilt’s approach incorporates online and discussionbased content based on the individual’s experience level and discipline. In addition to online education, individuals are expected to participate in discussion-based sessions to further explore the issues and challenges in conducting ethical research and scholarship.

Intent to Graduate An Intent to Graduate form must be submitted to the Graduate School at the beginning of the semester in which the student expects to receive a degree. Intent to Graduate forms and dates are available at the Graduate School website, vanderbilt. edu/gradschool. Requirements for the Master’s Degree The following master’s degrees are awarded in the Graduate School: master of arts, master of science, master of fine arts, and master of liberal arts and science. Students should check regulations of their particular program; many have requirements in addition to those listed here.

Residence The candidate for the master’s degree shall spend at least one academic year of graduate study at Vanderbilt. Candidates for the master’s degree are expected to be enrolled in the Graduate School during each fall or spring semester until completion of degree.

Course Work A minimum of 30 semester hours is required for the master’s degree. This includes enrollment in at least 24 semester hours of formal didactic course work plus enrollment in 6 additional hours of didactic course work or 6 credit hours of research. All requirements for the master’s degree must be completed within a six-year period calculated from the student’s first semester of enrollment in the Graduate School. International students should contact the Office of International Student and Scholar Services concerning time limitations for completion of master’s degrees. On recommendation of the student’s program and approval of the Graduate School, credit up to 6 semester hours toward the master’s degree may be transferred from graduate schools in accredited institutions, or other schools of the university. An incoming graduate student deficient in areas the major department considers prerequisite to a graduate program shall take such course work without graduate credit, in addition to the courses required for the advanced degree.

Thesis Electronic submission is expected. The document is converted to a PDF and uploaded on the ETD (Electronic Theses and Dissertations) website (etd.library.vanderbilt.edu). Links on the Graduate School webpage outline the process. (See “Theses and Dissertations” under “Academics.”) There are no fees associated with electronic submission. Two copies of the thesis are required, if the printed option is elected. Both copies will be placed in the Vanderbilt University library system. There is a binding fee of $19 per copy. Whether submitting electronically or as printed copies, the student must provide the Graduate School with two hard copies of the title page and one copy of the abstract. Both copies of the title page must contain the original signatures of at least two graduate faculty members in the student’s program.

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The abstract must contain the original signature of the thesis adviser. Specifications about required format, including the quality of paper to be used, are available at vanderbilt.edu/ gradschool. Due dates are listed on page 6. Some programs require an examination or defense in addition to the thesis.

Non-Thesis Programs Certain programs offer non-thesis master’s degree programs and specify additional course work up to at least 30 hours. Some programs require an examination in addition to the 30 hours in lieu of a thesis. Not later than fourteen days prior to the end of the term, the student’s department will verify that all degree requirements have been completed.

Master’s Degree in Passing Certain departments offering the Ph.D. degree allow, as an alternate to the master’s thesis requirement, passing the Ph.D. qualifying examination and the completion of at least 42 hours of graduate study. Students should consult the chairs of their departments or with their graduate advisers to determine whether such an optional plan is available in their program.

Final Examination The candidate for the master’s degree may, at the discretion of the program faculty, be required to take a final examination in the field of specialization. Such examination shall be completed not later than fourteen days before the end of the term in which the degree is to be granted. Requirements for the M.L.A.S. Degree A minimum of 30 semester hours of academic credit (ten courses) is required, with at least seven M.L.A.S. courses (21 hours) and the option of selecting the remaining three courses (9 hours) from the regular course offerings available to graduate students. Students normally take only one course each semester. All work must be completed within six years of the initial registration. A maximum of 6 credit hours may be transferred from graduate schools of other accredited universities and will count as part of the 9-hour non–M.L.A.S. course work.

Curriculum A range of courses is offered from the disciplines of the liberal arts, including core courses for beginning students and selected topics courses, available to students after successful completion of two core courses. When nine M.L.A.S. credit hours have been earned, students may select up to three courses offering graduate credit from the regular schedule of courses (M.L.A.S. discount tuition does not apply to the courses from the regular schedule). Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree The degree of doctor of philosophy is awarded in recognition of high attainment in a special field of knowledge, as evidenced by examination and by a dissertation presenting the results of independent research. General requirements are listed below. In many programs there are additional requirements, and students should carefully check regulations in their particular programs.

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Admission to Candidacy Admission to the Graduate School does not imply admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. To be admitted to candidacy the student must satisfy the language requirements, if any, in the program, and must pass a qualifying examination. The examination will be administered by the student’s Ph.D. committee, which will supervise subsequent work toward the degree. Upon completion of these requirements the Ph.D. committee will recommend to the Graduate School that the student be admitted to candidacy.

Residence and Course Work The Ph.D. degree requires at least three academic years of graduate study. A student must complete 72 hours of graduate work for credit, of which a minimum of 24 hours in formal, didactic course and seminar work in the Vanderbilt Graduate School is required. In most programs students are required to present considerably more hours in formal course work than the 24-hour minimum. The remainder of the 72 hours, above the program requirements in formal course hours, may be in dissertation research hours, in special readings, and in transfer credit if applicable. Performance in dissertation research does not affect the grade point average. “Formal, didactic course work” is approved courses taken for credit other than thesis and dissertation research courses. Students should check departmental regulations for the number of “formal course” hours required for their particular program. All students working full time toward the Ph.D. must register each fall and spring semester. When the required 72 hours of course work have been completed, registration for dissertation research without hourly credit applies; this reflects full-time effort on research and confers full-time student status. The minimum tuition of $200 is charged.

Qualifying Examination The purpose of the qualifying examination is to test the student’s knowledge of the field of specialization, to assess familiarity with the published research in the field, and to determine whether the student possesses those critical and analytic skills needed for a scholarly career. The examination is conducted by a Ph.D. committee appointed by the Graduate School on advice of the chair or director of graduate studies of the program. The committee consists of not fewer than four members of the Graduate faculty. Three of the members must be graduate faculty from within the student’s department/program and one from outside the program. Any variation of the committee makeup must be approved by the Graduate School. The committee must be appointed by the Graduate School no less than two weeks before the time the student expects to take the qualifying examination. Graduate faculty include all full-time tenured and tenuretrack Vanderbilt University faculty members with primary appointments in departments or programs offering the M.A., M.S., and/or Ph.D. degrees. Those tenured or tenure-track faculty having secondary appointments in departments offering the M.A., M.S., and/or Ph.D. degrees will also be considered Graduate faculty members. Appointment of other faculty members to the Graduate faculty can occur upon recommendation by the faculty member’s department and with the approval of the Graduate

Graduate School / Academic Regulations

School. Such appointment would require a majority vote by the Graduate faculty of the department/program, plus the recommendation of the chair/director of graduate studies and approval by the Graduate School. Such appointments are restricted to full-time faculty members with the rank of assistant professor or above, with a primary or secondary appointment in programs offering the M.A., M.S., and/or Ph.D. degree. Faculty members appointed to the Graduate faculty in this manner have all the privileges of Graduate faculty, including supervising graduate students’ research. Other faculty can be assigned some duties normally reserved for Graduate faculty on the recommendation of the chair and/or director of graduate studies of the department and with the approval of the Graduate School. The duties assigned must be specified and time-limited, e.g. membership on a Ph.D. committee or teaching a graduate-level class/seminar in a particular semester. On occasion, these duties within a program or department may be specified without a specific time limit, e.g. standard graduate teaching duties or membership on any Ph.D. committee in the program. Such faculty will not be permitted to direct theses or dissertations. Faculty members, or others carrying out research or scholarship from outside universities, may also be appointed to serve on a specific student’s Ph.D. committee without being considered for Graduate faculty status, e.g. a faculty member from outside of Vanderbilt, a faculty member from a professional school such as law or medicine, or a scientist working in a national laboratory, with the approvals of the director of graduate studies or chair of the student’s department and of the Graduate School. The request to appoint someone in this manner must be accompanied by a short letter of justification explaining what expertise this person brings to the student’s committee along with a copy of the faculty member’s curriculum vitae. The functions of the Ph.D. committee are (a) to administer the qualifying examination, (b) to approve the dissertation subject, (c) to aid the student and monitor the progress of the dissertation, and (d) to read and approve the dissertation and administer the final oral examination. The qualifying examination may be administered at any time during the school year and shall be completed within a period of four weeks. Before a qualifying examination can be scheduled, the student must have completed at least 24 hours of graduate work (to include all course work required for the degree) and the language requirement, if any. In some programs the student may be required to demonstrate basic competence in the discipline through a written preliminary examination prior to the actual qualifying examination. All departments and other units offering Ph.D. programs must set a maximum time limit within which a student, under normal circumstances, is required to take the qualifying examination. That maximum time limit must not exceed four years. The qualifying examination may be written or oral, or both. The Graduate School must be notified of the time and place of the qualifying examination at least two weeks in advance. The qualifying examination is not a public examination, and voice recordings of it are not permitted. A student is allowed only two opportunities to pass the qualifying examination. The qualifying examination results form, signed by the committee members and the director of graduate studies for the program, shall be forwarded to the Graduate School immediately after the examination. When the student has passed the qualifying examination, the Ph.D. committee shall recommend to the Graduate School that the student be admitted to candidacy for the degree.

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Dissertation A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must present an acceptable dissertation. The dissertation demonstrates that the candidate has technical competence in the field and has done research of an independent character. It must add to or modify what was previously known, or present a significant interpretation of the subject based upon original investigation. The subject of the dissertation must be approved by the student’s faculty adviser and Ph.D. committee. The dissertation must be completed within four years after a student has been admitted to candidacy for the degree. Upon petition to the Graduate School, a one-year extension of candidacy may be granted. If such a period has expired without successful completion of the dissertation, the student may be dismissed from the Graduate School. Readmission to the Graduate School, and to candidacy, requires application to the Graduate School, with approval of the program faculty. In such cases the student may be required, by the Graduate School or by the Ph.D. committee, to demonstrate competence for readmission by taking a qualifying examination or additional course work. The candidate should submit a copy of the completed dissertation to the Ph.D. committee at least two weeks prior to the dissertation defense. The committee reviews the dissertation and conducts the final examination. Final copies of the approved dissertation may be submitted to the Graduate School in electronic or printed form. Electronic submission is expected. Style specifications, paper requirements, fees, and further details are listed at vanderbilt. edu/gradschool. With either option, one copy of the title page, with the original signatures of not less than a majority of the Ph.D. committee, and one copy of an abstract of not more than three hundred fifty words, signed by the student’s adviser, must be turned in to the Graduate School by the date specified on page 6. Students who submit their dissertations electronically revise the title page, convert the documents to a PDF file, and upload the document on the Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) website, etd.library.vanderbilt.edu. Dissertations are intended to be of benefit to the academic community and to society in general, and thus are required to be publicly available. This is accomplished by placing a copy in the Vanderbilt Heard Library, posting an electronic version on the library website, and by filing with UMI/ProQuest authorization for inclusion in an accessible database. In some instances, students may request a delay in the release or posting of their dissertations for a limited time period. This can be done, for example, to protect intellectual property, to allow time to file a patent application, or to coordinate with the timing of publication in another form. In no circumstance will the release of the dissertation be delayed for more than two years. Unless requested for a shorter period of time, any request to delay public release will expire at the end of two years and the Graduate School will proceed with the public release through the library. For students who choose to register the copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office, the Graduate School will help facilitate the process. Registration is not required to ensure copyright protection for your work, but certain additional rights are gained by virtue of registration. All applicable fees must be paid at the time the dissertation is turned in to the Graduate School. The abstract is published in Dissertation Abstracts, which publicizes the completion of the dissertation and announces its availability on microfilm.

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Final Examination The candidate must pass his or her dissertation defense at least fourteen days before the end of the term in which the degree is to be conferred, or by April 1 for May graduation. The final oral examination is administered by the student’s Ph.D. committee and is on the dissertation and significant related material; the student is expected to demonstrate an understanding of the larger context in which the dissertation lies. The public is invited to attend the final examination, which is announced in advance in Vanderbilt’s electronic calendar. The chair of the Ph.D. committee or the director of graduate studies of the program, after consultation with the candidate, shall notify the Graduate School in advance of the place and time of the examination and the title of the dissertation. This should be done no later than two weeks prior to the examination. The Graduate School then formally notifies the Ph.D. committee and submits the defense notice to Vanderbilt’s electronic calendar. The dissertation defense results form, signed by the committee members and the director of graduate studies for the program, should be forwarded immediately to the Graduate School.

Further Requirements It should be understood that the requirements stated above are minimum and that individual programs may add others. Students are urged to consult individual program entries in this catalog and departmental chairs and directors of graduate studies to learn the requirements of programs in which they are interested. Language Requirements for the Master’s and Ph.D. Degrees The language requirements, if any, for the master’s and Ph.D. degrees in each graduate program are determined by the program faculty, and are set forth in this catalog in the section devoted to program descriptions and course offerings. Foreign language requirements are usually met by demonstration of proficiency in one or more of the following: French, German, or Spanish. Certain programs either permit or require proficiency in other languages; and some others restrict the choice to certain combinations within this group. Students should refer to the various program statements in this catalog and should consult their advisers regarding specific requirements. Examinations in languages are usually administered by the appropriate language faculty by arrangement with the program. As an alternative to certification of proficiency by examination, the Graduate School may accept certification from the program that the minimum requirement in a language has been met if the student is able to present an acceptable academic record of the equivalent of at least 12 semester hours in the language. A student who has fulfilled the language requirement at another graduate school prior to entering Vanderbilt may, at the discretion of the program and the Graduate School, transfer the certification if the student does so within three years after having received it. International students may petition the Graduate School through the program to substitute their native language for one of the usual languages required for the Ph.D. degree.

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Registration The normal academic load for full-time registration is 9 to 13 hours in the fall and spring semesters. Students registered for 9 or more credit hours in fall or spring are defined as full time. Those registered for 7 or 8 hours in fall or spring are considered three-quarter time, those registered for 6 hours in fall or spring are half time, and those registered for less than 6 hours in fall or spring are less than half time. In the summer term, 6 or more hours is defined as full time, 5 hours is three-quarter time, 3 to 4 hours is half time, and less than 3 hours is less than half time. After completing the hourly requirements for the degree, full-time students register for master’s (7999) or Ph.D. (8999, 9999) research without hourly credit to reflect full-time effort on research. Certain programs offer a half-time Ph.D. research course (9995) for students who are able to devote only half-time effort to dissertation research. During each semester currently enrolled students are asked to meet with their advisers and directors of graduate studies to plan their schedules for the coming semester. All students must later complete official registration at the appropriate time using YES (Your Enrollment Services). All full-time graduate students, including those receiving scholarship, assistantship, fellowship, or traineeship support through the university, must register each fall and spring semester with no breaks in registration to remain in good standing.

Changes in Registration Changes in registration may be made through YES during the change period (the first ten class days of the semester) with consent of the major department. A student is not permitted to add or drop a course, change the number of hours in a variablecredit course, or change from audit to credit status after the end of the change period. A student may formally withdraw from a course after the end of the change period with the permission of the department, and a grade of W will be given. A student is not permitted to withdraw from the course after the Last Day to Withdraw (see Graduate School calendar) except under certain circumstances. Failing the course is not considered one of the circumstances. Students should note, in the section on tuition and fees, the regulations concerning tuition obligations for courses dropped after the first week of the term. Courses in which there is a significant change in subject matter each semester (e.g., special topics courses) may be repeated for credit within limits noted in the course listings of this catalog. Grading System The grading system in the Graduate School includes the letter grades A, B, C, and F. A student will not be granted graduate credit for any course in which a grade less than C– is received. Courses with failing (F) grades may be repeated once at the discretion of the course director and the department. In this situation, the more recent grade will be calculated in the final grade point average. The letter I may be used at the discretion of the instructor in those cases in which the student is not able to complete work in the normal time. The notation W is entered onto the transcript when a student withdraws from a course or from the Graduate School. A grade point average of 3.0 is required for graduation. Letter grades are assigned grade point values as follows:

Graduate School / Academic Regulations A+ A A– B+ B

= = = = =

4.0 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0

B– C+ C C– F

= = = = =

2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 0.0

S/U grades are given every semester for all research courses (7999, 8999, and 9999), regardless of the number of hours registered. The accumulation of three (3) U grades over the course of study will lead to dismissal from the program and the Graduate School. No credit will be granted for courses in which a grade of U is received. Students receive grades in all courses except those approved for credit/non-credit, audits, and some seminars. An I that is not replaced by a letter grade within one year may be changed to the grade F at the discretion of the instructor; otherwise, the I may become permanent and remain on the transcript as such. Certain courses approved by the graduate faculty for credit/ non-credit or Pass/Fail count toward total hours. Courses that are strictly no-credit, however, do not count toward total hours or in calculating grade point average, although grades for such courses are entered on the student’s record. With the instructor’s permission, students are permitted to audit certain courses. Students who audit are expected to attend the course regularly. Students must be registered for regular courses in order to audit. Audits are listed on the student’s transcript. Audits are limited to two per semester. Grade Change Policy For a student enrolled in the Graduate School, a grade recorded in the Office of the University Registrar may be changed only upon the written request of the instructor, endorsed by the appropriate official (usually an associate dean) within the school/college that offered the course, and then the approval of the associate dean of the Graduate School. An instructor’s petition to change a grade must include a brief rationale for the change. Changing a recorded grade is a serious matter and, in general, petitions will be approved only upon certification that the original grade was in error or, in the case of an Incomplete, that the outstanding requirement(s) have been completed. Request for exceptions to this policy should be directed to the associate dean of the Graduate School and will be considered on an individual basis; these may require additional certifications and approvals. Academic Probation A grade point average of 3.0 is necessary for graduation. Students who fall below an average of 3.0 are placed on probation for one semester. If the student’s performance does not improve during that semester, the Graduate School and the appropriate department chair will decide whether to dismiss the student or to allow the continuation of probation. If at the end of the second semester the grade point average is still below 3.0, the student may be advised to withdraw or face dismissal. Students who earn a grade point average of 2.0 or less during their first semester of residence are subject to dismissal at the end of that semester. Accumulation of three U grades in research courses can lead to dismissal. Student Grievances and Appeals Students who believe their academic performance has not been judged reasonably or fairly, or who believe their intellectual contributions have not been fairly acknowledged, should

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discuss their concerns with the director of graduate studies in their program or, as necessary, the chair of the department. If the student’s concerns cannot be resolved at the program or departmental level, the student may then request a further review of the issues in question by the associate dean for graduate studies or similar official in their school dean’s office. The student may appeal the outcome of the school-level review to the Graduate School. Credit Courses not listed in this catalog that are numbered from 5000 to 9999 may be taken for credit by graduate students on the recommendation and consent of the faculty adviser and the director of graduate studies, unless some limit is noted in the description. Not all courses offered by various divisions of the university have been approved by the Graduate faculty for graduate credit. In these cases, students should complete a “Request for Graduate Credit” form. In arranging schedules, students should consult their advisers and carefully check the Graduate School catalog for approved courses. Students may register for graduate courses or other courses in the university on a non-credit basis—either to fulfill their own interests or to meet certain prerequisites and requirements. The designation “no-credit” presupposes the student’s participation in the course, including written assignments and examinations. Grades are received and recorded in no-credit courses and tuition is billed at the regular hourly rate. Credit Policy Credit hours are semester hours; e.g., a three-hour course carries credit of 3 semester hours. One semester credit hour represents at least three hours of academic work per week, on average, for one semester. Academic work includes, but is not necessarily limited to, lectures, laboratory work, homework, research, class readings, independent study, internships, and practica. Some Vanderbilt courses may have requirements that exceed this definition. Transfer Credit Graduate credit may be transferred from graduate schools in accredited institutions. Transfer is made only on the recommendation of the chair or director of graduate studies of the major department and approval of the Graduate School. A maximum of 6 semester hours of transfer credit may be applied toward the master’s degree and 48 hours toward the Ph.D. (See requirements for the master’s degree and Ph.D. degree elsewhere in this catalog.) Only those hours in which the student has achieved the grade B or its equivalent will be considered for transfer. Grades earned on transferred credit do not affect the student’s Graduate School average unless such courses are to be counted as didactic hours. Students who want to transfer to the Graduate School from professional degree programs offered by other schools at Vanderbilt must submit a formal application for admission and are expected to do so not later than the end of their first year of graduate-level studies at Vanderbilt. Credits earned through the Division of Unclassified Studies cannot generally be used toward a graduate degree at Vanderbilt University.

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Special Non-Degree Students Special non-degree student status is reserved for limited circumstances. It is not intended for students who seek regular admission or to be admitted later as degree-seeking students. Examples appropriate for special non-degree status include a student enrolled in an accredited university but will be in residence at Vanderbilt for up to one year, such as a student participating in an approved exchange program. Another example is a student enrolled for a degree at another accredited university and whose adviser becomes a faculty member at Vanderbilt. In those instances, the special student status at Vanderbilt is to maintain a connection to that faculty member and/or receive financial support while at Vanderbilt and completing the degree at their home university. Other circumstances may be considered on a case by case basis. Students admitted as non-degree students may register for selected courses in areas where they are qualified. Such students must submit an application and transcript(s) of their previous academic work with the Graduate School. Approval of the instructor, the department in which the course is offered, and the Graduate School is required. GRE scores are not required. Status as a non-degree student is expected to last no longer than one year. No more than 6 semester hours earned as a non-degree graduate student may be applied to graduate degrees at Vanderbilt. Leave of Absence The Graduate School requires continuous registration except for summer sessions. Students who want to interrupt their graduate study must petition the department, who on their behalf apply to the Graduate School for an authorized leave of absence. Leave of absence is granted for a maximum of one year. Those without authorized leave who do not register are dismissed from the Graduate School and are not considered students. If they want to resume graduate study at Vanderbilt, they must petition for reinstatement. Parental Leave All students enrolled full-time in the Graduate School and supported by funding from either internal or external sources are covered by this policy. This includes students with funding through stipends, such as training grants or service-free fellowships, and students compensated for services, such as teaching or research assistants. Prior to and/or following childbirth or adoption of an infant, the primary caregiver (whether mother or father) will be allowed to take six weeks of parental leave. During this period, the student’s current stipend, and, if applicable, funding for health insurance and tuition, will be continued without interruption. The student’s enrollment status will be continued during this period as well. Withdrawal Students who intend to withdraw from the university should inform the department, who then informs the Graduate School in writing. Improper notification may result in academic and financial penalties.

vanderbilt university

Credit for Graduate Courses Taken as an Undergraduate A qualified Vanderbilt University senior undergraduate may enroll in graduate courses and receive credit which, upon the student’s admission to the Graduate School, may be applicable toward a graduate degree. Undergraduate seniors interested in this option should review the regulations appearing in the Undergraduate Catalog and consult their advisers and the Graduate School. Undergraduates should note that those wanting to take 5000-level courses or above, whether under this option or not, must obtain the written approval of their academic adviser, the instructor of the course, and the Graduate School. In certain special cases, credit may be transferred for graduate-level course work completed during undergraduate degree studies by a student at another accredited institution. The course hours must be in excess of the minimum required for the undergraduate degree and the course(s) must not be a required part of the undergraduate degree or major. Requests for such transfer of credit must be carefully justified by the student’s major department and approved by the Graduate School. Commencement The university holds its annual Commencement ceremony following the spring semester. Degree candidates must have completed successfully all curriculum requirements and have passed all prescribed examinations by the published deadlines to be allowed to participate in the ceremony. A student completing degree requirements in the summer or fall semester will be invited to participate in Commencement the following May; however, the semester in which the degree was actually earned will be the one recorded on the diploma and the student’s permanent record. Students unable to participate in the graduation ceremony will receive their diplomas by mail. Please refer to the Commencement webpage at vanderbilt.edu/commencement for complete information on the May ceremony.

Graduate School / African American and Diaspora Studies

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Programs of Study African American and Diaspora Studies DIRECTOR Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Gilman W. Whiting PROFESSORS Victor Anderson, Houston Baker, Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Trica D. Keaton, Tiffany Ruby Patterson, Gilman W. Whiting MELLON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Alicia L. Monroe WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE Alice Randall

VANDERBILT University’s African American and Diaspora Studies program offers an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and comparative curriculum of study of the histories, literatures, music, visual cultures, and politics of people of African descent around the world. To that end, the African American and Diaspora Studies program focuses on several geographic areas: Africa, Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean. The certificate in diaspora studies has been designed to complement students’ disciplinary training, expose them to the interdisciplinary trends in the academy, and broaden their career possibilities. The diaspora studies certificate provides graduate students with access to interdisciplinary scholarship in the dynamic and continually evolving field of studies in the worldwide African diaspora. The certificate also gives students a competitive edge and interdisciplinary training for the still robust career outlook for specialists in pan-black studies as well as in the search for postdoctoral fellowships in the humanities and social sciences. The certificate in diaspora studies is open to any student enrolled in graduate study at Vanderbilt University. Acceptance to the program requires the approval of the African American and Diaspora Studies program graduate studies committee, comprising the director of graduate studies, the director of African American and Diaspora Studies, and one other faculty member from African American and Diaspora Studies. Students must also submit as part of the application to the certificate program: 1) a one-page description of their interests in African diaspora studies and how it relates to their graduate program of study; and 2) complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the AADS director of graduate studies, and the director of graduate studies for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form should be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]), to the University Registrar’s Office (URO) ([email protected]), and to the AADS program administrator ([email protected]). For more detailed information on the diaspora certificate, please go to vanderbilt.edu/aframst or contact the director of graduate studies in the African American and Diaspora Studies program.

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Diaspora Studies 1. 12 credit hours of course work, which includes:

a. 3 credit hours of African American and Diaspora Studies

5002. Interdisciplinary introduction to materials, teaching methods, debates, and theoretical terms of scholarly research in diaspora Studies. A three-week section devoted to course design and development will also be taught in conjunction with the Center for Teaching. Students will be required to prepare a syllabus for the introductory course in African Diaspora Studies, AADS 1010. b. 9 credit hours of interrelated graduate level coursework on race and its intersection with gender, class, religion, power, and/or sexuality, which are appropriate to the student’s graduate program of study. Students may take African American and Diaspora Studies 5654 Memoirs and Biographies as well as African American and Diaspora Studies 5095 Directed Study with a faculty member in African American and Diaspora Studies to fulfill 6 credit hours. No more than 6 credit hours of specifically-named courses required for the primary degree may be applied toward the Certificate. All courses must be approved by the African American and Diaspora Studies program graduate committee and must form an intellectually cohesive whole. Students will be required to provide a copy of course syllabi to the graduate committee so that the committee may determine whether the courses taken or proposed to be taken by the student are indeed appropriate for certificate credit. 2. Participation in a minimum of five extracurricular activities sponsored by the Callie House Research Center for the Study of Global Black Cultures and Politics. A short paper reflecting on the insights gained from participating must be submitted to the director of graduate studies before conferral of the certificate. 3. The conferral of the certificate requires a cumulative GPA of 3.3, satisfactory performance of 3.3 or better in AADS 5002, and completion of all the aforementioned requirements. Graduate courses successfully completed at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the program may be counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the director of the program if the course can satisfy one of the curriculum requirements of the program. Or if the program doesn’t require the permission of the director: Graduate courses successfully completed at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the program may be counted toward the certificate requirements if the course can satisfy one of the curriculum requirements of the program. An undergraduate course may be substituted for a graduate course required by the program’s curriculum with the approval of the director of the program and the Graduate School.

Approved List of Courses AFRICAN AMERICAN AND DIASPORA STUDIES: 5002 (300), Theories of Diaspora; 5095 (395a), Directed Study; 5654 (265) Memoirs and Biographies. ANTHROPOLOGY: 8220 (349), The Historical Archaeology of Latin America. ENGLISH: 8137 (337a), Introduction to Literary Theory; 8150 (350), Special Problems in English and American Literature; 8155 (355), Special Topics in English and American Literature; 8430 (325), Seminar in Modern British and American Literature; 8450 (320), Studies in American Literature; 8455 (321), Studies in Southern Literature.

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FRENCH: 8070 (388), Seminar in Francophone Literature. GERMAN: 5795 (395), The Racial Imagination. HISTORY: 6400 (302a), Readings in American History; 6410 (302b), Readings in American History; 6500 (303a), Readings in Early Latin American History; 6510 (303b), Readings in Modern Latin American History; 8050 (305), Studies in Comparative History; 8600 (358), Comparative Slavery in the Colonial Americas; 8610 (359), Atlantic World History, Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century; 8620 (361), Studies in Latin American History; 8630 (365), Research Seminar in Latin American History; 8700 (371), Studies in Early American History to 1783; 8710 (372), Studies in the Middle Period of American History, 1783–1861; 8720 (373), Studies in U.S. History, 1861–1900; 8730 (374), Studies in Recent American History; 8732, Religion and the Civil Rights Movement; 8740 (375), Research Seminar in Recent American History; 8745 U.S. and the World; 8750 (381), Studies in American History. PHILOSOPHY: 9000 (353), Figures in Philosophy (must be AADS-related); 9020 (352), Topics in Philosophy (must be AADS-related). POLITICAL SCIENCE: 8305 (305), Feminist Social and Political Thought; 8330 (330), Studies in American Politics; 8332 (332), Electoral Behavior and Public Opinion. RELIGIOUS STUDIES: 3442, African American Political Theology; 3535, Black Islam in America; 3538, The Black Church in America; 3822, The Amarna Period; 3852, Slave Thought; 3882, African American Biblical Hermeneutics; 7131 (3415), Feminist/Womanist Ethics. SOCIOLOGY: 6302, Contemporary Theory; 8331, Survey Seminar on Collective Behavior and Social Movements; 8333, Survey Seminar on Cultural Sociology; 8345, Survey Seminar on Social Stratification. SPANISH: 8200, Seminar: Studies in Colonial Literature; 8345, Introduction to Latin American Colonial Studies; 9240, Ordering and Disrupting Fictions in Latin America; 9270, The Politics of Identity in Latino U.S. Literature; 9520, Special Topics in Spanish American Literature. WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES: 8301, Gender and Sexuality: Feminist Approaches; 8302, Gender and Pedagogy. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 75.

American Studies DIRECTOR Ifeoma Nwankwo

VANDERBILT University’s Program in American Studies offers an interdisciplinary graduate certificate. This certificate has been designed to complement students’ disciplinary training, expose them to larger interdisciplinary traditions and academic literatures, and enhance their career options. The American Studies certificate provides graduate students with training across an array of disciplines as well as training in interdisciplinary methodology. The certificate provides students with a valuable professional credential and strengthens their ability to compete for jobs as well as national fellowships and postdoctoral awards. The certificate in American studies is open to any student enrolled in graduate study at Vanderbilt University. Students wishing to enroll must complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the director of the

program, and the director of the graduate program (DGS) for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form should then be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]) and to the University Registrar’s Office ([email protected]). Acceptance to the program requires the approval of both the graduate director of the student’s home department and the director of the Program in American Studies. Students must also submit an application that includes (1) a one-page rationale for their course of study to the American studies graduate committee for approval and (2) a plan of study focused on a specific theme, forming an intellectually coherent whole. Graduate courses successfully completed at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the program may be counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the director of the program if the course can satisfy one of the curriculum requirements of the program. An undergraduate course may be substituted for a graduate course required by the program’s curriculum with the approval of the director of the program and the Graduate School. The awarding of a certificate requires a cumulative GPA of 3.3, satisfactory performance of B+ or better in AMER 4000, completion of all requirements, and successful completion of the graduate certificate paper. Please contact the American Studies program for more information at [email protected] vanderbilt.edu.

Requirements for Graduate Certificate in American Studies 1. American Studies 300. 2. Four additional graduate-level American studies courses appropriate to the student’s program of study. Courses must be approved by the graduate committee for credit and should include at least three courses outside the student’s home discipline. The student’s total course work must include courses from at least three different departments. One course may be satisfied through an independent study with a faculty member affiliated with the American Studies program, with the approval of the director of the American Studies program. (See below for a list of approved graduate courses.) 3. A paper (thirty pages) submitted to the graduate committee for evaluation. The paper must demonstrate the application of an American studies methodology to research, teaching, or fieldwork. It should be a synthesis of interdisciplinary American studies work in the context of the student’s primary field.

Approved List of Courses AMERICAN STUDIES: 8000, Graduate Workshop in American Studies. ECONOMICS: 9550–9560, Labor Economics. ENGLISH: 8137, Introduction to Literary Theory (when an American topic is offered), 8138, Special Topics in Literary Theory (when an American topic is offered); 8150, Special Problems in English and American Literature (when an American topic is offered); 8155, Special Topics in English and American Literature (when an American topic is offered); 8430, Seminar in British and American Literature (when an American topic is offered); 8450, Studies in American Literature; 8455, Studies in Southern Literature. HISTORY: 8700, Studies in Early American History to 1783; 8710, Studies in the Middle Period of American History, 1783–1861; 8720,Studies in

Graduate School / Asian Studies United States History, 1861–1900; 8730, Studies in Recent American History; 8740, Seminar in Recent American History; 8750, Topics in American History; 8770, Studies in American Social History. PHILOSOPHY: 8050, Readings in Philosophy (when an American topic is offered); 8054, Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (when an American topic is offered); 9000, Figures in Philosophy (when an American topic is offered); 9010, History of Philosophy (when an American topic is offered); 9020, Topics in Philosophy (when an American topic is offered). POLITICAL SCIENCE: 8330, Studies in American Politics; 8331, Party Politics; 8332, Political Parties and Electoral Behavior; 8333, Political Culture, Opinion, and Behavior; 8335, Politics of American Legislation; 8336, The Judicial Process; 8339, Research in American Politics; 8370, Topics in Political Science (when an American topic is offered). RELIGION: 7220, Healthcare Ethics. SOCIOLOGY: 6301, Classical Sociological Theory and Major Theorists; 6302, Contemporary Theory; 8331, Survey Seminar on Inequalities and Movements; 8333, Survey Seminar on Cultural Sociology; 8335, Survey Seminar on Deviant Behavior and Social Control; 8339, Survey Seminar on Political Sociology; 8343, Survey Seminar on Social Psychology; 8345, Survey Seminar on Social Stratification; 9361, Special Topic Seminars on Social Phenomena at the Macro Level; 9363, Special Topic Seminars on Institutions and Organizations; 9367, Special Topic Seminars on Norms, Power, and Related Normative Phenomena; 9368, Special Topic Seminars on Social Processes and Social Change. SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE: 9270, The Politics of Identity in Latino U.S. Literature. WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES: 8301, Gender and Sexuality: Feminist Approaches; 8302, Gender and Pedagogy. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 75.

Anthropology CHAIR Beth A. Conklin DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Tiffiny A. Tung PROFESSORS EMERITI Thomas A. Gregor, Ronald Spores PROFESSORS Arthur A. Demarest, Tom D. Dillehay, Edward F. Fischer, Lesley Gill RESEARCH PROFESSOR Charles E. Orser, Jr. ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Beth A. Conklin, William R. Fowler Jr., John Janusek, Norbert Ross, Tiffiny A. Tung, Steven A. Wernke RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Patricia J. Netherly ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Carwil Bjork-James, Markus Eberl RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Anna Guengerich, Ahmad Mohammadpur

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in anthropology is designed to prepare students for careers in teaching and research, especially with an emphasis on specializations in the anthropology of Central America, Mexico, and South America. The graduate enrollment of approximately thirty graduate students assures a close tutorial relationship with faculty and ample student opportunities for field research and publication in Latin America. Requirements for the master’s degree in anthropology include a minimum of 30 semester hours of course work, which includes enrollment in at least 24 hours of formal didactic

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course work plus 6 hours of thesis and a comprehensive examination. An alternative master’s degree track involves 36 hours of course work and a comprehensive examination, rather than a thesis. Although students are expected to acquire a general knowledge of anthropology, the program encourages independent research on special subjects, particularly in archaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory, indigenous Latin America, and contemporary political economy and social movements. The Ph.D. program requires at least 45 hours of formal course work and four semesters of residency. A high level of proficiency in one foreign language is expected. Doctoral candidates pass general examinations, present and defend a dissertation proposal, complete a dissertation on original field or archival research, and defend the dissertation. Subject to the approval of the director of graduate studies, students entering the program with a master’s degree or with studies elsewhere may transfer up to 18 hours of graduate credit. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 75.

Arabic Course descriptions begin on page 76.

Archaeology See Anthropology and Classical Studies

Asian Studies DIRECTOR Gerald Figal PROFESSOR Robert Campany ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Ben Tran, Guojun Wang Affiliated Faculty PROFESSORS Gerald Figal (History), Tony Stewart (Religious Studies) ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Brett Benson (Political Science), Yoshikuni Igarashi (History), Tracy Miller (History of Art), Ruth Rogaski (History), Samira Sheikh (History) ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Nancy Lin (Religious Studies), Peter Lorge (History), Bryan Lowe (Religious Studies), Haerin Shin (English), Lijun Song (Sociology), Anand V. Taneja (Religious Studies)

Vanderbilt University’s Program in Asian Studies offers a graduate certificate in the interdisciplinary study of the societies and cultures of Asia. The certificate offers graduate students a perspective on Asia that goes beyond the student’s particular disciplinary specialization, and signals that the student has achieved competence in an Asian language. The certificate offers a valuable credential for students who wish

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to undertake career opportunities in Asia, or work in a field related to Asian countries, institutions, or populations. An Asian Studies certificate will also allow students in professional schools to take advantage of the many global opportunities opening up in business, law, education, and health care. The certificate in Asian Studies is open to any student enrolled in graduate study at Vanderbilt University. The certificate is awarded upon fulfillment of the following three categories of requirements: 1) Completion of at least 12 credit hours of interrelated graduate-level course work (see below); 2) Demonstrated language competency in an Asian language; and 3) Attendance at a minimum of five academic events. Courses may include those offered directly by the Asian Studies program, as well as graduate courses from other departments that have been approved by the director of the Asian Studies program. Course work must be focused on a specific theme and together form an intellectually coherent whole. Up to 6 credit hours of specifically named required courses of a student’s primary degree program may count toward the certificate. At least 6 credit hours must come from outside the student’s home discipline. Graduate courses successfully completed at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the program may be counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the director of the program. An undergraduate course may be substituted for a graduate course required by the program’s curriculum, with the approval of the director of the program and the Graduate School. Students wishing to enroll must complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the director of the Asian Studies Certificate Program, and the director of the graduate program (DGS) for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form must be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]) and to the University Registrar’s Office (university. [email protected]). A number of courses are available in Asian languages, social sciences, and humanities for graduate credit. A partial listing of relevant courses follows. See departmental listings for courses offered in the current academic year. ASIAN STUDIES: 5151, The Third World and Literature; 5210W, Hollywood Hanoi; 5511, Popular Culture in Modern Japan; 5512, Explorations of Japanese Animation; 5560, Current Japan–U.S. Relations; 5633, SelfCultivation in Ancient China; 5851–5852, Independent Study; 5891–5892, Special Topics. CHINESE: 5101, Elementary Chinese I; 5102, Elementary Chinese II; 5201, Intermediate Chinese I; 5202, Intermediate Chinese II; 5231, Calligraphy; 5301, Advanced Chinese I; 5302, Advanced Chinese II; 5401, Business Chinese I; 5402, Business Chinese II; 5403, Readings in Modern Chinese Media; 5404, Readings in Modern Chinese Media; 5405, Classical Chinese Literature and Philosophy; 5406, Readings in Modern Literary Chinese. HISTORY: 5115, Play and Pleasure in Early Modern Japan; 5120, PostWWII Japan; 5140, The Mughal World; 5150, India and the Indian Ocean. HISTORY OF ART: 5112, The Arts of China during the Liao-Song Period. JAPANESE: 5101, Elementary Japanese I; 5102, Elementary Japanese II; 5201, Intermediate Japanese I; 5202, Intermediate Japanese II; 5301, Advanced Japanese I; 5302, Advanced Japanese II; 5891, Special Topics in Advanced Japanese. POLITICAL SCIENCE: 5216, The Chinese Political System.

vanderbilt university RELIGIOUS STUDIES: 5665, Mythologies and Epics of South Asia; 5666, Devotional Traditions of South Asia: Hindu, Muslim, Sikh; 5669, Sacred Space in the Tibetan World; 5753, East Asian Buddhism; 5775, Chinese Religions through Stories. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 76.

Astronomy See Astrophysics and Physics and Astronomy

Astrophysics CHAIR Robert Scherrer DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Andreas Berlind PROFESSORS Robert S. Scherrer, Keivan G. Stassun, David A. Weintraub ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Andreas Berlind, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH PROFESSOR C. Robert O’Dell Affiliated Faculty PROFESSORS Thomas Kephart, Thomas Weiler

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy ASTROPHYSICS is the study of the universe on all physical scales—from nuclear reactions inside stars to the expansion of the universe as a whole—generally focusing on objects and physical phenomena beyond our own solar system. Areas of study include: stars (stellar astrophysics), their birth (star formation) and their death (stellar evolution); the discovery and characterization of other solar systems (exoplanetary science); the material between the stars (interstellar medium); large ensembles of stars (star clusters) and their interactions (stellar dynamics); our Milky Way galaxy and its local group of galaxies (galactic astrophysics); other galaxies (extragalactic astrophysics), their birth (galaxy formation) and their evolution (galactic evolution); the structure of the universe as a whole (large-scale structure); and the origin and evolution of the universe itself (cosmology). Astrophysics also includes the study of fundamental physics—forces, particles, the nature of matter and energy—in the astronomical context, including: particle astrophysics (e.g., solar neutrinos), gravity-wave physics, the extreme physics of compact objects (e.g., black holes), dark matter, and dark energy. Astrophysics involves experimental techniques (observational astrophysics), generally involving images or spectra from telescopes on the ground and/ or space, or analysis of archival datasets (data mining); theory, which includes the application of physics first-principles to derive fundamental physical laws or relationships; modeling techniques (computational astrophysics), which generally involves use of massive computing resources to simulate complex objects and phenomena; and information science (astroinformatics), which includes development and application of

Graduate School / Biological Sciences

algorithms for the analysis, deployment, and curation of large datasets (data-intensive astrophysics). The master of arts in astrophysics is awarded to students who earn a B average in a minimum of 30 credit hours of graduate study and complete the formal course requirements for the Ph.D. in astrophysics. The Ph.D. degree in astrophysics requires 72 hours of graduate work, including 28 hours of formal course work, including six core courses (16 credit hours) of core graduate courses in astrophysics, 3 credit hours of core graduate courses in physics, and 9 credit hours of elective graduate courses in astrophysics and/or physics or an approved field. A student must earn a grade of B or higher in every course that counts toward these 28 hours. The remaining credit hours may be earned through some combination of dissertation research and approved lecture courses. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 77 for Astrophysics and page 124 for Physics.

Biochemistry CHAIR John D. York DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Charles R. Sanders PROFESSORS Richard N. Armstrong, Richard Breyer, H. Alex Brown, Richard Caprioli, Bruce Carter, Walter Chazin, David Cortez, Martin Egli, Stephen Fesik, F. Peter Guengerich, Scott W. Hiebert, Billy Hudson, Lawrence J. Marnett, Neil Osheroff, Jennifer Ann Pietenpol, Ned A. Porter, Carmelo J. Rizzo, Charles R. Sanders, Samuel A. Santoro, Kevin L. Schey, Michael Stone, John D. York ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Brian Bachmann, Brandt Eichman, Tina Iverson, Borden Lacy, Andrew Link ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Manuel Ascano Jr., Emily C. Hodges, Nicholas Reiter

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy STUDENTS interested in this program usually participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences during their first year (see Biomedical Sciences). The second year of study comprises required and elective course work including Biochemistry 8300, 8301, 8302, 8303, 8327, 8336, 8337, 8343, 8349, and 8352 for a total of at least 24 hours of formal course work toward the Ph.D. degree (including 16 hours in the first year). A thesis-based master’s degree is awarded only under special circumstances. The program offers students fundamental training in biochemical principles and an opportunity to apply such fundamental knowledge to vital biological and medical problems. The intent of the department is to maintain a graduate program that emphasizes quality of experience, academic scholarship, and professional achievement. Faculty members are involved in active research programs. Thirty-five to fortyfive graduate students are generally enrolled. Major research efforts are concerned with studies on mechanisms of mutagenesis; cytochromes P450, regulation of expression, and mechanisms of detoxication; oxygenase and arachidonic acid biochemistry; cancer drug development; proteinase inhibitor structure and regulation; lipid-based

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signaling, nucleic acid structure and interactions with carcinogens, DNA-binding proteins; mass spectrometric tissue imaging, proteomics, DNA topoisomerase; structure and mechanism of ribonuclease P, biochemistry and endocrinology of hypertension; deep sequencing and human genetics; intracellular signaling in growth and development; molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease, RNA-based regulation of transcription, ion channels, neoplastic transformation by oncogenic transcription factors; cellular responses to DNA damage; bacterial toxins, chromatin structure and histone modifications; membrane protein-linked disease mechanisms, long non-coding RNA structure and function, genome surveillance, calcium-binding proteins, and one-carbon metabolism. These studies use state-of-the-art technology including molecular biology, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Faculty of the department also participate in interdisciplinary training programs, supported by National Institutes of Health training grants, that offer specialized biochemical training in the areas of molecular toxicology, chemical biology, biochemical nutrition, molecular biophysics, cancer research, and molecular endocrinology. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 78.

Biological Sciences CHAIR Douglas G. McMahon DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Donna J. Webb PROFESSORS EMERITI Burton J. Bogitsh, Clint E. Carter, Sidney Fleischer, Robert Kral, Wallace M. LeStourgeon, David E. McCauley, Terry L. Page, Gerald J. Stubbs, Dean P. Whittier, Robley C. Williams Jr. PROFESSORS Kendal S. Broadie, Kenneth C. Catania, Todd R. Graham, Carl H. Johnson, Douglas G. McMahon, James G. Patton, Antonis Rokas, Charles K. Singleton, Laurence J. Zwiebel RESEARCH PROFESSOR Hans-Willi Honegger ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS D. Kilpatrick Abbot, Seth R. Bordenstein, Brandt F. Eichman, Katherine L. Friedman, Daniel J. Funk, Julian F. Hillyer, Donna J. Webb RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Yao Xu ASSISTANT PROFESSORS John Anthony Capra, Lauren Parker Jackson, Maria Luisa Jorge, Jared T. Nordman, Maulik Patel RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Dominic Didiano, Cheryl Gatto, Tetsuya Mori, Jason Pitts, Shuqun Shi

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy RESEARCH activities in the Department of Biological Sciences encompass the study of biology at the molecular, subcellular, cellular, organismal, population, and community levels. The faculty have primary research interests in the areas of biological clocks, genome maintenance, small RNAs, protein trafficking, vector biology, symbiosis, social evolution, microbiomes, speciation, brain asymmetry, synapse formation and plasticity, cell migration, and touch, visual, and olfactory sensory systems. Students interested in this program may apply for direct admission in the Biological Sciences graduate program, or they may enter through the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program (IGP) in the Biomedical Sciences (see Biomedical Sciences),

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and choose Biological Sciences as their home department by the end of the second semester. The program is designed to lead to the Ph.D. degree; however, M.S. degrees are granted under special circumstances and require a research thesis. The Ph.D. degree requires 72 hours of credit for graduation, including at least 24 credit hours of formal course work with the remainder earned through dissertation research. Credit hours earned in the first-year IGP program will be counted toward the required 24 hours of formal course work. Desirable backgrounds for graduate study in the Department of Biological Sciences, depending upon the specific interests of the student, would be undergraduate programs emphasizing biological sciences, chemistry, mathematics, or physics course work, but students from other disciplines are also eligible. Visit the departmental website at as.vanderbilt.edu/biosci for more information. Note: The following courses (described in the course listing) are usually not available for graduate credit for students in the Biological Sciences program: 2201, 2205, 2210, 2520. Graduate students in biological sciences may take graduate courses in School of Medicine departments by arrangement. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 79.

Biomedical Engineering CHAIR Todd D. Giorgio DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Mark D. Does DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE RECRUITING W. David Merryman DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES Adam W. Anderson PROFESSORS EMERITI Thomas R. Harris, Paul H. King, Robert J. Roselli, Richard G. Shiavi PROFESSORS Mark D. Does, Robert L. Galloway Jr., Todd D. Giorgio, John C. Gore, Frederick R. Haselton, E. Duco Jansen, Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Michael I. Miga, Knowles A. Overholser, John P. Wikswo ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Adam W. Anderson, Franz Baudenbacher, Cynthia B. Paschal ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Brett C. Byram, Craig L. Duvall, William A. Grissom, W. David Merryman, Melissa C. Skala, Hak-Joon Sung

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy BIOMEDICAL engineering as a research discipline is concerned with the development of new physical and mathematical concepts applicable to problems in biology, medicine, and the organization of health care. Biomedical engineering also deals with more pragmatic problems, such as biomedical use of information systems and development of advanced biomedical instrumentation. The vision of the BME graduate program is to provide the best advanced education to our graduate students such that they are optimally prepared for successful careers in academia, industry, and related fields. The goal of the program is to provide advanced education and research training in quantitative biology, biomaterials, cellular bioengineering, biomedical photonics, medical imaging, biomedical instrumentation,

and the scientific principles underlying the origination of diagnostic and therapeutic devices and processes. The program is specifically concerned with the interface between biology, medicine, and the engineering, physical, computing, and mathematical sciences. Candidates for the master of science (M.S.) degree must complete 30 hours of graduate-level credit, approved by the faculty, with the following minimum distribution of didactic hours: 12 hours in biomedical engineering, 3 hours in life science (physiology [MPB 8330 or equivalent]) and 9 hours in advanced life science, physical science, or engineering. At least 6 of the BME hours and 3 of the advanced science or engineering hours must be 6000+ level courses. One (1) hour of BME seminar and 6 hours of thesis research credit hours can count toward the total of 30 hours necessary for the M.S. degree. In addition, the candidate must submit a research thesis for faculty approval and give a final oral presentation. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must complete a minimum of 27 semester hours of graduate-level didactic courses approved by the program faculty, excluding seminar, research, and teaching hours. Candidates must complete 15 hours in biomedical engineering courses (required: BME 6110 or equivalent), 3 hours in life science (required: physiology [MPB 8330 or equivalent]), and 9 hours in advanced life science, physical science, or engineering. At least 9 of the BME hours and 3 of the advanced science or engineering hours must be 6000+ level courses. The remainder of the 72 hours required for a Ph.D. will primarily consist of dissertation research, but may also include seminar and other approved (didactic) courses. In addition, students must pass a qualifying examination consisting of written and oral presentations of a proposal for doctoral research, present a dissertation showing the results of original research in biomedical engineering, and successfully defend the dissertation results in an oral examination. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 79.

Biomedical Informatics CHAIR Kevin B. Johnson DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Cynthia S. Gadd PROFESSORS Mark E. Frisse, Cynthia S. Gadd, Nunzia B. Giuse, Paul A. Harris, Kevin B. Johnson, Nancy M. Lorenzi, Blackford Middleton, Randolph A. Miller, William W. Stead, Zhongming Zhao ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Steven H. Brown, Joshua C. Denny, Dario A. Giuse, Bradley Malin, S. Trent Rosenbloom, Edward K. Shultz, Stuart T. Weinberg, Bing Zhang ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Hua Xu ASSISTANT PROFESSORS S. Toufeeq Ahmed, Stephanie Duda, Daniel Fabbri, Jonathan Holt, Thomas Lasko, Mia Levy, Michael E. Matheny, Laurie L. Novak, Josh Peterson, Kim Unertl, Colin G. Walsh, Firas H. Wehbe, Asli Weitkamp RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Cosmin A. Bejan, Fern FitzHenry, Peilin Jia, Qi Liu ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS William S. Bush, Richard J. Holden INSTRUCTORS Shane Stenner, Wei-Qi Wei RESEARCH INSTRUCTOR Xiaojing Wang ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR Judith Dexheimer

Graduate School / Biostatistics

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy BIOMEDICAL informatics studies the structure, discovery, acquisition, integration, management, and optimal use of biomedical information. The field involves multidisciplinary research in all aspects of health care delivery, biomedical research, computational biology, and public health. Biomedical informatics applies, evaluates, and expands results from a variety of disciplines including information and computer science, library science, cognitive science, business management and organization, statistics and biometrics, mathematics, artificial intelligence, operations research, economics, and of course, basic and clinical health sciences. Biomedical informatics has both “knowledge and methods” and “application domain” components. It expands beyond biomedical computer systems design, application, and evaluation to provide theory, tools, and systems that address today’s most urgent challenges in health care delivery, biomedical research, and health professions education. The curriculum offers concentration areas: Clinical Informatics, the application of informatics to direct patient care, such as advanced decision support and person-centered health records; Translational Bioinformatics, the application of informatics to support basic research in such areas as genomics, proteomics, and systems biology; and Clinical Research Informatics, which focus on innovative applications of informatics methods and principles to facilitating “bench to bedside” translational and clinical research. Students typically enter with a background in one of the health professions (e.g., M.D., R.N., D.D.S., Ph.D. in a healthrelated area such as psychology or biostatistics), or with a background in computing, engineering, biology, or mathematics. After graduation they pursue careers as full-time academic researchers, part-time academic researchers/part-time clinicians, scientific managers or advanced scientists in industry, information managers in health care settings, consultants, or entrepreneurs. All students take the five core Biomedical Informatics courses: Foundations of Biomedical Informatics, Foundations of Bioinformatics, Methodological Foundations of Biomedical Informatics, Scientific Communication, and Research Rotation in Biomedical Informatics. In addition, M.S. degree students take two selectives (advanced courses in Biomedical Informatics); two courses in each of two competency areas (unless satisfied by prior education or experience): Computer/Information Science, Biology/Medicine, and Research Methods; and take one additional elective. Ph.D. students take three selectives; two courses in each of three competency areas (unless satisfied by prior education or experience), depending on background; and three additional electives. The curriculum is adapted to students’ backgrounds and concentration area. Thus a minimum of 30 course credit hours and a thesis are required for the M.S. degree, and a minimum of 72 credits is required for the Ph.D. degree. In addition to earning the M.S. degree, Ph.D. students must pass a qualifying examination and successfully propose and defend a dissertation. A teaching practicum is strongly recommended. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 80.

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Biomedical Sciences ELEVEN programs participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program: Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Cancer Biology, Cell and Developmental Biology, Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Chemical and Physical Biology program, Microbiology and Immunology, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Neuroscience, Pharmacology, and Human Genetics. During their first year, students take a core curriculum and conduct research in four laboratories before selecting the discipline in which they will earn the Ph.D. degree. Additional course work during subsequent years is appropriate to each discipline and the student’s interests. Ph.D. dissertation research may be conducted in any one of over 250–300 laboratories. Research opportunities are available in the following areas: biochemistry, biological sciences, cancer biology, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, molecular biology, molecular pathology, molecular toxicology, molecular neuroscience, reproductive biology, signal transduction, structural biology, molecular biophysics, and vascular biology. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 81.

Biophysics See Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Physics and Astronomy

Biostatistics CHAIR Frank E. Harrell Jr. DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Jeffrey D. Blume PROFESSOR EMERITUS Charles F. Federspiel PROFESSORS William D. Dupont, Frank E. Harrell Jr., Yu Shyr ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Jeffrey D. Blume, Qingxia (Cindy) Chen, Leena Choi, Robert Greevy, Robert Johnson, Tatsuki Koyama, Jonathan S. Schildcrout, Bryan Shepherd, Lily Wang, Chang Yu ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Rameela Chandrasekhar, Guanhuan (Josth) Chen, Xi (Steven) Chen, Chris Fonnesbeck, Hakmook Kang, Dandan Liu, Benjamin Saville, Matt Shotwell, Chris Slaughter, Zhengzheng (Jane) Tang, Fei Ye RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Heidi Chen, Huiyun (William) Wu INSTRUCTOR Mario Davidson

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy BIOSTATISTICS is the branch of statistics responsible for the proper interpretation of scientific data generated in the biology, public health, and biomedical sciences. As such, biostatisticians must be trained as apt mathematicians and cogent scientists. Our program features rigorous classroom training, real-world apprenticing, exceptional computational

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preparation, and one-to-one mentoring in the theory, methods, and applications of biostatistics in biomedical research. This program is unique in integrating a curriculum that is nondenominational with respect to the foundations of statistical inference, modern in its emphasis on computing and teaching of statistical principles, progressive in regression modeling strategies, aggressive in involving students in biomedical research early in their career, and sui generis in its emphasis on communication skills. Both Ph.D. and M.S. curricula are proposed to meet the range of biostatistical career opportunities in academia, industry, and government. The program also features an interdisciplinary research rotation for all second-year students and summer chalk talk sessions with faculty. Students must demonstrate competency or strong proficiency in five generic skill areas of statistics: (1) theory, (2) application, (3) critical thinking, (4) communication (oral and written), and (5) computing.

Doctor of Philosophy Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) must complete a minimum of 72 semester hours of course work and dissertation research. A minimum of ten core biostatistics courses and five elective classes are required for the Ph.D. degree. The core Ph.D. curriculum consists of two probability courses, two statistical inference courses, four courses on statistical methods, and two courses of signature training. Ph.D. candidates must also pass the first-year and secondyear comprehensive examination, complete the second-year interdisciplinary research rotation, pass the doctoral qualifying oral examination, submit and defend a doctoral dissertation detailing original research and methodological contributions that advance the knowledge of the discipline of biostatistics, and present their dissertation in a departmental seminar.

Master of Science Candidates for the master of science (M.S.) must complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of graduate-level courses in biostatistics. The core M.S. curriculum consists of one probability course, one statistical inference course, five courses on statistical methods, and one course of signature training. A minimum of eight core biostatistics courses and four elective courses is required for the M.S. degree. Students who are currently Ph.D. candidates in other departments may be eligible for a waiver of the elective course requirement. M.S. candidates must also pass the first-year comprehensive examination, complete the second-year interdisciplinary research rotation, submit a master’s thesis detailing an original investigation in an area of biostatistics, and present their thesis in a departmental seminar. A minimum of 30 semester hours is required for the master’s degree. This includes enrollment in at least 24 semester hours of formal didactic course work plus enrollment in 6 additional hours of didactic course work or 6 credit hours of research. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 81.

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Cancer Biology ACTING CHAIR Harold L. Moses DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Jin Chen PROFESSORS Harold L. Moses, Cathleen C. Pettepher, Vito Quaranta, Albert B. Reynolds, Ann Richmond ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Alissa Weaver, Fiona Yull ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Robert Carnahan, Rebecca Cook, Lourdes Estrada, Barbara Fingleton, Rebecca A. Ihrie, Jonathan M. Irish, Carlos F. Lopez RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Kimberly Brown Dahlman, Yan Guo, Sergey Novitskiy, Dayanidhi Raman, Jiqing Sai, Darren Tyson

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy (Cancer Biology does not offer a master of science degree program; however, if a student’s goals change during the course of the Ph.D. program, an M.S. degree can be awarded provided the criteria as outlined in the program guidelines are met.) STUDENTS interested in this program participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program within the Division of Biomedical Sciences (see Biomedical Sciences) or in the Chemical and Physical Biology Program during the first year. The second year of study encompasses two required courses in Cancer Biology (8340 and 8342) and electives to complete a total of at least 24 hours of formal course work toward the Ph.D. degree (this includes the 16 hours completed in the first year). Additional requirements are: successful completion of the qualifying exam; regular meetings, initially with a mentoring committee and then biannual meetings with a dissertation committee; and an annual presentation at the department’s weekly “Science Hour Seminar Series,” starting in the spring of the third year of study. Attendance at the annual VanderbiltIngram Cancer Center retreat and the annual Cancer Biology departmental retreat is encouraged. Most Cancer Biology students participate in the Cancer Biology Student Association (CBSA), which organizes a variety of events each year to enhance the quality of student experience in the Cancer Biology program. The program offers focused and comprehensive training in the discipline of cancer biology. Modern cancer research is based on a broad range of technical skills, including molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics, all of which the student will learn through course work and laboratory training. Further training includes exercises designed to develop independent thinking, skills in oral and written presentation, analysis of data and information, and dissemination of information through teaching. The program prepares students with the necessary theoretical and practical skills to succeed in an increasingly wide range of available careers, including academic research, undergraduate teaching, science writing, and basic or applied science in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. Major research efforts include studies on tumor-stroma interactions, angiogenesis, growth factor and cytokine signaling, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, matrix and matrix degradation, cell adhesion, and metastasis, as well as systems biology as applied to cancer growth, metastasis, and response to drugs. These studies use state-of-the-art technologies, including all aspects of molecular and cell biology, biochemistry, genetically modified mice, “omics,” mathematical modeling, and others. Faculty within the department also participate in interdisciplinary training programs in cancer research supported

Graduate School / Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/.

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Cellular and Molecular Pathology See Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology

Course descriptions begin on page 83.

Cell and Developmental Biology CHAIR Ian G. Macara DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Matthew J. Tyska PROFESSORS EMERITI Steven Hanks, Jeanette Norden PROFESSORS Vivien A. Casagrande, Chin Chiang, Arthur F. Dalley II, Kathleen L. Gould, Stephen R. Hann, Ian G. Macara, David M. Miller III, William P. Tansey, Susan R. Wente, Christopher V. E. Wright ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Guoqiang Gu, Irina N. Kaverina, Ethan Lee, Melanie Ohi, Ryoma Ohi, Andrea Page-McCaw, Matthew J. Tyska ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Dylan T. Burnette, Ken Lau, Jason A. MacGurn

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy GRADUATE study in cell and developmental biology at Vanderbilt emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to biological research. Ongoing research programs bridge a wide range of scales, from single molecules to whole organisms, with exciting opportunities in both basic and disease-oriented biomedical science. Faculty are affiliated with several centers (Center for Molecular Neuroscience, Center for Stem Cell Biology, Center for Structural Biology, Digestive Disease Research Center, Vanderbilt Diabetes Research and Training Center, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, the Epithelial Biology Center, and the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center), and there are significant collaborative interactions with the transinstitutional Program in Developmental Biology. The department provides specialized training in basic cellular and organismal processes with the goal of solving fundamental biological problems as a foundation for addressing questions of biomedical significance. In each research area, multidisciplinary approaches in genetics, proteomics, and imaging are employed; key model systems include yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila, Xenopus, zebrafish, chick, mice, and cultured cell lines. Research areas include cell-cycle progression, cell signaling, motility and polarity, vesicle trafficking, gene regulation, cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular motors, apoptosis, cell differentiation and cell fate decisions, tissue patterning, embryogenesis, morphogenesis, organogenesis, and tumorigenesis. Graduate studies in each of these areas may also include interdepartmental courses from Cell and Developmental Biology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology, Psychology, Biological Sciences, Neuroscience, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics. The program is designed to lead to the Ph.D. degree. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 84.

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering CHAIR G. Kane Jennings DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE RECRUITING Jamey D. Young DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE PROGRAM Clare McCabe DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Paul E. Laibinis PROFESSORS EMERITI Thomas R. Harris, Robert J. Roselli, John A. Roth, Karl B. Schnelle Jr., Robert D. Tanner PROFESSORS Peter T. Cummings, Todd D. Giorgio, G. Kane Jennings, David S. Kosson, Paul E. Laibinis, M. Douglas LeVan, Clare McCabe, K. Arthur Overholser, Peter N. Pintauro, David W. Piston, Sandra J. Rosenthal PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Russell F. Dunn, Julie E. Sharp ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Kenneth A. Debelak, Scott A. Guelcher, Eva M. Harth, Matthew J. Lang, Bridget R. Rogers, Jamey D. Young ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Rizia Bardhan, Shihong Lin, Ethan S. Lippmann, John T. Wilson, Marija Zanic

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy CHEMICAL engineers play key roles in the development and production of commodity chemicals, pharmaceuticals and bioengineered materials, high-strength composites and specialty polymers, semiconductors and microelectronic devices, and a wide range of ultrapure fine chemicals. Indeed, chemical and biomolecular engineering is essential for the operation of contemporary society. The solutions to many of the problems that we face today—e.g., energy, the environment, development of high-performance materials—will involve chemical engineers. Graduate work in chemical and biomolecular engineering provides an opportunity for study and research at the cutting edge—to contribute to shaping a new model of what chemical engineering is and what chemical engineers do. Formal course work essentially increases the exposure to chemical and biomolecular engineering principles that students receive as undergraduates. Thesis research gives unparalleled experience in problem solving, the key to challenging research assignments in industry and admission to the worldwide community of scholars. All faculty members are active in research and direction of graduate student projects. Current research areas include adsorption and surface chemistry, electrochemical engineering, bio- and nano-materials, tissue engineering, and molecular and mathematical modeling, all to address problems in biotechnology, alternative energy, nanotechnology, and the environment. Programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are offered through the Graduate School. Both require a combination of course work and a thesis. There is no language requirement for any degree. Candidates for the master of science must complete 30 semester hours of work beyond the bachelor’s degree. At least

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24 of these hours are graduate-level courses (12 hours in chemical engineering core courses, with the remaining hours selected from courses in the major or from related areas of interest approved by the research adviser). Each degree candidate conducts research under the supervision of a faculty adviser (this will comprise at least 6 additional semester hours), prepares a written thesis, and presents it orally to the faculty. An M.S. program for non–chemical engineering undergraduates also exists at Vanderbilt. Persons interested in this program should contact the director of the graduate program in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering for more detailed information. Candidates for the doctor of philosophy complete a minimum of 72 semester hours of work beyond the bachelor’s degree. At least 24 of these hours are course work including 12 hours in required chemical and biomolecular engineering courses. Of the remaining 12 hours at least 3 hours must be taken outside the department (and cannot be for a co-listed course). These courses should complement the student’s research interests. The remaining hours are Ph.D. dissertation research. The course load is designed to allow students to spend the majority of their studies on original research. Up to 24 hours of graduate course work with an equivalent of A or B grade may be transferred to Vanderbilt and applied to the Ph.D. At the end of the first year in residence, students complete a departmental examination. Admission to candidacy in the Ph.D. program is based upon this departmental examination, as well as the Ph.D. qualifying examination, which consists of written and oral presentation of a proposal for doctoral research. Following the examinations and at least 24 semester hours of dissertation research, the student prepares and publicly defends a dissertation presenting results of original research. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 86.

Chemical and Physical Biology Ph.D. Training Program in Chemical and Physical Biology The Ph.D. degree in chemical and physical biology is available to all students who enter the transinstitutional QCB or IGP graduate admissions program, the MSTP, or any of the departmentally based graduate programs. The Ph.D. training program is designed to provide rigorous integrated training at the interface of the chemical and/or physical sciences and the biological sciences. The course work and research components of the program prepare students for research careers in which they are able to bring state-of-the-art tools of the modern chemical and physical sciences to bear on cutting-edge biological problems. The curriculum prepares students for research careers at the chemistry-biology interface, in imaging science, in structural biology, or in molecular biophysics. Research opportunities are available in a broad range of areas including: biological mass spectroscopy, biomagnetics and nonlinear dynamics, computational biology and molecular modeling, protein-protein

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interactions, NMR and EPR, cryo-Electron Microscopy, chemical biology, fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, in vivo imaging, protein-nucleic acid interactions, structural biology, nanocrystals, macromolecular structure and dynamics, mechanistic enzymology, proteomics, molecular toxicology, and mathematical modeling of biological systems. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 86.

Chemistry CHAIR David W. Wright DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Carmelo J. Rizzo PROFESSORS EMERITI Robert V. Dilts, Larry C. Hall, Thomas M. Harris, David M. Hercules, Melvin D. Joesten, Mark M. Jones, Joel Tellinghuisen, David L. Tuleen, David J. Wilson PROFESSORS Richard N. Armstrong, Darryl J. Bornhop, Richard M. Caprioli, Walter J. Chazin, David E. Cliffel, Stephen W. Fesik, Timothy P. Hanusa, Frederick R. Haselton, B. Andes Hess Jr., Jeffrey N. Johnston, Craig W. Lindsley, Terry P. Lybrand, Lawrence J. Marnett, Hassane S. Mchaourab, John A. McLean, Prasad L. Polavarapu, Carmelo J. Rizzo, Sandra J. Rosenthal, Sean B. Seymore, Michael P. Stone, Gary A. Sulikowski, David W. Wright RESEARCH PROFESSORS Thomas M. Harris, David M. Hercules, Charles M. Lukehart, Ned A. Porter ADJOINT PROFESSOR Lidia Smentek ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Brian O. Bachmann, Eva M. Harth, H. Charles Manning, Jens Meiler RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Markus W. Voehler ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Norma K. Dunlap ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Janet E. Macdonald, Nathan D. Schley, Steven D. Townsend RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Joseph A. Conrad, Kyle A. Emmitte, Hye-Young Kim, Kwangho Kim, Dmitry Koktysh, Amanda K. Kussrow, Jody C. May, James R. McBride, Keri A. Tallman, Ian D. Tomlinson, Alex G. Waterson ADJOINT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Natalie Y. Arnett, Andrienne C. Friedli

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy RESEARCH programs are offered in analytical, biological, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry along with interdisciplinary research programs in chemical biology, molecular toxicology, materials chemistry, nanoscale science, structural and computational biology, and chemical physics. A wide range of research is supported by excellent research facilities, modern instrumentation, and external funding. A research thesis of at least 6 hours is required for the master’s degree. Specific requirements for the Ph.D. degree are defined in the Ph.D. program document that is available upon request from the Department of Chemistry. Both the master’s and Ph.D. degrees require a minimum of 24 hours of formal course work. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 87.

Graduate School / Classical Studies

Chinese CHINESE LANGUAGE PROGRAM COORDINATOR AND SENIOR LECTURER Xianmin Liu LECTURERS Jing Liu, Qing Wei, Guojung Wu

Students should consult with the director of Asian Studies and their home department advisers about the acceptability of Chinese courses for their program of study. Courses are not designed for advanced native speakers. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 88.

Civil Engineering CHAIR Douglas E. Adams DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Caglar Oskay PROFESSORS EMERITI Paul Harrawood, Peter G. Hoadley, Hugh F. Keedy, Frank L. Parker, Richard E. Speece, Edward L. Thackston PROFESSORS Mark D. Abkowitz, Douglas E. Adams, Prodyot K. Basu, George M. Hornberger, Eugene J. LeBoeuf, David S. Kosson, Sankaran Mahadevan PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Curtis D. Byers, James H. Clarke, Sanjiv Gokhale ADJUNCT PROFESSORS Gregory L. Cashion, Vic L. McConnell ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Alan R. Bowers, Caglar Oskay, Florence Sanchez, Robert E. Stammer Jr. ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Lori Troxel, John R. Veillette ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Ravindra Duddu, Shihong Lin

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy DEGREE programs at the M.S. and Ph.D. level are offered in risk, reliability, and optimization; structural mechanics and materials; computational science and mechanics; and transportation engineering; and at the M.E. level in construction management, structural engineering, and transportation engineering. M.S. and Ph.D. programs in environmental engineering are offered by a separate graduate program in that subject. The Ph.D. requires a minimum of 36 hours of formal course work and a dissertation. The M.S. degree has two options: (1) 24 hours of graduate-level course work and a research thesis of at least 6 semester hours, or (2) 30 hours of graduate-level course work. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 88.

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Classical Studies CHAIR Gary Jensen DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Barbara Tsakirgis PROFESSORS EMERITI Robert Drews, F. Carter Philips, Jack M. Sasson, Susan Ford Wiltshire PROFESSORS Thomas A. J. McGinn, David J. Wasserstein ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Kathy L. Gaca, Joseph L. Rife, Betsey A. Robinson, Barbara Tsakirgis ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Scott F. Aikin, Mireille Lee, David A. Michelson

DEGREE OFFERED: CLASSICS. Master of Arts Note: Students are not being accepted for the 2015/2016 academic year. THE Department of Classical Studies offers a selective M.A. program that provides a solid basis for either of two important goals in the field of Classics. First, the department trains promising M.A. candidates who aspire to apply to and enter a nationally ranked Ph.D. program in classical languages or in other recognized fields of Classics, such as ancient history and classical art and archaeology. The department also trains M.A. candidates who aspire to become effective teachers of Latin and/ or Greek. The program, as broadly defined, involves a minimum of 36 hours and a maximum of 48 hours of course work over a two-year period. During the two years, the Classics M.A. student is also required to pass proficiency examinations in Greek and Latin and either proficiency examinations or course requirements in history and art. The student must also demonstrate reasonable proficiency in reading classical scholarship in German or French, or in another Romance language (e.g., Italian or Spanish). Applicants should be able to read both Latin and Greek, though not necessarily both at the same level of proficiency, and they also should have completed an elementary course in German, French, or another Romance language. On entering, every student takes diagnostic examinations in Greek and Latin prose and poetry. The examinations are not graded and are intended only to determine a student’s proficiency in the languages at the time of matriculation and for placement in courses. The examinations test familiarity with language and with scansion. Each semester each student takes at least three and no more than four courses for credit. It is expected that all classics M.A. students will take both graduate seminars regularly offered in Greek and Latin each semester and that they will strive to produce first-rate master’s seminar papers in these graduate courses. When their papers attain an A+ level of excellence, they are encouraged to present their papers to the Classics faculty and to submit their papers to professional academic conferences, such as the American Philological Association (APA), the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), and the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS). The proficiency examinations in Greek and Latin are made up of passages taken from the M.A. reading list. The two examinations test familiarity with language and scansion. The proficiency examinations are offered regularly over the course of the M.A. program. Classics M.A. students are required to take at least one course each in the areas of ancient history and the history of art, and both courses must be in either the Greek or the Roman tradition. Students may fulfill their Greek or Roman history of art requirement in several possible ways, including:

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(1) undergraduate courses in Greek or Roman art history, (2) graduate seminars in Greek or Roman art and archaeology, or (3) summer participation in the summer program of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece, or of the American Academy in Rome, Italy. To fulfill the requirement for ancient history, M.A. students can either (1) take a regular course in Greek history (CLAS 2110 or CLAS 2120) or Roman history (CLAS 2150 or CLAS 2160), or (2) take an examination. In order to fulfill the requirement with course work, a student must earn a B+ or better in each of the two courses in the given areas. If the student chooses to fulfill the requirement with an examination, the examination of two hours’ length is taken at the very beginning of the fourth semester. One re-take of each examination is allowed. A distinguished feature of Vanderbilt’s M.A. program in Classics is the anticipation that in the summer following the first year in residence, M.A. candidates will study in the Mediterranean. Students in good standing are urged to apply for the summer programs offered by the American School of Classical Studies in Athens (ASCSA) and the American Academy in Rome (AAR) in the hope of being accepted into one of these two summer programs. They also generally receive Rankin Fellowship funding from the department to support this study abroad in either the AAR or ASCSA summer program. Because students pursuing a graduate degree in Classics normally do so with aims that include teaching Latin, Greek, or Classics, the department makes every effort to provide each student with some teaching experience. In the second year of residence, an M.A. candidate may expect to gain experience as a teaching assistant, primarily as an instructor in an elementary Latin section or, secondarily, as an assistant in a Greek, Latin, or Classics course. Successful students in the Classics M.A. program are encouraged to pursue Classics Ph.D. studies in a nationally ranked doctoral program that is well positioned to help its Classics doctoral recipients to find a rewarding professional appointment. Faculty in the department are eager to support this aspiration, such as by advising the student about which Classics Ph.D. programs are best suited to his or her interests, and by doing their best to facilitate the student’s successful entry into such a doctoral program. If they so choose, Classics M.A. students with interdisciplinary interests are also welcome to apply for, and may be accepted into, an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program at Vanderbilt that promotes further graduate study in Classics, such as history, religious studies, Greek philosophy, English, and art history. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 89 for Classics, on page 99 for Greek, and on page 105 for Latin.

vanderbilt university

Community Research and Action CHAIR Marybeth Shinn DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Douglas Perkins PROFESSORS EMERITI Joseph Cunningham, Paul Dokecki PROFESSORS Sandra Barnes, Craig Anne Heflinger, Velma Murry, Douglas Perkins, Marybeth Shinn, Paul Speer, William Turner RESEARCH PROFESSOR Mark Lipsey ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS James Fraser, Maury Nation ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Kimberly Bess, Ashley Carse, David Diehl, Anjali Forber-Pratt, Sara Safransky RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Emily Tanner-Smith

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in community research and action is an interdisciplinary program combining community psychology, urban sociology, human geography, and community development. It trains action-researchers committed to promoting social justice in rigorous theoretical analysis and research methods to prepare them for careers in academia, research, and public policy. The Ph.D. degree includes (a) a core set of courses covering community psychology, community development, ethics, inequality, diversity and social justice, public and community health, and organizational theory and change; (b) research methodology covering quantitative and qualitative methods, action research, field research, and program evaluation; (c) advanced content areas; and (d) minors that are designed individually, drawing from other departments and specializations within Peabody College (e.g., leadership and organizations, quantitative psychology) and departments and schools throughout the university (e.g., economics, sociology, divinity, nursing). Planning is done with the major professor and approved by the student’s committee. Students without a relevant prior master’s are expected to take a master’s degree as part of their doctoral studies. Students entering with a nonempirical master’s degree are expected to complete an empirical study or thesis. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 89.

Computer Science CHAIR Daniel M. Fleetwood ASSOCIATE CHAIR Douglas C. Schmidt DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Xenofon D. Koutsoukos PROFESSORS EMERITI Lawrence W. Dowdy, Charlotte F. Fischer, J. Michael Fitzpatrick, Stephen R. Schach PROFESSORS Gautam Biswas, Benoit Dawant, Gabor Karsai, Xenofon D. Koutsoukos, Douglas C. Schmidt, Janos Sztipanovits RESEARCH PROFESSOR Robert Laddaga ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Julie A. Adams, Robert E. Bodenheimer, Douglas H. Fisher, Aniruddha S. Gokhale, Akos Ledeczi, Bradley Malin, Nabil Simaan, Jeremy P. Spinrad, Yuan Xue ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Gerald H. Roth

Graduate School / Economics ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Daniel Fabbri, Bennett Landman, Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, Jules White ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Graham S. Hemingway, Julie L. Johnson, Robert Tairas ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Abhishek Dubey, William R. Otte, Zhiao Shi

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in computer science is structured around six primary research areas: (1) distributed and networked systems, (2) embedded and hybrid systems, (3) image processing and graphics, (4) intelligent systems, (5) software and systems engineering, and (6) theory. A variety of advanced graduate courses are offered in each of these areas. Doctoral candidates are required to complete a minimum of 36 hours of formal course work, which may include at most 6 hours of independent study. The distribution of courses must contain three 6000-level courses and above in the student’s primary research area, and four 6000-level courses and above in at least three of the other primary research areas. All students must take CS 6310, which can be used to satisfy the distribution requirements above. CS 5258 and CS 5253 may be counted as 6000-level courses and above for satisfying the distributional requirements. The master’s degree in computer science may be earned through (a) the regular program that includes a thesis or (b) a non-thesis program requiring 30 hours of formal course work. For option (a), up to 6 hours of M.S. thesis research may be applied to the 30 hour total. Under either plan at least 12 hours must be in approved 6000-level courses and above. A master’s degree in passing option is available to students who have passed the Ph.D. qualifying exam and completed at least 42 hours of graduate studies. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 91.

Creative Writing See English

Earth and Environmental Sciences CHAIR Steven L. Goodbred DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Guilherme Gualda PROFESSORS EMERITI Leonard P. Alberstadt, Molly Fritz Miller, Arthur L. Reesman, William G. Siesser, Richard G. Stearns PROFESSORS John C. Ayers, Ralf Bennartz, James H. Clarke, David J. Furbish, Steven L. Goodbred, George M. Hornberger, Calvin F. Miller ADJOINT PROFESSORS Mark S. Ghiorso, David White ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Jonathan M. Gilligan, Guilherme Gualda

47 ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Simon A. F. Darroch, Larisa R. G. DeSantis, Maria Luisa Jorge, Jessica L. Oster RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Christopher P. Vanags SENIOR LECTURERS Lily L. Claiborne, Daniel J. Morgan

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy (option in Environmental Science offered jointly with Environmental Engineering) A STUDENT earns the master’s degree in earth and environmental sciences by completing 24 hours of formal course work and submitting an approved research thesis of at least 6 credit hours. Fields of study include sedimentology, geochemistry, geomorphology, transport processes, igneous and metamorphic petrology, volcanology, environmental geology, paleoclimate, and paleobiology and paleoecology. Graduate students in earth and environmental sciences must obtain permission from the department to receive credit for any course required for the undergraduate major: 3220, 3250, 3260, 3330, 3340. Graduate students in other disciplines may receive credit for these courses. Six hours of graduate credit is required in another discipline or in an area of earth and environmental sciences other than that in which the student is pursuing thesis research. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 92.

Economics CHAIR Kamal Saggi VICE CHAIR Eric W. Bond DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Jennifer F. Reinganum DIRECTOR OF THE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Kamal Saggi PROFESSORS EMERITI Jeremy Atack, T. Aldrich Finegan, C. Elton Hinshaw, Cliff J. Huang, Andrea Maneschi, Clifford S. Russell, John J. Siegfried, George H. Sweeney, Anthony M. Tang, Fred M. Westfield PROFESSORS Kathryn H. Anderson, Eric W. Bond, Christopher (Kitt) Carpenter, William J. Collins, John Conley, Mario Crucini, William W. Damon, Andrew F. Daughety, Robert A. Driskill, Benjamin Eden, Kevin X. D. Huang, Gregory Huffman, Atsushi Inoue, Tong Li, Jennifer F. Reinganum, Peter L. Rousseau, Kamal Saggi, Mototsugu Shintani, John A. Weymark, Myrna Wooders ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Malcolm Getz, Andrea Moro ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Andrew Dustan, Federico H. Gutierrez, Eun Jeong Heo, Dong-Hyuk Kim, Gregory Leo, Alejandro Molnar, Hyunseung Oh, Claudia Rei, Joel Rodrigue, Pedro Sant’Anna, Peter Savelyev, Diana N. Weymark

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy DOCTORAL study in economics at Vanderbilt prepares students for research and teaching careers in universities and for leadership positions in government, international agencies, and business. The curriculum emphasizes economic theory, econometrics, and the use of theory and measurement in understanding economic phenomena and policy issues. Students have been attracted to the program from all parts of the United States and from more than sixty countries.

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A master’s degree (without thesis) may be awarded after completion of 42 hours of Ph.D. course work with an average of at least B or better. For the Ph.D. degree, which requires 72 hours and a thesis, the student normally takes required courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics, economic history, statistics, and econometrics. There is a mathematics requirement, normally satisfied by taking Economics 8000, Selected Topics in Mathematics for Economists. There is no foreign language requirement. The faculty requires that all doctoral students, before undertaking the oral qualifying examination, pass written examinations in economic theory (micro and macro) and in one major elective field chosen from the following: Advanced Economic Theory, Econometrics, Economic Development, Economic History, Health Economics, Industrial Organization, International Economics, Labor Economics, Money and Financial Institutions, and Public Economics. A second field chosen from that list may be completed by either passing a written examination or by passing two courses in this field numbered above 8000 with a grade of B or better in each course. A field requested by petition must be passed by written examination. Each year the department offers a variety of doctoral-level courses beyond the core. At a minimum, it is expected that each entering student has completed one year of calculus and courses in intermediate microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, statistics, and linear algebra. Detailed information is available on request from the department.

Graduate Program in Economic Development The GPED is intended primarily for students seeking a master’s degree in economics with an interest in international development. Students who meet the academic requirements of 30 hours of course work, with at least a B average, receive the master of arts degree in economics. Students typically complete the program in sixteen to twenty-four months. Prospective students with a strong undergraduate background in economics, a good command of English, and high quantitative scores on the GRE are encouraged to apply. The program is described under Special Programs. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 92.

Electrical Engineering CHAIR Daniel M. Fleetwood ASSOCIATE CHAIR William H. Robinson DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Robert A. Reed PROFESSORS EMERITI A. B. Bonds, Arthur J. Brodersen, James A. Cadzow, George E. Cook, Jimmy L. Davidson, J. Michael Fitzpatrick, Robert W. House, L. Ensign Johnson, Kazuhiko Kawamura, Robert T. Nash, Richard G. Shiavi, Francis M. Wells, Edward J. White PROFESSORS Bharat L. Bhuva, Benoit M. Dawant, Philippe M. Fauchet, Daniel M. Fleetwood, Kenneth F. Galloway, Michael Goldfarb, Dennis G. Hall, Weng Poo Kang, Gábor Karsai, Lloyd W. Massengill, Sokrates T. Pantelides, Robert A. Reed, Nilanjan Sarkar, Ronald D. Schrimpf, Janos Sztipanovits, Robert A. Weller

PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Ralph W. Bruce RESEARCH PROFESSOR Michael L. Alles ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Xenofon Koutsoukos, Akos Ledeczi, Richard Alan Peters II, William H. Robinson, Greg Walker, Sharon M. Weiss, D. Mitchell Wilkes, James E. Wittig RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Theodore Bapty, Zhaohua Ding, W. Timothy Holman, Sandeep Neema, Arthur F. Witulski ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Marcus H. Mendenhall ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Kirill Bolotin, William A. Grissom, Bennett Landman, Pietro Valdastri, Jason Valentine, Robert Webster, Yaqiong Xu RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Pierre-Francois D’Haese, Jeremy Mares, Jack Noble, Supil Raina, Enxia Zhang ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Brian D. Sierawski, T. Daniel Loveless, Janos Sallai

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy PROGRAMS in electrical engineering are offered in the areas of analog and digital circuits, computer engineering, intelligent systems, solid state devices, signal and image processing and analysis, robotics, microelectronics, photonics, nanotechnology, and related areas in biomedical engineering. The master of science degree program requires 30 credit hours, including 18 hours in the major area (within EECE) and 6 hours in a minor area. At least 12 hours in the major area must be taken at or above the 6000 level. The courses taken must also include one of the gateway courses in each of two of the following areas: electronics, computer, and signals and systems. Gateway courses are graduate-level courses with senior-level prerequisite, the list of which is maintained by the DGS. The remainder of the course work in the major must be taken at or above the 5000 level. The minor will be six hours of graduatelevel course work, typically outside of EECE. A maximum of 3 hours of independent study may be applied to the 18 hours required in the major area. The student’s adviser must approve all courses. A research thesis is required. A non-thesis option is also offered, which requires an additional 6 hours of independent study constituting one single unit of research work. A total of 72 hours is required for the Ph.D. Of these, 36 hours must be in course work with at least 24 of the 36 hours in EECE (exceptions can be made to this rule based on the recommendation of the student’s adviser if the student research topic requires taking additional courses outside EECE). The courses taken must also include one of the gateway courses in each of the three following areas: electronics, computers, and signals and systems. Gateway courses are graduate-level courses with senior-level prerequisites, the list of which is maintained by the EE director of graduate studies, and posted on the EECS department website. Up to 6 hours of independent studies may be taken to fulfill the 36 hours requirement. Up to 24 hours of course work toward the master’s degree or in transfer credit will normally be applied to this total on approval by the committee. Up to 12 total hours of course work in the range 5000–5999 are allowed. CS courses in the student’s area of research can also be taken for EECE graduate program credit with written approval of the student’s adviser. The remainder of the 72 hours may be in dissertation research hours and in additional course work or independent study classes applicable to the student’s program of study. Students must complete at least 24 hours while in residence at Vanderbilt. At least 12 of these hours must be in formal course work. Specific and current degree requirements (including course selection, committee selection, preliminary examination, thesis/ dissertation, and dissertation defense policies) are detailed

Graduate School / Environmental Engineering

in the Graduate Policy Document. A copy of this document should be obtained from the program office. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 95.

Engineering Management DIRECTOR Christopher John Rowe DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES John A. Bers PROFESSORS EMERITI Jimmy L. Davidson, Robert W. House, Barry D. Lichter, Robert T. Nash PROFESSORS Mark D. Abkowitz, Gautam Biswas, David M. Dilts, Kazuhiko Kawamura, Frank L. Parker ADJUNCT PROFESSORS David A. Berezov, Christopher D. McKinney ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE John A. Bers, Benjamin T. Jordan, Jr. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Kenneth R. Pence

COURSES in engineering management are available for minor credit. Students should consult their advisers about the acceptability of the courses as related work in their specific program of study. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 95.

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DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in English offers course work and research supervision in all areas of British and American literature, Anglophone literature from other countries, film, cultural studies, and literary theory. The goal of the Ph.D. program is to produce scholars, critics, and teachers of literature and culture for colleges and universities. Applicants must submit scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination. Requirements for the master’s degree include 30 hours of course work and a thesis at the end of the M.A. year. Requirements for the M.F.A. include 42 to 48 hours of course work, a thesis of creative work (a novel, a book of short stories, a collection of poems, or a collection of personal essays), plus an oral defense of the thesis. Requirements for the Ph.D. include at least 52 hours of course work, Ph.D.–level proficiency in a foreign language, comprehensive examinations, and a dissertation. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the Department of English offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. Other regulations governing graduate work are available from the director of graduate studies. For more information on the M.F.A., see the Academic Programs chapter of this catalog. Graduate seminars in creative writing may be repeated for credit with the program director’s approval. Other graduate seminars may be repeated for credit if topics are not duplicated. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 96.

English CHAIR Dana Nelson ASSOCIATE CHAIR TBA DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Mark A. Wollaeger DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM Kate Daniels PROFESSORS EMERITI Vereen M. Bell, Paul Elledge, John Halperin, R. Chris Hassel Jr., Harold Lerow Weatherby Jr. PROFESSORS Houston Baker, Jay Clayton, Kate Daniels, Colin (Joan) Dayan, Tony Earley, Lynn E. Enterline, Sam B. Girgus, Roy K. Gottfried, Mark Jarman, Michael Kreyling, Vera Kutzinski, Jonathan Lamb, Leah S. Marcus, Lorrie Moore, Dana Nelson, John F. Plummer III, Mark Schoenfield, Kathryn Schwarz, Hortense Spillers, Cecelia Tichi, Mark A. Wollaeger ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Jennifer Fay, Teresa A. Goddu, Rick Hilles, Lorraine Lopez, Ifeoma Nwankwo, Bridget Orr, Nancy Reisman, Allison Schachter, Rachel Teukolsky ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Candice Amich, Christin Essin, Jessie Hock, Marzia Milazzo, Haerin Shin, Ben Tran WRITERS IN RESIDENCE Beth Bachmann, Peter Guralnick, Amanda Little, Sandy Solomon SENIOR LECTURERS Gabriel Briggs, Elizabeth Covington, Julie Fesmire, Andrea Hearn, Scott Juengel, Elizabeth Meadows, Roger Moore, Justin Quary

Environmental Engineering CHAIR Douglas E. Adams DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES James H. Clarke PROFESSORS EMERITI Frank L. Parker, John A. Roth, Karl B. Schnelle Jr., Richard E. Speece, Edward L. Thackston PROFESSORS Mark D. Abkowitz, Douglas E. Adams, P. K. Basu, David J. Furbish, George M. Hornberger, David S. Kosson, Eugene J. LeBoeuf, Sankaran Mahadevan, Charles W. Powers PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Curtis D. Byers, James H. Clarke, Sanjiv Gokhale, Steven L. Krahn RESEARCH PROFESSOR Craig Philip ADJUNCT PROFESSORS Gregory L. Cashion, Ann N. Clarke, Allen Croff, B. John Garrick, Vic L. McConnell, Michael T. Ryan, Raymond G. Wymer ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS John C. Ayers, Alan R. Bowers, Steven L. Goodbred, Caglar Oskay, Florence Sanchez, Michael G. Stabin RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Kevn G. Brown ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Ravindra Duddu, Shihong Lin RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Janey V. Camp

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DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in environmental engineering provides options for study and research in environmental engineering and environmental science. Students pursuing advanced degrees focus their course work and research in nuclear environmental engineering, water quality and water resources, risk assessment, waste management and remediation, energy choices and environmental consequences, environmental engineering, policy and management, or environmental resources and geologic processes. The master of science degree may be earned through (a) 24 hours of course work and a thesis of at least 6 semester hours or (b) a non-thesis program requiring 30 hours of course work. The Ph.D. degree requires a minimum of 36 hours of course work plus a dissertation. In addition, all Ph.D. students must pass a comprehensive exam based on their course work and area of interest as well as the university-required qualifying exam. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 96.

Epidemiology DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Katherine E. Hartmann ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Todd Edwards PROFESSORS William Blot, Peter Buerhaus, Robert Dittus, Wes Ely, Marie Griffin, Joseph McLaughlin, David Penson, Wayne Ray, Maureen Sanderson, Xiao-ou Shu, Flora Ukoli, Sten Vermund, Wei Zheng ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Qiuyin Cai, Qi Dai, Tom Elasy, Jay Fowke, Debra Friedman, Edmond Kabagambe, Harvey Murff, Russell Rothman RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Loren Lipworth, Melissa McPheeters, Martha Shrubsole, Wanqing Wen, Gong Yang ADJUNCT RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Lisa Signorello ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Melinda Aldrich, Kristin Archer, Alicia Beeghly-Fadiel, Stephen Deppen, Todd Edwards, Meira Epplein, Jirong Long, Han-Zhu Qian, Digna Velez-Edwards, Raquel Villegas, Xianglan Zhang RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Hui Cai ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sandra Deming-Halverson RESEARCH INSTRUCTORS Natalia Jimenez-Truque, Aaron Kipp

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE unique focus of the Ph.D. program in epidemiology is training epidemiologists with unparalleled excellence in advanced quantitative methods who have a strong grasp of causal logic, inference, probability, and other theoretical aspects of study design and data analysis, in addition to content area expertise. The curriculum features classroom, computing, and experience-based teaching. The program integrates training and research across clinical, laboratory, and quantitative disciplines. At the completion of the program, graduates will be prepared to develop an independent research portfolio in academia, research, or industry. Our goal is to train critical thinkers prepared to make fundamental advances using rigorous and cutting-edge approaches to research.

Graduates will be able to contribute across a wide spectrum of content areas and research foci. Students admitted to the program are required to complete a total of 72 credit hours, including course work and research. Selected core courses will be shared with the biostatistics graduate programs. In addition to the required methods curriculum, students will take content area and advanced methods electives. Students are eligible to take relevant course work, for which they meet the prerequisites, in any Vanderbilt department. Requirements for program completion include a comprehensive examination at the end of the second year, an oral defense of the dissertation proposal, and the doctoral dissertation. The program is expected to take four years to complete. Students can accelerate their studies to complete the program in three years. Students will be matched shortly after acceptance with research preceptor teams. These established multidisciplinary teams include epidemiology faculty, clinical experts and clinical researchers, biostatisticians, and experienced research staff. The research preceptor team commits to involving the student as a co-investigator from the beginning of the student’s graduate studies. Students will use actual data from their research teams in their course work. The goal is to create a mutually beneficial partnership that produces synergy between education, professional development, and the conduct of research. Strong candidates for admission will have a master’s degree in epidemiology, biostatistics, or another quantitative discipline; experience in the conduct of research and independent data analysis; and strong quantitative preparation and aptitude, including high GRE scores. Top applicants will have an expenses-paid, on-campus interview during which they will meet with research teams. Both students and research teams will then have the opportunity to rank whom they feel would be the best match(es). For further information, please visit our website at epi.phd. vanderbilt.edu. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 97.

French and Italian CHAIR Virginia M. Scott DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Nathalie Debrauwere-Miller PROFESSORS EMERITI Barbara C. Bowen, Dan M. Church, Patricia A. Ward, Ruth G. Zibart PROFESSORS Robert Barsky, William Franke, Marc Froment-Meurice, Virginia M. Scott, Tracy Sharpley-Whiting, Holly A. Tucker ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Nathalie Debrauwere-Miller, Andrea Mirabile, Letizia Modena, Anthère Nzabatsinda, Lynn Ramey ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Elsa Filosa, Paul Miller

DEGREES OFFERED: FRENCH. Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy REQUIREMENTS for the Ph.D. degree include a total of 52 credit hours of course work, taken in the Department of French and Italian and in other departments with the approval of the director of graduate studies. French 6030 and French

Graduate School / Germanic and Slavic Languages

7060 are required as part of the 36 credit hours that make up the M.A. component of the degree. A comprehensive examination, based on a departmental reading list, must be taken no later than before the beginning of classes in the student’s fourth semester of study, and students who successfully pass the exam enter the Ph.D. stage. Requirements for the Ph.D. include 52 credit hours of course work. Students are expected to begin to register for research credit no later than their fifth semester of study. Up to 20 credit hours may be taken as research credit. Students are required to take French 7010 and 6030 during their first year of study. In addition to French and English, doctoral candidates must demonstrate a reading knowledge of an additional language to be determined in consultation with the student’s dissertation adviser. Other regulations governing graduate work are available from the director of graduate studies. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the department offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. The Jean and Alexander Heard Library’s rich collection of French materials makes research possible in all periods of French literature. The library’s special collections department also houses the W. T. Bandy Center for Baudelaire and Modern French Studies, the Pascal Pia collection (nineteenth- and twentieth-century literary criticism), the Gilbert Sigaux collection (twentieth-century French literature), and the Wachs collection (eighteenth-century fiction and almanacs). The French department has formal ties to the Université de Provence through its Vanderbilt in France program, McGill University through its Vanderbilt-McGill Initiative, and the Sorbonne through MICEFA. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 98.

Gender Studies See Women’s and Gender Studies

Germanic and Slavic Languages CHAIR Meike G. Werner DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Christoph Zeller PROFESSORS EMERITI Konstantin V. Kustanovich, John A. McCarthy, Richard Porter PROFESSORS Barbara Hahn, Lutz Koepnick ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Meike G. Werner, Christoph Zeller ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Lilla Balint, James McFarland, Margaret Setje-Eilers MELLON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Jason Strudler DISTINGUISHED MAX KADE VISITING PROFESSOR Heide Volkening

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DEGREES OFFERED: GERMAN. Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy GRADUATE studies in German at Vanderbilt lead to the M.A. and the Ph.D. The program leading to the M.A. degree is designed primarily to deepen and broaden the student’s knowledge of German literature from its beginnings to the present day, with special emphasis on major areas not usually covered in-depth in an undergraduate course of study. The program is also intended to lay the groundwork for possible continuing study toward the Ph.D. Candidates for the master’s degree must meet three separate requirements: complete 30 hours of formal course work, submit written evidence of research abilities, and pass an oral examination based on course work and the departmental core reading list. Nine of the 30 hours are to be at the 3000 level and above in the department, and a minimum of 3 hours should be in a graduate seminar. Up to 6 credit hours may be transferred from outside the university. The oral examination is normally taken at the end of the student’s third semester. As a rule, independent study will not fulfill the requirement of formal course work. Evidence of research abilities will usually take the form of a research paper of twenty-five to thirty pages that is based on a term paper and is to be submitted no later than the end of the student’s fourth semester at Vanderbilt. As an alternative, students may choose to complete 24 hours of formal course work and to write a master’s thesis. The latter is a research paper of sixty to eighty pages in length that gives evidence of scholarly competence and independent, critical thought. The research-writing requirement for this latter option is satisfied after the formal course work and the oral examination have been completed. The department expects candidates to meet all formal course requirements for the master’s degree within three semesters. The student must maintain a minimum B average, provide evidence of scholarly research abilities, and pass the oral examination to receive her/his degree. The M.A. examination committee consists of three faculty members drawn from the department; usually—but not necessarily—the chair or the director of graduate studies serves as one of the examiners. In order to be admitted to candidacy for the master of arts degree, a student is required to prove ability in writing and speaking German to the satisfaction of the department. All candidates awarded a Teaching Assistantship will enroll in Foreign Language Teaching Theory and Practice during their first term of teaching. The student arranges her/his program in consultation with the director of graduate studies and in recognition of departmental objectives. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the department offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies.

Doctor of Philosophy Admission to the program does not imply acceptance for candidacy in the Ph.D. program. Performance well above the minimum Graduate School requirement of a B is expected for admission to the Ph.D. program. Candidates normally obtain the M.A. before going on for the Ph.D. The purpose of the doctoral degree at Vanderbilt is to develop the talented candidate’s capacity to make independent contributions to the field of

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German literature and cultural studies. Transfer students should consult the Graduate School requirements for the doctorate. The Ph.D. degree requires at least two academic years of graduate study beyond the master’s degree. A total of 72 credit hours beyond the B.A. degree is mandated by the Graduate School, thus 42 credit hours beyond the M.A. at Vanderbilt are necessary. A minimum of 36 of these credit hours are done in formal course work; most should be at the 6000 level and above with a minimum of 12 required seminar hours. Moreover, at this advanced level of study, the candidate will have considerable latitude in developing a focus (9 credit hours) in a related discipline or in crossdisciplinary studies relevant to Germanics, for example, in comparative literature, critical theory, philosophy, political science, or history. The department encourages students of German to incorporate an interdisciplinary dimension into their doctoral work that might include the philosophy of language, political and social history, women’s writing and the production of culture, censorship practices, or the impact of philosophy on aesthetic concepts and forms. Students completing a dissertation have the option under certain conditions of enrolling in 9995, half-time research (maximum of six years). The director of graduate studies in German assists in devising related areas of concentration so that the student, at this stage, can be narrowing her/his focus for a dissertation topic. Faculty members actively assist students to determine the most promising topics for innovative research by pointing out interesting knowledge gaps, theoretical issues, or interdisciplinary questions. A reading knowledge of French is usually expected, but another language may be substituted with the approval of the examination committee if it is felt that this language is relevant to the candidate’s area of concentration or dissertation research. The second language requirement must be fulfilled before the candidate may take the comprehensive examination. The teaching program option offers up to 12 credit hours in the area of teaching methodology (courses, research projects, and teaching internships). Work in this area does not count toward minimum degree requirements; 4 credit hours are normally the minimum in this program. Students opting for the full program should expect to add at least one semester to their course of study.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Gene W. Bratt, René H. Gifford, Troy Hackett, Sue Hale, P. Lynn Hayes, Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby, Ellen Kelly, Devin McCaslin, Bernard Rousseau, C. Melanie Schuele, G. Christopher Stecker RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Alexandra Key ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Tamala Bradham, Michael de Riesthal, Lea Helen Evans, Mary Sue Fino-Szumski, Michelle L. Gutmann, Charles Hausman, Melissa Henry, Barbara H. Jacobson, Robin Jones, Antje Mefferd, Ramnarayan Ramachandran, Marcy Sipes, Jennifer Pilkington, Wanda G. Webb RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Andrea H. Dunn, Erin Picou, Tiffany Woynaroski ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Barbara Peek, Mia Rosenfeld

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE Ph.D. degree normally requires four years of study with a minimum of 72 graduate credit hours (24 of which can be by transfer). There are no foreign language requirements. The student must complete two research projects and 12 hours of course work in statistics and research methodology prior to the dissertation. Laboratory work throughout the program and a teaching experience are also required as part of training. Doctoral candidates also present a minor of not less than 12 hours taken outside the department or from another subject area in hearing, speech, and language. The final year of the program is typically devoted to the dissertation. This department also offers the doctorate of audiology (Au.D.), master of education of the deaf (M.D.E.), and the master of science in speech-language pathology (M.S.) through the School of Medicine (vanderbilt.edu/catalogs/ medical). The teaching, clinical, and research programs of the department are housed primarily in Vanderbilt’s Bill Wilkerson Center. For further information, visit vanderbilthealth.com/billwilkerson. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 77 for Audiology, page 94 for Education of the Deaf, page 100 for Hearing and Speech Sciences, and page 151 for Speech Language Pathology.

NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 99 for German and on page 146 for Russian.

Hearing and Speech Sciences CHAIR Anne Marie Tharpe DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Todd A. Ricketts ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES, PH.D. PROGRAM Daniel H. Ashmead PROFESSORS EMERITI Edward G. Conture, D. Wesley Grantham, Ralph N. Ohde, R. E. Stone Jr., Robert T. Wertz PROFESSORS Daniel H. Ashmead, Fred H. Bess, James W. Bodfish, Stephen M. Camarata, Linda J. Hood, Gary P. Jacobson, Gus Mueller, Todd A. Ricketts, Anne Marie Tharpe, Mark T. Wallace ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITA Judith Rassi

History CHAIR Joel F. Harrington ASSOCIATE CHAIR Celia Applegate DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Catherine Molineux PROFESSORS EMERITI Paul K. Conkin, Jimmie L. Franklin, Samuel T. McSeveney, Matt Ramsey, V. Jacque Voegeli, Donald L. Winters PROFESSORS Celia Applegate, Michael D. Bess, David Blackbourn, Richard J. M. Blackett, William Caferro, William J. Collins, Katherine B. Crawford, Dennis C. Dickerson, Marshall C. Eakin, James A. Epstein, Gerald Figal, Joel F. Harrington, Peter Lake, Jane Gilmer Landers, Moses Ochonu, Peter L. Rousseau, Thomas Alan Schwartz, Helmut Walser Smith, Arleen M. Tuchman, Daniel H. Usner Jr., David Wasserstein ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS David Lee Carlton, Julia Phillips Cohen, Leor Halevi, Yoshikuni Igarashi, Sarah Igo, Paul A. Kramer, Catherine Molineux, Ruth Rogaski, Samira Sheikh, Francis W. Wcislo, Edward Wright-Rios ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Celso Castilho, Lauren Clay, Peter Lorge, Ole Molvig, Claudia Rei, Frank Robinson, Alistair Sponsel

Graduate School / Human Genetics

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy

Master of Arts The Department of History does not accept external applications for a terminal master’s degree. The M.A. is usually earned en route to the Ph.D. It is also available to Vanderbilt undergraduates who enroll in Vanderbilt’s 4+1 program.

Doctor of Philosophy The Ph.D. requires 72 hours of graduate credit, including 45 quality hours. All candidates for the Ph.D. must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language or languages. In U.S. and British history, one language is required. In all other fields, the minimum is two. In addition, students are expected to develop proficiency in any languages required for their dissertation research. The first two years in the Ph.D. program are devoted to taking classes, writing two substantial research papers, passing the necessary language examination(s), and preparing for the qualifying examination. A full list of graduate history courses is available in the courses section of this catalog. All first-year students take a two-semester introduction to methods and research, History 6100 and 6110. These courses are designed to familiarize students with a range of theoretical and methodological approaches. Each second-year student, in consultation with his or her adviser and the director of graduate studies, chooses a Ph.D. Committee, consisting of the dissertation director, two other members of the Graduate Faculty from the Department of History, and one from outside the department, either at Vanderbilt or at another university. Students take their qualifying examination either in the spring of the second year or winter of the third year. The examination is administered by the student’s Ph.D. committee. Note: the examination cannot be scheduled until the student has 30 quality hours, with at least a B average and no Incompletes, and has met the language requirement. When the student has passed the qualifying examination, the Ph.D. committee shall recommend to the Graduate School that the student be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The Vanderbilt history program does not have predetermined fields of study. In consultation with their adviser and the director of graduate studies, students define a major field and two minor fields that meet their interests and needs. The major field is typically defined as a long time span and either a regional or a national geographic framework (for example, Europe 1600–1789 or modern Germany). A large topical field such as modern medical history, Anglo-American legal history, or the Reformation may also be appropriate. One of the minor fields may be a subfield of the major field, defined by topic and/ or geography. An example would be a major field on modern Latin America combined with a minor field on Brazil. The other minor field must be distant from the major field in terms of topic, chronology, and/or geography. Typically, this field will have theoretical, cross-cultural, and/or interdisciplinary components (e.g. comparative slavery, postcolonial theory and history, comparative nationalisms). This field may be primarily based in a department other than history or in an interdisciplinary program that trains students at the graduate level. In the third year, the fall term schedule includes History 6300 (The Art and Craft of Teaching History), an introduction to teaching methods and teaching practicum designed

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to familiarize students with techniques for lecturing, leading discussions, designing examinations, and grading undergraduates. All students also take History 8200, which aids students in preparing the dissertation prospectus and beginning work on the dissertation itself. The dissertation prospectus is approved through an oral examination conducted by members of the student’s Ph.D. committee. From the fourth year forward, students will normally enroll in History 9999, Dissertation Research, each semester they are in residence. The dissertation should be completed within four years after admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. The candidate will defend the dissertation at a public examination conducted by the Ph.D. committee. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 101.

Human Genetics DIRECTOR Nancy Cox DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES David Samuels ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION Douglas Mortlock PROFESSORS Thomas Aune, H. Scott Baldwin, Randy D. Blakely, Kendal Broadie, Ellen Wright Clayton, Nancy Cox, James Crowe, Sergio Fazio, Carl Johnson, MacRae Linton, David McCauley, James Patton, John A. Phillips III, Dan Roden, Laurence J. Zwiebel ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Seth Bordenstein, Milam Brantley, Joshua Denny, Katherine Friedman, Rizwan Hamid, Ela Knapik, Antonis Rokas, David Samuels, Jeffrey Smith, Michelle Southard-Smith, James S. Sutcliffe, Zhongming Zhao ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Melinda Aldrich, John Capra, Todd Edwards, Emily Hodges. Bingshan Li, Douglas Mortlock, Shirley Russell, Digna Velez-Edwards, Bryan Venters

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE overall goal of the Human Genetics Ph.D. degree program is to provide students with a solid foundation for a career in genetics research and teaching. Training is available in human genetic analysis and in genetic analysis of model systems that contribute to our understanding of human disease. The training combines a prescribed set of basic courses intended to ground students in the fundamentals of genetic analyses, the basics of human genetics, a set of elective courses designed to meet individual needs, and a rigorous research experience that will contribute to the field of genetics. Students completing the requirements of the Ph.D. program in Human Genetics will have demonstrated mastery of knowledge in genetics and contributed substantial and original scientific knowledge to the field. Ph.D. students in the Human Genetics program are required to complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of formal course work, consisting of 24 hours of required course work and 6 hours of electives. One of the required courses will be a statistics course to be chosen from several currently available on campus and approved by the program faculty. Students will take a minimum of 6 hours of didactic classes per semester during their first two years of study. It is expected that during the second year at least one semester will exceed this minimum in order to complete the required courses prior to year three

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of study. The electives come from an approved list of advanced genetics courses and the choice of these courses will be based on the individual student’s research interests. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 102.

Interdisciplinary Materials Science DIRECTOR Eva M. Harth DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Eva M. Harth PROFESSORS EMERITI Jimmy L. Davidson, William F. Flanagan, George T. Hahn, Donald L. Kinser, Taylor G. Wang, James J. Wert PROFESSORS David E. Cliffel, Peter Cummings, Daniel M. Fleetwood, Todd D. Giorgio, Richard F. Haglund, Timothy P. Hanusa, G. Kane Jennings, Weng Poo Kang, Paul Laibinis, M. Douglas LeVan, Clare McCabe, Sandra Rosenthal, Ronald D. Schrimpf, Norman Tolk, David W. Wright ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Scott A. Guelcher, Eva Harth, Deyu Li, Charles H. Manning, Bridget R. Rogers, Florence Sanchez, Kalman Varga, D. Greg Walker, Sharon Weiss, James E. Wittig RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Anthony Hmelo ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Rizia Bardhan, Leon M. Bellan,Kirill I. Bolotin, Craig L. Duvall, Janet Macdonald, Cary Pint, Hak-Joon Sung, Jason G. Valentine, John T. Wilson, Yaqiong Xu, Qi Zhang

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy MATERIALS advancements improve the standard and the quality of living of societies everywhere. They are indeed the underpinning of the development of new technologies with the potential for global impact. In today’s sophisticated and complicated world, continued advancements in materials demand intimacy among a variety of disciplines. In recognition of this multidisciplinary need, professors at Vanderbilt University from Departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, and School of Medicine have come together in the Interdisciplinary Materials Science program. Therefore, extensive collaboration in both the teaching of and research in materials science is pervasive, where multidisciplinary study is a hallmark of the educational experience. The M.S. degree in materials science requires a minimum of 24 semester hours (beyond the baccalaureate) of formal course work plus a thesis of at least 6 semester hours. Nine semester hours are a selection of three of the four Materials Science core program courses. The core courses are Thermodynamics, Materials Chemistry, Atomic Arrangements in Solids, and Solid State Physics of Condensed Matter. Six additional hours are taken from the approved list of Interdisciplinary Materials Science program courses. A minor consisting of 6 semester hours is chosen in a separate but related field. The remaining 3 hours are an elective selected from either Interdisciplinary Materials Science program offerings or a related field. The Ph.D. degree in materials science requires a total of 72 semester hours (beyond the baccalaureate) plus a dissertation.

Within the requirement are a minimum of 24 semester hours of course work that include 12 hours from the materials science core curriculum and 12 hours from the approved list of Interdisciplinary Materials Science program courses. The intent of these courses is to complement the student’s technical interests. The remaining semester hours may be in research dissertation hours or in additional course electives. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 103.

Interdisciplinary Social and Political Thought STUDENTS with an interest in expanding their knowledge of social and political thought beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries are invited to propose an individualized interdisciplinary master of arts degree in social and political thought. The program is coordinated by Professor Brooke Ackerly (Political Science). Students develop, in consultation with the coordinator, a set of courses, including Interdisciplinary Social and Political Thought, drawing on courses from any of the following graduate programs, to complete the 24 semester hours required for a master’s degree: English, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, and Sociology. The thesis topic must cross disciplinary boundaries. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 103.

Japanese JAPANESE LANGUAGE SENIOR LECTURERS Michiru Lowe, Keiko Nakajima

Students should consult with the director of Asian Studies and their home department advisers about the acceptability of Japanese courses for their program of study. Courses are not designed for advanced native speakers. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 104.

Graduate School / Jewish Studies

Jewish Studies INTERIM DIRECTOR Michael Bess ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR Adam S. Meyer PROFESSORS Robert F. Barsky, Amy-Jill Levine, David J. Wasserstein ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Nathalie Debrauwere-Miller, Idit DobbsWeinstein, Jay Geller, Shaul Kelner, Adam S. Meyer, Julia Phillips Cohen, Allison Schachter ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Phillip Ackerman-Lieberman, Ari Joskowicz, Nina Warnke

JEWISH Studies at Vanderbilt offers an interdisciplinary academic program that seeks to facilitate the critical study of Jewish history, religion, language, philosophy, politics, culture, society, music, art, and literature across continents and eras, and to situate this study in relation to the world in the present. The program accesses the resources of the entire university to explore Judaism, its evolution and expression from biblical times onwards. Students interested in graduate instruction in Jewish studies have the option of pursuing a master of arts in Jewish studies through the Graduate Department of Religion, or a graduate certificate in Jewish studies through the Program in Jewish Studies.

Master of Arts See Religion.

Graduate Certificate in Jewish Studies The certificate in Jewish studies provides graduate and professional students with access to interdisciplinary scholarship in the field of Jewish studies, supplies them with a valuable professional credential, and strengthens their ability to compete for jobs as well as for national fellowship and postdoctoral awards. Any student enrolled in a graduate or professional program at Vanderbilt University is eligible to apply for the certificate in Jewish studies. Acceptance to the program requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3, and the approval of both the student’s primary adviser and the director of the Program in Jewish Studies. Courses taken at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the certificate program may be counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the director of the Program in Jewish Studies. Students wishing to enroll must complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the director of the Program in Jewish Studies, and the director of the graduate program (DGS) for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form must be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]) and to the University Registrar’s Office ([email protected]). A certificate in Jewish studies is awarded with either the M.A. or Ph.D. degree upon fulfillment of the following requirements: 1. Foundational Course, 3 credit hours. JS 5000, Major Themes in Jewish Studies. As this course is not offered every year, students may petition to have this requirement waived. If this requirement is waived, students will be required to take an additional 3 credit hours under requirement 2. 2. Focus Courses, 15 credit hours. Students must complete 15 credit hours of interrelated courses in Jewish studies,

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appropriate to the student’s program of study and forming an intellectually cohesive whole (or 18 credit hours, if the requirement to take JS 5000 is waived). Students are required to complete at least one course from three of four subfields, with at least 9 credit hours coming from a single subfield: • Area 1: Biblical Studies • Area 2: Antiquity and Medieval World • Area 3: Modern and Contemporary Experience • Area 4: Culture, Philosophy, and Literature Courses listed below are approved for certificate credit. Other courses not on this list must be approved for credit by the director of the Program in Jewish Studies. Any courses at the 2000 or 3000 level also require instructor permission to enroll and arrangements for additional work beyond the undergraduate requirements. No more than 6 credit hours of specifically named courses required for the primary degree may be applied toward the certificate. 3. A non-credit final project/paper submitted to the Jewish Studies steering committee that demonstrates an application of Jewish studies contents or methodology to research, teaching, or fieldwork. The project/paper may originate as an assignment in a graduate-level course.

Approved List of Courses LANGUAGE: Jewish Studies: 5301, Jewish Language and Paleography. Classics: 6300, Akkadian. Hebrew (Modern Hebrew): 1101–1102, Elementary Hebrew; 2201–2202, Intermediate Hebrew; 3851–3852; Independent Study in Modern Hebrew; 5111, Hebrew for Graduate Reading; 5301, Advanced Hebrew Grammar; 5302, Advanced Hebrew Composition. Religion: 2514, Elementary Modern Hebrew I; 2515, Elementary Modern Hebrew II; 3102, Intermediate Modern Hebrew I; 3103, Intermediate Modern Hebrew II; 5101–5102, Elementary Biblical Hebrew; 5120, Intermediate Biblical Hebrew; AREA 1. BIBLICAL STUDIES: Jewish Studies: 5100, The New Testament in Its Jewish Contexts. English: 3370, The Bible in Literature. Music Literature: 2310, The Bible and Music. Religious Studies: 5225, Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East; 5926, Ancient Goddesses; 5938, Marriage in the Ancient Near East and the Hebrew Bible. Religion: 3109, Exilic Prophecy; 3111, The Pentateuch; 3112, Apocalyptic; 3113, The Wisdom Literature of the Ancient Near East; 3117, The Ethics of Ancient Israel; 3124, Esther and Ruth; 3127, Cultures of Ancient Near East; 3128, Jewish Messianism; 3129, Book of Judges; 3130, Book of Jeremiah; 3131, Voices of Women in the Ancient Near East; 3142, The Old Testament in Greek; 6177, Song of Songs; 6500, The Hebrew Bible; 6501, Literary Analysis of the Hebrew Bible; 6502, Leadership in Hebrew Bible; 6503, Seminar in the History of Ancient Israel; 6504, Modern Interpreters of Ancient Israel; 6505, Biblical Law and Ancient Israel; 6506, Politics and the Economy in Ancient Israel; 6510, Empire and Canon; 6511, Book of Genesis; 6513, The Book of Exodus; 6515, The Book of Deuteronomy; 6516, The Book of Numbers; 6517, Book of Joshua; 6518, Book of Job; 6519, Book of Qoheleth; 6520, Book of Daniel; 6522, Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible and ANE; 6524, Literature of the Ancient Near East; 6525, Ancient Goddesses; 6528, Book of Amos; 6529, Eighth-Century Prophecy; 6575, Old Testament Theology; 6580, West Semitic Inscriptions; 6609, Feminist Interpretations of Scripture; 9200, Reading Course in Hebrew Bible. AREA 2. ANTIQUITY AND THE MEDIEVAL WORLD: Jewish Studies: 2600, Islam and the Jews; 5150, Issues in Rabbinic Literature; 5210, Reading across Boundaries: Jewish and Non-Jewish Texts; 5620, Jews in Egypt; 5640, Jews and Greeks; 5892, Topics in Ancient and Medieval Jewish History. Anthropology: 8230, The Collapse of Civilizations. Classics: 5010, The Ancient Origins of Religious Conflict in the Middle East;

56 5100, History of the Ancient Near East; 5120, Greece and the Near East from Alexander to Theodosius; 5160, History of Roman Empire. History: 3210, Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain; 5160, Medicine in Islam; 5170, Islam and the Crusades. History of Art: 5260, The Art of Pagans, Christians, and Jews. Philosophy: 2101, Hellenistic and Late Ancient Philosophy; 2102, Medieval Philosophy. Religion: 3150, Lives of Jesus: Ancient and Modern; 3151, Jesus and the Early Christian Communities; 3156, Jewish and Christian Self-Definition; 3501, Judaism in New Testament Times; 6526, Jewish Life in Persian Egypt; 6527, Hellenistic Jewish Literature; 6608, Jewish/Christian Relation; 6794, Art of Pagans, Christians, and Jews. Religious Studies: 4554, The Qur’an and Its Interpreters. AREA 3. MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY EXPERIENCE: Jewish Studies: 2400, American Jewish Life; 2450, The Jewish Diaspora; 2500, Modern Israel; 3100, The Holocaust; 3830, Contemporary Jewish Issues; 5300, Modern Jewish Thought; 5540, Power and Diplomacy in the Modern Middle East; 5560, Social Movements in Modern Jewish Life; 5894, Topics in Modern Jewish History. European Studies: 2208, Conspiracy Theories and Rumors in European and U.S. History. History: 3160, Immigration, Race, and Nationality: The American Experience; 5130, Russia: Old Regime to Revolution; 5135, Russia: The U.S.S.R. and Afterward; 5190, Last Empire of Islam; 5300, Twentieth-Century Germany; 2720, World War II; 5885, Cities of Europe and the Middle East. Political Science: 2230, Middle East Politics. Religion: 3502, Judaism and Modernity; 8817, The Holocaust: Its Meanings and Implications; 8822, The Holocaust: Representation and Reflection. Religious Studies: 2210W, Constructions of Jewish Identity in the Modern World; 3229, The Holocaust: Its Meanings and Implications; 4939, Religious Autobiography. Sociology: 3702, Racial and Ethnic Minorities in the United States. AREA 4. CULTURE, PHILOSOPHY, AND LITERATURE: Jewish Studies: 2210W, Hebrew Literature in Translation; 2230W, American Southern Jews in Life and Literature; 2240W, Black–Jewish Relations in Post-War American Literature and Culture; 2280, Jewish Humor; 2280W, Jewish Humor; 2290W, Imagining the Alien: Jewish Science Fiction; 2420W, American Jewish Music; 5250W, Witnesses Who Were Not There: Literature of the Children of Holocaust Survivors; 5260, Coming of Age in Jewish Literature and Film; 5260W, Coming of Age in Jewish Literature and Film; 5270, Jewish Storytelling; 5270W, Jewish Storytelling; 5320, Freud and Jewish Identity; 5330, Is G-d Guilty? The Problem of Evil in Judaism; 5340, Jewish Philosophy after Auschwitz; 5520, Zionism: Politics, Religion, and Ethnicity; 5000, Major Themes in Jewish Studies. English: 3664, Jewish American Literature. French: 4430, The Struggle of Encounter: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Literature. German: 5445, Nazi Cinema: The Manipulation of Mass Culture; 5344, Women at the Margins: German-Jewish Women Writers. History of Art: 5765, Art since 1945. Music Literature: 2150, Music, Identity, and Diversity. Philosophy: 2109, Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy; 3005, Jewish Philosophy; 3006, Islamic Philosophy; 3011, Critical Theory. Religion: 3503, The Jewish Heritage; 3505, Jewish Ethics; 8805, Jewish Theories of Religion; 8825, Jewish Animals. Religious Studies: 2220, Jewish Ethics; 2940, Great Books of Literature and Religion; 5270, Jewish Theories of Religion; 5940, The Nature of Evil. Russian: 2434, The Russian Cinema; 5231, Jews in Russian Culture: Survival and Identity. Sociology: 3204, Tourism, Culture, and Place; 3222, Sociology of Religion NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 104. See also Religion.

vanderbilt university

Latin American Studies DIRECTOR Edward F. Fischer EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Avery Dickins de Girón ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS W. Frank Robinson, Helena Simonett DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES W. Frank Robinson ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Helena Simonett LATIN AMERICAN BIBLIOGRAPHER Paula Covington Affiliated Faculty PROFESSORS Robert Barsky (French and Italian), Susan Berk-Seligson (Spanish), Richard Blackett (History), John Brock (Medicine), Ellen Clayton (Medicine), Daniel Cornfield (Sociology), Pelayo Correa (Medicine), Arthur A. Demarest (Anthropology), Tom D. Dillehay (Anthropology), Katharine Donato (Sociology), Marshall Eakin (History), David J. Ernst (Physics), Edward F. Fischer (Anthropology), Earl E. Fitz (Portuguese), Leonard Folgarait (History of Art), Edward H. Friedman (Spanish), Lesley Gill (Anthropology), Thomas A. Gregor (Anthropology), Ruth Hill (Spanish), Doug Heimburger (Medicine), David Hess (Sociology), Stephen Heyneman (Education), Robert T. Jiminez (Education), Cathy L. Jrade (Spanish), Vera Kutzinski (English), Jane G. Landers (History), William Luis (Spanish), Terry Maroney (Law), Peter Martin (Medicine), Beverly Moran (Law), Fernando Polack (Medicine), Philip D. Rasico (Spanish), Fernando Segovia (Divinity), Mitchell A. Seligson (Political Science), Randall Thomas (Law), Benigno Trigo (Spanish), Sten Vermund (Medicine), Bart Victor (Management), David Wasserstein (History), Mel Ziegler (Art) ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Dominique Béhague (Medicine, Health, and Society), Tony Brown (Sociology), Victoria Burrus (Spanish and Portuguese), Beth A. Conklin (Anthropology), Markus Eberl (Anthropology), Quentin Eichbaum (Medicine), Carol Etherington (Nursing), William R. Fowler Jr. (Anthropology), Guilherme Gualda (Earth and Environmental Sciences), Elizabeth Heitman (Medicine), Jonathan Hiskey (Political Science), John Janusek (Anthropology), John Johns (Music), Lorraine Lopez (English), Kevin Leander (Education and Human Development), Maria Luisa Jorge (Biological Sciences), Christina Karageorgou (Spanish), Jose Medina (Philosophy), Douglas Morgan (Medicine), Ifeoma Nwankwo (English), Emanuelle Oliveira-Monte (Portuguese), Cynthia Paschal (Engineering), Tiffany Patterson (African American and Diaspora Studies), Norbert O. Ross (Anthropology), Mariano Sana (Sociology), Mavis Schorn (Nursing), Tiffiny A. Tung (Anthropology), Steven A. Wernke (Anthropology), Gilman Whiting (African American and Diaspora Studies), Edward Wright-Rios (History), Andrés Zamora (Spanish), Elizabeth Zechmeister (Political Science) ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Candice Amich (English), Marcio Bahia (Portuguese), Adriana Bialostozky (Medicine), Carwil Bjork‑James (Anthropology), José Cárdenas Bunsen (Spanish), Kathryn Carlson (Medicine), Celso Castilho (History), Neerav Desai (Medicine), Andrew Dustan (Economics), Markus Eberl (Anthropology), Lindy Fenlason (Medicine), Stella Flores (Education), Oscar Gomez (Medicine), Federico Gutierrez (Economics), Andrew Hostetler (Education), Peter James Hudson (History), Cecilia Hyunjung Mo (Political Science), Christina Karageorgou-Bastea (Spanish), Maria Luisa Jorge (Earth and Environmental Sciences), Thomas Morgan (Medicine), Marzia Milazzo (English), Paul B. Miller (French and Latin American Studies), Cecelia Hyunjung Mo (Political Science), Alicia Monroe (African American and Diaspora Studies), Alistair Newbern (Law), Vesna Pavlovic (Art), Efrén O. Pérez (Political Science), Yolanda Redero (Law), W. Frank Robinson (History), Helena Simonett (Blair, Latin American Studies), Michelle Shepherd (Spanish), Susan G. Stewart (Astronomy), Sarah Vanhooser Suiter (Education), Thomas Verrier (Music), Zina Yzquierdo (Education), Carol Ziegler (Nursing) SENIOR LECTURERS Frances Alpren (Spanish), Ana Regina Andrade (Economics), Jose Aznar (Spanish), Joe Bandy (Sociology), Tom Bogenschild (Latin American Studies and Global Education), Lorraine Catanzaro (Spanish), Rachel Chiguluri (Spanish), Paula Covington (Latin American Studies), Sarah Delassus (Spanish), Heraldo Falconi

Graduate School / Latin American Studies (Spanish), Victoria Gardner (Spanish), Chalene Helmuth (Spanish), Clint Hendrix (Spanish), Brian Heuser (Education), Alicia Lorenzo (Spanish), Patrick Murphy (Spanish), Patricia Netherley (Anthropology), Michael Newton (Law), Elena Olazagasti-Segovia (Spanish), Charles Orser (Anthropology), Amarillis Ortiz (Spanish), David Owens (Management), Carolina Palacios (Spanish), Gina M. Perez (Medicine), Maria Paz Pintane (Spanish), Raquel Rincón (Spanish), Mareike Sattler (Anthropology), Jacob Sauer (Anthropology), James Schorr (Management), Waldir Sepúlveda (Spanish), Cynthia Wasick (Spanish), Jennifer Vogt (Anthropology), Catesby Yant (Anthropology), Isleide Zissimos (Economics)

DEGREE OFFERED: LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES. Master of Arts DESIGNATED by the U.S. Department of Education as a National Resource Center for Latin America, Vanderbilt’s Center for Latin American Studies draws on departmental strengths and faculty expertise from across campus. Integrating teaching, research, and service, the center maintains substantive collaborations with all of Vanderbilt’s colleges and schools. The center has special strengths in Maya studies, Brazilian studies, Andean studies, and the Black Atlantic, as well as unique library collections of Colombiana. Programs of instruction provided by the center promote greater understanding of the region’s history, culture, political economy, and social organization and cultivate the ability to think strategically about global issues. Faculty and courses come from the Departments of Anthropology, Economics, History, History of Art, Political Science, Sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese as well as from Vanderbilt’s education, engineering, law, management, medical, music, and nursing schools. The center fosters a lively research community on campus by sponsoring colloquia, conferences, films, and a speaker series that brings distinguished scholars, government and business leaders, and social activists to campus. Students work toward an M.A. in Latin American studies, a master’s or doctoral degree in one of the related programs with a minor in Latin American studies, or a certificate in Latin American studies. Candidates for the M.A. in Latin American studies choose a thesis (30 hours and thesis) or non-thesis (33 hours) option. Each option includes Latin American Studies 4901. While students may spend part of their third or fourth semester doing research in Latin America, subject to approval by the program, the dean of the College of Arts and Science, and the Graduate School, the candidate for the master’s degree must complete four semesters of graduate study as a full-time student. Master’s degree candidates are expected to demonstrate language ability in Spanish, Portuguese, or an indigenous Latin American language; this means advanced ability in one of the three languages and intermediate ability in another. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the department offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. Students combining a master’s degree from a related discipline with a minor in Latin American studies select area courses as their minor and knowledge of Spanish, Portuguese, or an indigenous Latin American language. Doctoral candidates with a minor in Latin American studies must have a reading and speaking competence in either Spanish, Portuguese, or an indigenous Latin American language, and a technical reading knowledge of another. The doctoral minor consists of not

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less than 15 credit hours, selected from area courses in two disciplines. The Center for Latin American Studies Graduate Certificate seeks to equip students with a broad, interdisciplinary view of Latin America. The program allows students enrolled in a post-baccalaureate degree program to document their specialization in Latin America and their language proficiency as well as to extend their studies beyond their disciplinary specialization. Students completing the certificate must fulfill the following requirements: 1. Complete at least 12 credit hours of interrelated graduate course work on Latin America, with at least 6 credit hours coming from outside the student’s home discipline. No more than 6 credit hours of specifically named courses required for the primary degree may be applied toward the certificate. Graduate courses successfully completed at Vanderbilt prior to admission to the program may be counted toward the certificate requirements, and an undergraduate course may be substituted for a graduate course, with the approval of the director of the program and the Graduate School. All courses must be approved by the associate director of the Latin American Studies program and form an intellectually cohesive whole. 2. Demonstrate conversational or reading proficiency in Spanish, Portuguese, or an indigenous Latin American language. Proficiency will be demonstrated by an oral examination administered by a Vanderbilt professor or lecturer (not a graduate student) following ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) guidelines and resulting in a rating of at least “intermediate–mid.” 3. Participate in a minimum of five extracurricular activities sponsored by CLAS. A short paper reflecting on the insights gained from participating must be submitted to the associate director of CLAS. Students wishing to enroll must complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the director of the LAS Certificate Program, and the director of the graduate program (DGS) for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form has to be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]) and to the University Registrar’s Office ([email protected]). Latin American Studies offers dual degree MBA and MPH programs. Applicants must apply independently to and be accepted by both the Graduate School and the particular professional school. The LAS component requires 30 credit hours of course work and a thesis. See departmental listings for courses offered 2015/2016. The following are specialized courses in the participating programs. ANTHROPOLOGY: 5106, Culture and Power in Latin America; 5108, Indigenous Peoples of Lowland South America; 5231, Ancient Andean Civilizations; 5603, Comparative Writing Systems; 5612, Introduction to a Maya Language; 5614, Conversational K’iche’ Maya; 6122, The Anthropology of Globalization; 6130, Andean Culture and Society; 6140, Myth, Ritual, Belief: The Anthropology of Religion; 6141, Anthropology of Healing; 6143, Medical Anthropology; 6200, Ancient Cities; 6202, The Collapse of Civilizations; 6240, Ancient Mesoamerican Civilizations; 6241, The Aztecs; 6242, The Archaeology of the Ancient Maya Civilization; 6243, Classic Maya Religion and Politics; 6250, The Inca Empire; 6614, Advanced K’iche’ Maya; 6620, Maya Language and Literature; 6850–6851, Independent Research; 8110, Seminar in Maya Ethnography; 8220, The Historical Archaeology of Latin America; 8230, The Collapse of Civilizations: General Theories and the Maya Collapse; 8232, Seminar in Mesoamerican Archaeology; 8240,

58 Seminar in South American Archaeology and Ethnohistory; 8311, Violence and Its Embodiments in the Past and Present. ECONOMICS: 7910, Seminar: Research Economic Development (GRAD); 7920, Seminar: Research Economic Development. HISTORY: 5450, Reform, Crisis, and Independence in Latin America, 1700–1820; 5460, Colonial Mexico; 5470, Modern Mexico; 5480, Central America; 5490, Brazilian Civilization; 5510, Reform and Revolution in Latin America; 5530, African Religions in the Americas; 5535, Latin America and the United States; 5570, Caribbean History, 1492–1983; 8600, Comparative Slavery in the Colonial Americas; 8610, Atlantic World History, Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century; 8620, Studies in Latin American History; 8630, Research Seminar in Latin American History. POLITICAL SCIENCE: 5213, Democratization and Political Development; 5219, Politics of Mexico; 6228, International Politics of Latin America; 8315, Research in Latin American Politics; 8317, The Political Economy of Development. PORTUGUESE: 2203, Intermediate Portuguese; 3301, Portuguese Composition and Conversation; 3302, Brazilian Pop Culture; 3303, Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature; 3850, Independent Study; 3892, Special Topics in Portuguese Language, Literature, or Civilization; 4350, Brazilian Culture through Native Material; 4420, Brazilian Literature through the Nineteenth Century; 4425, Modern Brazilian Literature; 7050, Introduction to Latin American Colonial Studies; 7070, Spanish American and Brazilian Literature I; 7071, Spanish American and Brazilian Literature II; 8200, Seminar: Studies in Colonial Literature; 8210, Seminar: Hispanic American Essay; 9520, Seminar: Studies in Contemporary Literature of the Portuguese-Speaking World; 9670, Special Studies in Brazilian Literature. SOCIOLOGY: 3322, Immigration in America; 390a–390b, Directed Studies. SPANISH: 3330, Cultural Studies in the Andes; 3850, Independent Study; 3891, Special Topics in Hispanic Culture; 4340, History of the Spanish Language; 4420, Spanish American Literature from the Conquest to 1900; 4425, Spanish American Literature from 1900 to the Present; 4440, Development of the Short Story; 4450, The Contemporary Novel; 4720, Literary Genres and National Identities in Latin America; 4730, Modern Latin American Poetry; 4740, Spanish-American Literature of the Boom Era; 4741, Spanish-American Literature of the Post-Boom Era; 4750, Afro-Hispanic Literature; 4755, Latina and Latin American Women Writers; 4810, Images of the City; 7050, Introduction to Latin American Colonial Studies; 7060, Seminar: Modernismo; 7070, Spanish American and Brazilian Literature I; 7071, Spanish American and Brazilian Literature II; 8200, Seminar: Studies in Colonial Literature; 8210, Seminar: Hispanic American Essay; 9240, Ordering and Disrupting Fictions in Latin America; 9250, Self-Writing in Latin America; 9260, The Spanish American Novel of the Boom Period; 9265, The Melancholy Novel in Latin America; 9270, The Politics of Identity in Latino U.S. Literature; 9520, Special Topics in Spanish American Literature; 9670, Special Studies in Spanish American Literature.

In addition, qualified graduate students in the Latin American Studies program may, with appropriate permission, enroll in Special Topics (3891) courses directly relating to Latin America. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 105.

vanderbilt university

Latino and Latina Studies DIRECTOR William Luis

Latino and Latina Studies focuses on cultural production and political and socioeconomic experiences of people inculcated with the U.S. experience, self-identifying as Latinos and Latinas, and communicating primarily in English and sometimes in Spanish. The LATS graduate certificate will examine this enduring and dynamic population that crosses and re-crosses borders constructed by geography, linguistics, class, race, and gender. This program of study is designed to accommodate a range of voices and multiple manifestations of Latino and Latina identity and cultural expression in historical and contemporary contexts to fill in this vital but often overlooked component of our national identity and discourse. Students pursuing a LATS graduate certificate are expected to obtain language competence in Spanish before completing the program, though they do not need to meet this requirement when applying for the certificate. Students may satisfy this requirement by completing SPAN 3103, or any other course with a higher number taught in Spanish, or an oral or written exam administered by the program. Any student enrolled in a graduate program at Vanderbilt is eligible to apply for the certificate in Latino and Latina studies. Acceptance in the program requires the approval of the student’s primary adviser and the director of the Program in Latino and Latina Studies, Professor William Luis. Graduate courses successfully completed at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the program may be counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the director of the program. An undergraduate course may be substituted for a graduate course required by the program’s curriculum with the approval of the director of the program and the Graduate School. Students wishing to enroll must complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the director of the LATS Certificate Program, and the director of the graduate program (DGS) for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form should be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]), to the University Registrar’s Office (URO) ([email protected] vanderbilt.edu), and to the LATS program administrator. A certificate in Latino and Latina Studies is awarded with either the M.A. or Ph.D. degree upon fulfillment of the following requirements: (1) Completion of at least 12 (M.A.) or 15 (Ph.D.) credit hours of interrelated course work across two or more disciplines. Two courses, LATS 3201/5201 or English 3658/LATS 3658 and LATS 4961, are required. Remaining courses must be taken in at least two different disciplines outside of students’ home department, with no more than two courses (6 credit hours) coming from any one discipline. We strongly encourage students to take as wide a range of courses as possible appropriate to the student’s program of study and forming an intellectually cohesive whole. Up to 6 credit hours of specifically named required courses from a student’s primary degree program may count toward the certificate. Courses must be approved for credit by the LATS director. One course (3 credit hours) may be satisfied through an independent study with a faculty member affiliated with the Latino and Latina Studies program, with the approval of the director of Latino and Latina Studies. (2) Completion of two papers or projects demonstrating the application of concepts

Graduate School / Leadership and Policy Studies

related to Latino and Latina studies framework or methodology to research, teaching, or fieldwork. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/.

Law and Economics DIRECTORS Joni Hersch, W. Kip Viscusi DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Erin O’Hara O’Connor PROFESSORS Joni Hersch, Paige Marta Skiba, W. Kip Viscusi ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Jennifer Bennett Shinall Affiliated Faculty PROFESSORS Kathryn H. Anderson, Andrew F. Daughety, Jennifer F. Reinganum

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE Ph.D. Program in Law and Economics combines analytical training in economic theory and methodology with the study of law. The program is designed to allow students to satisfy the requirements for the Ph.D. within four to five years. For students who matriculate without a J.D., the requirements for the Ph.D. and the J.D. degrees can be completed within six to seven years. The Ph.D. degree is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in universities, research institutions, or government. It is not designed for students who wish to pursue careers in corporate finance. The program is based in Vanderbilt Law School, and courses are taught by faculty in the Law School and the Department of Economics. Students receive a solid grounding in microeconomic theory, econometrics, and law and economics theory. Students admitted to the Ph.D. program are required to complete 72 hours of course work and research. This includes a minimum of 47 hours of formal course work in core, field, and elective courses and 6 hours of Ph.D. Law and Economics Workshop. The core consists of 27 hours in law and economics theory, economic theory, and empirical analysis. After completing the first year of graduate study, all students must pass a written comprehensive examination in economic theory, law and economics theory, behavioral law and economics, and econometrics. In year 3 for joint-degree students and year 2 for Ph.D.-only students, students select two fields of concentration from a pre-approved list of fields and begin taking the associated field courses. Currently, the list of identified fields includes behavioral law and economics, labor and human resources, and risk and environmental regulation. Field requirements include 12 hours of formal course work (6 hours in each field). In some circumstances, and with the consent of the director of graduate studies and program faculty, students are allowed to develop a new field. Detailed information is available upon request from program staff (email [email protected]) or from the program webpage, law.vanderbilt.edu/phd.

59 NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 106.

Leadership and Policy Studies CHAIR Ellen B. Goldring DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Thomas M. Smith PROFESSOR EMERITUS James W. Guthrie PROFESSORS John M. Braxton, Robert L. Crowson Jr., Ellen B. Goldring, Gary Henry, Stephen P. Heyneman, Joseph Murphy ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Robert Dale Ballou, Mark D. Cannon, Will Doyle, Stella Flores, Thomas M. Smith, Claire E. Smrekar, Ron Zimmer ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Christine Quinn Trank ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Angela Boatman, Mimi Engel, Brent Evans, Jason Grissom, Christopher Loss, Matthew Springer ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Xiu Cravens, Brian L. Heuser, Carrie Kortegast, David Laird, Catherine Gavin Loss, Dayle A. Savage

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations takes as its mission “to understand and enhance the social and institutional contexts in which learning occurs.” To fulfill this mission, the department engages in multidisciplinary social and behavioral science research, professional development of leaders, and outreach projects. LPO’s doctoral-level program in leadership and policy studies offers three concentrations: K–12 Leadership and Policy, Higher Education Leadership and Policy, and International Education Policy. Students focus on their selected area of inquiry throughout the program, and are expected to conduct research, present papers at national academic conferences, and publish in academic journals. The Ph.D. program is designed for those who intend to build an academic career focused on the study of education and policy, as researchers, professors, and policy analysts. It is a full-time, four- to five-year program that equips its graduates with the knowledge and methodological tools to conduct cutting-edge research on the pressing educational issues of the day. Students learn to examine education problems through the lenses of economics, political science, sociology, and international and comparative education. All students are expected to develop strong statistical and data analysis skills, while developing expertise in other tools of inquiry, including experimental and quasi-experimental design, survey research methods, and qualitative research methods. At the heart of the program is the mentor-apprentice model, where students work on research projects alongside a collection of esteemed faculty. As part of their course work and apprenticeship experiences, students learn to present papers at scholarly conferences and submit journal articles for publication. Transfer Hours: Up to 15 hours of transfer credit may be accepted in consultation with the student’s adviser. Total Minimum Hours: 72 hours

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vanderbilt university

Educational Leadership and Policy Areas of study include accountability, improving teachers’ instructional practices, leadership development, performance incentives, school choice, teacher hiring and retention, and urban school reform.

Higher Education Leadership and Policy Areas of study include international higher education policies, the delineation of a normative structure for undergraduate college teaching, or an analysis of state higher education policy initiatives. You might also develop and test theories of student persistence.

International Education Policy Incorporates course work in both the K–12 and higher education concentrations, but includes international organizations and trends in education policy reform, economics, sociology, and political science.

Requirements for All Specializations I. Social Science Core Requirements (15 hours) Politics of Education Sociology of Education Economics of Education History of Education International Issues in Education Policy II. Ph.D. Research Seminars (Requirements differ by specialization) Education Leadership and Policy (9 hours) Higher Education Leadership and Policy (15 hours) International Education Policy (15 hours) III. Research Tools (18 hours) Research Design and Methods for Education Policy Intro to Statistics and Probability Regression Analysis I Regression Analysis II Causal Inference Qualitative Research Methods IV. Research Practicum (6 hours) V. Ph.D. Proseminar (3 hours) VI. Electives (15–21 hours) NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 106.

Learning, Teaching, and Diversity CHAIR Rogers Hall ASSOCIATE CHAIR Marcy Singer-Gabella DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Clifford Hofwolt and Melissa Gresalfi PROFESSORS EMERITI Jerold P. Bauch, Carolyn M. Evertson, Charles B. Myers, Robert Whitman, Victoria J. Risko PROFESSORS Paul A. Cobb, David Dickinson, Dale C. Farran, Rogers Hall, Robert Jimenez, Richard Lehrer, Leona Schauble PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE EMERITA Earline D. Kendall PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Kathy Ganske, Marcy Singer-Gabella, Barbara Stengel ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Douglas Clark, Melissa S. Gresalfi, Clifford A. Hofwolt, Ilana Horn, Kevin M. Leander, Deborah W. Rowe ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Ann M. Neely, Lisa Pray ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Amanda Goodwin, Ebony O. McGee, Pratim Sengupta ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Andrew Hostetler, Melanie Hundley, Heather L. Johnson, Amy Palmeri, Lanette Waddell RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Alene Harris SENIOR LECTURER Catherine McTamaney

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in learning, teaching, and diversity offered by the Department of Teaching and Learning is designed for persons who will conduct research on teaching and learning processes and who will pursue careers as education faculty members at research universities. The program admits a very select number of students with strong academic credentials who have had experience in K–12 education and are interested in working closely with the faculty in research and development projects. Programs of study for the doctor of philosophy include (a) a core set of courses that develops a knowledge base in the areas of learning theory and classroom processes; (b) a specialization area, developed in conjunction with a faculty adviser, which focuses on an area of research such as classroom processes, young children’s learning, or applications of technology to instruction; (c) a minor area, either within the department or in a related area; and (d) research methodology courses including statistics and research design. Students admitted to the doctor of philosophy program in learning, teaching, and diversity may obtain a master of science degree with a major in learning, teaching, and diversity upon completion of 42 semester hours and the completion of either a thesis or the major area paper. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 109.

Graduate School / Mechanical Engineering

Liberal Arts and Science DIRECTOR Martin Rapisarda

DEGREE OFFERED: Master of Liberal Arts and Science THE Master of Liberal Arts and Science degree program offers part-time, adult students the opportunity to earn an interdisciplinary, nontraditional graduate degree. Each course generally meets one night per week, and students select one course per semester. While the program is designed primarily for personal enrichment, students often discover important professional career benefits as well. The requirements and curriculum provide flexibility in program design and course selection, and the tuition, scheduling, admission, and registration procedures acknowledge the special circumstances of the part-time adult student. Specific titles, topics, and instructors of courses are available for each semester from the director of the Master of Liberal Arts and Science degree program. Requirements for the degree are listed in the chapter on Academic Regulations in the front of this catalog. Prospective students may also consult the website for additional information: vanderbilt.edu/mlas. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 112.

Materials Science and Engineering See Interdisciplinary Materials Science

Mathematics CHAIR Dietmar Bisch VICE CHAIR Mike Neamtu DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES John Rafter DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Denis Osin PROFESSORS EMERITI Richard R. Goldberg, Matthew Gould, Robert L. Hemminger, Ettore F. Infante, Bjarni Jónsson, Richard J. Larsen, Michael D. Plummer, Eric Schechter, Horace E. Williams PROFESSORS John F. Ahner, Akram Aldroubi, Dietmar Bisch, Philip S. Crooke III, Emmanuele DiBenedetto, Paul H. Edelman, Mark N. Ellingham, Douglas P. Hardin, C. Bruce Hughes, Vaughan F. R. Jones, Gennadi Kasparov, Ralph N. McKenzie, Michael L. Mihalik, Mike Neamtu, Alexander Olshanskiy, Denis Osin, John G. Ratcliffe, Edward B. Saff, Mark V. Sapir, Larry L. Schumaker, Gieri Simonett, Constantine Tsinakis, Glenn F. Webb, Daoxing Xia, Dechao Zheng ADJOINT PROFESSORS Don Hong, Mary Ann Horn, Xiaoya Zha ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Jesse Peterson, Alexander Powell, Steven T. Tschantz ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Yago Antolin-Pichel, Marcel Bischoff, Anna Marie Bohmann, Arnaud Brothier, Darren Creutz, Marcelo Disconzi, Spencer Dowdall, Victor Falgas-Ravry, José Gil-Férez, Gili Golan,

61 Keaton Hamm, Benjamin Hayes, Matthew Moore, Rares Rasdeaconu, Alexandr Reznikov, Rudy Rodsphon, Andrew Sale, Songling Shan, Ioana Suvaina, Maria Van der Walt, Kun Wang ADJOINT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Colette Calmelet

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy A MASTER’S degree may be earned by completing 36 hours of course work. By careful selection of courses, a master’s candidate may achieve special preparation in applied mathematics or computer science and thus become qualified for a position in industry or government or as a teacher in high school or junior college. Each of the master’s programs is adequate preparation for advanced graduate work in mathematics. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the department offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree take at least 48 hours of formal course work, including seven courses from 6100–6101, 6200–6201, 6300–6301, and 7100–7101, and at least eight additional courses at the 6000 level or above. A complete description of Ph.D. requirements in mathematics may be obtained on request from the director of graduate studies. Courses acceptable for credit toward an advanced degree in mathematics are those that are numbered 5640, 5641, or 6000 or above, unless exception has been granted. Courses numbered above 5000 may be used for minor credit by students in other disciplines. All graduate students with a teaching assistantship participate in teaching activities. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 114.

Mechanical Engineering CHAIR Robert W. Pitz DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Deyu Li DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES Kenneth D. Frampton PROFESSORS EMERITI Thomas A. Cruse, John H. Dunlap, William F. Flanagan, George T. Hahn, Donald L. Kinser, Robert L. Lott Jr., Arthur M. Mellor, Carol A. Rubin, Taylor G. Wang, James J. Wert, John W. Williamson PROFESSORS Michael Goldfarb, Robert W. Pitz, Nilanjan Sarkar, Alvin M. Strauss PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Amrutur V. Anilkumar ADJUNCT PROFESSOR Ahad Nasab ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Eric J. Barth, Deyu Li, Haoxiang Luo, Nabil Simaan, Greg Walker, Robert J. Webster III ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Robert J. Barnett, Kenneth D. Frampton ADJOINT ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Peiyong Wang, Joseph A. Wehrmeyer ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Leon M. Bellan, Cary Pint, Pietro Valdastri, Jason G. Valentine, Karl E. Zelik ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Thomas J. Withrow RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Jason Mitchell

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ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Mark Richter ADJOINT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Tracie J. Prater

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy THE program in mechanical engineering allows concentration in a variety of areas of mechanical engineering research. Candidates for the master of science degree must complete 24 hours of course work and 6 hours of acceptable master’s thesis. The course work must include at least 12 hours at or above the 5000 level, and a minor of at least 6 hours in courses separate from, but related to, the field of study. The Ph.D. program requires 24 hours of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree and an acceptable dissertation. This course work must include a 6-hour minor in an area separate from, but related to, the field of study. At least 12 hours of the 24 must be at or above the 5000 level. A maximum of 6 hours in independent study may be included in the 24-hour requirement. There is also a master of science/doctor of medicine degree program joint between the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Medicine. Details may be obtained from the director of graduate studies in Mechanical Engineering. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/.

program of an affiliated department. The graduate programs currently affiliated with the MSTP are biochemistry, biological sciences, biomedical informatics, biomedical engineering, cancer biology, cell and developmental biology, cellular and molecular pathology, chemical and physical biology, epidemiology, human genetics, microbiology and immunology, molecular physiology and biophysics, neuroscience, and pharmacology. MSTP students must pass the qualifying examination for the Ph.D. degree and present an acceptable dissertation within their field of study in the usual manner. Requirements for successful completion of the Ph.D. degree are the same for all students at Vanderbilt. The Ph.D. thesis must be successfully defended prior to reentry into medical school. The MSTP-Clinical Investigation Track (MSTP-CIT) is offered to facilitate the training of clinical investigators. The goal of the MSTP-CIT is to provide comprehensive training in science for physician scientists engaged in translational and patient-oriented research. This program is intended for students who enter the MSTP after the third year of medical school or during the later stages of residency or fellowship. For additional information about the Vanderbilt MSTP, including application information, visit the program’s website at http://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/mstp. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/.

Course descriptions begin on page 115. Course descriptions begin on page 116.

Medical Scientist Training Program (M.D.–Ph.D.) DIRECTOR Terence S. Dermody ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS Michelle M. Grundy, Danny G. Winder, and Sally J. York ASSISTANT DIRECTOR Megan A. Williams PROGRAM COORDINATOR Melissa S. Krasnove

DEGREES OFFERED: Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy THE central goal of the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) is to train leaders in biomedical research and human medicine. The program is based on solid clinical and research training and designed to foster the development of independent scientific careers. The MSTP provides students with an integrated curriculum comprising a strong core education in medicine and intensive training in scientific inquiry. Successful completion of the program leads to both the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees. MSTP students come from a diverse applicant pool drawn from throughout the nation and abroad and are admitted to the program through the deans of the two schools upon recommendation of the MSTP Faculty Advisory Committee. The MSTP is a joint endeavor between Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Vanderbilt University Graduate School. Trainees are required to fulfill all the requirements for both the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees. Most M.D.–Ph.D. students begin full-time study and research for the Ph.D. degree after the second year in medical school. After completing at least two laboratory rotations prior to their second year of medical school, students will select and be accepted into the graduate

Medicine, Health, and Society DIRECTOR Jonathan M. Metzl ASSISTANT DIRECTOR JuLeigh Petty DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Jonathan M. Metzl PROFESSORS Jonathan M. Metzl, Hector Myers ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Dominique Béhague, Derek Griffith, Martha W. Jones ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Aimi Hamraie, Kenneth MacLeish, Tara McKay, Lijun Song, Laura Stark Affiliated Faculty PROFESSORS EMERITI Vera Chatman (Human and Organizational Development), Matthew Ramsey (History), R. Jay Turner (Sociology) PROFESSORS Kathryn Anderson (Economics), Victor Anderson (Christian Ethics), Michael Bess (History), James Blumstein (Health Law and Policy), Frank Boehm (Obstetrics and Gynecology), Peter Buerhaus (Nursing), Christopher Carpenter (Economics), Larry Churchill (Medicine), Ellen Clayton (Pediatrics and Law), Jay Clayton (English), Bruce Compas (Psychology and Human Development), Katherine Crawford (History), Kate Daniels (English), Richard D’Aquila (Infectious Diseases), Dennis Dickerson (History), Katharine Donato (Sociology), Volney Gay (Religious Studies), Lenn Goodman (Philosophy), Douglas Heimburger (Medicine), Joni Hersch (Law and Economics), George Hill (Microbiology and Immunology), Carl Johnson (Biological Sciences), John Lachs (Philosophy), Jane Landers (History), Jana Lauderdale (Nursing), Pat Levitt (Pharmacology), Leah Marcus (English), John McCarthy (German), Richard McCarty (Psychology), Timothy McNamara (Psychology), Velma McBride Murry (Human and Organizational Development), Linda Norman (Nursing), Scott Pearson (Surgery), Sharon Shields (Human and Organizational Development), John Tarpley (Surgery), Benigno Trigo (Spanish), Arleen Tuchman (History), Holly Tucker

Graduate School / Medicine, Health, and Society (French), Sten Vermund (Pediatrics and Global Health), Bart Victor (Organization Studies), Kip Viscusi (Law and Economics), Lynn Walker (Pediatrics and Psychology and Human Development), Kenneth Wallston (Nursing and Psychology), David W. Wright (Chemistry), Laurence Zwiebel (Biological Sciences) ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Gregory Barz (Ethnomusicology), Mark Bliton (Medicine), Tony N. Brown (Sociology), Karen Campbell (Sociology), Laura Carpenter (Sociology), André Christie-Mizell (Sociology), Beth Conklin (Anthropology), Elizabeth Heitman (Medicine), Julián F. Hillyer (Biological Sciences), Kathleen Hoover-Dempsey (Psychology and Human Development), Melanie Lutenbacher (Nursing), Ruth Rogaski (History), Norbert Ross (Anthropology), Russell Rothman (Medicine), David Schlundt (Psychology), Tiffiny Tung (Anthropology), Timothy J. Vogus (Management and Organization Studies) ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Carolyn Audet (Preventive Medicine), Tyson Brown (Sociology), Joseph B. Fanning (Medicine), Rolanda Johnson (Nursing), Chase Lesane-Brown (Psychology and Human Development), Chandra Y. Osborn (Medicine), Michele Salisbury (Nursing), Kevin T. Seale (Biomedical Engineering)

DEGREE OFFERED: Master of Arts Graduate study in medicine, health, and society at Vanderbilt offers an interdisciplinary master of arts and a graduate certificate for students interested in studying health-related beliefs and practices in their social and cultural contexts. It is available to graduate and professional students from the six participating Vanderbilt schools (Arts and Science, Divinity, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Peabody). External candidates are also considered for admission, as are Vanderbilt undergraduates applying through the 4+1 program in the College of Arts and Science. MHS draws on a variety of fields in the social sciences and humanities—anthropology, economics, history, literature, psychology, sociology, philosophy/ethics, and religious studies. It should be of particular interest to students preparing for careers in a health-related profession, but also has much to offer any graduate or professional student interested in examining an important part of human experience from multiple perspectives and developing a critical understanding of contemporary society.

Master of Arts

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4+1 M.A. Program This program is available only to current Vanderbilt undergraduate students. Students may choose between the thesis and non-thesis options described above.

Graduate Certificate The certificate is available only to current graduate and professional students from the six participating Vanderbilt schools (Arts and Science, Divinity, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Peabody). Acceptance to the program requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3 and the approval of both the student’s adviser and the director of graduate studies for Medicine, Health, and Society. To apply, students will: 1. Complete the Intent to Enroll form from the Graduate School’s website. 2. Contact MHS to arrange a meeting with the director of graduate studies. 3. After fulfilling the program requirements, complete the MHS Graduate Certificate Application Form. Turn in the application form and a copy of the paper to be evaluated by the MHS Graduate Committee to the director of graduate studies. Requirements include: 1. Completion of MHS 6100 and an additional 12 credit hours of graduate-level course work in Medicine, Health, and Society. The courses must form an intellectually cohesive whole. Courses must be approved by the MHS Graduate Committee for credit and should include at least two courses (at least 6 credit hours) outside the student’s home discipline. One course may be satisfied through an independent study with a faculty member affiliated with the MHS with the approval of the director of graduate studies. Graduate courses taken at Vanderbilt University prior to admission to the MHS Graduate Certificate Program may be counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the MHS Graduate Committee if the course can satisfy one of the curriculum requirements of the program. No more than two courses (6 credit hours) of specifically named courses required for the primary degree may be applied toward the certificate.

Students may choose a thesis option (24 credit hours of course work plus 6 credit hours of thesis research) or non-thesis option (30 hours). The thesis should draw on at least two disciplines. Requirements include the 3 credit hour core colloquium (MHS 6100) and an additional 21 or 27 credit hours (depending on the option) of courses approved for the MHS graduate program. It is expected that students who can devote themselves to the MHS program full time will complete their studies in three terms (i.e., two semesters and one summer or three semesters). However, the length of the program will be flexible to accommodate the needs of different constituencies.

2. Submission of a research paper to the MHS Graduate Committee for evaluation. The paper must demonstrate the application of interdisciplinary methods and knowledge of an area of study related to medicine, health, and society.

M.D./M.A.

Other Approved Courses

This program is available to current medical students, who may choose between the thesis and non-thesis options described above. The M.A. may be completed in one year, plus either a summer or two research electives.

3. Participation in a minimum of five extracurricular activities sponsored by MHS. A short paper reflecting on the insights gained from participating must be submitted to the assistant director of MHS.

Additional courses not on this list may be approved at the discretion of the CMHS director. Graduate students enrolled in mezzanine-level courses will complete additional work in order to gain graduate credit. ANTHROPOLOGY: 4373, Health and Disease in Ancient Populations; 5310, Death and the Body; 6141, Anthropology of Healing; 6142, Medicine, Culture, and the Body; 6143, Medical Anthropology; 6344, Genetic Anthropology Lab Techniques; 6345, Human Evolutionary Genetics; 8010,

64 Special Topics (as appropriate); 8310, The Anthropology of Death: Body, Place, and Memory. DIVINITY/RELIGION: 5022, Reading Course in Medical Ethics; 7004, Theories of Personality; 7007, Religion and Coping; 7024, Research in Religion and Health; 7041, Pastoral Care for Persons with Addictions and Mental Disorders; 7049, The Religious Self According to Jung; 7051, Freudian Theories and Religion; 7052, Post-Freudian Theories and Religion; 7053, Seminar: Contemporary Psychotherapy and Pastoral Counseling; 7101, Methods in Ethics; 7220, Seminar in Clinical and Research Ethics. ECONOMICS: 5350, Economics of Health; 9480, Health Economics; 9490, Seminar: Health Economics. ENGLISH: 8155, Special Topics in English and American Literature (as appropriate). Note: topics vary; the CMHS director will approve versions with sufficient MHS content for credit toward this program. HISTORY: 5800, Modern Medicine; 5810, Women, Health, and Sexuality; 5830, Medicine, Culture, and the Body (same as Anthropology 6142). MEDICINE, HEALTH, AND SOCIETY: 5030, Community Health Research; 5120, Medicine, Technology, and Society; 5230, Masculinity and Men’s Health; 5250, War and the Body; 5310, Psychiatry, Culture, and Globalization; 5330, Men’s Health Research; 5350, Perspectives on Trauma; 5410, HIV/AIDS in the Global Community; 6100, Graduate Colloquium; 6500, Special Topics: Social Foundations of Health; 7000, Interdisciplinary Research Methods; 7100, Research Workshop; 7305, Foundations in Global Health; 7306, Essential Skills in Global Health; 7308, Ethics, Law, and Medicine; 7311, Ethics in Global Health; 7312, Informatics for Global Health Professionals; 7313, Introduction to Medical Anthropology; 7314, Global Health Politics and Policy; 7315, Leadership and Development in Global Health; 7316, Case Studies in Tropical Diseases; 7317, Introduction to Quality Improvement; 7319, Lab Technology Low Resource Setting; 7830, Graduate Service Learning; 7831, Service Learning Research; 7832, Service Learning Readings; 7850, Independent Study; 7851, Independent Study; 7880, Internship Training; 7881, Internship Research; 7882, Internship Readings; 7999, Master’s Thesis Research. NURSING: 6040, Introduction to Health Informatics; 6149, Special Topics: Complementary and Alternative Therapies; 6812, The Evolution of Midwifery in America. PSYCHOLOGY: 6310, Advanced General Psychology, as appropriate [topics vary; the program director will approve versions with sufficient MHS content for credit toward this program]; 8310, Research Methods in Clinical Psychology; 8360, Seminar: Clinical Psychology; 8942, Seminar: Social. SOCIOLOGY: 9363, Special Topics Seminar on Institutions and Organizations (as appropriate). NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 116.

Microbiology and Immunology See Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology

vanderbilt university

Molecular Physiology and Biophysics CHAIR Roger D. Cone DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Alyssa H. Hasty PROFESSORS Albert H. Beth, G. Roger Chalkley, Alan D. Cherrington, Roger J. Colbran, Roger D. Cone, Eric Delpire, Emmanuele DiBenedetto, Ronald B. Emeson, John H. Exton, Aurelio Galli, John C. Gore, Raymond Harris, David Harrison, Jacek Hawiger, Carl H. Johnson, Fred Lamb, Robert MacDonald, Mark A. Magnuson, James M. May, Hassane Mchaourab, Owen P. McGuinness, Richard M. O’Brien, John Penn, Alvin C. Powers, Ambra Pozzi, Roland W. Stein, David H. Wasserman, P. Anthony Weil, John P. Wikswo Jr., Danny G. Winder RESEARCH PROFESSORS Charles E. Cobb, Mary C. Moore, K. Sam Wells ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Milam Brantley, Wenbiao Chen, Bruce Damon, Maureen Gannon, Volker H. Haase, Alyssa Hasty, Anne K. Kenworthy, Rachel Kuchtey, Matthew Lang, Terunga Nakagawa, Kevin Niswender, David Samuels, Linda Sealy, Masakazu Shiota, James S. Sutcliffe, Jens Marc Titze, Jeanne Wallace RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Subhadra Gunawardana, Eric Hustedt, Robert Matthews, Michael McCaughey ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Jason Becker, Brad Greuter, David Jacobson, Ashwath Jayagopal, Bingshan Li, Chee Chew Lim, Meenakshi Madhur, Gregor Neuert, Sachin Patel, John Stafford, Tricia Thornton-Wells, Bryan Venters, Kasey Vickers, Jamey Young RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Dale S. Edgerton, Kevin Erreger, Heinrich Matthies, Douglas P. Mortlock, Patrick Page-McCaw, Richard L. Printz, Jason Winnick RESEARCH INSTRUCTORS Sheng-Song Chen, Derek Claxton, Masoud Ghamari-Langroudi, Arion Kennedy, Louise Lantier, Lisette Madison, Anna Osipovich, Yuval Silberman, Smriti Mishra, Richard Stein, Tiffany Wills, Shu-Yu Wu

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy STUDENTS interested in this program participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences or Chemical and Physical Biology program during the first year (see Biomedical Sciences). The second year comprises required and elective courses in Molecular Physiology and Biophysics for a total of at least 24 hours of formal course work toward the Ph.D. degree. Variations are permitted in the number of formal course hours above the minimum of 24 required for the degree. A thesis-based master’s degree is awarded only under special circumstances. The emphasis of the graduate program is on research and research training in the areas of molecular and cell biology, cellular regulation and endocrinology, electrophysiology and biophysics, whole animal physiology and pathophysiology, and genetics. Students obtain a general background in physiology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics through course work and laboratory exercises. Students are encouraged to rotate freely among various research laboratories in their first year in order to select a particular research area and thesis adviser for dissertation research. Research areas available to the student include hormonal and developmental aspects of gene control at the molecular level, with emphasis on the role played by DNA-protein interactions. There is also a focus on cellular aspects of hormonal regulation of biological process involving glucose, fatty acid and ion transport, as well as the mechanism of action of hormonal second messengers such as cAMP, cGMP, and calcium. In addition, neuroendocrine studies of CNS-mediated

Graduate School / Nursing Science

energy homeostasis are the focus of several groups. Studies are conducted using various biophysical techniques to study membrane function and the action of proteins in membranes and free solution, with a focus on the regulation of synaptic transmission. Studies are also carried out to investigate the hormonal regulation of metabolism in whole animal models. Examination of the genetic basis of neurological and metabolic disorders is also ongoing in the department. Research in the department has relevance to a range of human diseases including diabetes, obesity, cancer, nutritional deficiencies, developmental abnormalities, and addiction. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 118.

Music DEAN Mark Wait (Blair School of Music) ASSOCIATE DEAN Melissa K. Rose (Blair School of Music) ASSOCIATE DEAN Pamela Schneller (Blair School of Music) SENIOR ARTIST TEACHER Marianne Ploger (Musicianship)

THREE courses are currently available in Musicianship for graduate credit: MUSC 5110, Intensive Musicianship I; MUSC 5120, Intensive Musicianship II; MUSC 5130, Intensive Musicianship III. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 120.

65 Kearney, Alex Maier, Bethann McLaughlin, Wellington Pham, Sean Polyn, Gavin Price, Ramnarayan Ramachandran, Tonia Rex, Rebecca Sappington, Neil D. Woodward, Qi Zhang

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy The program of study provides a broad background in neuroscience and related disciplines, preparing a student for a career as a research scientist and teacher. Graduates are recruited for positions into academic institutions where the discipline of neuroscience is growing rapidly, as well as into government, industry, and biotechnology. The Ph.D. program requires a minimum of 24 hours of formal didactic course work. Students enter the program via one of two paths—either directly or via the IGP (see Biomedical Sciences), and complete an interdisciplinary core of course work in their first year. This course work consists of a two-semester survey course of neuroscience along with a two-semester professional development course. These courses survey the broad areas of neuroscience and are designed to link fundamental principles to contemporary research, as well as focus on building the skills necessary for success. An individualized elective schedule augments the required material in areas that relate directly to the student’s area of chosen research. Major research emphases within the program span the breadth of contemporary neuroscience, and are divided into twelve themes: addiction and reward, circadian rhythms and sleep, cognitive neuroscience, computational neuroscience and neuroengineering, developmental neuroscience, educational neuroscience, law and society, learning and memory, mood, anxiety and psychosis, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, synaptic function and neuroendocrine signaling, and sensory and motor neuroscience. An original research dissertation is required for the Ph.D. degree. For additional information, see braininstitute.vanderbilt.edu. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 120.

Neuroscience DIRECTOR Mark Wallace DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Bruce D. Carter PROFESSORS EMERITI Ford F. Ebner, Elaine Sanders-Bush PROFESSORS Malcolm Avison, Randolph Blake, Randy D. Blakely, James Bodfish ,Kendal Broadie, David Calkins, Bruce D. Carter, Vivien A. Casagrande, Kenneth C. Catania, Roger Colbran, Roger Cone, Jeffrey Conn, Nancy J. Cox, Laurie Cutting, Eric Delpire, Ariel Y. Deutch, Laura L. Dugan, Elisabeth Dykens, Ronald B. Emeson, Aurelio Galli, Isabel Gauthier, John Gore, Heidi E. Hamm, Stephan Heckers, Owen Jones, Jon H. Kaas, Christine Konradi, Robert L. Macdonald, Beth Malow, René Marois, Douglas McMahon, David Miller, Karoly Mirnics, Paul Newhouse, Terry Page, Anna Roe, Jeffrey D. Schall, Frank Tong, William Valentine, Mark Wallace, Danny Winder, David H. Zald, Laurence J. Zwiebel ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Blythe Corbett, Kevin Currie, Martin Gallagher, Eugenia Gurevich, Fiona Harrison, Angela Jefferson, Andre Lagrange, Jun Li, Terunaga Nakagawa, Kevin Niswender, Sachin Patel, Michelle Southard-Smith, James S. Sutcliffe, Donna Webb, Zhongming Zhao ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Brandon Ally, Aaron Bowman, Ana Carneiro, Carissa Cascio, Michael Cooper, Anita Disney, Kevin C. Ess, Rene Gifford, Bradley Grueter, Rebecca Ihrie, Jing-Qiong Kang, Jennifer

Nursing Science DEAN Linda D. Norman PROFESSORS Susan M. Adams, Colleen Conway‑Welch, Karen C. D’Apolito, Mary Jo Gilmer, Jeffry S. Gordon, Ann F. Minnick (Program Director), Lorraine C. Mion, Linda D. Norman, Bonnie A. Pilon, Sheila H. Ridner, Vaughn G. Sinclair, Patricia A. Trangenstein, Kenneth A. Wallston, Elizabeth E. Weiner RESEARCH PROFESSORS OF NURSING Mary S. Dietrich, Nancy L. Wells ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Sarah C. Fogel, Jana L. Lauderdale, Melanie Lutenbacher, Elizabeth R. Moore, Shelagh A. Mulvaney ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Terrah L. Akard, Thomas L. Christenbery, Jie Deng, Catherine H. Ivory, Sharon M. Karp, Cathy A. Maxwell, Todd B. Monroe, Jeremy Neal, Julia C. Phillippi

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THIS program prepares scholars for research and academic careers in major universities and for research positions in public or private sectors of health care. Two tracks of study are available: Clinical Research and Health Services Research.

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These areas of study are reflective of the overall research interests and expertise of School of Nursing faculty members and the resources available in the medical center, the university, the School of Nursing nurse-managed and interdisciplinary care delivery centers, and the Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System (Nashville campus). Examples of faculty research interests include gerontology, health promotion, oncology, pediatric palliative care, chronic conditions, natural childbirth issues, midwifery, health psychology/behavioral medicine, life transitions, and symptom management. Health services research topics include outcomes measurement and interventions, workforce policy, and economic aspects of health care delivery. Admission to the Ph.D. in Nursing Science Program is through the Graduate School. For additional information, go to nursing.vanderbilt.edu/phd. Application materials are online. Successful applicants to the program are those whose previous academic performance, letters of recommendation, Graduate Record Examination scores, and written goal statement meet admission standards for the School of Nursing and the Graduate School and whose research and career goals best match the school’s research foci and faculty expertise. The program requires 72 credit hours of study, of which 16 may be transferred from master’s course work, pending review and approval by the graduate faculty. The core curriculum of the program includes 31 credit hours of required course work for all Ph.D. students, 15 credit hours of required course work specific to the selected track of study, and 10 credit hours of course work that supports the student’s focus of research (4 research practica and 6 dissertation research credits). Course work is delivered using a combination of formats using Internet technology with limited, required on-campus visits. Students work with faculty mentors who guide and oversee their educational program from admission through completion of degree requirements. Students participate in intensive research experiences connected with faculty research projects and are exposed to a variety of research designs and analytic techniques. Requirements for the degree include successful completion of advanced course work, a qualifying paper, oral qualifying exam, and dissertation (including an oral defense). Full-time and part-time options are available. Further information about the doctoral program can be obtained by writing the Ph.D. Program Office, Godchaux Hall, 461 21st Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee 37240, calling (615) 322-7410 or toll-free 1-855-868-7410, or visiting the website at nursing.vanderbilt.edu/phd. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 121.

vanderbilt university

Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology CHAIR Samuel A. Santoro DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Cellular and Molecular Pathology, W. Gray Jerome DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Microbiology and Immunology, Christopher R. Aiken PROFESSORS EMERITI John H. Hash, George C. Hill PROFESSORS Christopher R. Aiken, James B. Atkinson III, Dean W. Ballard, Joey V. Barnett, Paul E. Bock, Mark R. Boothby, Raymond F. Burk, Timothy Cover, James Crowe, Jeffrey Mark Davidson, Mark R. Denison, Terence S. Dermody, Agnes B. Fogo, David Gailani, David W. Haas, J. Harold Helderman, Richard L. Hoover, Billy G. Hudson, Sebastian Joyce, Simon Mallal, Harold L. Moses, Kevin G. Osteen, Donald H. Rubin, H. Earl Ruley, Samuel A. Santoro, Virginia L. Shepherd, Ed Sherwood, Subramaniam Sriram, Larry L. Swift, James Ward Thomas, Luc Van Kaer, M. Kay Washington, Mary M. Zutter ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Ty W. Abel, David Michael Aronoff, Thomas N. Aune, Seth Bordenstein, Kelli L. Boyd, Justin M. Cates, Wonder Drake, Christine M. Eischen, W. Gray Jerome, Spyros Kalams, Douglas Kernodle, D. Borden Lacy, Deborah A. Lannigan, Andrew J. Link, Susan Majka, Amy S. Major, Geraldine G. Miller, Louise A. Rollins-Smith, Gregory C. Sephel, Eric P. Skaar, William M. Valentine, Jeanne M. Wallace, Lorraine B. Ware, Alissa M. Weaver, John Williams, Pampee Young RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Lan Wu ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Holly M. Algood, Dorin-Bogdan Borza, James D. Chappell, Oscar Gomez, Maria Hadjifrangiskou, Peggy Kendall, Annette S. Kim, Daniel J. Moore, Claudio A. Mosse, Jonathan Irish, Oliver G. McDonald, Uche Sampson, Jonathan G. Schoenecker, Eric Sebzda, Adam Seegmiller, Ben Spiller, Thomas P. Stricker, Alison L. Woodworth, Andries Zijlstra RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Danyvid Olivares-Villagómez, Kyra Oswald-Richter, Ingrid A. M. Verhamme, Jing Zhou RESEARCH INSTRUCTORS Sung Hoon Cho, Melissa Farrow, Takashi Suzuki, Haichun Yang

Cell and Molecular Pathology Program DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy STUDENTS interested in the Cell and Molecular Pathology Program participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences (see Biomedical Sciences). Cellular and molecular pathology occupies a unique place among the biomedical sciences in that it bridges the basic science and clinical disciplines. It seeks to determine the mechanism and etiology of disease, to study the agents and conditions that cause disease, and to elucidate the steps in the transformation of a normal tissue or process into an abnormal one. Pathology is ideally positioned to influence the conceptual and methodologic transfer of advances in the basic biological sciences to the alleviation of disease and the maintenance of health. It uses, therefore, a methodology that encompasses in part the techniques of all other basic and clinical science. Undergraduate majors in biology, chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology are appropriate preparation for graduate work in pathology, which requires a foundation in biochemistry, immunology, molecular genetics, and structural biology. The program in cellular and molecular pathology leading to the Ph.D. degree is designed to prepare students for

Graduate School / Pharmacology

careers in biomedical sciences, focusing on research. Students in their first year complete a core of course work through the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences (see Biomedical Sciences). The second year of study comprises required and elective courses for a total of at least 24 hours of formal course work (including the 16 hours in the first year). Course selection is tailored to the interests and particular needs of the student, and elective hours are usually taken in areas such as cell biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and molecular physiology and biophysics. Qualifying examinations are administered after the second year of study, and the final two to three years of the program are devoted to research. A thesis-based master’s degree is awarded only under special circumstances. The research interests of the faculty include vascular biology and biochemistry, tumor biology, the immune response, inflammation and repair, the biology of the extracellular matrix in response to disease processes, the pathogenesis of infectious agents, and the regulation of gene expression in disease. The department is fully equipped with modern research training facilities and provides close faculty mentoring through a high faculty-to-student ratio. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 85.

Microbiology and Immunology Program DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy STUDENTS interested in the Microbiology and Immunology Program participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences during their first year (see Biomedical Sciences). The second year of study comprises required and elective courses in Microbiology and Immunology for a total of at least 24 hours of formal course work toward the Ph.D. degree. The Microbiology and Immunology Program is designed to provide state-of-the-art training in modern virology, molecular and cellular immunology, bacteriology, molecular genetics and pathogenesis, and biotechnology. Research experience in a specific area provides the basis for a dissertation. Entering students normally serve brief apprenticeships in the laboratories of four faculty members during the first year as preparation for choosing a field of study. Dissertation research may be initiated in any of the following areas: • Signal transduction and gene transcription in T and B cells; developmental immunology and cell-mediated immunity in parasitic and viral infections (Algood, Aronoff, Aune, Boothby, Crowe, Irish, Joyce, Kalams, Kendall, Kernodle, Mallal, Moore, Oswald-Richter, Rollins-Smith, Sebzda, Sriram, Thomas, Van Kaer); • Molecular biology of viruses, including DNA and RNA viruses (Aiken, Crowe, Denison, Dermody, Rubin, Williams); • Molecular cell biology of inflammation (Ruley, Van Kaer);

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• Bacterial pathogenesis, including mechanisms of toxin action (Cover, Drake, Gomez, Hadjifrangiskou, Lacy, Skaar, Spiller); • Molecular genetics (Aiken, Bordenstein, Crowe, Dermody, Hadjifrangiskou, Ruley, Skaar, Williams); • Functional genomics, protein structure, and proteomics (Lacy, Link, Ruley, Spiller). Emphasis is on basic research aimed at understanding molecular mechanisms of microbial infections and the defenses mounted by the immune system. Students whose interests are primarily in diagnostic, ecological, or taxonomic aspects of microbiology are not encouraged to apply. Doctoral study is emphasized. However, an M.S. degree may be granted under special circumstances and may require a research thesis. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 117.

Pharmacology ACTING CHAIR (2013–Present) Joey V. Barnett DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Christine Konradi PROFESSORS EMERITI Wolf D. Dettbarn, Joel G. Hardman, Elaine Sanders-Bush, Jack N. Wells PROFESSORS Malcolm Avison, Jeffrey Balser, Joey V. Barnett, Italo Biaggioni, Randy D. Blakely, Alan R. Brash, Richard M. Breyer Kendal S. Broadie, H. Alex Brown, Nancy J. Brown, Richard Caprioli, Jeffrey Conn, Ariel Y. Deutch, Ronald B. Emeson, John H. Exton, Stephen Fesik, Thomas L. Force, Vsevolod Gurevich, David W. Haas, Heidi E. Hamm, Kenneth R. Hande, David G. Harrison, Bjorn Knollmann, Christine L. Konradi, Daniel Liebler, Craig Lindsley, MacRae Linton, Terry Lybrand, Robert Macdonald, Lawrence J. Marnett, Peter R. Martin, Douglas McMahon, Katherine T. Murray, Paul A. Newhouse, John A. Oates, Matthias Riess, L. Jackson Roberts II, David Robertson, Dan M. Roden, Sandra Rosenthal, Jeffrey Rottman, C. Michael Stein, Ronald G. Wiley, Laurence Zwiebel ADJUNCT PROFESSORS Sanika Chirwa, John T. Clark, Sukhbir Mokha, Martin Ogletree ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS EMERITI Erwin J. Landon, Peter W. Reed ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Kevin Currie, Jerod Denton, Igor Feoktistov, Eugenia Gurevich, Eva Harth, Charles Hong, Tina M. Iverson, Ethan Lee, Michael J. McLean, Jens Meiler, Paul Moore, Claus Schneider, Bih-Hwa Shieh, Ben Spiller, Brian E. Wadzinski, Matthew H. Wilson RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Olivier Boutaud, Maureen Hahn, Ginger L. Milne, Colleen M. Niswender, Christine Saunders, Tao Yang Associate Clinical Professor David L. Black ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS W. Scott Akers, Eun-Sook Lee, Gregg Stanwood ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Ana M. Carneiro, John H. Cleator, Sean S. Davies, Joshua P. Fessel, Patrick Grohar, Richard J. Gumina, Carrie K. Jones, James M. Luther, BethAnn McLaughlin, W. David Merryman, Rebecca Sappington, Jonathan Schoenecker, Jialiang Wang, C. David Weaver, Quinn Wells, Qi Zhang RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Anna Blobaum, Randy S. Barrett, Christopher B. Brown, Michael Bubser, Michael R. Dohn, Kyle A. Emmitte, Paul Gresch, Corey Hopkins, Hideki Iwamoto, Aurea Pimenta, Jerri Rook, Shaun Stauffer, Alex Waterson, Zixiu Xiang

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vanderbilt university

ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Chang Chung, J. Scott Daniels, R. Nathan Daniels, Hugh Fentress, Klarissa Hardy, Susan Mercer INSTRUCTOR Alice Rodriguez ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR Phyllis Freeman RESEARCH INSTRUCTORS Mohamed Ahmed, Darren W. Engers, Roman Lazarenko, Bruce Melancon, Nathalie C. Schnetz-Routaud, Sergey Vishnivetskiy, Ran Ye

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy STUDENTS interested in pharmacology participate in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences (see Biomedical Sciences). The program of study provides a broad background in pharmacology and other biomedical disciplines, preparing the student for a career as a research investigator. Graduates have been highly successful in obtaining positions in medical schools, government research institutes, and the pharmaceutical industry. Students in their first year complete a core of course work through the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The second year of study is composed of required and elective courses in Pharmacology for a total of 31 hours of formal course work toward the Ph.D. degree (including the 16 hours in the first year IGP). Requirements vary regarding the amount and distribution of course work that must be taken in related fields, but substantial work is usually taken in such other areas as cell biology, biochemistry, molecular physiology, biophysics, and chemistry. Subsequent years focus upon research and specialized course work as directed by mentors in the Pharmacological Sciences Training Program. Fields of research include molecular and biochemical pharmacology; neuropharmacology; autonomic, cardiovascular, endocrine, and clinical pharmacology; and drug metabolism and toxicology. A research dissertation is required for the Ph.D. degree. A thesis-based master’s degree is awarded only under special circumstances. For more information, visit medschool.vanderbilt.edu/ pharmacology. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 123.

Philosophy CHAIR Robert Talisse DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Kelly Oliver PROFESSORS EMERITI Clement Dore, Robert R. Ehman, Marilyn Friedman, John F. Post, Charles E. Scott, Donald W. Sherburne, Henry A. Teloh PROFESSORS Lenn E. Goodman, Michael P. Hodges, John Lachs, Larry May, José Medina, Kelly Oliver, Lucius T. Outlaw Jr., Robert Talisse, David Wood ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Idit Dobbs-Weinstein, Lisa Guenther, Jeffrey Tlumak, Julian Wuerth ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Scott Aikin, Karen Ng

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy Work for the Ph.D. degree is offered in all major fields in the discipline. Candidates must complete at least 47 hours of

formal course work and satisfy additional requirements. When appropriate, course work may include a limited number of seminars in other disciplines. For further details and current information, see the Department of Philosophy webpage: vanderbilt.edu/AnS/philosophy. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the department offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 124.

Physics and Astronomy CHAIR Robert J. Scherrer DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Julia Velkovska PROFESSORS EMERITI Royal G. Albridge, John Paul Barach, Charles A. Brau, Frank E. Carroll Jr., Leonard C. Feldman, Arnold M. Heiser, E. A. Jones, P. Galen Lenhert, C. E. Roos, Medford S. Webster PROFESSORS Charles W. Coffey, Louis J. DeFelice, David J. Ernst, Daniel M. Fleetwood, John C. Gore, Senta V. Greene, Richard F. Haglund Jr., Dennis G. Hall, Joseph H. Hamilton, Will E. Johns, Thomas W. Kephart, Charles F. Maguire, Volker E. Oberacker, Sokrates Pantelides, James A. Patton, David W. Piston, Ronald R. Price, Akunuri V. Ramayya, Sandra J. Rosenthal, Robert J. Scherrer, Paul D. Sheldon, Keivan G. Stassun, Norman H. Tolk, A. Sait Umar, Julia Velkovska, Thomas J. Weiler, David A. Weintraub, Robert A. Weller, John P. Wikswo Jr. DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH PROFESSOR C. Robert O’Dell RESEARCH PROFESSORS Aaron B. Brill, C. Richard Chappell, Leonard C. Feldman, Medford S. Webster ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Andreas Berlind, Steven E. Csorna, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, M. Shane Hutson, Kalman Varga, Sharon Weiss RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Anthony B. Hmelo, Marcus H. Mendenhall, Mark P. Oxley, Alan Tackett ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Dennis Michael Duggan, Daniel F. Gochberg, Erin Rericha, Yaqiong Xu RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Sergey Avanesyan, William E. Gabella, Leslie Hebb, Shengli Huang, Jae-Kwang Hwang, Manodeep Sinha, Dina M. Stroud, Momchil Velkovsky

DEGREES OFFERED: PHYSICS. Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy physics and astronomy are driving intellectual forces that expand our understanding of the universe, discover the science that underlies new technologies, and applies these technologies to both curiosity-driven and applied research. In keeping with this role, the Department of Physics and Astronomy has active research groups studying the theoretical and experimental physics of elementary particles; nuclear structure, heavy-ion reactions, and relativistic heavy-ion physics; linear and nonlinear interactions of photons, electrons, atoms, and molecules with nanocrystals, surfaces, and interfaces; the electric, magnetic, and active mechanical properties of living systems; the structure and dynamics of biopolymers; the physics and technology of medical imaging; computational physics; low mass and young stars; detection of extrasolar planets;

Graduate School / Psychological Sciences

structure and dynamics of galaxies; observational and theoretical cosmology; ultra-high energy cosmic rays; and cosmology. The master of science degree in physics requires a minimum of 30 credit hours consisting of at least 24 hours of formal didactic course work and normally including 6 credit hours of master thesis research. The didactic course work must include at least 9 credit hours above the 8000 level. The master of science degree requires a written thesis approved by at least two graduate faculty members in the physics and astronomy program. A non-thesis option (master of arts in physics) is available to students admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. in physics. Under the non-thesis plan, the student presents an oral report on a research subject in the field of investigation and submits a written account of this subject to the program faculty. This degree also requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. A master’s degree in physics with emphasis in health physics is also available. For information regarding the master of science degree in medical physics, see the medical physics section in the School of Medicine catalog. The Ph.D. degree requires 72 hours of graduate work, including 15 hours of core courses, the 1 hour Physics 8000 seminar, 3 hours in one breadth course outside the student’s main research area, and 9 hours of elective physics graduate courses. The remaining credit hours may be earned through some combination of non-candidate research, dissertation research, and approved lecture courses. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 77 for Astrophysics and on page 124 for Physics. See also Astrophysics.

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terminal master’s can be earned through (a) a program that requires 24 hours of course work (including Political Science 8355 and 8356 and at least 18 hours of 8000-level courses), 6 credit hours of master’s thesis work, and a thesis or (b) a nonthesis option requiring 33 hours of course work (including Political Science 8355 and 8356 and at least 27 hours of 8000level courses). The student must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 in the 8000-level courses. A master’s degree in passing option is available to students en route to the Ph.D., who have completed all courses required for the Ph.D. degree, passed the preliminary examinations, and defended successfully the dissertation proposal. At least 48 hours of formal course work are required for the Ph.D. degree; 72 credit hours (including dissertation research hours) are required in total to complete the degree. Research Design (8355) and Statistics for Political Research (8356), required of all prospective candidates, are normally taken in the first year of residence. Candidates for the Ph.D. are expected to demonstrate proficiency in research skills, including statistics, at a level fixed by the program faculty. Through the combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) program, the Department of Political Science offers exceptional Vanderbilt undergraduates the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 125.

Political Science CHAIR David E. Lewis ASSOCIATE CHAIR Jonathan T. Hiskey DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Jonathan T. Hiskey PROFESSORS EMERITI Robert H. Birkby, Erwin C. Hargrove, M. Donald Hancock, William C. Havard Jr., Richard A. Pride, James Lee Ray, Benjamin Walter PROFESSORS Larry M. Bartels, William James Booth, Joshua Clinton, John G. Geer, Marc J. Hetherington, Cindy D. Kam, David E. Lewis, Bruce I. Oppenheimer, Mitchell A. Seligson, Carol M. Swain, Elizabeth J. Zechmeister ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Brooke A. Ackerly, Brett Benson, Giacomo Chiozza, Jonathan T. Hiskey, Alan Wiseman ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Amanda Clayton, Molly Jackman, Saul Jackman, Brenton Kenkel, Kristin Michelitch, Cecilia Mo, Emily Nacol, Efrén O. Pérez, Hye Young You

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy THE graduate program in political science provides graduate students with rigorous training in American politics, comparative politics, international relations, political methodology, and political theory. The Department of Political Science does not accept external applications for a terminal master’s degree. A terminal master’s degree in political science may be earned by Ph.D. students electing not to continue with the program. The

Portuguese See Spanish and Portuguese

Psychological Sciences CHAIRS René Marois, A&S; Amy Needham, Peabody DIRECTORS OF GRADUATE STUDIES Geoffrey F. Woodman, A&S; Daniel Levin, Peabody DIRECTORS OF CLINICAL TRAINING Bunmi O. Olatunji, A&S; Bruce Compas, Peabody PROFESSORS EMERITI Leonard Bickman, Penelope H. Brooks, William F. Caul, Keith N. Clayton, David S. Cordray, Ford F. Ebner, Robert Fox, Jeffery J. Franks, James H. Hogge, Kathleen V. Hoover-Dempsey, Martin Katahn, Joseph S. Lappin, Richard D. Odom, Leslie Phillips, Howard M. Sandler, William P. Smith, Warren W. Webb PROFESSORS Camilla P. Benbow, Randolph Blake, Vivien A. Casagrande, David A. Cole, Bruce E. Compas, Elisabeth M. Dykens, Dale Farran, Judy Garber, Isabel Gauthier, Steven D. Hollon, Jon H. Kaas, Daniel Levin, Gordon D. Logan, David Lubinski, René Marois, Richard McCarty, Timothy P. McNamara, Amy Needham, Thomas J. Palmeri, Sohee Park, John J. Rieser, Joseph L. Rodgers, Anna Roe, Jeffrey D. Schall, Frank Tong, Tedra Ann Walden, Lynn S. Walker, David Zald

70 RESEARCH PROFESSORS Leonard Bickman, David S. Cordray, Joseph S. Lappin ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Jo-Anne Bachorowski, Denise Davis, Laura R. Novick, Bunmi O. Olatunji, Kristopher Preacher, Bethany Rittle-Johnson, Megan Saylor, David G. Schlundt, Craig A. Smith, Andrew J. Tomarken, Georgene L. Troseth, Bahr Weiss, Geoffrey F. Woodman RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Georgine M. Pion ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR F. Joseph McLaughlin ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Sun-Joo Cho, Anita Disney, Joseph Franklin, Alexander Maier, Sean Polyn, Gavin Price, Sonya Sterba RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Chase A. Lesane-Brown, Julia Noland, Hui-Xin Qi, Adriane Seiffert, Iwona Stepniewska ASSISTANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR Vicki S. Harris

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy THE doctoral program in psychological sciences is offered jointly by the Department of Psychology in the College of Arts and Science and the Department of Psychology and Human Development in Peabody College. The Psychological Sciences program focuses on psychological theory and the development of original empirical research. Students are admitted to work toward the Ph.D. degree in the following areas: • Clinical Science • Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience • Developmental Science • Neuroscience • Quantitative Methods A major goal of our doctoral program is the placement of its graduates in academic settings. The faculty aim to tailor graduate training to meet the needs and the interests of each individual student. Students are monitored very closely from the beginning of their training, and emphasis is on active student participation during every stage of training. Through the Combined B.A./M.A. (4+1) Option, the department offers exceptional students the opportunity to earn both the B.A. and the M.A. in five years. Students will be provisionally admitted to the 4+1 program only by approval of the department. Further information about the program is available from the director of graduate studies. The curriculum is designed to: (a) familiarize students with the major areas of psychology; (b) provide specialized training in at least one of the five specific areas of psychology emphasized in the program; and (c) provide students sufficient flexibility to enroll in classes consistent with their interests and long-term developmental trajectory. During the first two to three years, students take several core courses in quantitative methods and in substantive areas. Beyond this, the program consists of seminars, further research participation, and other inquiries expressly designed to fulfill career objectives. Each of the five areas offers a seminar on current research every semester, attended by all faculty and graduate students in that area. We expect students to be continually involved in research throughout their tenure in our program. We use a one-on-one mentoring model as a primary though not exclusive means for the acquisition of scientific skills by students. As such, students work very closely with their advisers in all phases of the research process. In addition, advisory committees that consist of both the adviser and other faculty members offer guidance throughout the student’s graduate school years. There is also potential for considerable interaction among programs and with other disciplines across campus. This interaction produces an exciting intellectual environment that is further enriched by visiting faculty members and speakers. Interested students are

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encouraged to find out more about our research programs by reading the descriptions of faculty research interests available on our program website (vanderbilt.edu/psychological_sciences). The Clinical Science program in Psychological Sciences at Vanderbilt subscribes to the clinical scientist model of training, with the primary goal of training clinical scientists. Through the combination of advanced course work, practicum experiences, and research emphases, students concentrate in one or more of the following areas: developmental psychopathology (including children and/or adults), prevention and treatment, clinical health psychology, clinical neuroscience, socioaffective science, developmental disabilities (including children and/or adults), and quantitative methods. Regardless of concentration, the training experience includes a core curriculum, a common set of course requirements and research milestones, and a variety of practicum opportunities. All of our Ph.D. program areas offer a range of financial support options for graduate students, including research fellowships, research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and graduate fellowships. Applicants to our program need to submit scores on the Graduate Record Examination General Test. Applicants may also submit scores on the Psychology subject test, but this is not required. In addition to overall potential for a scientific career, the fit between an applicant’s research interests and those of a potential faculty mentor significantly influence admissions decisions. Admission is not limited to students with undergraduate backgrounds in psychology. Specific program requirements are described in the Graduate Student Handbook, which is available on the Psychological Sciences website. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions for courses offered through the Department of Psychology in the College of Arts and Science begin on page 127. Course descriptions for courses offered through the Department of Psychology and Human Development in Peabody College begin on page 128.

Quantitative and Chemical Biology The Quantitative and Chemical Biology program is an interdepartmental umbrella graduate program seeking students who have earned undergraduate degrees in the quantitative and/or physical sciences (e.g., chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics) who wish to pursue a doctoral degree at the interface of the chemical, physical, engineering and biological sciences. In the first year, students will complete four laboratory rotations of their choice as well as take courses related to their interests. The curriculum is designed to familiarize students from a quantitative sciences background with the concepts and nomenclature of modern biomedical research in an expeditious and efficient fashion. Following the completion of the first year, students may enter any of the Ph.D. degree

Graduate School / Religion

programs housed in the School of Engineering, School of Medicine, and College of Arts and Science, or alternatively, one of three transinstitutional Ph.D. degree programs, which are Chemical and Physical Biology, Human Genetics, and Molecular Neuroscience.

Religion CHAIR Paul J. DeHart ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR GRADUATE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH James P. Byrd PROFESSORS EMERITI/A J. Patout Burns, David G. Buttrick, Edward Farley, H. Jackson Forstman, Frank Gulley Jr., Charles H. Hambrick, Walter Harrelson, Peter C. Hodgson, Joseph C. Hough Jr., Dale A. Johnson, Douglas A. Knight, Sallie McFague, M. Douglas Meeks, Daniel M. Patte, Jack M. Sasson, Eugene TeSelle, Richard M. Zaner PROFESSORS Victor Anderson, Dale P. Andrews, Sandra Barnes, Robert Campany, Larry Churchill, Paul J. DeHart, Dennis C. Dickerson, Paul R. Dokecki, William Franke, Volney P. Gay, Lenn E. Goodman, Thomas A. Gregor, Joel F. Harrington, William J. Hook, James Hudnut-Beumler, Peter Lake, Amy-Jill Levine, Leah Marcus, John S. McClure, Thomas McGinn, Keith G. Meador, Bonnie J. Miller‑McLemore, Bruce Morrill, Laurel C. Schneider, Fernando F. Segovia, Leong Seow, Tony Stewart, Emilie M. Townes, David J. Wasserstein, D. Don Welch Jr. ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Ellen T. Armour, Gregory F. Barz, Mark J. Bliton, James P. Byrd, Beth Ann Conklin, Idit Dobbs‑Weinstein, Juan Floyd-Thomas, Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Kathy L. Gaca, Jay Geller, Leor Halevi, Jacobus J. Hamman, Joel F. Harrington, Paul C. H. Lim, Herbert R. Marbury, Thomas McGinn, Richard McGregor, Phillis I. Sheppard, Melissa Snarr ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Annalisa Azzoni, Dianna Bell, Nancy G. Lin, Bryan Lowe, David A. Michelson, Graham Reside, Anand V. Taneja

DEGREES OFFERED: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy STUDENTS may be admitted upon graduation from an accredited college with a baccalaureate degree or from an accredited seminary or graduate school with a post-baccalaureate degree. Ordinarily, students with only the baccalaureate degree are admitted to the M.A. program. Successful completion of the latter provides a foundation for doctoral studies but does not guarantee admission to the Ph.D. program. Students with an M.Div., M.T.S., or M.A. degree may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. Applicants with the B.A. degree are advised to consider not only the M.A. program in the Graduate School, but also the two-year M.T.S. program in the Divinity School of Vanderbilt University as preparation for Ph.D. work. Degree programs are offered in ethics and society; Hebrew Bible; historical studies; history and critical theories of religion; homiletics and liturgics; Jewish studies (M.A. only at present); New Testament; religion, psychology, and culture; and theological studies. Interdisciplinary studies, both within religion and in other areas of knowledge, are encouraged. The study of religion is pursued both as a critical, humanistic discipline, employing a variety of methodological perspectives, and as a theological discipline, interpreting religions and their historical, theological, and ethical heritage.

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Master of Arts The M.A. program is designed to enable students to explore personal interests or vocational options, to acquire a background for teaching at the secondary level, or to attain a foundation for further studies at the doctoral level. A total of 30 credit hours and a thesis are required for the first two programs described below, while the final two programs have special requirements. 1. Specialty M.A. This program involves a concentration in one of the subspecialties of religious study. Students will select a major of at least 12 hours and a minor of at least 6 hours from the following areas: ethics and society; Hebrew Bible; historical studies; history and critical theories of religion; homiletics and liturgics; Jewish studies; New Testament; religion, psychology, and culture; and theological studies. The remaining hours may be chosen from the above areas or from other departments of the Graduate School. 2. Cross-Disciplinary M.A. This program, to which students are admitted under exceptional circumstances, provides an opportunity for students to relate one of the subspecialties of religious studies to an appropriate supportive discipline. Normally, 12 hours are taken in one of the areas listed under the specialty M.A., with the remaining hours taken in another department of the Graduate School. The thesis will attempt to integrate the methods and subject matters of the two disciplines in relation to a chosen problem. 3. Terminal M.A. The terminal M.A., offered exclusively for Ph.D. students who elect not to complete the Ph.D. program, may be received by students who have demonstrated reading knowledge in at least one foreign language at the level required for the M.A. degree; have completed 48 semester hours of formal, graded course work at the graduate level, including at least 24 hours at Vanderbilt; have passed an oral examination conducted by a committee of faculty members from the Graduate Department of Religion; and do not seek candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. 4. Master’s Degree in Passing. Ph.D. candidates may earn the M.A. degree upon completion of at least 42 hours of graduate study, satisfaction of the language requirements, passing of the Ph.D. qualifying exam, and approval of the dissertation proposal according to the GDR guidelines. M.A. candidates demonstrate reading competence in foreign languages, ancient or modern, as required in the program or area of concentration. Students should consult area policies for specific requirements. In most cases, however, reading knowledge in one foreign language is required for the M.A. Students will normally satisfy this requirement by performing satisfactorily in the departmentally administered Ph.D. language examination, taking and passing with the grade of B+ or higher a Vanderbilt University course designed specifically to teach graduate students to use the language in research, or by presenting an acceptable record of at least 12 hours (or its equivalent) in a language. Candidates specializing in Hebrew Bible or New Testament are expected to work with the original texts in Hebrew or Greek. Students designating Greek or Hebrew as the foreign language may not count introductory courses in these languages toward the requisite 30 hours for the degree. Joint J.D.–M.A. Program. Students who have been admitted to both the Law School and the Graduate School may work toward the J.D. and the M.A. in religion concurrently.

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Six hours of religion credits will be accepted toward the J.D. degree, and 6 hours of law credits will be accepted toward the M.A. in religion. The joint program normally takes four years. For further information, write to the chair of the Graduate Department of Religion.

NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 146.

Doctor of Philosophy Ph.D. programs are currently available in the following areas of major concentration: ethics and society; Hebrew Bible; historical studies; history and critical theories of religion; homiletics and liturgics; New Testament; religion, psychology, and culture; and theological studies. Students applying to each of these areas may also apply for a fellowship from The Program in Theology and Practice (vanderbilt.edu/gradschool/ religion/t&p). Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must demonstrate reading knowledge of one modern language of research, a second language as designated and approved by the Area and the GDR, and additional languages as specified by the Area (see Area requirements). Each of the areas of major concentration specifies which languages are acceptable for its students. The requirement for modern languages may be satisfied by taking and passing with the grade of B+ or higher a Vanderbilt University course designed specifically to teach graduate students to use the language in research, or by passing the departmental reading examination. Beyond this department-wide requirement, in biblical studies a knowledge of Hebrew or Greek is required, and in some areas of historical studies a knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. Students should be prepared to learn such other languages, ancient and modern, as may appear requisite for scholarly interests. Students should check with their area directors concerning specific requirements.

Certificate Programs Students enrolled full time in the M.A. or Ph.D. programs may earn graduate certificates in two areas: (1) Jewish Studies (offered through the interdisciplinary program in Jewish Studies, vanderbilt.edu/jewishstudies/Cert in JS.htm) and (2) Religion, Gender, and Sexuality (offered through the Carpenter program in Religion, Gender, and Sexuality, vanderbilt.edu/ divinity/carpenter). NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 130.

Second Language Studies ACADEMIC DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR SECOND LANGUAGE STUDIES Virginia M. Scott

TWO courses are currently available in Second Language Studies for graduate credit: SLS 6030 (also listed as French 6030, German 5310, Portuguese 6030, Spanish 6030); SLS 7040 (also listed as French 7040

Sociology CHAIR Larry W. Isaac DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Mariano Sana PROFESSORS EMERITI Jack P. Gibbs, Walter R. Gove, Gary F. Jensen, Ronnie Steinberg, R. Jay Turner PROFESSORS Daniel B. Cornfield, Katharine M. Donato, David J. Hess, Larry W. Isaac, Holly J. McCammon, Jonathan M. Metzl ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS George Becker, Tony N. Brown, Karen E. Campbell, Laura M. Carpenter, André Christie-Mizell, Shaul Kelner, Richard Lloyd, Richard Pitt, Mariano Sana ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Tyson Brown, Joshua Murray, Evelyn Patterson, Lijun Song, LaTonya Trotter

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE sociology program prepares students for research and teaching careers in academic and policy settings. Students are exposed to a wide range of sociological works and research methods. Emphasis is on becoming an independent social researcher and teacher. Students have an opportunity to work closely with faculty members, in part because of a low ratio of graduate students to faculty members. The master’s degree requires 36 hours of course work: 6301, 6302, 6310, 6311, 6312, 7500, and 18 hours of electives. Also, students must write a master’s paper that must be finished before their fifth semester to receive a master’s degree. Students must satisfy all of the master’s degree requirements in order to receive a Ph.D. In addition, Ph.D. degree course work requirements consist of a teaching workshop (7400) and 33 hours of electives (up to 20 hours of which may be 8999 or 9999). Students must pass two special area exams, defend a dissertation proposal, complete a dissertation, and defend a dissertation to receive a Ph.D. degree. Students may request the transfer of credit hours of eligible, graduate course work performed at another institution, subject to the approval of the director of graduate studies, the department chair, and the Graduate School. However, these requests are not always honored. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 146.

Graduate School / Special Education

Spanish and Portuguese CHAIR Benigno Trigo VICE CHAIR Victoria A. Burrus DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Christina Karageorgou-Bastea PROFESSORS EMERITI M. Fräncille Bergquist, Susan Berk-Seligson, Russell G. Hamilton, C. Enrique Pupo-Walker PROFESSORS Earl E. Fitz, Edward H. Friedman, Ruth Hill, Cathy L. Jrade, William Luis, Philip D. Rasico, Benigno Trigo ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Victoria A. Burrus, Christina KarageorgouBastea, Emanuelle Oliveira-Monte, Andrés Zamora ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Márcio Bahia, José Cárdenas-Bunsen, N. Michelle Murray

DEGREES OFFERED: SPANISH. Doctor of Philosophy SPANISH-PORTUGUESE. Doctor of Philosophy SPANISH-PORTUGUESE. With specialization in Comparative Literature, Doctor of Philosophy SPANISH-PORTUGUESE. With specialization in InterAmerican Literature, Doctor of Philosophy THE Department of Spanish and Portuguese does not accept external applications for a terminal master’s degree. The M.A. programs in Spanish and in Portuguese are degrees earned in passing en route to the Ph.D. and are awarded after successful completion of the comprehensive exam required of all Ph.D. candidates. A reading knowledge of another foreign language is also required. (For Portuguese M.A. students, the required language is Spanish; for Spanish M.A. students, Portuguese is recommended.) Students seeking a combined Spanish/ Portuguese Ph.D. take a combined comprehensive exam upon successful completion of which those who come with an M.A. in Spanish receive an M.A. in Portuguese and those who come with an M.A. in Portuguese receive an M.A. in Spanish. Those who come to Vanderbilt with just a B.A. will be awarded an M.A. in either Spanish or Portuguese or they may opt to take separate exams in Spanish and in Portuguese in order to obtain two M.A. degrees. The Ph.D. program in Spanish requires 63 hours of course work, which includes an M.A. in passing for those who come with just a B.A. and 9 hours for a minor, which may be Portuguese, a certificate program in Latin American studies, an interdisciplinary minor in philosophy and literature, or another approved program of courses from one or more departments. Candidates must demonstrate either a reading knowledge of an additional foreign language beyond the one required for the M.A. (normally Portuguese) or they may continue in the study of Portuguese (or another approved language) to an advanced level. The combined Ph.D. in Spanish and Portuguese requires 66 hours of course work, which includes an M.A. in passing as described above and course work reflecting both of the two areas. No minor is necessary. Candidates must have near-native proficiency in either Spanish or Portuguese, and advanced proficiency in the other language must be acquired or demonstrated at Vanderbilt. There is no additional language requirement. The combined Ph.D. in Spanish and Portuguese with a specialization in Comparative Literature requires 72 hours of course work, which includes an M.A. in passing as described above. Students must develop a plan of study that focuses on a unifying theme that emphasizes a rigorously comparative methodology. Courses are taken in Spanish and Spanish

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American literature and in Portuguese, Lusophone African, and Brazilian literature, as well as in a related language field, such as English, French, German, or Classics, or in a related area of humanistic endeavor such as history, religion, Latin American studies, art, the history of art, philosophy, literary theory, or music. In addition to English, candidates must have near-native proficiency in either Spanish or Portuguese, and advanced proficiency in the other language must be acquired or demonstrated at Vanderbilt. The combined Ph.D. in Spanish and Portuguese with a specialization in Inter-American Literature requires a minimum of 72 hours of course work, which includes an M.A. in passing as described above. Students are expected to develop a plan of study that is both comparative and inter-American in its design through course work in both Spanish American and Brazilian literature, as well as in one of a number of related fields such as English (American and Caribbean literature), French (Canadian and Caribbean literature, subject to course availability), and Latin American studies (cultural anthropology). In addition to English, candidates must demonstrate near-native proficiency in either Spanish or Portuguese, and advanced proficiency in the other language must be acquired or demonstrated at Vanderbilt. Specific program requirements are described under the Graduate Studies tab on the Department of Spanish and Portuguese website. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 126 for Portuguese and on page 147 for Spanish.

Special Education CHAIR Donald L. Compton ASSOCIATE CHAIR Joseph H. Wehby DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES Joseph H. Wehby PROFESSORS Donald L. Compton, Donna Y. Ford, Douglas Fuchs, Lynn S. Fuchs, Mary Louise Hemmeter, Robert Hodapp, Ann P. Kaiser, Daniel Reschly, Paul J. Yoder RESEARCH PROFESSOR Ted S. Hasselbring ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS Erik Carter, Laurie Cutting, Deborah D. Hatton, Joseph H. Wehby ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF THE PRACTICE Kimberly Paulsen ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Erin E. Barton, Victoria F. Knight, Christopher J. Lemons, Blair P. Lloyd ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF THE PRACTICE Karen Blankenship, Andrea M. Capizzi, Alexandra Da Fonte, Joseph Lambert

DEGREE OFFERED: Doctor of Philosophy THE program of study is based in the multidisciplinary body of knowledge relevant to the understanding, education, and treatment of persons with disabilities. The Ph.D. degree is composed of three major elements of course work: core studies in special education, including 9 hours of proseminar in special education; at least 12 formal course hours in research methods; and a 15 hour minor or related area of study. The program of study will be planned individually with the major professor and approved by the student’s qualifying committee. In addition, the program requires demonstration of competence in research

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methods and dissemination and in college teaching/supervision. Students who enter without a master’s degree may earn a thesis-based M.S. degree while working on their Ph.D. NOTE: New course numbers took effect in fall 2015. Former course numbers are included in course descriptions in this catalog and at this website: registrar.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/course-renumbering/course-lookup/. Course descriptions begin on page 148.

Teaching and Learning See Learning, Teaching, and Diversity

Women’s and Gender Studies DIRECTOR Katherine B Crawford ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR TBA

VANDERBILT University’s Program in Women’s and Gender Studies offers interdisciplinary graduate instruction in gender studies in cooperation with the Departments of Anthropology, English, French and Italian, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese, and the Graduate Department of Religion. Affiliated faculty from other schools, including Vanderbilt Peabody College (Human and Organizational Development), Vanderbilt Law School (Law and Economics), and Vanderbilt Divinity School, also participate in the program. Students work toward a certificate in gender studies. A certificate in gender studies is awarded with either the M.A. or Ph.D. degree upon fulfillment of the following requirements: (1) Completion of at least 13 credit hours of course work across two or more disciplines. Two courses, WGS 8301 (3 credit hours) and WGS 8302 (1 credit hour), are required. Three additional interrelated graduate-level courses (9 credit hours) on women, gender, and/or sexuality, appropriate to the student’s program of study and forming an intellectually cohesive whole, are required. At least one course (3 credit hours) must come from outside the student’s home discipline. Up to 6 credit hours of specifically named required courses from a student’s primary degree program may count toward the certificate. Courses must be approved for credit by the WGS director. One course (3 credit hours) may be satisfied through an independent study with a faculty member affiliated with the Program in Women’s and Gender Studies, with the approval of the director of Women’s and Gender Studies. (2) Completion of one paper or substantial project demonstrating the application of a gender studies or sexuality studies framework or methodology to research, teaching, or fieldwork. Any student enrolled in a graduate program at Vanderbilt is eligible to apply for the certificate in gender studies. Acceptance in the program requires a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3, satisfactory performance of B+ or better in WGS 8301, and the approval of the student’s primary adviser and the director of the Program in Women’s and Gender Studies. Courses taken at Vanderbilt prior to admission to the program may be

counted toward the certificate requirements with the approval of the director of the Program in Women’s and Gender Studies. Students wishing to enroll must complete an Intent to Enroll form, which must be signed by the student, the director of the WGS Certificate Program, and the director of the graduate program (DGS) for the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A signed copy of the form must be submitted to the Graduate School ([email protected]) and to the University Registrar’s Office ([email protected] vanderbilt.edu).

Requirements for Graduate Certificate in Gender Studies 1. Women’s and Gender Studies 8301. 2. Women’s and Gender Studies 8302. 3. Three additional graduate-level courses (9 credit hours) on women, gender, and/or sexuality, appropriate to the student’s program of study and forming an intellectually cohesive whole. At least one course (3 credit hours) must come from outside the student’s home discipline. Up to 6 credit hours of specifically named required courses from a student’s primary degree program may count toward the certificate. Courses must be approved for credit by the WGS director. One course (3 credit hours) may be satisfied through an independent study with a faculty member affiliated with the Women’s and Gender Studies program, with the approval of the director of Women’s and Gender Studies. 4. A paper submitted to the Women’s and Gender Studies steering committee for evaluation. The paper must demonstrate the application of a gender studies or sexuality studies framework or methodology to research, teaching, or fieldwork. Course descriptions begin on page 152.

Graduate School / Courses

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Graduate School Courses Explanation of Symbols 5000-level courses listed in this catalog may be taken by graduate students for credit unless a specific restriction is indicated in the course description and provided there is no duplication of the student’s previous courses. 6000-level courses and above listed in this catalog are graduate courses. They are on a level normally considered too high for undergraduates and are not open to undergraduates without consent of the instructor, the adviser, and the Graduate School. Length of a course is one semester. The semester in which a one-semester course is offered is indicated by the word FALL (or SPRING) in the course description. Hours referred to are semester hours, and figures in brackets always indicate semester hours credit. Formal course work means all courses taken for credit except thesis and dissertation research courses. The university reserves the right to change the arrangement or content of courses, to change texts and other materials used, or to cancel any course on the basis of insufficient enrollment or for any other reason.

African American and Diaspora Studies AADS 5002. Theories of Diaspora. [Formerly AADS 300] Interdisciplinary introduction to materials, methods, debates, and theoretical language of scholarly research in diaspora studies. [3] AADS 5095. Directed Study. [Formerly AADS 395A] [3] AADS 5654. Memoirs and Biographies. (Also listed as AADS 2654) Biographies and autobiographies as lenses for the study of historical trends and events; development of gender, sexual, and racial identities in subjects. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2654. [3]

American Studies AMER 5883. Independent Study. [Formerly AMER 301A] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3] AMER 5884. Independent Study. [Formerly AMER 301B] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3] AMER 8000. Graduate Workshop In American Studies. [Formerly AMER 300] Issues, methodologies, traditions, approaches, and problems in the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4]

Anthropology ANTH 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ANTH 369] [0-12] ANTH 8000. History of Anthropological Theory I. [Formerly ANTH 314] An advanced consideration of the history of anthropological theory from its origins to the mid-twentieth century. [3]

ANTH 8001. History of Anthropological Theory II. [Formerly ANTH 315] An advanced consideration of the history of anthropological theory from the mid-twentieth century to the present. [3] ANTH 8010. Special Topics. [Formerly ANTH 367] Problems, themes, or issues in anthropological theory and methods. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] ANTH 8100. Political Violence. [Formerly ANTH 318] Comparative and ethnographic analysis of state violence, guerrilla insurgencies, paramilitarism and vigilantism; consequences of repression, impunity, and social fragmentation on historical memory and democratic processes. [3] ANTH 8104. Seminar on Political Economy and Anthropology. [Formerly ANTH 323] Anthropological approaches to political economy and globalization. Fundamental works in political economy and economic anthropology. [3] ANTH 8106. Ethics in Anthropology. [Formerly ANTH 345] Ethical obligations of anthropologists in dealing with human subjects on the interpretation, interaction, and action with non-western societies. Ethics from Socrates to radical postmodernism. Debate of specific issues presented by non-Western practices, cultural property rights, sites versus sacred places, repatriation, cultural relativism, and anthropological activism. [3] ANTH 8107. Race as a Cultural and Legal Construct. [Formerly ANTH 333] Historical and contemporary roles of race and racism in settler colonialism, slavery, the nation-state, and empire. Theoretical perspectives from social constructionism, anti-colonial literature, critical race theory, and standpoint theory. [3] ANTH 8110. Seminar in Maya Ethnography. [Formerly ANTH 303] Ethnographic survey of the Maya of Mexico and Guatemala; historical and current data, methods, theories. [3] ANTH 8200. Archaeological Method and Theory. [Formerly ANTH 310] Development of archaeology as a discipline; relationships with anthropology and history; intellectual trends. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [3] ANTH 8201. Advanced Spatial Analysis. [Formerly ANTH 312] Theoretical and methodological training for advanced GIS applications in social science research. Implementing GIS in research design, field spatial data acquisition methods, data processing, management, visualization, and analysis. [3] ANTH 8210. Preindustrial Political Systems. [Formerly ANTH 331] History, structure, and change of pre-modern political systems around the world. [3] ANTH 8211. Space, Place, and Landscape. [Formerly ANTH 335] Cross-disciplinary approaches to the significance of space and landscape for human societies in the past and present. [3] ANTH 8212. Historical Archaeology. [Formerly ANTH 340] Development, practice, methods, and theoretical perspectives in historical archaeology; relationships between archaeology and history. [3] ANTH 8220. The Historical Archaeology of Latin America. [Formerly ANTH 349] The study of archaeological, historic, and ethnohistorical materials in examining the conquest, colonization, and process of culture change in Latin America. [3] ANTH 8230. The Collapse of Civilizations: General Theories and the Maya Collapse. [Formerly ANTH 325] An advanced consideration of the causes and processes involved in the decline of complex societies. General theory is then illustrated by detailed interactive study of the evidence and interpretations of the collapse of the civilization of the Classic Maya, arguably the New World’s most advanced society. A seminar allowing each student to develop and define their own perspective on this major problem in archaeology and social theory. [3]

76 ANTH 8232. Seminar in Mesoamerican Archaeology. [Formerly ANTH 350] The prehistory of pre-Columbian civilizations of Mexico and Central America. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] ANTH 8240. Seminar in South American Archaeology and Ethnohistory. [Formerly ANTH 360] The prehistory of pre-Columbian civilizations of the Andean and lowland regions of South America. [3] ANTH 8300. Human Variation and Osteology. [Formerly ANTH 307] Survey of physical and genetic variation in modern human populations. Laboratory techniques in osteological analysis. [3] ANTH 8310. The Anthropology of Death: Body, Place, and Memory. [Formerly ANTH 329] Cultural responses to death in Western and nonWestern societies. Emphasis on issues of how social relations, emotion, and memory are shaped in relation to ideas and practices focused on the body and the significance of places as sites of identity. Theory and perspectives from anthropology, religion, and philosophy. [3] ANTH 8311. Violence and Its Embodiments in the Past and Present. [Formerly ANTH 328] Anthropology and bioarchaeology of violence in ancient and modern communities. Bioarchaeological theory and method to identify trauma and violence against the body. Study of war and other forms of violence, including domestic abuse, ritual battles, corporeal punishment. [3] ANTH 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ANTH 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] ANTH 9000. Seminar in Research Design. [Formerly ANTH 319] Objectives and strategies of contemporary research problems in anthropology; formulation, writing, and construction of grant proposals; interplay between data, method, and theory; develop skill in critiquing research ideas, techniques, and designs. [3] ANTH 9001. Research Design in Anthropology. [Formerly ANTH 330] Research design, formulating research questions, and definition of appropriate data and methods. [3] ANTH 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ANTH 399] [0-12]

Arabic ARA 5101. Elementary Arabic. [Formerly 210A] (Also listed as ARA 1101) Development of reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Arabic language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101. [5] ARA 5102. Elementary Arabic. [Formerly 210B] (Also listed as ARA 1102) Continuation of 5101. Development of reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Arabic language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1102. [5] ARA 5201. Intermediate Arabic. [Formerly 220A] (Also listed as ARA 2201) Practice and development of all language skills at the intermediateadvanced level. Intensive work in spoken Arabic with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension, and writing skills. Advanced grammar, modern Arabic word formation, verb aspect usage, and structure of complex sentences. Three hours of class work per week with an additional two hours per week of individual work in the language laboratory. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Arabic language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2201. [4] ARA 5202. Intermediate Arabic. [Formerly 220B] (Also listed as ARA 2202) Continuation of 5201. Practice and development of all language skills at the intermediate-advanced level. Intensive work in spoken Arabic with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition, reading comprehension, and writing skills. Advanced grammar, modern Arabic word formation, verb aspect usage, and structure of complex sentences. Three hours of class work per week with an additional two hours per week of individual work in the language laboratory. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Arabic language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2202. [4]

vanderbilt university ARA 5301. Advanced Arabic. [Formerly 230A] (Also listed as ARA 3301) Further development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in the Arabic language. Emphasis on grammar and literary techniques. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Arabic language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3301. [3] ARA 5302. Advanced Arabic. [Formerly 230B] (Also listed as ARA 3102) Continuation of 5301. Further development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in the Arabic language. Emphasis on grammar and literary techniques. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Arabic language course. No credit for students who have completed 3102. [3] ARA 5401. Media Arabic. [Formerly 240] (Also listed as ARA 3201) Listening to, discussing, simulating, and analyzing Arabic media materials. Coverage of current and historical events, such as TV broadcasts, headline news, documentaries, and public discussions on political, religious, and cultural issues. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3201. [3] ARA 5501. Arabic of the Qur’an and Other Classical Texts. [Formerly 250] (Also listed as ARA 3301) Syntactical and morphological features of classical Arabic. Differences and similarities with modern standard Arabic in vocabulary usage, semantic extensions, and context; vocabulary borrowing. Texts drawn from the Qur’an, Hadith, and Sira (biographical) literature. Offered on a graded basis only. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3301. [4]

Asian Studies ASIA 5151. The Third World and Literature. (Also listed as ASIA 3151) The history of cultural and political concepts of the Third World from 1955 to the present. Contemporary literary and cultural debates regarding models of transnationalism and processes of globalization. National literatures and cultures foundational to the Third World model. The relationship between the genre of the novel and the formation of national communities. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3151. [3] ASIA 5210. Hollywood Hanoi. (Also listed as ASIA 2210W) Cultural narratives of the Vietnam War, including novels and films. War and representation. International, minority, and antiwar perspectives on the violence and aftermath. Muhammad Ali, Werner Herzog, Jean Genet, Graham Greene, and Dinh Linh. All texts in English translation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2210W. [3] ASIA 5511. Popular Culture in Modern Japan. (Also listed as ASIA 2511) Popular culture in Japan from 1900 to the present. The rise of mass culture and media, song, sports, food, fashion, and popular film genres. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2511. [3] ASIA 5512. Explorations of Japanese Animation. (Also listed as ASIA 2512) Introduction to the form and content of Japanese animation as globalized popular entertainment and as a speculative artistic medium that explores history and memory, nature and technology, human identity, carnivalesque comedy, and gender relations. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2512. [3] ASIA 5560. Current Japan-U.S. Relations. (Also listed as ASIA 2560) Similarities and differences in theory and practice in the United States and Japan on public policy issues such as trade, defense, environment, education, medical care, and racial prejudice. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2560. [3] ASIA 5602. Modern Chinese Fiction. (Also listed as ASIA 2602) Short stories and novels of twentieth-century China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Traumatic experience of modernity; nation and narration; new perceptions of time and space; transformed gender relations; contested national and local identities. All texts in English translation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2602. [3] ASIA 5604. Memory and Forgetting in Traditional Chinese Culture. (Also listed as ASIA 3604) Cultural meanings and religious uses of memory from the late sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries. Chinese

Graduate School / Courses and Western mnemonics. Architecture and memorial sites; nostalgia and mourning; testimonials, memoirs, and novels. Forgetfulness and knowledge. No credit for students who have completed 1111 section 3. [3] ASIA 5633. Self-Cultivation in Ancient China. (Also listed as ASIA 3633) 300 BCE to 500 CE. Methods, goals, and contexts of self-cultivation in antiquity. Breathing exercises, meditation, visualization, sexual arts, sacrifice, alchemy, and other practices in their religious, cultural, and social contexts. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3633. [3] ASIA 5680. Inside China. (Also listed as ASIA 1680) First-hand experience of China’s dynamic society and expanding economy. Guided exploration of famous historical sites and contemporary institutions such as hospitals, businesses, factories, and art galleries in Beijing and Shanghai. Interviews with individuals from many different walks of life, including physicians, entrepreneurs, migrant workers, and college students. No knowledge of Chinese is required. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] ASIA 5851. Independent Study. (Also listed as ASIA 3851) Designed primarily for majors who want to study Asian topics not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit more than once, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3851. [1-3] ASIA 5852. Independent Study. (Also listed as ASIA 3852) Designed primarily for majors who want to study Asian topics not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit more than once, but students may earn only up to 3 credits per semester of enrollment. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3852. [1-3] ASIA 5891. Special Topics. (Also listed as ASIA 3891) Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3891. [1-3] ASIA 5892. Special Topics. (Also listed as ASIA 3892) Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3892. [1-3]

Astrophysics ASTR 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ASTR 369] [0-12] ASTR 8001. Order of Magnitude Astrophysics. [Formerly ASTR 355] Order-of-magnitude estimates on astrophysical problems. May be repeated for credit more than once. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1] ASTR 8010. Radiative Processes. [Formerly ASTR 310] Electromagnetic radiation from astrophysical sources. Radiative transfer; blackbody radiation; atomic and molecular absorption and emission; radiation from moving charges. [3] ASTR 8020. Special Topics in Astrophysics. [Formerly ASTR 351] Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] ASTR 8030. Stellar Astrophysics. [Formerly ASTR 352] Physics of stellar structure and evolution, including nuclear energy generation, equations of state, and heat transfer by radiation, conduction , and convection. Numerical stellar models. Observational aspects of stellar astrophysics. [3] ASTR 8040. The Structure and Dynamics of Galaxies. [Formerly ASTR 353] The stellar, gaseous, and dark matter content of galaxies; their internal bulk properties, structure, kinematics, and dynamics. Equilibrium and stability of stellar systems. Orbit theory, the gravitational N-body problem, relaxation, dynamical friction, and the Fokker-Planck equation. Galaxy evolution from the standpoint of stellar populations, the initial mass function, chemical evolution, and galaxy interactions. No credit for students who have completed 3700. [3]

77 ASTR 8050. Structure Formation in the Universe. [Formerly ASTR 354] Dark matter and dark energy. Growth of linear and non-linear density fluctuations. Density and velocity fields, perturbation theory, and non-linear collapse models. Cosmological N-body simulations and the formation of dark matter halos. Galaxy clustering measurements and galaxy formation physics. Experimental cosmological probes of dark matter and dark energy. [3] ASTR 8060. Methods in Observational and Computational Astronomy. [Formerly ASTR 322] Principles and techniques including accurate measurement of astronomical distance, data handling and error analysis, computer programming. Four to six experiments such as determination of Earth’s radius, distance to the Moon, refraction by the atmosphere, distance to a star cluster. Scheduled evening sessions at Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory. [3] ASTR 8900. Independent Study. [Formerly ASTR 390] May be repeated for credit more than once, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3] ASTR 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ASTR 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] ASTR 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ASTR 2995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] ASTR 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ASTR 399] [0-12]

Audiology AUD 5303. Hereditary Hearing Loss. Hereditary aspects of hearing loss in infants, children, and adults. Genetic bases of hearing loss, modes of inheritance, characteristics of syndromic and non-syndromic hearing losses. Collaboration with geneticists and genetic counselors. Recent developments and issues in evaluating and managing patients with genetic hearing loss. SUMMER. [2] AUD 5310. Measurement of Hearing. The theory and practice of hearing measurement, with emphasis on routine clinical and screening audiometric techniques, testing environment, audiometric standards and calibration, applied impedance measurements, and interpretation of audiometric tests. FALL. [4] AUD 5318. Educational Audiology and Aural Habilitation for Children. A survey of approaches to aural rehabilitation for children. Specific focus will be on intervention for children with hearing loss in educational and other habilitative settings. SPRING. [3] AUD 5325. Pediatric Audiology. A survey of methods and procedures used in the evaluation of the auditory function and management of neonates, infants, and young children. Includes identification and intervention procedures. There will be review of special populations of children with hearing loss. FALL. [3] AUD 5327. Hearing Loss and Speech Understanding. This course examines various factors that may affect the speech understanding of persons with hearing loss. The contribution to the unaided and aided speech understanding of persons with hearing loss of (1) subject factors, such as degree of hearing loss, and deficits in frequency and temporal resolution, and (2) environmental factors, such as the level and type of background noise, reverberation, and talker characteristics, will be examined. Methods for predicting speech understanding will also be discussed. SPRING. [3] AUD 5328. Psychoacoustics. Psychoacoustic theory and methods. Auditory perception in normal hearing and hearing impaired subjects. SPRING.[3] AUD 5332. Pathology of the Auditory System. A study of pathologies involving the peripheral auditory system arising from genetic factors, disease, and trauma, with emphasis applied to presenting signs/symptoms, and medical/audiological management. FALL. [3] AUD 5340. Lab: Amplification I. Laboratory that stresses instruction and practice in basic hearing aid techniques including Otoscopic examination, ear impressions, electroacoustic evaluation and probe microphone techniques. Corequisite: AUD 5339. SPRING. [1]

78 AUD 5345. Amplification II. Advanced topics in amplification including advanced probe microphone techniques, single and multi-channel compression systems, analog and digital signal processing, and current and emerging prescriptive and fitting verification methods. FALL. [3] AUD 5346. Vestibular Sciences I. This course offers an in-depth approach to the basic assessment of the dizzy patient. Subject matter will include; where the vestibular system assessment falls in the audiology scope of practice, detailed anatomy and physiology of the peripheral and central vestibular, ocular motor, and postural control systems; bedside testing, introduction to both electrical and video techniques for recording the vestibulocular reflex; case history and bedside assessment of the dizzy patient, and the technique and interpretation of video and electronystagmography. Students will be expected to conduct practica outside the classroom. FALL. [3] AUD 5347. Vestibular Sciences II. This course will focus on the description of advanced assessment techniques including whole body, yaw axis sinusoidal harmonic acceleration testing and step testing, and techniques for the assessment of the otolith system including on and off-axis centrifugation, and both cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. A module will be taught on the topic of peripheral and central disease and disorders affecting the vestibular system. Embedded in this module will be a section describing the multidimensional assessment of falls risk, disequilibrium of aging and the medical/surgical and non-medical management (i.e., vestibular rehabilitation) of vestibular system impairments. A final module will focus on how results of the vestibular test battery form predictable patterns. Students will be expected to conduct practica outside the classroom. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Vestibular Sciences I. SUMMER. [3] AUD 5353. Amplification III. Design and evaluation of auditory prostheses for listeners with hearing loss. Industrial audiology including testing, training, and intervention protocols. A discussion of noise levels, OSHA guidelines, noise-induced hearing loss, and hearing protection in work and leisure activities. SPRING. [3] AUD 5354. Cochlear Implants. This course covers basic principles of electrical stimulation of neural tissue, cochlear implant design, as well as the history of cochlear implants. Further it will cover current issues in the medical, audiological, speech/language, and educational management of adults and children with cochlear implants—emphasis on multidisciplinary team function. Prerequisite: AUD 5318. SPRING. [3] AUD 5361. Family-Centered Counseling and Interviewing. Examines the helping relationship in the clinical process, counseling theory relative to audiology practices, and principles and methods of effective clinical interviewing and counseling. SUMMER. [2] AUD 5363. Hearing and Aging. A survey of major concepts in gerontology, including demographics, psychosocial aspects of aging, biology of aging, and clinical conditions of the older adult. Physiological changes within the aging auditory system, and clinical issues in audiological assessment and intervention with older hearing-impaired patients. FALL. [3]

Biochemistry (GS) BCHM-GS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly BCHM-GS 369] BCHM-GS 8300. Introduction to Structural Biology. [Formerly BCHMGS 300] Introduction to methods to determine the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules and macromolecular complexes at or near atomic resolution. Techniques covered include X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, and fluorescence spectroscopies, cryo-electron microscopy, and computational modeling. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of each technique and the range of applications for which each technique is applicable. The course is given during the first third of the semester, just preceding Biochemistry 8303. SPRING. [1] BCHM-GS 8301. Molecular Structure and Function. [Formerly BCHMGS 301] This course considers the use of biochemical methods to answer important questions of function in systems involving interacting species. Protein-protein, protein-ligand, protein-nucleic acid, and nucleic acidnucleic acid interactions are considered. Multiple approaches discussed include mutagenesis, kinetic, chemical, spectroscopic, and in vitro selection methods. SPRING. [2]

vanderbilt university BCHM-GS 8302. Advanced Biochemistry, Cell Biology, and Genetics. [Formerly BCHM-GS 302] Advanced concepts in genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology will be reviewed using a combination of lectures and discussion sections based on published manuscripts. Prerequisite: IGP core course or consent of instructor. FALL. [3] BCHM-GS 8303. Biomolecular X-Ray Crystallography. [Formerly BCHM-GS 303] Introduction to the theory and practice of X-ray crystallography for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules at atomic resolution. Topics to be covered include X-ray diffraction, symmetry and space groups, crystallization, data collection, phasing, model building, refinement and validation. Prerequisite: BCHMGS 8300. SPRING. [2] BCHM-GS 8323. Special Problems and Experimental Techniques. [Formerly BCHM-GS 323] Opportunity to master advanced laboratory techniques while pursuing special problems under direction of individual members of the faculty in areas of their specialized interests. Admission to course, hours, and credit by arrangement. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-6] BCHM-GS 8325. Special Topics in Biochemistry. [Formerly BCHM-GS 325] Introduction to current research through the biochemical literature. Given on an individual basis by arrangement. May be taken more than once, but not for more than 2 hours credit with a single adviser, nor for more than 4 hours total. May be taken concurrently with 8323 with a different adviser. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-2] BCHM-GS 8327. Scientific Communication. [Formerly BCHM-GS 327] This course will develop skills required for effective oral and written scientific communication. Students will present research from the current literature and will be required to write an NIH formatted grant proposal to be critiqued by faculty assigned by the course director. Students not working for a degree in biochemistry must have the consent of the instructor to enroll. FALL. [2] BCHM-GS 8336. Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology. [Formerly BCHM-GS 336] (Also listed as Chemistry 6170) Chemical and biological aspects of toxicology and carcinogenesis, including basic principles and mechanisms, metabolism and enzymology, cellular biology, chemistry of reactive intermediates, tissue-specific toxicity, and a survey of several classes of environmentally important compounds and drugs. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry and general biochemistry. Three lectures per week. FALL. [3] BCHM-GS 8337. Molecular Aspects of Cancer Research. [Formerly BCHM-GS 337] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology 8337) A focused series of seminars and discussions to explore the molecular basis of cancer. Seminars rely heavily on extramural speakers with recognized expertise in selected research areas. Discussion sections led by a faculty member following each series of three to four seminars. SPRING. [1] BCHM-GS 8343. Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy. [Formerly BCHMGS 343] Introduction to the theory and practice of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the study of the structure, dynamics, and biochemistry of biological macromolecules. After introducing the basic concepts of NMR and formalisms for predicting the outcome of experiments, topics to be covered will include multidimensional NMR, scalar and dipolar couplings, chemical exchange, relaxation, resonance assignment strategies, and determination of 3D structures. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 8300. FALL. [3] BCHM-GS 8349. Graduate Seminar in Molecular Biophysics. [Formerly BCHM-GS 349] (Also listed as CPBP 8349) Introduction to research areas of current interest through examination of key publications in the preceding year. The weekly meetings consist of open discussions of assigned readings led by multiple student teams. May be repeated for credit. SPRING. [1] BCHM-GS 8352. Analytical Proteomics. [Formerly BCHM-GS 352] Introduces analytical proteomics methods and approaches through lectures, directed readings, and group and individual data analysis exercises. Topics include (a) mass spectrometry instrumentation, (b) mass spectrometry approaches to protein and peptide analysis, (c) protein and peptide preparation and separation methods, (d) bioinformatics tools for

Graduate School / Courses identification of proteins from mass spectrometry data, (e) quantitative proteomics methods, (f) applications of proteomics in common experimental designs in biochemistry and cell biology, (g) applications to clinical studies. SPRING. [2]. BCHM-GS 8381. Molecular Foundations of Medicine. [Formerly BCHM-GS 381] Molecular Foundations of Medicine is designed to familiarize students with the cellular structures, biomolecules, and processes that constitute life, human health, and disease at the molecular level. The course employs an integrated approach to teach underlying principles of biochemistry, cell and tissue biology, and genetics with an emphasis on human systems and medical conditions. The inclusion of clinical correlation sessions, small groups, and laboratory sessions will further integrate and broaden course material and relate molecular processes to the study of human disease. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. FALL. [Variable credit: 1-6] BCHM-GS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly BCHM-GS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] BCHM-GS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly BCHM-GS 399] [Variable credit: 0-12]

Biological Sciences BSCI 5890. Special Topics in Biological Sciences. (Also listed as BSCI 3890) Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once by permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. Prerequisite: 1511. [3] BSCI 6320. Graduate Seminar in Biological Sciences. [Formerly BSCI 320] May be repeated for credit more than once. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1] BSCI 6332. Seminar in Biological Rhythms. [Formerly BSCI 332] May be repeated for credit more than once. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-2] BSCI 6336. Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. [Formerly BSCI 336] May be repeated for credit more than once. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-2] BSCI 6341. Focal Topics in Molecular Biology. [Formerly BSCI 341] Indepth analysis of three to four research areas in molecular and cell biology taught by experts in each subdiscipline through lectures and discussions of papers from the current literature. Prerequisite: IGP 8001 or permission of instructor. [3] BSCI 6384. The Brain and Behavior. [Formerly BSCI 384] Brain and Behavior provides a basic understanding of the human central nervous system and human behavior. The format includes lectures, lab exercises, small-group discussions, and patient case presentations. Brain and Behavior integrates three areas of medical science: (1) neuroanatomy, physiology, and biochemistry; (2) psychopathology and systems neuroscience; and (3) pathology, pharmacology, and radiology. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. [1] BSCI 6385. Advanced Reading in Biological Sciences. [Formerly BSCI 385] Specialized topics under the guidance of a member of the department’s faculty. Open to qualified graduate students only. Admission to course by arrangement. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] BSCI 7390. Special Topics and Advanced Techniques in Biological Sciences. [Formerly BSCI 390] Specialized laboratory experiments, open to a limited number of properly qualified students. Admission to course, hours, and credit by arrangement. May be repeated for credit more than once. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [2-4] BSCI 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly BSCI 369] [0-12] BSCI 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly BSCI 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] BSCI 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly BSCI 399] [0-12]

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Biomedical Engineering BME 5420. Advanced Quantitative and Functional Imaging. [Formerly BME 377] Analysis of non-invasive image data to assess tissue structure and function in the body. Modeling and parameter estimation based on medical imaging data. Measurements of tissue volume, fiber structure, blood flow, brain function, and receptor density. No credit for both BME 4420 and 5420. FALL. [3] BME 6110. Research and Professional Development in Biomedical Engineering. [Formerly BME 305] Database search strategies, interpreting engineering and scientific literature, communication skills, engineering design, proposal writing, preparation of engineering publications, technology transfer/intellectual property, engineering laboratory documentation, regulatory oversight, ethics, funding. SPRING. [3]. BME 7110. Laser-Tissue Interaction and Therapeutic Use of Lasers. [Formerly BME 320] Optical and thermal aspects and models of the interaction between laser/light and biological tissue as it is used for therapeutic applications in medicine and biology. Issues and objectives in therapeutic and surgical applications of lasers, overview of state-of-the-art topics and current research. FALL. [3] BME 7120. Optical Diagnosis: Principles and Applications. [Formerly BME 321] Applications of light and tissue optical properties for the diagnosis of tissue pathology. Basic scientific and engineering principles for developing techniques and devices that use light to probe cells and tissues. Recent applications of different optical diagnostic techniques. SPRING. [3] BME 7310. Advanced Computational Modeling and Analysis in Biomedical Engineering. [Formerly BME 329] Survey of current topics within biomedical modeling: biotransport, biomechanics, tumor and virus growth dynamics, model-based medical imaging techniques, etc. Mathematical development and analysis of biomedical simulations using advanced numerical techniques for the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Emphasis will be on graduate research related topics. SPRING. [3] BME 7410. Quantitative Methods in Biomedical Engineering. [Formerly BME 300] Mathematics, quantitative analysis, and computational methods for biomedical engineering applications. Topics include applied probability and statistics, signal analysis and experiment design, linear systems, Fourier transforms, and numerical modeling and analysis. FALL. [3] BME 7413. Advanced Biomechanics. [Formerly BME 313] Application of advanced concepts in statics, dynamics, continuum mechanics, and strength of materials to biological systems. Topics include measurement of mechanical properties of biological materials; rheological properties of blood; mechanics of cells, bone, skeletal muscle, and soft tissue; normal and abnormal dynamics of human movement; mechanics of articular joint movement; pulmonary mechanics; cardiac mechanics; arterial mechanics; mechanics of veins and collapsible vessels; and mechanics of flow in the microcirculation. Prerequisite: BME 2100, BME 3000 or equivalent. [3] BME 7419. Engineering Models of Cellular Phenomena. [Formerly BME 319] Application of engineering methods to model and quantify aspects of cell physiology. Topics include receptor mediated cell processes, cell-cell signaling, cooperative barrier behavior, cell structural components, and cell motility. SPRING. [3] (Offered alternate years) BME 7420. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods. [Formerly BME 378] MR techniques to image tissue for clinical evaluation and research. RF pulses, k-space trajectories, chemical shift, motion, flow, and relaxation. Derivation of signal equations for pulse sequence design and analysis. Course includes hands-on experimental studies. SPRING. [3] BME 7425. Physical Measurements on Biological Systems. [Formerly BME 325] A survey of the state-of-the-art in quantitative physical measurement techniques applied to cellular or molecular physiology. Topics include the basis for generation, measurement, and control of the transmembrane potential; electrochemical instrumentation; optical spectroscopy and imaging; x-ray diffraction for determination of macromolecular structure; magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Prerequisite: PHYS 2250. SPRING. [3] BME 7430. Cancer Imaging. [Formerly BME 330] Applications of noninvasive, in vivo imaging (i.e., MRI, optical, CT, SPECT, PET, and ultrasound)

80 to cancer biology. Emphasis on assessing the response of tumors to treatment using emerging and quantitative imaging techniques. SPRING. (Offered alternate years) [3] BME 7440. Neuroimaging. [Formerly BME 331] Applications of noninvasive imaging techniques including MRI, fMRI, optical, EEG, and PET to the study of neural systems. Emphasis on the human brain, with a focus on current scientific literature. FALL. (Offered alternate years) [3] BME 7473. Design of Medical Products, Processes, and Services. [Formerly BME 373] Medical design projects involving teams of graduate level engineering and management students. Projects are solicited from industry or universities and are undertaken from the initial phase of a design request to the end product, prototype, plan, or feasibility analysis. Prerequisite: BME 4950 or equivalent. SPRING. [3] BME 7500. Independent Study in Biomedical Engineering. [Formerly BME 390] Study of advanced biomedical engineering topics not regularly offered in the curriculum. Consent of instructor is required. FALL, SPRING. [3] BME 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly BME 369] BME 8900. Special Topics. [Formerly BME 395A] Different topics taught at graduate level. [1-3] BME 8901. Special Topics. [Formerly BME 395B] Different topics taught at graduate level. [1-3] BME 8902. Special Topics. [Formerly BME 395C] Different topics taught at graduate level. [1-3] BME 8903. Special Topics. [Formerly BME 395D] Different topics taught at graduate level. [1-3] BME 8991. Biomedical Research Seminar. [Formerly BME 391] [1]

vanderbilt university required. Students will write and present individual projects. Undergraduates need the permission of the instructor to enroll. FALL. [3] BMIF 6315. Methodological Foundations of Biomedical Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 6315] In this course, students will develop foundational concepts of computation and analytical thinking that are instrumental in solving challenging problems in biomedical informatics. The course will use lectures and projects directed by co-instructors and guest lecturers. SPRING. [3] BMIF 6321. Scientific Communication. [Formerly BMIF 316A] The course will enhance students’ skills in written and oral scientific communication. An introductory segment covers categories of scientific writing, the peer review process, and ethical issues in research communication. Through a two-semester sequence, it provides direct, hands-on experience in writing papers, abstracts, and grant proposals; critiquing and copy editing; and preparing and giving presentations for scientific meetings. FALL, SPRING. [1-1] BMIF 6322. Scientific Communication. [Formerly BMIF 316B] The course will enhance students’ skills in written and oral scientific communication. An introductory segment covers categories of scientific writing, the peer review process, and ethical issues in research communication. Through a twosemester sequence, it provides direct, hands-on experience in writing papers, abstracts, and grant proposals; critiquing and copy editing; and preparing and giving presentations for scientific meetings. FALL, SPRING. [1-1] BMIF 6331. Student Journal Club and Research Colloquium. [Formerly BMIF 317A] The class meets weekly and is a seminar course that involves two revolving formats: journal club presentations and student research in progress presentations. For Biomedical Informatics graduate students only, usually taken in the second year of the program. FALL [1]

BME 8994. Biomedical Research Seminar. [Formerly BME 394] [1]

BMIF 6332. Student Journal Club and Research Colloquium. [Formerly BMIF 317B] The class meets weekly and is a seminar course that involves two revolving formats: journal club presentations and student research in progress presentations. For Biomedical Informatics graduate students only, usually taken in the second year of the program. SPRING. [1]

BME 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly BME 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

BMIF 6341. Research Rotation In Biomedical Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 318A] Students will perform research under the direction of a faculty adviser. FALL. [1-1]

BME 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly BME 399]

BMIF 6342. Research Rotation In Biomedical Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 318B] Students will perform research under the direction of a faculty adviser. SPRING. [1-1]

BME 8992. Biomedical Research Seminar. [Formerly BME 392] [1] BME 8993. Biomedical Research Seminar. [Formerly BME 393] [1]

Biomedical Informatics (GS) BMIF 6300. Foundations of Biomedical Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 300] This introductory course examines the unique characteristics of clinical and life science data and the methods for representation and transformation of health data, information, and knowledge to improve health care. Principles of information security and confidentiality are taught, along with functional components of information systems in clinical settings and the use of databases for outcome management. Through skill modules and weekly programming exercises, the course provides an introduction to methods underlying many biomedical informatics applications, including information retrieval, medical decision making, evaluation of evidence, and knowledge representation. The historical evaluation of the field of biomedical informatics is taught concurrently, using examples of landmark systems developed by pioneers in the field. FALL. [3] BMIF 6310. Foundations of Bioinformatics. [Formerly BMIF 310] This survey course introduces students to the experimental context and implementation of key algorithms in bioinformatics. The class begins with a review of basic biochemistry and molecular biology. The group will then focus on algorithms for matching and aligning biological sequences, given the context of molecular evolution. The emphasis will move from comparing sequences to the systems developed to enable high-throughput DNA sequencing, genome assembly, and gene annotation. Gene products will be the next focus as students consider the algorithms supporting proteomic mass spectrometry and protein structure inference and prediction. The informatics associated with transcriptional microarrays for genomewide association studies will follow. Finally, the class will examine biological networks, including genetic regulatory networks, gene ontologies, and data integration. Formal training in software development is helpful but not

BMIF 7311. Systems Biology. [Formerly BMIF 311] This survey course presents the student with the historical, conceptual, and technical foundations of systems biology as it relates to biomedical research using model systems as well as human disease. SPRING. [3] BMIF 7320. Healthcare System and Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 320] The purpose of this course is for students to understand the organizational world in which they will spend most of their professional lives. A better understanding will lead to strategies to build partnerships with physicians, researchers, hospitals, and academic organizations. In turn, better understanding will lead to working more closely as a team in planning future directions and implementing technological programs and changes. This course provides an overview of theoretical concepts as well as the practical tools for the student to understand and work effectively with two major topic areas: (1) understanding the health care environment; and (2) understanding organizational informatics, including the implementation of informatics systems and the concepts of behavioral change management. Prerequisite: BMIF 6300. SPRING. [3] BMIF 7330. Machine Learning for Biomedicine. [Formerly BMIF 330] This course builds on the material covered in Methodological Foundations of Biomedical Informatics (BMIF 6315) by introducing several additional machine learning concepts and algorithms with a focus on biomedical decision-making and discovery. Even though biomedical applications and examples will be discussed, the methods have broad applicability in science and engineering. The following topics will be covered in this course (may be expanded or modified based on the background of the class participants): decision support systems, natural language processing and text mining, Bayesian networks, neural networks, decision trees, feature selection, SVM regression and unsupervised SVMs, hidden Markov models,

Graduate School / Courses Bayesian network learning, and causal discovery using Bayesian networks. Prerequisite: For Biomedical Informatics students, BMIF 6315; for nonBiomedical Informatics students, a course in data structures or algorithm design and analysis, the ability to program in MATLAB version 6 or later, and basic concepts of machine learning and fundamental mathematical concepts needed in machine learning at the level covered in BMIF 6315. SPRING. [3] BMIF 7340. Clinical Information Systems and Databases. [Formerly BMIF 340] This course builds on material covered in Methodological Foundations of Biomedical Informatics (BMIF 6315) by introducing and developing concepts in distributed systems and network computing: OSI stack, protocols, TCP/IP, Sockets, and DNS; clinical database concepts: synchronization, concurrency, deadlock, full-text databases; distributed database services, including high-availability techniques; and architectural considerations in the design of clinical information systems. The VUMC clinical database architecture is used as a case study. Prerequisite: For Biomedical Informatics students, BMIF 6315 or permission of instructor; for non-Biomedical Informatics students, coding ability in some standard procedural or object-oriented computer language, preferably PERL. FALL. [3] BMIF 7370. Evaluation Methods in Biomedical Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 370] Students are introduced to health information technology evaluation, with exposure to study design, including sampling, appropriate use of controls; data collection, including human subjects research considerations; analysis, including testing for statistical significance, definitions of sensitivity and specificity, ROC plots; and reporting of results. Quantitative and qualitative methods will be covered, as well as methods and issues specific to health care settings. FALL. [3] BMIF 7380. Data Privacy in Biomedicine. [Formerly BMIF 380] This course introduces students to concepts for evaluating and constructing technologies that protect personal privacy in data collected for primary care and biomedical research. Material in this course touches on topics in biomedical knowledge modeling, data mining, policy design, and law. Prerequisite: students are expected to be proficient in writing basic software programs, although no specific programming language is required. SPRING. [3] BMIF 7391. Special Topics Seminar in Biomedical Informatics. [Formerly BMIF 391] This course is designed for faculty to offer small groups of students a study course on a topic of mutual interest and concern in the faculty member’s area of expertise. BMIF 7395. Directed Research/Independent Study. [Formerly BMIF 395] Students will work under close supervision of a specific faculty member on an ongoing research problem. Depending on the specific project, students will learn aspects of study design, research methods, data collection and analysis, research manuscript writing, and human factors engineering. SPRING/FALL. [1-3] BMIF 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly BMIF 369] BMIF 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly BMIF 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] BMIF 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly BMIF 399]

Biomedical Sciences IGP 8001. Bioregulation I. [Formerly IGP 300A] Fundamental aspects of the utilization of genetic material from DNA to RNA to protein. This includes macromolecular structure and function, cell biology, and the regulation of cell growth. FALL. [1-8] IGP 8002. Bioregulation II. [Formerly IGP 300B] Fundamental aspects of cell-cell communication and information flow through multicellular organs and the overall regulation of these processes. Includes immunologic defense, endocrine signalling, neuroscience, and molecular aspects of disease. SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-6] IGP 8004. Responsible Conduct in Research. [Formerly IGP 303] Formal lectures and small group discussions on a range of issues encountered in research activities. Included are responsibilities of the investigator

81 and the university to the federal government; scientific misconduct, ethical use of animals in research; ethics of publication, lab management, and grant writing. IGP 8005. Techniques and Preparations. [Formerly IGP 302] Eight-week modules conducting laboratory research on a project designed by a faculty preceptor. Includes technical instruction, critical data analysis, experimental design, and literature review. FALL, SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-5] IGP 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly IGP 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] IGP 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly IGP 399]

Biostatistics BIOS 6301. Introduction to Statistical Computing. [Formerly BIOS 301] This course is designed for students who seek to develop skills in statistical computing. Students will learn how to use R and STATA for data management, database querying, reporting generating, data presentation, and data tabulation and summarization. Topics will include organization and documentation of data, input and export of data sets, methods of cleaning data, tabulation and graphing of data, programming capabilities, and an introduction to simulations and bootstrapping. Students will also be introduced to LaTeX and Sweave for report writing. Students will also be briefly introduced to SAS and SQL programming. FALL. [2] BIOS 6311. Principles of Modern Biostatistics. [Formerly BIOS 311] This is the first in a two-course series designed for students who seek to develop skills in modern biostatistical reasoning and data analysis. Students learn the statistical principles that govern the analysis of data in the health sciences and biomedical research. Traditional probabilistic concepts and modern computational techniques will be integrated with applied examples from biomedical and health sciences. Statistical computing uses software packages STATA and R; prior familiarity with these packages is helpful but not required. Topics include types of data, tabulation of data, methods of exploring and presenting data, graphing techniques (boxplots, q-q plots, histograms), indirect and direct standardization of rates, axioms of probability, probability distributions and their moments, properties of estimators, the Law of Large numbers, the Central Limit Theorem, theory of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing (one sample and two sample problems), paradigms of statistical inference (Frequentist, Bayesian, Likelihood), introduction to non-parametric techniques, bootstrapping and simulation, sample size calculations and basic study design issues. One hour lab required; Students are required to take 6311L concurrently. Prerequisite: Calculus I. FALL. [3] BIOS 6311L. Principles of Modern Biostatistics Lab. [Formerly BIOS 311L] This is a discussion section/lab for Principles of Modern Biostatistics. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing solutions and extensions will be emphasized. Students are required to take 6311 concurrently. FALL. [1] BIOS 6312. Modern Regression Analysis. [Formerly BIOS 312] This is the second in a two-course series designed for students who seek to develop skills in modern biostatistical reasoning and data analysis. Students learn modern regression analysis and modeling building techniques from an applied perspective. Theoretical principles will be demonstrated with real-world examples from biomedical studies. This course requires substantial statistical computing in software packages STATA and R; familiarity with at least one of these packages is required. The course covers regression modeling for continuous outcomes, including simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, and analysis of variance with oneway, two-way, three-way, and analysis of covariance models. This is a brief introduction to models for binary outcomes (logistic models), ordinal outcomes (proportional odds models), count outcomes (poisson/negative binomial models), and time to event outcomes (Kaplan-Meier curves, Cox proportional hazard modeling). Incorporated into the presentation of these models are subtopic topics such as regression diagnostics, nonparametric regression, splines, data reduction techniques, model validation, parametric bootstrapping, and a very brief introduction to methods for handling missing data. One hour lab required. Students are required to take 6312L

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concurrently. Prerequisite: Biostatistics 6311 or equivalent; familiarity with STATA and R software packages. SPRING. [3]

solutions and extensions will be emphasized. Students are required to take 7323 concurrently. FALL. [1]

BIOS 6312L. Modern Regression Analysis Lab. [Formerly BIOS 312L] This is a discussion section/lab for Modern Regression Analysis. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing solutions and extensions will be emphasized. Students are required to take 6312 concurrently. SPRING. [1]

BIOS 7330. Regression Modeling Strategies. [Formerly BIOS 330] The course presents strategies for, and a survey of current thinking on, building predictive models. Multivariable predictive modeling for a single response variable: using regression splines to relax linearity assumptions, perils of variable selection and over-fitting, where to spend degrees of freedom, shrinkage, imputation of missing data, data reduction, and interaction surfaces. Methods for graphically understanding models (e.g., using nomograms) and using resampling to estimate a model’s likely performance on new data. Statistical methods related to binary logistic models and ordinal logistic and survival models will be covered. Students will develop, validate, and graphically describe multivariable regression models. Prerequisite: BIOS 6311 and 6312 or permission. SPRING. [3]

BIOS 6321. Clinical Trials and Experimental Design. [Formerly BIOS 321] This course covers the statistical aspects of study designs, monitoring and analysis. Emphasis is on studies of human subjects, i.e. clinical trials. Topics include principles of measurement, selection of endpoints, bias, masking, randomization and balance, blocking, study designs, sample size projections, study conduct, interim monitoring of accumulating results, flexible and adaptive designs, sequential analysis, analysis principles, adjustment techniques, compliance, data and safety monitoring boards (DSMB), Institutional Review Boards (IRB), the ethics of animal and human subject experimentation, history of clinical trials, and the Belmont report. BIOS 6341. Fundamentals of Probability. [Formerly BIOS 341] The first in a two-course series (6341–6342), Fundamentals of Probability introduces and explores the probabilistic framework underling statistical theory. Students learn probability theory—the formal language of uncertainty — and its application to everyday statistical concepts and analysis methods. Students will validate analytical solutions and explore limit theorems using R software. This course covers probability axioms, probability and sample space, events and random variables, transformation of random variables, probability inequalities, independence, discrete and continuous distributions, expectations and variances, conditional expectation, moment generating functions, random vectors, convergence concepts (in probability, in law, almost surely), Central Limit Theorem, weak and strong Law of Large Numbers, extreme value distributions, order statistics and exponential family. FALL. BIOS 6341L. Fundamentals of Probability Lab. [Formerly BIOS 341L] This is a discussion section/lab for Fundamentals of Probability. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing solutions and extensions will be emphasized. Students are required to take 6341 concurrently. BIOS 6342. Contemporary Statistical Inference. [Formerly BIOS 342] The second in a two-course series (6341–6342), Contemporary Statistical Inference introduces and explores the fundamental inferential framework for parameter estimation, testing hypotheses, and interval estimation. Students learn classical methods of inference (hypothesis testing), and modes of inference (Frequentist, Bayesian and Likelihood approaches) and their surrounding controversies. Topics include delta method, sufficiency, minimal sufficiency, exponential family, ancillarity, completeness, conditionality principle, Fisher’s Information, Cramer-Rao inequality, hypothesis testing (likelihood ratios test, most powerful test, optimality, Neyman-Pearson lemma, inversion of test statistics), Likelihood principle, Law of Likelihood, Bayesian posterior estimation, Interval estimation (confidence intervals, support intervals, credible intervals), basic asymptotic and large sample theory, maximum likelihood estimation, resampling techniques (e.g., bootstrap). BIOS 6342L. Contemporary Statistical Inference Lab. [Formerly BIOS 342L] This is a discussion section/lab for Contemporary Statistical Inference. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing solutions and extensions will be emphasized. Students are required to take 6342 concurrently. BIOS 7323. Applied Survival Analysis. [Formerly BIOS 323] This course provides an applied introduction to methods for time-to-event data with censoring mechanisms. Topics include life tables, nonparametric approaches (e.g., Kaplan-Meir, log-rank), semi-parametric approaches (e.g., Cox model), parametric approaches (e.g., Weibull, gamma, frailty) competing Risks (introduce Poisson regression as connection to Cox model), and time-dependent covariates. Focus is on fitting the models and the relevance of those models for the biomedical application. [3] BIOS 7323L. Applied Survival Analysis Lab. [Formerly BIOS 323L] This is a discussion section/lab for Applied Survival Analysis. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing

BIOS 7345. Advanced Regression Analysis I (Linear and General Linear Models). [Formerly BIOS 345] Students are exposed to a theoretical framework for linear and generalized models. First half of the semester covers linear models: multivariate normal theory, least squares estimation, limiting chi-square and F-distributions, sum of squares (partial, sequential) and expected sum of squares, weighted least squares, orthogonality, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Second half of the semester focuses on generalized linear models: binomial, Poisson, multinomial errors, introduction to categorical data analysis, conditional likelihoods, quasi-likelihoods, model checking, matched pair designs. [3] BIOS 7345L. Adv Regression Analysis I Lab. [Formerly BIOS 345L] This is a discussion section/lab for Advanced Regression Analysis. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing solutions and extension will be emphasized. Students are required to take 7345 concurrently. FALL. [1] BIOS 7346. Advanced Regression Analysis II (General Linear & Longitudinal Models). [Formerly BIOS 346] Second in a yearlong series, students are exposed to a theoretical framework for generalized linear and longitudinal models. Covers classic repeated measures models, random effect models, generalized estimating equations (GEEs), Hierarchical models, and transitional models for binary data, marginal vs. mixed effects models, model fitting, model checking, clustering, and implication for study design. Also includes discussion of missing data techniques, Bayesian and Likelihood methods for GLMs, and various fitting algorithms such as maximum likelihood and generalized least squares. Prerequisite: BIOS 7345. SPRING. [3] BIOS 7346L. Advanced Regression Analysis II Lab. [Formerly BIOS 346L] This is a discussion lab for Advanced Regression Analysis II. Students will review relevant theory and work on applications as a group. Computing solutions and extensions will be emphasized. Students are required to take BIOS 7346 concurrently. FALL. [1] BIOS 7351. Statistical Collaboration in Health Sciences I. [Formerly BIOS 351] First course of two on collaboration in statistical science. Students are exposed to a variety of problems that arise in collaborative arrangements. The course’s goal is to sharpen students’ consulting skills while exposing them to the application of advanced statistical techniques in routine health science applications. The importance of understanding and learning the science underlying collaborations will be emphasized. Students will role-play with real investigators, discuss real consulting projects that have gone awry, and face real-life problems such as opaque scientific direction poor scientific formulation, lack of time, and ill-formulated messy data. Students will engage in several consulting projects that will involve the use of a wide range of biostatistics methods from design to analysis. Course content will also make use of departmental clinics that are run concurrently. [3] BIOS 7352. Statistical Collaboration in Health Sciences II. [Formerly BIOS 352] Second course of a yearlong sequence in collaboration in statistical science. Students are exposed to a variety of problems that arise in collaborative arrangements. The course’s goal is to sharpen students’ consulting skills while exposing them to the application of advanced statistical techniques in routine health science applications. The importance of understanding and learning the science underlying collaborations will be emphasized. Students will role-play with real investigators, discuss real consulting projects that have gone awry, and face real-life problems such

Graduate School / Courses as opaque scientific direction, poor scientific formulation, lack of time, and ill-formulated messy data. Students will engage in several consulting projects that will involve the use of a wide range of biostatistics methods from design to analysis. Course content will also make use of departmental clinics that are run concurrently. Prerequisite: BIOS 7351 FALL. [3] BIOS 7361. Advanced Concepts in Probability and Real Analysis for Biostatisticians. [Formerly BIOS 361] To include characteristic functions, modes of converge, uniform integrability, Brownian motion, classical limit theorems, Lp spaces, projections, sigma-algebras and RVs, martingales, random walks, Markov chains, probabilistic asymptotics. Emphasis on measure theory is minimal. Concepts are illustrated in biomedical applications whenever possible. [3] BIOS 7362. Advanced Statistical Inference. [Formerly BIOS 362] This course is an in-depth examination of modern inferential tools. Topics include High-order asymptotics, Edgeworth expansions, nonparametric statistics, quasi-likelihood and estimating equations theory, multivariate classification methods, re-sampling techniques, statistical learning, methods and tehory of high-dimensional data, estimation-maximization (EM) algorithms, and Gibbs sampling. Concepts are illustrated in biomedical applications whenever possible. SPRING. [3] BIOS 7393. Independent Study in Biostatistics. [Formerly BIOS 393] Designed to allow the student to explore and/or master advanced or specialized topics in Biostatistics under the guidance of faculty with relevant expertise. May be repeated. BIOS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly BIOS 369] Master’s Thesis Research BIOS 8366. Advanced Statistical Computing. [Formerly BIOS 366] Course covers numerical optimization, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation-maximization (EM), algorithms, Gaussian processes, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, and data augmentation algorithms with applications for model fitting and techniques for dealing with missing data. Prerequisite: BIOS 6301 or permission of instructor. FALL. [3] BIOS 8370. Foundations of Statistical Inference. [Formerly BIOS 370] Examines the foundations of statistical inference as viewed from Frequentist, Bayesian, and Likelihood approaches. Famous papers and controversies are discussed along with statistical theories of evidence and decision theory, and their historic significance. SPRING. [3] BIOS 8372. Bayesian Methods. [Formerly BIOS 372] This course covers the methodology and rationale for Bayesian methods and their applications. Statistical topics include the historical development of Bayesian method such as hierarchical models, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and related sampling methods, specification of priors, sensitivity analysis, model specification and selection. This course features applications of Bayesian methods to biomedical research. FALL [3] BIOS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly BIOS 379] BIOS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly BIOS 399]

Cancer Biology (GS) CANB 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly CANB 369] Master’s Thesis Research CANB 8320. Cancer and Development. [Formerly CANB 320] A crosslisted CDB/CB graduate-level course that will examine relationships between cellular responses in normal tissue development and cancer. The goal of the course is to familiarize the students with major cellular pathways and responses that are regulated in normal embryonic and post-natal tissue development and how abnormal re-activation of these responses gives rise to malignant disease. SPRING. [3] CANB 8340. Introduction to Cancer Biology. [Formerly CANB 340] This is a didactic lecture series in which general concepts in cancer biology will be reviewed. Topics range from molecular biology of cancer (oncogene and tumor suppressors) to novel concepts such as cancer stem cells and therapeutic approaches. Prerequisite: IGP core course or consent of instructor. FALL [2]

83 CANB 8341. Cell Migration in Normal and Diseased States. [Formerly CANB 341] This course is focused on molecular and cell biological underpinnings of cell migration, with emphasis on cancer motility, invasion and metastasis. It is an in-depth analysis of three to four research areas in molecular and cell biology. It is intended for graduate students with a strong foundation in experimental biology. Students in interdisciplinary fields such as engineering and mathematics are welcome (and encouraged) to take the course if they already have some background biological knowledge, however it is encouraged to discuss enrollment with the instructor first. This course will add options for graduate students interested in cancer metastasis and related biological processes (leukocyte motility, bone and tissue remodeling, embryonic development, etc.) taught by experts in each sub-discipline through lectures and discussions of papers from the current literature. CANB 8342. Advanced Concepts in Cancer Biology. [Formerly CANB 342] Advanced concepts in cancer biology will be reviewed in depth using a combination of lectures and student-led discussion sessions based on current literature. This course is offered only in tandem with the Introduction to Cancer Biology course to be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: must be a Cancer Biology graduate student or have consent of instructor. FALL. [4] CANB 8344. Current Topics in Cancer Biology: Integrative Cancer Biology. [Formerly CANB 344] This is a graduate-level course focusing on cancer as a complex biological system. The goal of this course is to provide the students with comprehensive and up-to-date knowledge about the dynamic and spatial interactions that exist among molecules in a cancer cell, between cancer cells and their “microenvironment,” and between the organism and its “macroenvironment.” This class will integrate multiple cutting-edge research approaches from several disciplines, including cancer biology, proteomics and bioinformatics, functional imaging, mathematical modeling and bioengineering, and epidemiology. Class will include both presentations by the instructors and discussion of recent publications by students. SPRING. [2] CANB 8346. Cancer Imaging. [Formerly CANB 346] [3] CANB 8347. Cancer Systems Biology. [Formerly CANB 347] This course is designed to familiarize student with the emerging field of Cancer Systems Biology. The focus is on research and education programs that link biology, engineering, and computer science in a multidisciplinary approach to the systematic analysis and modeling of complex biological phenomena, such as cancer. It is designed for students with an interest in interdisciplinary training and research in the area of computational and systems biology. This course will provide an overview of systems biology approaches and tools; it will familiarize the students with simple mathematical models for cell proliferation, motility and metabolism. It will also provide an introduction to computational biology with a special emphasis on biological networks, including: construction of gene or signaling networks using literature-based knowledge and existing databases, basics of graph theory, visualization and analysis of networks from the high-throughput data. There will be a strong focus on hands-on training of system biology tools and their application to designing experiments and interpreting results in a modern cancer research laboratory. CANB 8351. Teaching Assistantship in Cancer Biology Curriculum. [Formerly CANB 351] Enrollees in the course will act as teaching assistants for one of the Cancer Biology courses (8340 or 8342 in fall; 8347 or 8384 in spring) with a maximum of 16 hours class contact time. All enrollees will be also required to participate in a monthly journal club for that semester devoted to teaching methods in STEM subjects; and to work with course directors on evaluations. Prerequisite: CANB 8340 and CANB 8342, Ph.D. candidacy. [1] CANB 8352. Biophysical Models of Cancer. [Formerly CANB 352A] The study of biophysical modeling in cancer biology, including models of DNA damage, avascular tumor growth, tumor cell motion and invasion, angiogenesis, transport within tumors, and therapy response. Prerequisite: MATH 2400 or MATH 2420/2610, one year calculus-based physics, or consent of instructor. CANB 8381. Molecular Foundations of Medicine. [Formerly CANB 381] Molecular Foundations of Medicine is designed to familiarize students with the cellular structures, biomolecules, and processes that constitute life, human health, and disease at the molecular level. The course employs

84 an integrated approach to teach underlying principles of biochemistry, cell and tissue biology, and genetics with an emphasis on human systems and medical conditions. The inclusion of clinical correlation sessions, small groups, and laboratory sessions will further integrate and broaden course material and relate molecular processes to the study of human disease. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. FALL. [1] CANB 8384. Clinical and Molecular Based Approaches to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer. [Formerly CANB 384] Over the last decade there has been an increase in the understanding of the molecular drivers of cancers. Based on this information, gene mutation-specific inhibitors are being developed for clinical use that target only sub-populations of patients with particular tumor genotypes. As a result, there is a need for modern oncologists to have an appreciation of the fundamental molecular biology underlying their patient’s tumor to effectively translate tumor genotype to personalized patient care. This course will provide a unique experience in oncology where medical and graduate students work together to explore the molecular drivers of cancer and how that information is translated into targeted cancer therapies. Students will learn the risk factors for and signaling pathways that are often deregulated in cancer through seminars and literature review sessions. This information will be used as a platform to describe how molecular changes are detected in the laboratory and leveraged in the clinic for personalized patient care. Students will examine the multidisciplinary teams necessary in the care of cancer patients through participation in tumor board meetings, clinical experiences, and roundtable discussions. Furthermore, cancer screening, imaging, pre-clinical drug discovery, the advantages and barriers of clinical trials, and socioeconomic disparities will be presented in this course. Prerequisite: CANB 340. [2] CANB 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CANB 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] CANB 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CANB 399]

Cell and Developmental Biology CBIO-GS 8310. Cell Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 310] This is a graduate-level course with three major goals pivotal for success as a graduate student: (1) To provide solid foundational knowledge of cell biology, (2) To learn to think critically about experimental design and interpretation, (3) To learn to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing. The class features faculty from the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and emphasizes fundamental cell processes such as migration, mitosis, proliferation, and death. Critical signaling pathways are reviewed in relation to cell biological processes essential for developmental biology. Weekly student presentations help develop oral communication skills and weekly writing assignments hone writing skills, helping students learn classical and cutting-edge techniques while improving their ability to read and synthesize the literature. Final paper assignment is designed to help students learn to develop and design feasible experiments to test a strong hypothesis. Prerequisite: IGP curriculum and the entire Bioregulation class. CBIO-GS 8312. Introduction to Developmental Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 312] This combined lecture and laboratory course will present students with the basics in the analysis of standard animal models used in modern developmental biology. Central concepts in development will be presented in lecture while the student will gain “hands on” training in the growth and care of embryos and analysis of embryonic development in model organisms. Standard methods of analysis (e.g. basic microscopy/ morphological analysis, immunolabeling, time-lapse imaging, embryo microinjection) will be presented. Prerequisite: IGP Curriculum. Tuesday/ Thursday; SUMMER. [3] CBIO-GS 8313. Introduction to Modern Biological Microscopy. [Formerly CBIO-GS 313] This lecture course will provide students an introduction to modern microscopy and its biological applications. Topics will include diverse methods of light and electron microscopy, the basic principles of each method, details of specific instrumentation, historical background, advantages and restrictions, as well as applicability to various model systems and organisms. Sample preparation, technical hurdles, tricks of live imaging, micro- and nanomanipulation, quantitative image analysis and

vanderbilt university other issues will be addressed. The course will also include a tour of microscopy facilities available at Vanderbilt. SPRING. [2] CBIO-GS 8314. Basic Biological Microscopy. [Formerly CBIO-GS 314] This lecture course will present students with an introduction to microscopy and its applications to biology. Lectures will cover basic principles of light and optics, transmitted light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, digital image acquisition and the “do’s and don’ts” of digital image processing. Fixed sample preparation and basic live cell imaging will also be covered. CBIO-GS 8320. Cancer and Development. [Formerly CBIO-GS 320] (Also listed as CANB 8320) Graduate-level course that will examine relationships between cellular responses in normal tissue development and cancer. The goal of the course is to familiarize the students with major cellular pathways and responses that are regulated in normal embryonic and post-natal tissue development and how abnormal re-activation of these responses gives rise to malignant disease. Offered every other year. SPRING. [3] CBIO-GS 8324. Epithelial Pathobiology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 324] To introduce students to issues of polarized epithelial cell function in the context of normal physiology as well as alterations associated with disease. Two one-and-a-half-hour sessions per week, one-semester course; paper presentation and discussion on Wednesday, lecture on Friday by visiting scientists. During the course, five visiting scientists from outside Vanderbilt will present special topics changing each year. Prerequisite: open to all graduate students. Offered every other year. SPRING. [3] CBIO-GS 8325. Histology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 325] (Also listed as Cancer Biology 8325) This course focuses on the organization of cells to form tissues and organs both in terms of structure and function. Our studies begin with a discussion of the basic tissue types that form all multicellular organisms. Lecture and microscopic laboratory formats will introduce students to epithelia, connective tissue, muscle, nerve, and lymphoid tissues. Students will examine histological preparations microscopically in laboratory during this phase of the course. Next, a discussion of the organization of tissues into functioning organs will be pursued. Here, we will focus on basic concepts in organ arrangement rather than memorizing various structures. Students will have significant input on which adult or developing organs are used as models of organ structure and function. Learning laboratory methods in the analysis of tissues and organs will run concurrently with didactic instruction. Students will be asked to choose specific tissues/ organs (often directly related to their thesis work) that they will prepare for morphological analysis. Specifically, students will learn methods in fixation, processing, sectioning, and microscopic analysis including morphometrics, immunofluorescence, histochemistry, and electron microscopy. Offered every other year. FALL. [3] CBIO-GS 8330. Seminar In Cell and Developmental Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 330] The goal of the course is for graduate students to learn about two cutting-edge areas of research in cell and developmental biology. Each area will be presented by four outside speakers (eight dates total). The week before each seminar, the student will read and discuss, facilitated by a faculty member, a paper authored by the next week’s speaker and prepare written critiques. The students will attend the seminar followed by a discussion section with the speaker. FALL, SPRING. [1] CBIO-GS 8331. Current Topics in Developmental Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 331] This course is offered in both the fall and spring semesters and meets once per week to hear a graduate student, postdoctoral fellow, or faculty member discuss a research paper from outside his or her field of research, followed by an audience Q&A session. Students taking this course are paired with a PI mentor and together choose a topical scientific paper that the trainee presents at the end of the semester. FALL, SPRING. [1] CBIO-GS 8333. Reproductive Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 333] A multidisciplinary approach to the study of reproductive biology. Topics covered center on cutting-edge research advances in modern reproductive biology, including: specification of germ cells; cell signaling and the germ line; gonadogenesis and sex determination; meiosis; X-inactivation; germline stem cells; spermatogenesis; oogenesis; fertilization; and implantation. The format will consist of a combination of lectures, faculty-led discussions, and faculty-mentored student presentations. Offered every other year. [3] (Not currently offered)

Graduate School / Courses CBIO-GS 8337. Molecular Aspects of Cancer Research. [Formerly CBIO-GS 337] (Also listed as Biochemistry 8337) A focused series of seminars and discussions to explore the molecular basis of cancer. Seminars rely heavily on extramural speakers with recognized expertise in selected research areas. Students meet with the speaker immediately following each seminar. Discussion sections led by a faculty member follow each series of three to four seminars. SPRING. [1] CBIO-GS 8338. Special Topics Cell Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 338] This course is intended to give first-year IGP students a personal perspective on the careers of exceptional cell and developmental biology researchers. Each session will focus on Nobel Prize or Lasker Award winners in Physiology or Medicine that have impacted cell and developmental biology fields. A faculty member with training or interest ties to the researcher will present and lead a discussion on the research topic and the history of the researcher’s career. In preparation for each session, the students will research the information at or linked to the award Web sites. For each session, the students will be given a key paper(s) of the winner (or the winner’s acceptance speech, or biographical articles, etc. at the discretion of the faculty member). During the class-time interactions with the faculty member, the students will incorporate their perspectives on what they found interesting about the winner’s history. For the last wrap-up session, each student will pick an ward winner, who has not been discussed, and prepare a 15-minute presentation about that person, Prerequisite: Must be first-year IGP student. [1] CBIO-GS 8339. Research Seminar in Cell Biology. [Formerly CBIO-GS 339] Students and postdoctoral fellows present their research projects in an informal atmosphere. Students are critiqued on presentations. CBIO-GS 8340. Special Problems and Experimental Techniques. [Formerly CBIO-GS 340] Designed to allow the student an opportunity to master advanced techniques in cell biology while pursuing special projects under individual members of the faculty in their areas of expertise. Admission to course, hours, and credit by arrangement. [Variable credit: 1-6] (Not currently offered) CBIO-GS 8341. Molecular Developmental Biology. [Formerly CBIOGS 341] This course comprises three cutting-edge areas of developmental biology per year. The aim of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of fundamental issues in modern developmental biology. Faculty didactic lectures provide essential background to facilitate critical reading and discussions of the recent scientific literature. This course is modular, with each module(approximately one month) corresponding to a single thematic topic. Students meet with external lecturers. Topics to be selected. Offered every other year. SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-3] CBIO-GS 8345. Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience. [Formerly CBIOGS 345] (Also listed as Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8345, Neuroscience 8345, Pharmacology 8345) This course is a required entry-level course for students in the Cell and Molecular Track of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vanderbilt that should be taken in the first graduate school year. It also serves as an elective for medical students and graduate students in a number of other programs. Its goal is to expose students to fundamental concepts and techniques in molecular and cellular neuroscience and provide a theoretical context for experimental analysis of brain function and disease. The course is divided into three modules. Module I: Neural Anatomy and Development provides an overview of the anatomy of the nervous system and neurotransmitters and examines concepts in neural pattern formation, neuronal migration, axon guidance, and synapse formation. Module II. Signaling, Plasticity, and Modulation reviews biophysical and molecular concepts relating to neuronal membrane excitability, secretion, and plasticity. Module III: Neural Diseases and Disease Models focuses on specific brain disorders such as epilepsy, pain disorders, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and schizophrenia and current models used to investigate their origin and/or treatment. This course combines faculty lecture with discussion of original articles, with an emphasis on fundamental concepts and the elucidation of important research paradigms in the discipline. Faculty and assistants guide students through important research paradigms with a critical analysis of the primary literature in the topic area. Prerequisite: Bioregulation I (IGP 8001) or consent of instructor. Course directors may consider undergraduate course work in cell biology or biochemistry to meet this requirement. SPRING. [4]

85 CBIO-GS 8347. The Visual System. [Formerly CBIO-GS 347] (Also listed as Neuroscience 8347, Psychology 5780) An interdisciplinary approach to how humans see and interpret their visual environment. Topics include the structure of the eye and brain (including optics), the physiology of individual cells and groups of cells, machine vision and models of visual function, visual attention, and mechanisms of complex visual perception. Lectures by faculty from Psychology and Cell and Developmental Biology. Graduate students attend one hour discussion section per week in addition to lecture, and turn in a more extensive paper than undergraduates. SPRING. [3] CBIO-GS 8349. Genetics of Model Organisms. [Formerly CBIO-GS 349] (Also listed as Human Genetics 8349, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8349) Basic genetic principles across a broad range of organisms (yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, plants, mouse, zebrafish) that are used in genetic analyses to investigate molecular pathways of interest for human disease will be presented. This course will provide students with in-depth terminology and understanding of the advantages, applications, and approaches specific to each organism. Genomic and bioinformatics tools that facilitate genetic analysis in each species will be emphasized. Specific examples of how each model organism has successfully contributed to elucidation of a human disease gene, pathway, or genetic principle will be presented. Course combines faculty lectures with student presentation and discussion of original articles to emphasize the uniqueness of each model system. Prerequisite: one statistics course at the upper undergraduate level or higher and Fundamentals of Genetic Analysis (MPB 8385), or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. SPRING. [3] CBIO-GS 8381. Molecular Foundations of Medicine. [Formerly CBIOGS 381] Molecular Foundations of Medicine is designed to familiarize students with the cellular structures, biomolecules, and processes that constitute life, human health, and disease at the molecular level. The course employs an integrated approach to teach underlying principles of biochemistry, cell and tissue biology, and genetics with an emphasis on human systems and medical conditions. The inclusion of clinical correlation sessions, small groups, and laboratory sessions will further integrate and broaden course material and relate molecular processes to the study of human disease. Prerequisite: THSP students only. FALL. [Variable credit: 1-5] CBIO-GS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CBIO-GS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] CBIO-GS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CBIO-GS 399]

Cellular and Molecular Pathology PATH-GS 8322. Experimental Methods In Pathology. [Formerly PATHGS 322] Special techniques and preparations. Topics include electron microscopy, tissue culture, histochemistry, cytochemistry, and molecular biology. Admission to course, hours, and credit by arrangement. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-4] PATH-GS 8329. Lipoprotein Metabolism. [Formerly PATH-GS 329] Lectures, discussions, and assigned readings in the metabolism of plasma lipoproteins. Topics include the composition and structure of plasma lipoproteins; lipoprotein biosynthesis and assembly; enzyme, exchange proteins, and receptors involved in lipoprotein catabolism; and disorders of lipid metabolism. Presentation of oral reports is required. Prerequisite: an introductory course in biochemistry. Minimum enrollment six students. SPRING. [2] PATH-GS 8331. Seminar in Experimental Pathology. [Formerly PATHGS 331] Students and faculty participate in a weekly discussion of current research projects and literature. FALL. [1] PATH-GS 8332. Current Topics in Experimental Pathology. [Formerly PATH-GS 332] Students and faculty participate in a weekly discussion of current research projects and literature. SPRING. [1] PATH-GS 8333. Fundamentals of Scientific Communication. [Formerly PATH-GS 333] Focuses on development and enhancement of skills in written and oral scientific communication, and critical thinking in scientific problem solving. Lectures, student projects, presentations, and class

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discussions emphasizing manuscript and research grant proposal writing, poster and oral presentations. SPRING. [3]

model and possible solution methods. Applications in heat and mass transfer, chemical kinetics. FALL. [3]

PATH-GS 8335. Molecular Pathology of Extracellular Matrix. [Formerly PATH-GS 335] Lectures on the structure, genes, metabolism, and regulation of the collagens, structural glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and elastin. The role of these macromolecules in maintaining normal tissue integrity and function and in development and wound healing is emphasized, as is the molecular basis for the involvement of these proteins in both inherited and acquired diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer). Prerequisite: Biochemistry and/or cell biology. SPRING. [2]

CHBE 6110. Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. [Formerly CHBE 311] Application of the thermodynamics method to chemical engineering problems. Development of the first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics; estimation and correlation of thermodynamic properties; chemical and phase equilibria; irreversible thermodynamics. FALL. [3]

PATH-GS 8337. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Vascular Disease. [Formerly PATH-GS 337] Lectures on contemporary research in cell biology, protein and lipid biochemistry, and molecular biology of the vascular system. Open to graduate and medical students, postdoctoral fellows, and undergraduate students with consent of instructors and the Graduate School. Prerequisite: A suitable background in biochemistry and cell biology. FALL. [3] PATH-GS 8339. Topics in Pathobiology Methods: Student Teaching Experience. [Formerly PATH-GS 339] This is a dynamic course focused on topics in pathobiology with an emphasis on methodology and teaching. The course meets for 1.5 hours weekly to review a specific method in pathobiology and its evolution. For those interested, participation in the course provides an opportunity for the student to gain teaching experience in a supervised setting (optional). Students will pick a topic from an existing list of focus topics. Students will be responsible for constructing an indepth, expert lecture on the selected topic and presenting this to the class body in a 45-minute presentation. Each session will be 50 percent didactic lecture (by the student) and 50 percent dialog including question/answer and discussion. Students attending the lecture will bring two questions as their contribution to the discussion. Grading will be based on the lecture presentation of each student and will encompass the physical presentation (quality of the material, organization, and relevance), oral presentation (depth, clarity, timing), and management of the discussion. PATH-GS 8351. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Disease. [Formerly PATHGS 351A] An introduction to human disease and the accompanying changes in normal structure and function. The course consists of modules focused on a physiologic system and its related diseases. Each module includes a review of normal anatomy and physiology and the pathological changes occurring with the disease, an in-depth discussion of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the disease along with clinical correlates, as well as a discussion of high-profile papers relevant to the disease. 8351 (spring) and 8352 (fall) are offered as a series, but they can be taken in any order. Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of biochemistry, cell, and molecular biology. [3-3] PATH-GS 8352. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Disease. [Formerly PATHGS 351B] An introduction to human disease and the accompanying changes in normal structure and function. The course consists of modules focused on a physiologic system and its related diseases. Each module includes a review of normal anatomy and physiology and the pathological changes occurring with the disease, an in-depth discussion of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the disease along with clinical correlates, as well as a discussion of high-profile papers relevant to the disease. 8351 (spring) and 8352 (fall) are offered as a series, but they can be taken in any order. Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of biochemistry, cell, and molecular biology. [3-3] PATH-GS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PATH-GS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PATH-GS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PATH-GS 399]

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering CHBE 6100. Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering. [Formerly CHBE 310] Chemical engineering applications of advanced mathematical methods. Analytical and numerical methods for ordinary and partial differential equations. Emphasis on recognizing the form of a mathematical

CHBE 6120. Applied Chemical Kinetics. [Formerly CHBE 313] Experimental methods in kinetics. Kinetics of industrial reactions and reactor design. Absorption and catalytic systems are considered. FALL. [3] CHBE 6200. Transport Phenomena. [Formerly CHBE 312] The theory of non-equilibrium processes. Development of the analogy between momentum, energy, and mass transport with applications to common engineering problems. SPRING. [3] CHBE 6215. Systems Analysis for Process Design and Control. [Formerly CHBE 315] The design and control of chemical process plants, including economic optimization under steady state and transient conditions. [3] CHBE 6220. Surfaces and Adsorption. [Formerly CHBE 320] Surface energy, capillarity, contact angles and wetting, surface films, insoluble monolayers, solid surfaces, membranes, surface area determination, adsorption, adhesion, interface thermodynamics, friction and lubrication, interface in composites, relationships of surface to bulk properties of materials. FALL. [3] CHBE 6250. Professional Communication Skills for Engineers. [Formerly CHBE 395] Introduction of graduate-level written and oral communication skills for engineers. Skills needed to produce peer-reviewed journal publications, research proposals, and research presentations are covered. SPRING. [1] CHBE 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly CHBE 369] CHBE 8900. Special Topics. [Formerly CHBE 397] [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] CHBE 8991. Seminar. [Formerly CHBE 398] [0] CHBE 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CHBE 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] CHBE 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CHBE 399]

Chemical and Physical Biology CPBP 8306. Introduction to Chemical and Physical Biology. [Formerly CPBP 306] This course is designed to provide a basic overview of modern molecular and cellular biology, with particular emphasis on physical and quantitative approaches that are currently being used to address important questions in these fields. Topics covered include DNA, RNA, protein structure and function, protein machines, membrane structure and function, membrane proteins and signaling, cellular structure and function, metabolism, and cell cycle. CPBP 8307. Advanced Membrane Protein Biology. [Formerly CPBP 307] This course’s objective is to provide an in-depth understanding of the role of membrane proteins in biology and medicine. Each year the module will focus on a different class of membrane proteins, channel, receptors or transporters. The selected course material will follow the evolution of our understanding of these molecules by focusing on a representative of each class and emphasizing the transdisciplinary nature of scientific advances. [1] CPBP 8308. Protein-Protein Interactions. [Formerly CPBP 308] Essentially all cellular functions depend on appropriately specific and dynamically modulated interactions of multiple proteins. This course is intended to provide students with a cohesive and comprehensive overview of current qualitative and quantitative methodology used in this field, and the application of these techniques to provide novel insights into disparate cellular functions/systems. [1] CPBP 8310. Graduate Seminar In Chemical Biology. [Formerly CPBP 310]

Graduate School / Courses

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CPBP 8311. In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging. [Formerly CPBP 311]

Students who have earned credit for 5209 will earn two hours of credit for this course. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry. [4]

CPBP 8312. Current Topics in Imaging Science. [Formerly CPBP 312]

CHEM 5320. Quantum Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 338] Limits of classical mechanics at the atomic and molecular level; postulates of quantum mechanics applied to problems in one, two, and three dimensions; perturbation and other methods. Prerequisite: 3300 or equivalent. [3]

CPBP 8320. Foundations in Chemical Biology. [Formerly CPBP 320] A series of overviews and in-depth case studies will demonstrate the breadth of chemical biology and the importance of this emerging field in advancing biological sciences. CPBP 8324. Tutorials in Chemical and Physical Biology. [Formerly CPBP 324] Each student will write, present, and defend a short research proposal based on their research area. This exercise will prepare the students fo their candidacy exams. [1] CPBP 8325. Fundamentals of Molecular Probes. [Formerly CPBP 325] CPBP 8330. Special Topics in Ligand-Protein Recognition. [Formerly CPBP 330] Structural, chemical, biochemical, and biophysical studies of ligand-protein recognition including the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). May be repeated. SUMMER. [1] CPBP 8349. Graduate Seminar in Molecular Biophysics. [Formerly CPBP 349] SPRING. [1] CPBP 8350. Independent Study. [Formerly CPBP 350] FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-6] CPBP 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CPBP 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [0-12] CPBP 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CPBP 399]

Chemistry CHEM 5030. Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 306] Application of spectroscopic methods to inorganic chemistry. Discussion of symmetry and group theory as required for the use of spectroscopic methods is also included. [3] CHEM 5040. Nanoparticles. [Formerly CHEM 305] Bottom-up synthetic schemes for nanoparticle construction; characterization techniques; consequences of quantum confinement, and surface area enhancement; design for specific applications. No credit for students who earned credit for 304 section 1 in fall 2011 or spring 2013. Prerequisite or corequisite: 3010. [3] CHEM 5130. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 313] Design and analysis of experimental data, instrumental design, and analytical surface science. [1-3] CHEM 5140. Analytical Mass Spectrometry. [Formerly CHEM 311] Theory, design, and interpretation of mass spectrometry instrumentation and experiments. [3] CHEM 5150. Electrochemistry: Theory and Analysis. [Formerly CHEM 312] [3] CHEM 5160. Separation Methods: A Practical Approach. [Formerly CHEM 315] Theories of separation science; distillation, capillary electrophoresis, membrane separation, and supercritical fluid extraction; emphasis on chromatography. [3] CHEM 5170. Analytical Optical Methods. [Formerly CHEM 314A] Analytical spectroscopy and biomedical imaging. [3] CHEM 5209. Organic Chemistry Structure and Mechanism. [Formerly CHEM 320A] The first half of 5210. Theory, models, and description of chemical bonding. Stereochemistry, and conformational analysis. Reaction thermodynamics, kinetics, and mechanism. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4210 or 5210. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry. [2] CHEM 5210. Organic Structure, Mechanism, and Reactions. [Formerly CHEM 320] Theory, models, and description of chemical bonding. Stereochemistry, and conformational analysis. Reaction thermodynamics, kinetics, and mechanism. Synthetic transformations employed in small molecule synthesis. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4210.

CHEM 5330. Spectroscopy. [Formerly CHEM 339] Experimental and theoretical aspects of spectroscopy. Energy levels, selection rules, and spectral transitions related to atomic and molecular structure. Design of contemporary magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy measurements. Prerequisite: 3310. [3] CHEM 5340. Applications of Group Theory. [Formerly CHEM 340] Molecular symmetry, point groups, and character tables. Application to molecular orbitals, vibrational spectra, organic and inorganic systems. [3] CHEM 5360. Advanced Quantum Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 330] Advanced topics in the application of quantum mechanics to chemical bonding and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: 5320. [3] CHEM 5610. Chemistry of Inorganic Materials. [Formerly CHEM 350A] Chemical synthesis, processing, characterization, and applications of inorganic materials. Molecular precursor routes to inorganic solids. Structure and bonding properties of materials at the atomic, molecular, or extended molecular level and their relationship to desired properties. Carbon-based materials (graphene, fullerenes, diamond), ceramics and zeolites, semiconductors, electronic, magnetic, and optical materials, and nanomaterials. Prerequisite: General chemistry. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 350 in fall 2011, fall 2009, or fall 2007. [3] CHEM 5620. Chemistry of Biological Materials. [Formerly CHEM 350B] The synthesis, directed self-assembly, and hierarchical organization of naturally occurring materials. Engineering of new bioinspired artificial materials for diverse applications. Materials and devices from DNA, genetic reprogramming of the design of new materials. Peptide-, protein-, and carbohydrate-based materials. Biomineralization, biomimetic systems, and complexity in self-assembly. [3] CHEM 6050. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 304] [3] CHEM 6150. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 314B] [3] CHEM 6250. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 324] [3] CHEM 6340. Special Topics in Chemical Physics. [Formerly CHEM 332] [3] CHEM 6900. Professional Development. [Formerly CHEM 301A] Grant writing, from specific aims and development of hypotheses to broader impact statements. The curriculum vitae, the “three-minute thesis” pitch, scientific presentations, and responsible conduct in research. Open only to chemistry graduate students. May be repeated for credit once for a total of two credit hours. [1] CHEM 6901. Introduction to Research. [Formerly CHEM 380] Introduction to chemical research under the guidance of individual faculty members. Students participate in three rotations among faculty research groups and provide graded work. For chemistry graduate students only. [1-2] CHEM 6902. Practicum in Chemistry Instruction. [Formerly CHEM 360] Preparation for and the teaching of chemistry to undergraduate students. No credit for chemistry graduate students. [0] CHEM 6903. Advanced Reading in Chemistry. [Formerly CHEM 385] Specialized topics under the guidance of a departmental faculty member. Open to qualified graduate students only. [3] CHEM 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly CHEM 369] [0-12] CHEM 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CHEM 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] CHEM 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CHEM 399] [0-12]

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Chinese CHIN 5101. Elementary Chinese I. (Also listed as CHIN 1101) Introduction to Modern Chinese pronunciation, grammar, conversation, reading, and writing. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101. [5] CHIN 5102. Elementary Chinese II. (Also listed CHIN 1102) Continuation of 5101. Introduction to Modern Chinese pronunciation, grammar, conversation, reading, and writing. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1102. [5] CHIN 5110. Calligraphy. (Also listed as CHIN 1110) Basic skills of writing standard script kaishu. Basic aesthetic of Chinese calligraphy. No Chinese language background necessary. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1231. [1] CHIN 5201. Intermediate Chinese I. (Also listed as CHIN 2201) Oral and written language training. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. Repeat credit for students who completed 214. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 1102. [5] CHIN 5202. Intermediate Chinese II. (Also listed as CHIN 2202) Continuation of 2201. Language training in oral and written Chinese. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. Serves as repeat credit for 216. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. Prerequisite: 2201. [5] CHIN 5301. Advanced Chinese I. (Also listed as CHIN 3301) Readings in Chinese culture to enhance proficiency in oral and written Chinese. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3301. [3] CHIN 5302. Advanced Chinese II. (Also listed as CHIN 3302) Readings in Chinese culture to enhance proficiency in oral and written Chinese. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3302 or 3302W. [3] CHIN 5401. Business Chinese I. (Also listed as CHIN 4401) Language skills for listening, speaking, reading, and writing in business environments. Modern China from economic and business perspectives. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Chinese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4401. [3] CHIN 5402. Business Chinese II. (Also listed as CHIN 4402) Continuation of 5402. Language skills for listening, speaking, reading, and writing in business environments. Modern China from economic and business perspectives. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4402. [3] CHIN 5403. Readings in Modern Chinese Media. (Also listed as CHIN 4403) Books, newspapers, Internet, and television documents and productions pertaining to political, social, and economic issues in China, including foreign trade-related issues. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4403. [3] CHIN 5404. Readings in Modern Chinese Media. (Also listed as CHIN 4404) Books, newspapers, and Internet sources pertaining to political, social, and cultural issues. No credit for students who have earned 4404. [3] CHIN 5405. Classical Chinese Literature and Philosophy. (Also listed as CHIN 4405) Classical writings by Confucius, Sunzi, and Zhuangzi. Poems by Li Bai and Du Fu. Excerpts from The Dream of the Red Chamber. Linguistic comparisons between classical and modern Chinese. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4405. [3] CHIN 5406. Readings in Modern Literary Chinese. (Also listed as CHIN 4406) 1910 to the present. Chinese literature and poetry. Linguistic transformations that produced modern literary Chinese. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4406. [3] CHIN 5851. Independent Study. (Also listed as CHIN 3851) Designed primarily for majors who want to study Chinese not regularly offered in the

vanderbilt university curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours in 5851 and 5852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum 12 credit hours total for all semesters of CHIN 5851 and 5852.] No credit for students who have earned credit for 3851. CHIN 5852. Independent Study. (Also listed as CHIN 3852) Designed primarily for majors who want to study Chinese not regularly offered in the curriculum. Must have consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours in 5851 and 5852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum 12 credit hours total for all semesters of CHIN 5851 and 5852.]

Civil Engineering CE 6200. Advanced Mechanics of Solids I. [Formerly CE 301] Mathematical preliminaries: tensor algebra, coordinate transformation, principal values and directions. Kinematics of continuum: motion and deformation, infinitesimal and finite strain theory, balance of mass. Stress: traction on planes, stress invariants and failure theories, Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensors, balance of momentum, stress power. Elasticity: linear isotropic and anisotropic elasticity, engineering material constants, plane waves, hyperelasticity. Fracture mechanics, semi-infinite medium problems in elasticity, Timoshenko beam theory. FALL. [3] CE 6205. Advanced Mechanics of Solids II. [Formerly CE 302] Modes of failure: creep and relaxation, plastic flow, fracture and fatigue. Stability of members, frames, and plates. Membrane and bending analyses of shells, including the beam on elastic foundation analogy for cylindrical shells. Inelastic behavior and plasticity including frame, planar, axi-symmetric, and slip line problems. Prerequisite: CE 6200. SPRING. [3] CE 6210. Finite Element Analysis. [Formerly CE 307] Discrete modeling of problems of the continua. Mathematical basis of finite element methodweighted residual and variational concepts. Finite element formulations; displacement, force, and mixed methods. 1-D problems of the continua and finite element solution-C0 and C1 elements, eigenvalue and transient problems. Error checks and control. Mapping, shape functions, numerical quadrature, and solution of equations. Formulation of 2-D problems (single and multi-field)-mapping and shape functions, triangular and quad elements with straight or curved boundaries. 3-D elements, singular problems, buckling, and nonlinear problems. Error estimation and quality control. Computer implementation. Commercial packages. Prerequisite: MATH 2410, MATH 3620. FALL. [3] CE 6212. Advanced Computational Mechanics. [Formerly CE 308] Basics of nonlinear mechanics — geometric and material nonlinearities. Discrete Lagrangian, Eulerian and other formulations. Nonlinear material models. Numerical solution algorithms in space and time. Solution of nonlinear (second-order and higher) problems. Multi-disciplinary problems. Error estimation and adaptive model improvement. Introduction to multi-scale modeling and atomistic/continuum coupling. Prerequisite: CE 6210. SPRING. [3] CE 6215. Structural Dynamics and Control. [Formerly CE 309] Analysis of single- and multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Modal superposition method. Time and frequency domain analyses. Numerical methods and nonlinear dynamic analysis. Application to structures subject to earthquake and impact forces. Elements of feedback control systems. Control of lumped parameter systems. Active, passive, and hybrid mass dampers. Application to simple building and bridge structures. SPRING. [3] CE 6300. Probabilistic Methods in Engineering Design. [Formerly CE 310] Applications of probabilistic methods in the analysis and synthesis of engineering systems. Review of basic probability concepts, random variables and distributions, modeling and quantification of uncertainty, testing the validity of assumed models, linear regression and correlation analyses, Monte Carlo simulation, reliability analysis and reliability-based design. Prerequisite: Math 2410. FALL. [3] CE 6305. Engineering Design Optimization. [Formerly CE 311] Methods for optimal design of engineering systems. Optimization under uncertainty, reliability-based design optimization, robust design, multidisciplinary

Graduate School / Courses problems, multi-objective optimization. Discrete and continuous design variables, advanced numerical algorithms, and formulations and strategies for computational efficiency. Practical applications and term projects in the student’s area of interest. Prerequisite: Math 4630, Math 4620 or CE 6300. [3] CE 6310. Uncertainty Quantification. [Formerly CE 313] Computational methods for analysis and design of modern engineering systems under uncertainty. Emphasis on epistemic uncertainty due to data and models. Topics include stochastic finite elements; time-dependent reliability; Bayesian methods and networks; surrogate modeling; advanced simulation; global sensitivity analysis; model verification, validation, and calibration; and optimization under uncertainty. Applications to practical engineering systems. Prerequisite: CE 6300. SPRING. [3] CE 6313. Multiscale Modeling. [Formerly CE 314] State-of-the-art and emerging multiscale computational methods for modeling of mechanics, transport, and materials phenomena. Principles of information transfer between multiple spatial and temporal scales, including atomistic-to-continuum coupling, continuum-to-continuum coupling, and bridging of time scales. Enrichment methods including generalized finite elements, partition of unity, variational multiscale methods. FALL. [3] CE 6317. Stability of Structures. [Formerly CE 317] Buckling analysis of perfect and imperfect columns, mathematical treatment of various stability criteria, dynamic and static instability, energy methods. Buckling of frames, trusses, beam-columns, rings, and tubes. [3] CE 6318. Prestressed Concrete. [Formerly CE 318] Behavior and design of statically determinate prestressed concrete structures under bending moment, shear, torsion, and axial load effects. Design of statically determinate prestressed structures such as continuous beams, frames, slabs and shells. Creep and shrinkage effects and deflections of prestressed concrete structures. Application to the design and construction of bridges and buildings. Prerequisite: CE 3205. [3] CE 6351. Public Transportation Systems. [Formerly CE 351] Comprehensive study of public transportation, with emphasis on planning, management, and operations; paratransit, ridesharing, and rural public transportation systems. Prerequisite: CE 4505. SPRING. [3] CE 6353. Airport Planning and Design. [Formerly CE 353] Integration and application of the principles of airport master planning from the beginning stages of site selection through actual design of an airport facility. Specific study topics address demand forecasting, aircraft characteristics, capacity analyses, and geometric design of runways, terminals, and support facilities. Prerequisite: CE 3601. [3] CE 6355. Advanced Transportation Design. [Formerly CE 355] An indepth view of the design process. Complex design problems and solutions, with the use of computer-based analytical and design tools. Comprehensive design projects. Prerequisite: CE 4500. SPRING. [3] CE 6356. Advanced Transportation Planning. [Formerly CE 356] A continuation of the concepts from CE 256, with emphasis on analytical techniques used in forecasting travel. Use of computer-based models, transportation and energy contingency planning methods. Prerequisite: CE 4505. SPRING. [3] CE 6357. Theory of Traffic Flow. [Formerly CE 357] A study of traffic flow from the perspective of probability as applied to highway, intersection and weaving capacities. Discrete and continuous flow, vehicle distributions, queuing, and simulation. Prerequisite: CE 4510. [3] CE 6359. Emerging Information Systems Applications. [Formerly CE 359] Introduction to emerging information systems technologies and their role in improving productivity and efficiency in managing engineering operations. Design of integrated approaches to enhance the speed, accuracy, reliability, and quantity of information available for decision support. Emphasis on case studies of innovative applications in transportation and manufacturing, leading to individual and group projects requiring new product development. Prerequisite: background transportation or manufacturing operations. FALL. [3] CE 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly CE 369]

89 CE 8000. Individual Study of Civil Engineering Problems. [Formerly CE 325A] Literature review and analysis of special problems under faculty supervision. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-4 each semester] CE 8001. Individual Study of Civil Engineering Problems. [Formerly CE 325B] Literature review and analysis of special problems under faculty supervision. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-4 each semester] CE 8002. Individual Study of Civil Engineering Problems. [Formerly CE 325C] Literature review and analysis of special problems under faculty supervision. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-4 each semester] CE 8300. Reliability and Risk Engineering Seminar. [Formerly CE 371A] Seminars by expert speakers provide a wide range of perspectives on reliability and risk assessment and management of multi-disciplinary engineering systems. Topics on infrastructure and environmental systems, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace systems; network systems (power distribution, water and sewage systems, transportation etc.); manufacturing and construction; and electronic and software systems. FALL, SPRING. [1] CE 8301. Reliability and Risk Engineering Seminar. [Formerly CE 371B] Seminars by expert speakers provide a wide range of perspectives on reliability and risk assessment and management of multidisciplinary engineering systems. Topics on infrastructure and environmental systems; mechanical, automotive, and aerospace systems; network systems (power distribution, water and sewage systems, transportation, etc.); manufacturing and construction; and electronic and software systems. FALL, SPRING. [1] CE 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CE 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] CE 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CE 399]

Classics CLAS 6240. The Parthenon, the Akropolis, and Fifth Century Athens. (Also listed as CLAS 3210) Ancient Athens in the fifth century B.C.E.. Art, architecture, literature, history, and historical evidence for religious and political life in the city. No credit for students who earned credit for 295 or 295W prior to fall 2014. [3] CLAS 7000. Seminar in Classics. [Formerly CLAS 355] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] CLAS 7100. Seminar: Studies in Ancient History. [Formerly CLAS 309] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] CLAS 7200. Seminar in Classical Art and Architecture. [Formerly CLAS 305] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] CLAS 7850. Independent Study. [Formerly CLAS 398] An individual reading and study program on an author or area of classical antiquity not treated in the regular curriculum. No formal instruction is given, but the student’s work is supervised and evaluated by one or more members of the staff. Open only to students who have completed one year of graduate study in classics. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum of 12 credit hours for all semesters of CLAS 7850] CLAS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly CLAS 369] [0-12]

Community Research and Action HOD 6400. High Poverty Youth: Improving Outcomes. [Formerly HOD 3665] (Also listed as SPED 6300) Youth from high-poverty backgrounds often are placed at risk for a host of unfavorable outcomes including academic failure, school dropout, drug abuse, unemployment, and incarceration. In this class, we will be working with schools and community agencies in Nashville to improve outcomes for youth living in highpoverty neighborhoods. We will have class meetings twice weekly as well

90 as ongoing field-based experiences. Field work will include mentoring, tutoring, or providing job readiness training to youth in neighborhood community centers or in students’ high schools. [3] HOD 7100. Community Health Theory and Practice. [Formerly HOD 3500] This course is divided into three components. Part 1 provides background on the public health model, health education and the role of community health educators in public health. Part 2 investigates socio-environmental factors influencing health-related behavior. The role of groups, institutions and social structures in encouraging healthy or unhealthy behavior is covered. Part 2 also provides background and evaluation in interventions designed to improve health behavior through changes in the social environment; economic, social and political structures and practices creating barriers to effective interventions. Part 3 investigates behavior change theories directed toward individuals. A variety of health behavior change models targeting psychosocial approaches are presented and the application of these theories into community health education programs are stressed. Students will gain exposure to the use of theory in health education and be introduced to how to translate theoretical models into intervention strategies for program development. [3] HOD 7110. Survey of Preventive Interventions. [Formerly HOD 3510] This course surveys preventive interventions related to health and developmental outcomes. Course readings explore programs, policies, and practices that have been found effective in preventing poor outcomes. Particular emphasis is focused on issues related to program implementation, program evaluation, organizational capacity, and other issues that may influence program outcomes. Readings explore a variety specific outcomes (e.g., substance abuse, high school dropout, obesity), and program settings (schools, social service organizations, neighborhoods) to provide exposure to wide variety of applications of prevention programs and frameworks. [3] HOD 7120. Human Development and Prevention Science. [Formerly HOD 3520] This course introduces students to science-based preventive intervention strategies and model programs that target youth/and or families. Activities will facilitate critical thinking; increase skills and capacities for program development, and understanding of the interactions of human development, socio-contextual processes, preventive interventions, and social behavioral change. [3] HOD 7130. Public Policy Development and Advocacy in Mental Health. [Formerly HOD 3530] This course will provide students with a hands on-opportunity to learn about the health (including mental health) policy development process. Students will gain an understanding of the different ways in which health policies are made through the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, as well as the role of the media and advocates/stakeholder groups in shaping health policy. Students will also gain practical experience designing and implementing a campaign aimed at changing health policy. Specifically, students will be asked to select a problem that has policy implications, and then develop a policy analysis and advocacy strategy around their chosen topic. [3] HOD 7210. Community Development Theory. [Formerly HOD 3601] This course provides beginning graduate students an introduction to theories that shape or directly pertain to community development. Focus of the course is on theories that explain local, community and municipal-level processes. Students develop an understanding of the theoretical strands in current development issues and policies. [3] HOD 7300. Ethics of Community Research and Action. [Formerly HOD 3200] This course is intended to develop the ability to analyze situations encountered by action-researchers in community psychology, community development, prevention and community health/mental health, organizational change, community studies, and related community-based professional activities from the perspectives of (1) practice ethics, (2) research ethics, (3) policy ethics, and (4) the ethical/value issues entailed in conceptualizing the “ideal” community or society. [3] HOD 7400. Community Intervention and Change. [Formerly HOD 3470] Introduction to applied community studies, including change theory, research, and intervention at multiple levels from community psychology, sociology and other disciplines. The course will help students develop a thesis, project, paper, or dissertation topic and proposal. Readings focus on meanings, types and significance of community; issues of diversity,

vanderbilt university difference, deviance, labeling, and stigma; ecological theory, research and environmental and setting/systems-level interventions; social movements; social capital and community cognitions and behaviors; stress, coping, adaptation, and social support; prevention and promotion programs and coalitions; organizational and institutional change; faith communities; community organizing, development, mobilization and social action; assessing and informing local-to-national policies; community change around the world. HOD 7600. Global Dimensions of Community Development. [Formerly HOD 3640] The globalization process induces new forms of human organization and transforms existing organizations at the community, national, and international levels. This course provides an understanding of the nature, functioning, and development of organizations affected by globalization in societies different from our own and as they relate to multilateral or global institutions that span different social and cultural settings. To do this, the course explores organizations from a comparative perspective, using the analytical framework of human ecology, in terms of differential access to economic and other productive assets, education and information, security and the rule of law, social capital and cultural identity. [3] HOD 7700. Development Project Design and Evaluation. [Formerly HOD 3610] Examines how development projects and programs intended to improve social, economic, health, energy, environmental, and other conditions in human communities are designed by development professionals and how they determine whether or not such interventions achieve their purposes and warrant similar investment in the future. Analytical work undertaken at several stages in the design and evaluation process, including social, financial, managerial, legal, environmental, and other analyses, as well as impact analysis, are carried out. The purpose is to understand the ways applied research underpins and influences development investment decisions. [3] HOD 7710. Advanced Group Development. [Formerly HOD 3310] Students learn the fundamental structures and processes of group development, including how to collect and analyze group-level data. Course has a heavy emphasis on context and the application of group theory to intervene in community groups, both from the perspective of a participant and as an outside facilitator or practitioner. Primarily intended for CDA Masters students, this course welcomes others graduate students interested in group development. [3] HOD 7950. Fieldschool in Intercultural Education. [Formerly HOD 3460] This course takes place in a community other than one’s own either domestically or internationally over a 10-week period in the summer session. It provides training in community field research and analysis techniques directed to human, social, and civic development issues. [3] HOD 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly HOD 3690] Open to Graduate School students only. [3] HOD 8000. Community Research and Action Proseminar. [Formerly HOD 3700] Ther Pro-seminar course provides professional development and practical skills to help new Community Research and Action (CRA) students maximiize the graduate school experience. Students are given foundational information, instruction, and skill-building exercises on subjects related to teaching, research, and service. [2] HOD 8100. Theories of Inequality, Diversity, and Social Justice. [Formerly HOD 3650] This course is designed to acquaint incoming Community Research and Action (CRA) students with the core theories and theoretical perspectives germane to the study of inequality broadly defined. The course includes readings that critically address structural, community, and individual levels of analysis. [3] HOD 8120. Community Organizing. [Formerly HOD 3670] This course provides graduate students an introduction to theories, processes and models for community organizing. Focus of the course is on post-Alinsky models, particularly congregation-based models in the US. Methods of civic engagement, leadership development, organizational processes and community change are addressed through readings and cases studies. Exposure to and analysis of local organizing efforts are part of this course. [3] HOD 8200. Community Development and Urban Policy. [Formerly HOD 3600] Provides the beginning graduate student with an introduction to theory,

Graduate School / Courses practice and research in community development (CD) and in urban social policy. It has a laboratory portion in which the student works on a CD project in the local community and uses that to propose to the relevant authorities, a new social policy to implement the findings of the CD project. [3] HOD 8400. Theory and Application in Action Research. [Formerly HOD 3621] This course is designed to provide students with both intellectual and practical exposure to action research and applied research methods-particularly in relation to working for social change. The course will focus on the issue of knowledge generation and the role of knowledge production in social power. Practical experience will be gained by conducting research on community projects and applying the concepts gained in course work. Prerequisite: One graduate statistics course. [3] HOD 8810. Doctoral Community Inquiry. [Formerly HOD 3100] Overview of issues and methods in community research. Epistemology, theory, research design, critical analysis, levels of inquiry, and the range of data collection and analysis methods available for community research. Doctoral students only. [3] HOD 8820. Ethnographic Research Methods in Communities. [Formerly HOD 3450] Through empirical data collection on human behavior in communities, ethnography and other qualitative research methods build hypotheses and theory grounded in the values, beliefs, and aspirations of different societies and cultures. This course introduces and explores the tools and techniques of ethnography and their uses in (1) research problem conceptualization, delineation of assumptions, and generation of culturally competent hypotheses and (2) identification and construction of data sets, field research to collect data, and theory building and practical application derived from data analysis. The course is explicitly interdisciplinary. [3] HOD 8830. Evaluation Research. [Formerly HOD 3800] This course is a doctoral-level introduction to evaluation research. It is designed for people who expect to work as university faculty members or principal investigators in research organizations with a commitment to using research to understand the contribution of social programs and social change efforts to ending social problems. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding multiple approaches and types of evaluations and how they are embedded in social and political contexts. The second half will introduce design and analytic techniques particularly useful in large scale social experiments, and some of their limitations. [3]

Computer Science CS 6310. Design and Analysis of Algorithms. [Formerly CS 310] Set manipulation techniques, divide-and-conquer methods, the greedy method, dynamic programming, algorithms on graphs, backtracking, branch-and-bound, lower bound theory, NP-hard and NP-complete problems, approximation algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 3250. SPRING. [3] CS 6311. Graph Algorithms. [Formerly CS 311] Algorithms for dealing with special classes of graphs. Particular emphasis is given to subclasses of perfect graphs and graphs that can be stored in a small amount of space. Interval, chordal, permutation, comparability, and circular-arc graphs; graph decomposition. Prerequisite: CS 6310 or Math 4710. [3] CS 6315. Automated Verification. [Formerly CS 315] Systems verification and validation, industrial case studies, propositional and predicate logic, syntax and semantics of computational tree and linear time logics, binary decision diagrams, timed automata model and real-time verification, hands on experience with model checking using the SMV, SPIN and UPPAAL tools, and state reduction techniques. [3] CS 6320. Algorithms for Parallel Computing. [Formerly CS 320] Design and analysis of parallel algorithms for sorting, searching, matrix processing, FFT, optimization, and other problems. Existing and proposed parallel architectures, including SIMD machines, MIMD machines, and VLSI systolic arrays. Prerequisite: CS 6310. [3] CS 6350. Artificial Neural Networks. [Formerly CS 350] Theory and practice of parallel distributed processing methods using networks of neuron-like computational devices. Neurobiological inspirations, attractor networks, correlational and error-correction learning, regularization, unsupervised learning,

91 reinforcement learning, Bayesian and information theoretic approaches, hardware support, and engineering applications. SPRING. [3] CS 6351. Advanced Animation. [Formerly CS 351] Current research issues and problems in computer animation, with special focus on motion capture, dynamic simulation, and key-framing. Cloth, deformable bodies, natural phenomena, geometric algorithms, procedural techniques, facial animation, hair, autonomous characters, flocking, empirical evaluation, and interfaces for animation. Prerequisite: CS 3259. FALL. [3] CS 6352. Human-Computer Interaction. [Formerly CS 352] An overview of human computer interaction and problems of current interest. Topics include human factors, GOMS, user interface design and evaluation, interaction modalities, distributed cognition, ubiquitous computing. A project involving design and evaluation will be performed. [3] CS 6358. Computer Vision. [Formerly CS 358] The fundamentals of computer vision and techniques for image understanding and high-level image processing. Includes image segmentation, geometric structures, relational structures, motion, matching, inference, and vision systems. Prerequisite: EECE 6357. SPRING. [3] CS 6359. Medical Image Registration. [Formerly CS 359] Foundations of medical image registration. Mathematical methods and practical applications. Image-to-image registration, image-to-physical registration, applications to image-guided procedures and the most commonly used imaging modalities with an emphasis on tomographic images. FALL. [3] CS 6360. Advanced Artificial Intelligence. [Formerly CS 360] Discussion of state-of-the-art and current research issues in heuristic search, knowledge representation, deduction, and reasoning. Related application areas include planning systems, qualitative reasoning, cognitive models of human memory, user modeling in ICAI, reasoning with uncertainty, knowledge-based system design, and language comprehension. Prerequisite: CS 4260 or equivalent. [3] CS 6362. Machine Learning. [Formerly CS 362] An introduction to machine learning principles of artificial intelligence, stressing learning’s role in constraining search by augmenting and/or reorganizing memory. Topics include connectionist systems; concept learning from examples; operator, episode, and plan learning; problem-solving architectures that support learning; conceptual clustering; computer models of scientific discovery; explanation-based learning; and analogical reasoning. Psychological as well as computational interests in learning are encouraged. Prerequisite: CS 4260, CS 6360, or equivalent. SPRING. [3] CS 6364. Intelligent Learning Environments. [Formerly CS 364] Theories and concepts from computer science, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and education that facilitate designing, building, and evaluating computer-based instructional systems. Development and substantiation of the concept, architecture, and implementation of intelligent learning environments. Multimedia and web-based technology in teaching, learning, collaboration, and assessment. Prerequisite: CS 4260, CS 6360, or equivalent. [3] CS 6366. Distributed Artificial Intelligence. [Formerly CS 366] Principles and practice of multiple agent systems for distributed artificial intelligence. Game theory, distributed negotiation and decision making, distributed problem solving, cooperation, coalition formation and distributed learning. Prerequisite: CS 4260. [3] CS 6375. Discrete-Event Systems: Supervisory Control and Diagnosis. [Formerly CS 375] Algebraic structures, automata and formal language theory, process modeling with finite-state automata, supervisory control theory, controllability and supervision, supervisory control under partial observation, modular and hierarchical supervisory control, supervisory control of real-time systems, fault diagnosis of discrete-event systems, and modular diagnosis approaches. SPRING. [3] CS 6376. Foundations of Hybrid and Embedded Systems. [Formerly CS 376] Modeling, analysis, and design of hybrid and embedded systems. Heterogeneous modeling and design of embedded systems using formal models of computation, modeling and simulation of hybrid systems, properties of hybrid systems, analysis methods based on abstractions, reachability, and verification of hybrid systems. FALL. [3]

92 CS 6377. Topics in Embedded Software and Systems. [Formerly CS 377] Specification and composition of domain-specific modeling languages. Design methodologies for embedded systems. Platforms for embedded system design and implementation. Analysis of embedded systems. SPRING. [3] CS 6381. Distributed Systems Principles. [Formerly CS 381] Techniques and mechanisms in distributed system design, such as logical clocks, distributed consensus, distributed mutual exclusion, consistency models, fault tolerance and paradigms of communication. Contemporary distributed system case studies and open challenges. Prerequisite: CS 3281. [3] CS 6384. Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems. [Formerly CS 384] Techniques for computer systems modeling and analysis. Topics covered include analytical modeling with emphasis on queuing network models, efficient computational algorithms for exact and approximate solutions, parameter estimation and prediction, validation techniques, workload characterization, performance optimization, communication and distributed system modeling. Prerequisite: CS 3281 or CS 6381. SPRING. [3] CS 6385. Advanced Software Engineering. [Formerly CS 385] An intensive study of selected areas of software engineering. Topics may include CASE tools, formal methods, generative techniques, aspect-oriented programming, metrics, modeling, reuse, software architecture, testing, and open-source software. Prerequisite: CS 4278. FALL. [3] CS 6386. System-Level Fault Diagnosis. [Formerly CS 386] An overview of the basic concepts of the theory of fault diagnosis and problems of current interest. Topics include the classical PMC and BGM models of fault diagnosis, hybrid (permanent and intermittent faults) models, diagnostic measures for one-step, sequential, and inexact diagnosis. Emphasis is on algorithmic techniques for solving the diagnosis and diagnosability problems in various models. Prerequisite: CS 6381. SPRING. [3] CS 6387. Topics in Software Engineering. [Formerly CS 387] Topics may include empirical software engineering and open-source software engineering. Prerequisite: CS 4278 or consent of instructor. SPRING. [3] CS 6388. Model-Integrated Computing. [Formerly CS 388] Model-Integrated Computing addresses the problems of designing, creating, and evolving information systems by providing rich, domain-specific modeling environments including model analysis and model-based program synthesis tools. Students are required to give a class presentation and prepare a project. FALL. [3] CS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly CS 369] CS 8390. Individual Studies. [Formerly CS 390] Offered each term. [1-3] CS 8395. Special Topics. [Formerly CS 395] [3] CS 8396. Special Topics. [Formerly CS 396] [3] CS 8991. Seminar. [Formerly CS 391] [1-3 each semester] CS 8992. Seminar. [Formerly CS 392] [1-3 each semester] CS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly CS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit 0-12] CS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly CS 399]

Earth and Environmental Sciences EES 6100. Earth Fluids. [Formerly EES 310] Fluid dynamics in relation to natural Earth systems, including low and high Reynolds number flows. No credit for students who have earned credit for 390 section 1 in spring 2007, section 3 in fall 2009, section 1 in fall 2011, or section 1 in fall 2013. [3] EES 6891. Special Topics and Advanced Techniques in Geology. [Formerly EES 390] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-4] EES 7110. Advanced Topics in Earth Materials. [Formerly EES 311] Selected topics in the structure, composition, properties of the materials that

vanderbilt university constitute the Earth, and the natural processes that control their stability and transformations. May be repeated for credit if there is no duplication in topic. [3] EES 7300. Isotopes and the Environment. [Formerly EES 330] Isotope systems, research techniques and applications used to trace, date, and understand environmental processes on Earth’s surface. Stable, radiogenic, and cosmogenic isotope systems. Radiometric dating of low temperature processes. No credit for students who earned credit for 390 section 1 in fall 2012. [3] EES 7350. Magmatic Processes and the Construction of Earth’s Crust. [Formerly EES 335] Generation of magma and its role in construction of Earth’s crust. Connection between magmatism and large-scale tectonics. Introduction to magmatic tracers: isotopes, trace elements, phase equilibria; geochronology; and the history of the crust, Hadean to present. No credit for students who completed 390 section 1 in fall 2008. [3] EES 7380. Sedimentary Systems: Source-to-Sink. [Formerly EES 338] Generation and distribution of sediment from mountain tops to deep-sea basins. Construction of depositional landscapes and stratigraphy. Sediment dispersal and interactions between source-to-sink components along transport pathways; feedbacks with climate, tectonics, the biosphere, and humans. Earth system interactions, energy budgets, and nutrient and geochemical cycling. No credit for students who earned credit for 390 section 1 in spring 2007, section 3 in spring 2011, or section 2 in spring 2013. [3] EES 7620. Macroecology and Biogeography. [Formerly EES 362] Integration of evolutionary biology, paleobiology, ecology, and biogeography to understand interactions between organisms and their environments over large spatial and temporal scales, including in ancient ecosystems. The discipline of macroecology; nature of species, niches, and communities; abundance and distribution of species; species diversity; composition and assembly of continental biotas; allometry and body size; evolutionary dynamics; methodological advances. [3] EES 7640. Topics in Macroevolution. [Formerly EES 364] Evolutionary processes that operate on geological time scales. Evolutionary theory; systematics; speciation and extinction; evolutionary benefits of sexual reproduction; co-evolution; convergence; biogeography; and relevance of evolution to modern ecology and conservation. Effects of abiotic processes on the evolution of terrestrial and marine organisms. [3] EES 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly EES 369] [0-12] EES 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly EES 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

Economics ECON 6100. Microeconomic Theory (M.A. Level). [Formerly ECON 301] The price system in consumer demand and as a mechanism for organizing production, allocating resources, and distributing the national income. [3] ECON 6200. Macroeconomic Theory (M.A. Level). [Formerly ECON 302] National income accounting. Theories of income, employment and price determination. Growth and planning models. Monetary theory. [3] ECON 6500. Statistical Analysis (M.A. Level). [Formerly ECON 306] Interpretation of statistical materials, the principles of statistical inference, the use of available statistics for problems of economic analysis, and the importance of statistics in economic policy and administration. [3] ECON 6600. Econometrics (M.A. Level). [Formerly ECON 308] Empirical measurements with applications to basic economic relations. Specification, estimation of microeconomics and macroeconomics models for the purpose of testing hypotheses, forecasting, and evaluating policy. Prerequisite: 6500. [3] ECON 7100. Project Evaluation. [Formerly ECON 353] Social-benefit cost analysis of investment projects: investment criteria, estimation of benefits and costs, and evaluation of shadow prices and of the social discount rate. The role of national planning. Case studies utilize the experience of developing economies. [3]

Graduate School / Courses ECON 7500. The Chinese Economy. [Formerly ECON 352] Growth, development, and fluctuations in the Chinese economy. Transition from central planning to markets since 1978. Implications for global economy. Primarily designed for students in the Economic Development program. [3] ECON 7600. International Trade and Economic Development. [Formerly ECON 357] Selected topics concerning the exchange and transfer of goods and resources between less- and more-developed countries. Possible topics include the international monetary system, the SDR-aid link, dependence and imperialism, the role of trade in economic growth, foreign exchange strategies, and the structure of protection. Primarily designed for students in the Economic Development program. No credit for students who have completed 3600. [3] ECON 7881. Special Topics in Development Policies. [Formerly ECON 358A] Selected topics in the economic analysis of problems in developing countries. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] ECON 7882. Special Topics in Development Policies. [Formerly ECON 358B] Selected topics in the economic analysis of problems in developing countries. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] ECON 7910. Seminar in Research on Economic Development. [Formerly ECON 355A] How to select and define an economic problem, assemble relevant factual and statistical information, and analyze and interpret it. Students will write a research paper. May not be included in the 24 hours required for the M.A. degree. Completion of both 7910 and 7920 with an average grade of B counts in lieu of M.A. thesis. Open only to students in the Economic Development program. [3] ECON 7920. Seminar in Research on Economic Development. [Formerly ECON 355B] How to select and define an economic problem, assemble relevant factual and statistical information, and analyze and interpret it. Students will write a research paper. May not be included in the 24 hours required for the M.A. degree. Completion of both 7910 and 7920 with an average grade of B counts in lieu of M.A. thesis. Open only to students in the Economic Development program. [3]

93 market, monetary and fiscal policy, and New Keynesian economics. Prerequisite: 8210. [3] ECON 8300. Statistical Analysis. [Formerly ECON 307] Statistical methods applicable to quantitative research in economics. Distribution theory, statistical inference, and selected multivariate statistical methods. [3] ECON 8310. Econometrics I. [Formerly ECON 309A] Analysis of specification errors in single-equation estimation of economic relations. Introduction to the estimation and application of simultaneous-equation models. Prerequisite: 8300. [3] ECON 8320. Econometrics II. [Formerly ECON 309B] Identification and estimation of econometric models with nonlinearity and/or endogeneity/ simultaneity. Asymptotic theory and finite-sample properties of M-estimation and inference. Model building and testing of economic theory. Prerequisite: 8310. [3] ECON 8400. Introduction to Economic History. [Formerly ECON 371] Measurement and theory. Factors associated with modern economic growth and institutional change in various countries and time periods. Prerequisite: 8100 and 8200, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3] ECON 8981. Reading Course. [Formerly ECON 349A] Intensive study in an area of special interest beyond regular course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [1-3] ECON 8982. Reading Course. [Formerly ECON 349B] Intensive study in an area of special interest beyond regular course offerings. [1-3] ECON 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ECON 379] Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and the economics director of graduate studies. [0-12] ECON 9110. Topics in Microeconomics. [Formerly ECON 333] Advanced theory and applications. Variable topics including auctions, networks, contract theory, social choice, political economy, and market design. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. Prerequisite: 8110, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3]

ECON 8000. Selected Topics in Mathematics for Economists. [Formerly ECON 300] Mathematics used in the analysis of economic models. [3]

ECON 9210. Topics in Macroeconomics. [Formerly ECON 377] Advanced theory and applications. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. Prerequisite: 8210. [3]

ECON 8100. Microeconomic Theory 1. [Formerly ECON 304A] Analysis of resource allocation and relative prices. Behavior of individual economic units and markets. Models of technology, cost, and profit and the firm; consumer preferences, constraints, and choice; expected utility theory and risk aversion; partial equilibrium under competition and monopoly; partial equilibrium welfare and surplus. [3]

ECON 9250. Theory of Money and Finance I. [Formerly ECON 332A] Advanced topics in monetary and financial economics theory and applications. Recently developed dynamic theories of money and asset pricing. Inflationary dynamics; money, welfare, and growth; money and business cycles; financial development and growth; credit market imperfections and financial crises. Prerequisite: 8210. [3]

ECON 8110. Microeconomic Theory II. [Formerly ECON 304B] Noncooperative game theory, information economics, public goods. Nash equilibrium, sequential rationality, and incomplete information; oligopoly; bargaining; adverse selection, signaling and screening; principal-agent models; externalities and public goods. Prerequisite: 8100 [3]

ECON 9260. Theory of Money and Finance II. [Formerly ECON 332B] Analyses of microeconomic foundations and general equilibrium models of money and financial markets. Theory of payments structure, capital asset pricing, rational expectations, efficient markets, and contingent claims markets. Prerequisite: 8210. [3]

ECON 8120. Microeconomic Theory III. [Formerly ECON 304C] General equilibrium, welfare economics, social choice, and mechanism design. Prerequisite: 8100 and 8110; or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3]

ECON 9310. Time Series Econometrics. [Formerly ECON 373] Methods for estimating structural vector autoregressive models and dynamic economic models, such as maximum likelihood method, Bayesian method, and generalized method of moments. Prerequisite: 8320, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3]

ECON 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ECON 369] [0-12]

ECON 8200. Macroeconomic Theory I. [Formerly ECON 305A] Dynamic models and solution techniques. Development of models to study growth, business cycles, and government policies. [3] ECON 8210. Macroeconomic Theory II. [Formerly ECON 305B] Inflation and growth, optimal monetary and fiscal policy, overlapping-generations models and money non-neutrality. Prerequisite: 8200 or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3] ECON 8220. Macroeconomic Theory III. [Formerly ECON 305C] Theories of consumption, investment, demand and supply of money, the labor

ECON 9320. Non-parametric and Semi-parametric Econometrics. [Formerly ECON 374] Non-parametric and semi-parametric methods for estimation and inference in econometric models. Prerequisite: 8320. [3] ECON 9330. Topics in Advanced Econometrics. [Formerly ECON 375] Econometric models and methods for dealing with micro data. Structural and reduced-form approaches. Statistical inference using the models and their applications in IO, labor, health, and elsewhere in economics and social sciences. Prerequisite: 8320, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3]

94 ECON 9440. Topics in Economic History: Microeconomic. [Formerly ECON 366A] Examination of various microeconomic aspects of long-term development. Topics include demographic change, labor market outcomes, the development of institutions, industrialization, migration, health, and inequality. Prerequisite: 8310 and 8400. [3] ECON 9450. Topics in Economic History: Macroeconomic. [Formerly ECON 366B] Macroeconomic aspects of long-term development. Economic growth, the development of financial markets and the role of financial markets in economic development, the history and evolution of monetary and fiscal policy, capital market integration, and business cycles, including the Great Depression. Prerequisite: 8310 and 8400. [3] ECON 9480. Health Economics. [Formerly ECON 312B] Conceptual and empirical analysis of demand for health, medical services, and insurance. Causes and consequences of various health risk behaviors. Emphasis on tools and designs of research in modern health economics. Prerequisite: 8110 and 8310, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3] ECON 9490. Health Economics. [Formerly ECON 312A] Conceptual and empirical analysis of the origins of health attributes; joint investments in skill and health capitals; health-related consumption and lifestyles; the value of health, life, and medical innovation; the demand for health insurance; and the supply of health care. Applied econometrics methods, with a particular emphasis on comparisons among alternative methods used in health economics research. Prerequisite: 8110 and 8310. [3] ECON 9500. Industrial Organization I. [Formerly ECON 320A] Models of market structure and behavior from monopoly and oligopoly to perfect competition. Strategic interaction between a firm and its customers and between a firm and its competitors. Firm practices and government policies that promote or hinder the efficient operation of markets. Graded basis only. Prerequisite: 3010 [3] ECON 9510. Seminar in the Organization and Control of Industry. [Formerly ECON 320B] Emphases on empirical research in the field and application of models. Consumer demand for differentiated products, static games of imperfect competition, dynamic models of individual choice, dynamic games of imperfect competition, and the estimation of production functions. Prerequisite: 8320 and 9500, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3] ECON 9550. Labor Economics. [Formerly ECON 329A] Static and dynamic models of labor demand and labor supply, and models of human capital development. Applications of the theory to migration, fertility, health, wage determination, education, unionism and industrial relations, employment policies, implicit contracting and layoffs, and discrimination. Methodological problems related to the analysis of labor markets. Prerequisite: 8110 and 8310. [3] ECON 9560. Labor Economics. [Formerly ECON 329B] Static and dynamic models of labor demand and labor supply, and models of human capital development. Applications of the theory to topics such as migration, fertility, health, wage determination, education, unionism and industrial relations, employment policies, implicit contracting and layoffs, and discrimination. Methodological problems related to the analysis of labor markets. Prerequisite: 8110 and 8310. [3] ECON 9600. International Trade Theory. [Formerly ECON 316] Empirical evidence that build theories of international trade. Commercial policy, tariffs, the terms of trade and income distribution, international factor movements, and trade agreements. Trade and growth. Prerequisite: 8110. [3] ECON 9610. International Monetary Economics. [Formerly ECON 317] Neoclassical and New Keynesian international business cycle models; interaction of asset markets and goods markets. Dynamic models of exchange rates, relative prices, and the trade balance. Monetary and fiscal policy in the open economy. Simulation and estimation of business cycle models. Prerequisite: 8210, or consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [3] ECON 9710. Public Economics: Expenditure. [Formerly ECON 354A] Analysis of issues. Possible topics include externalities, public goods, local public goods, and aspects of public choice and voting theory. Prerequisite: 8110. [3]

vanderbilt university ECON 9720. Public Economics: Taxation. [Formerly ECON 354B] Analysis of issues. Possible topics include optimal taxation theory, tax reform, tax incidence, behavioral impacts of taxation, dynamic taxation, tax competition, and the political economy of taxation. Prerequisite: 8810 [3] ECON 9810. Economic Development. [Formerly ECON 388A] Contemporary theories and empirical studies. Topics include missing markets and market imperfection in developing countries; health, education, and labor market performance in low-income countries; credit, savings and insurance in rural economies; property rights, infrastructure and public provision of goods; intra-household bargaining and allocation; technology adoption; inequality and redistributive policy; and macroeconomic policy. Empirical strategies in development economics. Prerequisite: 8110, 8210, and 8310. [3] ECON 9820. Economic Development. [Formerly ECON 388B] Contemporary theories and empirical studies. Topics include missing markets and market imperfection in developing countries; health, education, and labor market performance in low-income countries; credit, savings and insurance in rural economies; property rights, infrastructure and public provision of goods; intra-household bargaining and allocation; technology adoption; inequality and redistributive policy; and macroeconomic policy. Strategies in development economics. Prerequisite: 8110, 8210, and 8310. [3] ECON 9890. Workshop on Economics. [Formerly ECON 398] Development of thesis topics and presentation of research papers according to interests of students and faculty. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor and the director of graduate studies. [0-3] ECON 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ECON 399] [0-12]

Education of the Deaf MDE 5207. American Sign Language I. This introductory course includes basic communication skills of American Sign Language and “contact” language (e.g., nonmanual markers, fingerspelling, numbers, basic vocabulary, classifiers), the sign system continuum, culture implications, and media resources available. Open to all Hearing and Speech students. Requires faculty approval. FALL only. [3] MDE 5208. American Sign Language II. This is an intermediate course in American Sign Language that includes an in-depth look at the linguistics of ASL (e.g., morphology, syntax, phonology, and semantics) and current readings and research in the field. Prerequisite: one 3-credit, college level course in ASL. Requires faculty approval. SPRING only. [3] MDE 5308. Language and Literacy in Children with Hearing Loss. This course presents an overview of normal language acquisition and the challenges imposed by a hearing loss. A variety of methods and materials to develop oral and written language and reading will be included. Practical methods of assessment, supportive strategy development, and curricular adaptations for children with hearing loss will be explored. SUMMER. [3] MDE 5312. Psychology and Culture of the Deaf. Presentation and discussion of significant historical and current issues relating to the deaf population. Primary focus will be on psychological development, educational/methodological models, and deaf culture. Although the principal focus is on the psycho/social and cognitive/intellectual development of deaf individuals through the lifespan, a general survey of other areas of exceptionality is made with emphasis on the implications for the deaf child with additional disabilities and/or special needs. SPRING. [2] MDE 5320. Introduction to Amplification for Infants and Children. Designed for deaf education and speech-language pathology students. Current issues and trends in conventional amplification for infants and children. Selection, fitting, verification, and validation of traditional amplification options will be addressed including directional vs. omnidirectional microphones, analogue vs. digital instruments, monaural vs. bilateral fittings, and real-ear measures vs. functional aided gain. Hearing aid retention, maintenance, and troubleshooting techniques are addressed. FALL. [2]

Graduate School / Courses

Electrical Engineering EECE 6301. Introduction to Solid-State Materials. [Formerly EECE 301] The properties of charged particles under the influence of an electric field, quantum mechanics, particle statistics, fundamental particle transport, and band theory of solids will be studied. FALL. [3] EECE 6302. Electric and Magnetic Properties of Solids. [Formerly EECE 302] A review of electromagnetic theory of solids using advanced mathematical and computational techniques. Dielectric, magnetic, and optical properties. Fundamental interactions of electromagnetic radiation and charged particles in solids. Prerequisite: EECE 6301. SPRING. [3] EECE 6304. Radiation Effects and Reliability of Microelectronics. [Formerly EECE 304] The space radiation environment and effects on electronics, including basic mechanisms of radiation effects and testing issues. Total dose, single-event, high-dose-rate, and displacement damage radiation effects. Effects of defects and impurities on MOS long-term reliability. SPRING. [3] EECE 6305. Topics in Applied Magnetics. [Formerly EECE 305] Selected topics in magnetism, magnetic properties of crystalline and noncrystalline materials; ferrite materials for electronics and microwave applications, resonance phenomena. Prerequisite: EECE 6302. [3] EECE 6306. Solid-State Effects and Devices I. [Formerly EECE 306] The semiconductor equations are examined and utilized to explain basic principles of operation of various state-of-the-art semiconductor devices including bipolar and MOSFET devices. FALL. [3] EECE 6307. Solid-State Effects and Devices II. [Formerly EECE 307] The structure of solids, phonons, band theory, scattering phenomena, and theory of insulators. [3] EECE 6311. Systems Theory. [Formerly EECE 311] Analysis and design of multivariable control systems using state space methods. Stability, controllability, and observability treated. Controllers designed using pole placement, optimal linear regulator, and the method of decoupling. State reconstruction via observers. SPRING. [3] EECE 6341. Advanced Analog Electronics. [Formerly EECE 341] Analysis and design of analog electronics circuits with emphasis on integrated circuits. Topics include operational amplifiers, wideband amplifiers, multipliers, and phaselocked loops. FALL. [3] EECE 6342. Advanced Digital Electronics. [Formerly EECE 342] Analysis and design of digital electronic circuits with emphasis on integrated circuits. Topics include logic families, semiconductor memories, and the analog-digital interface. [3] EECE 6343. Digital Systems Architecture. [Formerly EECE 343] Architectural descriptions of various CPU designs, storage systems, IO systems, parallel and von Neumann processors and interconnection networks will be studied. [3] EECE 6354. Advanced Real-Time Systems. [Formerly EECE 354] Fundamental problems in real-time systems, with focus on modeling, analysis, and design. Topics include scheduling theory and techniques, time synchronization, time- and event-triggered systems, distributed architectures, advanced programming languages for real-time systems. Literature reviews and projects. [3] EECE 6356. Intelligent Systems and Robotics. [Formerly EECE 356] Concepts of intelligent systems, AI robotics, and machine intelligence, using research books and papers. Emphasis on how AI, brain research, soft computing, and simulations are advancing robotics. Class projects. [3] EECE 6357. Advanced Image Processing. [Formerly EECE 357] Techniques of image processing. Topics include image formation, digitization, linear shift-invariant processing, feature detection, and motion. Prerequisite: MATH 2300; programming experience. FALL. [3] EECE 6361. Random Processes. [Formerly EECE 361] An introduction to the concepts of random variables, functions of random variables and random processes. Study of the spectral properties of random processes and of the response of linear systems to random inputs. Introduction to

95 linear mean square estimation. The emphasis is on engineering applications. FALL. [3] EECE 6362. Detection and Estimation Theory. [Formerly EECE 362] Fundamental aspects of signal detection and estimation. Formulation of maximum likelihood, maximum aposteriori, and other criteria. Multidimensional probability theory, signal and noise problems, and Kalman filter structure are studied. SPRING. [3] EECE 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly EECE 369] EECE 8395. Special Topics. [Formerly EECE 395] Based on research and current developments in electrical engineering of special interest to staff and students. [3] EECE 8396. Special Topics. [Formerly EECE 396] Based on research and current developments in electrical engineering of special interest to staff and students. [3] EECE 8850. Independent Study. [Formerly EECE 397] Readings and/ or projects on advanced topics in electrical engineering under the supervision of the staff. Consent of instructor required. [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] EECE 8991. Seminar. [Formerly EECE 392] [1] EECE 8992. Advanced Seminar for Ph.D. Candidates. [Formerly EECE 393] [1] EECE 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly EECE 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit 0-12] EECE 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly EECE 399]

Engineering Management ENGM 5000. Enterprise System Design. (Also listed as ENGM 3000) Design of complex enterprise systems and processes including enterprise requirements analysis, process-mapping, modeling, performance measurement, benchmarking, solution development, and change management. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3000. FALL, SPRING. [3] ENGM 5010. Systems Engineering. (Also listed as ENGM 3010) Fundamental considerations associated with the engineering of large-scale systems. Models and methods for systems engineering and problem solving using a systems engineering approach. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3010. FALL, SPRING. [3] ENGM 5100. Finance and Accounting for Engineers. (Also listed as ENGM 3100) Time value of money, capital budgeting and formation, financial accounting and reporting, double entry bookkeeping, taxation, performance ratio measurements, and working capital management. Probabilistic models for expected net present value and rate of return, dividend pricing models for alternative growth scenarios, cost and market based models for average cost of capital, taxation algorithms, and regression analysis for individual firm betas. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3100. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [3] ENGM 5200. Technology Marketing. (Also listed as ENGM 3200) Strategies for marketing technology-based products and services. Demand analysis, segmentation, distribution, and personal selling. Economic analysis from inception to end use. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3200. FALL. [3] ENGM 5300. Technology Assessment and Forecasting. (Also listed as ENGM 3300) Methods of forecasting technological advancements and assessing their potential intended and unintended consequences. Delphi method, trend exploration, environmental monitoring, and scenario development. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3300. SPRING. [3] ENGM 5600. Technology-Based Entrepreneurship. (Also listed as ENGM 3600) Identification and evaluation of opportunities: risks faced by entrepreneurs, market assessment, capital requirements, venture capital acquisition, legal structures, tax implications for sharing technology-based businesses. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3600. FALL. [3]

96 ENGM 5650. Operations and Supply Chain Management. (Also listed as ENGM 3650) Manufacturing strategy, process analysis, product and process design, total quality management, capacity planning, inventory control, supply chain design, and advanced operations topics. Modeling and analysis using cases and spreadsheets. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3650. FALL. [3] ENGM 5700. Program and Project Management. (Also listed as ENGM 3700) Scheduling, cost estimation/predictions, network analysis, optimization, resource/load leveling, risk/mitigation, quality/testing, international projects. Term project required. Provides validated preparation for the Project Management Institute CAPM certification for undergraduates or the PMP for graduate students. Credit given for only one of ENGM 3700 or 5700, CE 4400 or 5400, or EECE 4950. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [3]

English ENGL 7430. Graduate Fiction Workshop. [Formerly ENGL 303] [May be repeated for credit with the program director’s approval] [4] ENGL 7440. Graduate Poetry Workshop. [Formerly ENGL 304] [May be repeated for credit with the program director’s approval] [4] ENGL 7450. Graduate Nonfiction Workshop. [Formerly ENGL 305] [May be repeated for credit with the program director’s approval] [4] ENGL 7460. Literature and the Craft of Writing. [Formerly ENGL 307] [May be repeated for credit with the program director’s approval] [4] ENGL 7998. Master of Fine Arts Thesis Research. [Formerly ENGL 370] [1-8] ENGL 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ENGL 369] [0-12] ENGL 8137. Introduction to Literary Theory. [Formerly ENGL 337A] [4] ENGL 8138. Introduction to Literary Theory. [Formerly ENGL 337B] [4] ENGL 8150. Special Problems in English and American Literature. [Formerly ENGL 350] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 4 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-4] ENGL 8155. Special Topics in English and American Literature. [Formerly ENGL 355] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] ENGL 8310. Seminar in Middle English Literature. [Formerly ENGL 301] [4] ENGL 8314. Seminar in Chaucer. [Formerly ENGL 302] [4] ENGL 8330. Seminar in Sixteenth-Century Literature. [Formerly ENGL 306] [4] ENGL 8340. Seminar in Shakespeare. [Formerly ENGL 310] [4] ENGL 8346. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century Literature. [Formerly ENGL 312] [4] ENGL 8360. Seminar, 1660-1800. [Formerly ENGL 314] [4] ENGL 8370. Seminar in the Enlightenment and Its Literary Connections. [Formerly ENGL 330] [4] ENGL 8410. Seminar in Romantic Prose and Poetry. [Formerly ENGL 316] [4] ENGL 8420. Seminar in Victorian Prose and Poetry. [Formerly ENGL 318] [4] ENGL 8430. Seminar in Modern British and American Literature. [Formerly ENGL 325] [4] ENGL 8440. Introduction to Literary Modernism. [Formerly ENGL 326] [4] ENGL 8450. Studies in American Literature. [Formerly ENGL 320] [4] ENGL 8455. Studies in Southern Literature. [Formerly ENGL 321] [4] ENGL 8998. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ENGL 398] [0]

vanderbilt university ENGL 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ENGL 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] ENGL 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ENGL 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] ENGL 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ENGL 399] [0-12]

Environmental Engineering ENVE 5305. Enterprise Risk Management. (Also listed as ENVE 4305) Development of safety and security programs for protecting human health, the environment and business continuity. Focus on defining an all-hazards risk management process and program implementation, performing risk assessments, determining and selecting appropriate risk reduction strategies, and influencing risk management decisions internally and externally. Applications drawn from natural disasters, man-made accidents and intentional acts. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4305. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5600. Environmental Chemistry. (Also listed as ENVE 4600) Theoretical aspects of physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry applied to environmental engineering. Estimation of chemical parameters based on thermodynamic and structural activity relationships, kinetics of chemical reactions, equilibrium processes in the environment, including the carbonate system, metal complexation and precipitation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4600. FALL. [3] ENVE 5605. Environmental Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Mass Transfer. (Also listed as ENVE 4605) Examination of fundamental environmental processes and phenomena that provide the analytical tools necessary to solve a broad range of environmental problems. These tools include equilibrium phenomena, process rate and mass transport phenomena. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4605. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5610. Biological Unit Processes. (Also listed as ENVE 4610) Principles of biology and their application to wastewater treatment processes with emphasis on microbial ecology, bioenergetics, and the role of chemical structure in biodegradability. Utilization kinetics of inhibitory and non-inhibitory organic compounds. Biological process analysis and design (aerobic and anaerobic) for municipal and industrial wastewaters, using a mass balance approach. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4610. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5615. Environmental Assessments. (Also listed as ENVE 4615) Design and conduct of environmental assessments to evaluate risks posed by infrastructure systems or environmental contamination. Impact analyses for sources, infrastructure modifications, due diligence environmental audits, and contaminated site remedial investigations. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4615. FALL. [3] ENVE 5620. Environmental Characterization and Analysis. (Also listed as ENVE 4620) Acquisition and interpretation of environmental data. Principles of chemical measurement, sample collection and sample program design; laboratory safety and good laboratory practices; analytical instrumentation and methods; quality assurance and quality control; and statistical interpretation of data. Hands-on experience through demonstrations featuring state-of-the-art analytical instrumentation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4620. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5700. Energy and Water Resources. (Also listed as ENVE 4700) Scientific, technological, philosophical, and social issues surrounding approaches to carbon-based energy and alternative energy resources, management of carbon through sequestration, supplying and treating water for agriculture, communities, and industry, and changing climate impacts on regional distribution of water resources. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4700. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5705. Physical Hydrology. (Also listed as ENVE 4705) Development of fundamental bases of hydrological processes. Landatmosphere processes, surfacewater flows, soil moisture dynamics, and groundwater flows. Exposition of physical principles, their embodiment in mathematical models, and their use in interpreting observations in the field and laboratory. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4705. FALL. [3]

Graduate School / Courses ENVE 5710. Hydrology. (Also listed as ENVE 4710) The hydrologic cycle, study of precipitation, evapotranspiration, hydrometeorology, stream flow, flood flow, flood routing, storm sewer design, detention basin design, and water quality. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4710. FALL. [3] ENVE 5715. Groundwater Hydrology. (Also listed as ENVE 4715) The occurrence and flow of ground water. Basic concepts of the effects of varying permeability and capillarity on seepage flow. Flow toward wells, through dikes, and beneath dams. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4715. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5720. Surface Water Quality Modeling. (Also listed as ENVE 4720) Analysis of physical, chemical, biological, and physiological contaminants in streams, lakes, and estuaries, and surface water/groundwater interfaces. Analytical and numerical modeling techniques. One- and two-dimension computer simulation of surface water quality. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4720. SPRING. [3] ENVE 5800. Introduction to Nuclear Environmental Engineering. (Also listed as ENVE 4800) The nuclear fuel cycle and environmental and societal impacts associated with its traditional implementation. Technical and programmatic challenges associated with fuel production, and waste management including processing, storage, transportation, decontamination, decommissioning, and environmental restoration. Technologies and approaches for reducing impacts of the nuclear fuel cycle. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4800. SPRING. [3] ENVE 6800. Nuclear Facilities Life Cycle Engineering. [Formerly ENVE 330] The life cycle (including siting, licensing, construction, operations and decommissioning) of the nuclear facilities that comprise the nuclear fuel cycle--from mining uranium ore through the potential recycling of used nuclear fuel. SPRING. [3] ENVE 6805. Storage, Treatment and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. [Formerly ENVE 332] Evolution of current domestic and international approaches, including waste forms, classification, storage and disposal locations, and environmental and safety assessments. FALL. [3] ENVE 7812. Pollutant Transport in the Environment. [Formerly ENVE 312] An introduction to the mathematical foundations of fluid mechanics and transport of pollutants in the environment. Fundamental conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations will be developed. Appropriate initial and boundary conditions and solution techniques will be discussed for a number of applications. Prerequisite: CE 3700, Math 2420. FALL. [3] ENVE 7899. Master of Engineering Project. [Formerly ENVE 389] ENVE 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ENVE 369] ENVE 8000. Individual Study. [Formerly ENVE 325A] Literature review and analysis, or laboratory investigation of special problems under faculty supervision. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-4 each semester] ENVE 8001. Individual Study. [Formerly ENVE 325B] Literature review and analysis, or laboratory investigation of special problems under faculty supervision. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-4 each semester] ENVE 8002. Individual Study. [Formerly ENVE 325C] Literature review and analysis, or laboratory investigation of special problems under faculty supervision. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-4 each semester] ENVE 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ENVE 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] ENVE 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ENVE 399]

Epidemiology EPID 8301. Introduction to Statistical Computing and Programming Workshop. [Formerly EPID 301] This course is designed for students who seek to develop skills in statistical computing. Students will learn how to use R and STATA for data management, database querying, reporting generating, data presentation, and data tabulation and summarization. Topics include organization and documentation of data, input and export of data sets; methods of cleaning data; tabulation and graphing of data;

97 programming capabilities; and an introduction to simulations and bootstrapping. Students will also be introduced to LATEX and SWEAVE for report writing. Students will also be briefly introduced to SAS. [2] EPID 8310. Causal Inference. [Formerly EPID 310] This course will concentrate on conceptually grasping tools of logic and critical thinking as they apply to epidemiologic research. Our emphasis will be on rigorous definition of a causal effect and the minimal conditions necessary to consistently estimate such effects. In a small group format, we will examine case studies and anchor our discussions in readings from philosophy of science, logic, and probability. We will cover examples of valid and fallacious arguments, probability calculus, probabilistic fallacies, applications of Bayes theorem, the frequentist and Bayesian perspective, counterfactual logic, introduction of directed acyclic graphs (DAG), and interpretation of p-values and confidence intervals in epidemiologic research. [3] EPID 8311. Epidemiologic Theory and Methods I. [Formerly EPID 311] This is the first of a two-course series on advanced epidemiologic concepts and methods that includes measures of disease frequency, measures of effect, descriptive epidemiology, study designs, bias, misclassification and effect measure modification, and ethics in epidemiologic research. A casebased approach will engage students in demonstrating concepts using actual research data and in critical appraisal of case studies and publications that feature strong and weak examples. [4] EPID 8312. Epidemiologic Theory and Methods II. [Formerly EPID 312] This second in a two-course series provides an in-depth treatment of concepts and skills in epidemiologic research, including problem conceptualization, study design, data analysis and interpretation. Includes emphasis on how to design studies to best measure etiologic effects and includes advanced discussion of confounding, interaction, and missing data. A continued case-based approach will engage students in demonstrating concepts and methods using the students’ own data. Prerequisite: 8311: Epidemiologic Theory and Methods I. [4] EPID 8315. Scientific Writing I. [Formerly EPID 315] Scientific Writing I. Participatory course in which students develop skills in presenting research results in manuscripts, abstracts, and posters. Students work in small groups to write and critique published and unpublished manuscripts, with a focus on understanding the essential components of a scientific manuscript or presentation, as well as the process of publishing in the peer-reviewed literature and managing reviewer and editor comments and requests. [1] EPID 8321. Applied Epidemiologic Methods in Regression I: Binary Data. [Formerly EPID 321] Applied Epidemiologic Methods in Regression I: Binary Data. Concepts and applications, including logistic regression, binomial regression, ordinal regression, multinomial regression, quantile regression, model building strategy, additive and multiplicative interaction, clustered and longitudinal data, and graphical exploration. Includes computer-based experience with real data, and an emphasis on logistic regression. EPID 8323. Epidemiolgic Methods: Design and Analysis with Timeto-Event Data. [Formerly EPID 323] Epidemiolgic Methods: Design and Analysis with Time-to-Event Data. Concepts and applications in survival analysis and analysis of incidence rates, including truncation and censoring, life tables, nonparametric approaches (e.g. Kaplan-Meier, log-rank), semi-parametric approaches (e.g. Cox models, proportional hazards regression), parametric approaches (e.g. Weibull, gamma regression) accommodating time-dependent exposures, Poisson regression, sensitivity analysis, bootstrapping, and multiple imputation. [4] EPID 8325. Scientific Writing II—Proposal Development in Epidemiology. [Formerly EPID 325] Scientific Writing II—Proposal Development in Epidemiology. Paricipatory course in which each student develops a high quality, detailed research proposal suitable for submission to NIH or AHRQ that includes both a technical proposal and a draft budget justification. Includes lecture, in-class exercises and group processes. SPRING EPID 8331. Seminar in Quantitative Methods and Measurement. [Formerly EPID 331] Concepts and application of cross-cutting tools used for unique and/or specialized types of measurement and instrument development for areas such as physical activity, clinical laboratory tests, and imaging studies. May be repeated. [2]

98 EPID 8332. Advanced Methods for Epidemiology. [Formerly EPID 332] These methods electives will be taught in modular format, most often with three modules on related methods topics, which will vary annually. Students will explore methodological issues in epidemiology like measurement error, missing data, intermediate variables, complex study designs, meta-analysis, splines, propensity scores, simulation. Exercises with provided datasets and the student’s own data will be included. May be repeated. [1-3] EPID 8333. Analytic Techniques for Genetic Epidemiology. [Formerly EPID 333] This course will take an example-based approach to provide students with the skills necessary to conduct statistical association analysis of genetic data from human populations for genetic epidemiology studies. Topics will include quality control, statistical methods for association testing, common study design issues, future directions of genetic epidemiology and advanced topics. HGEN 8330, HGEN 8340, MP&B 8341 recommended. EPID 8340. Content Area Intensives. [Formerly EPID 340] These intensives are offered on a rotating basis and taught by faculty with research expertise in the content area of focus. Areas of epidemiology may include cancer, cardiovascular disease, child health, chronic disease/diabetes, genetics, global health, health care, infectious disease, nutrition, pharmacoepidemiology, reproductive, and social. May be repeated. [1-3] EPID 8370. Current Topics In Research. [Formerly EPID 370] Students attend weekly presentations selecting from the Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center Seminar Series, Biostatistics Clinic, clinical grand rounds on topics related to content area interests, and other relevant seminars. Students will convene with faculty to reflect on and critique components of research presentations relevant to the students’ interests and to the contemporaneous topics being covered in the core epidemiology curriculum. Course assignments will focus on critical appraisal of a methodologic challenge identified in a seminar setting that has immediate relevance to the student’s own research. May be repeated. [1] EPID 8371. Special Topics Seminar in Epidemiology. [Formerly EPID 371] Faculty offer small groups of students a study course on a topic of mutual interest and concern in the faculty member’s area of expertise. May be repeated with topic change. [1-3] EPID 8372. Advanced Readings in Epidemiology. [Formerly EPID 372] Additional readings in specialized epidemiologic topics will be explored in depth under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated. [1-3] EPID 8373. Independent Study in Epidemiology. [Formerly EPID 373] Designed to allow the student an opportunity to master advanced skills in epidemiology while pursuing special projects under individual members of the faculty in their areas of expertise. May be repeated. [1-3] EPID 8374. Advanced Readings in Epidemiologic Context, Thought, and History. [Formerly EPID 374] Reading and discussion of seminal literature in the history of epidemiology as well as contemporary literature that provides social and cultural context for the development of the field, challenges to the application of epidemiologic findings, consideration of roles and history of public health advocacy, and exploration of topics like social justice and research ethics through the lens of fiction, nonfiction, and scientific literature. A core reading will be selected to launch each semester and students will work as a group to select the balance of the readings for the semester from a recommended source list. Discussions will be facilitated by faculty and students including guest lecturers. Minimum of masters training in quantitative discipline and research experience in epidemiology or related field is required; other graduate students with permission of the instructor. EPID 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly EPID 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] EPID 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly EPID 399]

European Studies EUS 5220. Religion and Politics in Modern Europe, 1648-Present. (Also listed as EUS 2220) Toleration in the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; antisemitism; genocide; secularism and political Islam. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2220. [3]

vanderbilt university

Financial Economics FNEC 5700. Investment Analysis. (Also listed as FNEC 3700) Investment principles and practices. Security analysis and valuation. Portfolio theory. Current issues in the financial sector. Stock market simulation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3700. [3] FNEC 5705. Financial Management. (Also listed as FNEC 3705) Analysis of cases representing capital budgeting, forecasting cash flow, risk assessment, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions. Seminar. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3705. [3]

French FREN 7020. History of the French Language: Medieval Period. [Formerly FREN 302] Syntax, morphology, phonology, emphasis on textual explication. Prerequisite: Elementary knowledge of Latin. [4] FREN 7050. Applied French Linguistics. [Formerly FREN 318] Phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics, with application to teaching; theories of second language acquisition. [4] FREN 7060. French Literary Theory. [Formerly FREN 380] Literary theory as it has been shaped by and shapes the French tradition. [4] FREN 8000. Apprenticeship in Undergraduate Teaching. [Formerly FREN 397] Supervised experience and instruction of pedagogical practices in foreign language and literature courses. May be repeated once for credit. Consent of supervisor and director of graduate studies required. [2] FREN 8010. Seminar in Medieval French Literature. [Formerly FREN 332] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] FREN 8020. French Feminism from de Beauvoir to the Present. [Formerly FREN 338] Ideological, political, and cultural contexts. French feminist theory explored through essays, novels, drama, and poetry. Principal theoretical feminists (Beauvoir, Delphy, Guillaumin, Leclerc, Cixous, Irigaray, Kristeva), as well as lesser-known figures (Halimi, Badinter, Agacinsky, Roudinesco, Amara) and literary figures (Duras, Abécassis, Schwarz-Bart, Ednan and Bâ. [4] FREN 8030. Seminar in Seventeenth-Century French Literature. [Formerly FREN 342] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] FREN 8040. Seminar in Eighteenth-Century French Literature. [Formerly FREN 353] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] FREN 8050. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century French Literature. [Formerly FREN 362] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] FREN 8060. Seminar in Twentieth-Century French Literature. [Formerly FREN 372] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] FREN 8070. Seminar in Francophone Literature. [Formerly FREN 388] Literature of the French-speaking world (“La Francophonie”). May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] FREN 8075. Seminar in Francophone Caribbean Literature. [Formerly FREN 387] Major literary figures and intellectual traditions. No credit for students who earned credit for 388 section 1 in fall 2012. [4] FREN 8080. Seminar in French Film. [Formerly FREN 375] Theory and practice of French-language film, often in comparative context, for example in a side-by-side study of French and Italian New Wave. No credit for students who completed 390 section 1 in fall 2009. [4]

Graduate School / Courses FREN 8090. Special Topics in French Studies. [Formerly FREN 394] Problems, themes, or issues in literature, language, or culture approached in ways that transcend traditional chronological distinctions. [4] FREN 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly FREN 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] FREN 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly FREN 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] FREN 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly FREN 399] [0-12]

German GER 5111. German for Graduate Reading. [Formerly GER 101G] Survey of grammar and vocabulary, with extensive reading. Available only to graduate students for no credit. [0] GER 5310. Foreign Language Learning and Teaching. [Formerly GER 310] (Also listed as French 6030, Portuguese 6030, and Spanish 6030) Principles and practices of teaching a second language, with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Goals of the course are 1) to introduce principles of Second Language Acquisition and learning, 2) to critically read relevant literature in the area(s), and 3) to develop FL instructor’s awareness through reflective and critical thinking. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action-research project are expected. Required of all entering teaching assistants. [3] GER 5613. Bibliography and Methods. [Formerly GER 314] An introduction to German studies in the U.S., to the resources and practice of literary history and criticism. [3] GER 5616. Literary Theory and Criticism. [Formerly GER 316] Selected problems of literary theory, history, and interpretation. [3] GER 5680. Problems in Germanic Languages and Literatures. [Formerly GER 385A] [3] GER 5681. Problems in Germanic Languages and Literatures. [Formerly GER 385B] [3] GER 5730. Expressionism. [Formerly GER 330] The chief intellectual movement in Germany and Austria from 1910 to 1925. Topics include all genres of literature with frequent references to other disciplines including politics, the pictorial arts, and film. In German. [3] GER 5734. Enlightenment and Its Literary Connections. [Formerly GER 335] (Also listed as English 8370) Philosophy and literature in the age of reason; emphasis on aesthetic innovation and rise of the modern individual; authors include Locke, Kant, Richardson, and Lessing. [3] GER 5740. Beyond Good and Evil. [Formerly GER 340] [3] GER 5750. Graduate Tutorials. [Formerly GER 350] Graduate Tutorials. Supervised reading in special areas of German language and literature according to a fixed syllabus. Number, content, and schedule of meetings with the instructor are predetermined, as are reading assignments, tests, term papers, and grading procedure. Units are related to the content and method of period seminars and other graduate courses and allow students to deepen their knowledge of subjects not covered in depth in formal courses offered by the department. Students may not take more than one unit per semester. [3] GER 5751. Philosophical Backgrounds of German Literature. [Formerly GER 351] Survey of German philosophical thinking from Leibnitz to Nietzsche and its importance for German literature from Goethe to Hesse. [3] GER 5787. Seminar: Studies in Medieval Literature. [Formerly GER 387] [3] GER 5788. Seminar: Studies in Literature 1400-1680. [Formerly GER 388] [3] GER 5789. Seminar: Eighteenth-Century German Literature. [Formerly GER 389] [3]

99 GER 5790. Seminar: Nineteenth-Century German Literature. [Formerly GER 390] [3] GER 5791. Seminar: Twentieth-Century German Literature. [Formerly GER 391] [3] GER 5792. Seminar: Problems of Theory in German Studies. [Formerly GER 392] Author, Archive, Work. [3] GER 5793. Seminar: Intellectual Constellations. [Formerly GER 393] [3] GER 5794. Seminar: Society and Ethics. [Formerly GER 394] [3] GER 5795. The Racial Imagination. [Formerly GER 395] The complex and contradictory history of the idea of “race” as a scientific category. Study of medical, scientific, philosophical, anthropological, and literary texts. No knowledge of German is required. [3] GER 5852. Independent Readings. (Also listed as GER 3852) Designed for majors and qualified undergraduates. Projects are carried out under the supervision of a member of the department. All projects must be approved by the department. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours over a four-semester period in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum of 6 credit hours total for four semesters of GER 3851 and 3852] GER 5884. Teaching Program Option: Internship in Advanced Language and Literature Courses. [Formerly GER 329A] Graduate interns participate in the teaching of advanced language or literature courses and receive training in the writing of syllabi, text selection, testing, the development of supplementary materials, the selection of visual aids. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours, but students may earn only up to 2 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-2; maximum of 6 credit hours for all semesters of GER 5884] GER 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly GER 369] [0-12] GER 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly GER 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] GER 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly GER 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] GER 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly GER 399] [0-12]

Greek GRK 7000. Seminar in Classical Greek Prose. [Formerly GRK 313] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] GRK 7010. Seminar in Classical Greek Poetry. [Formerly GRK 314] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

Haitian Creole Language CREO 5101. Creole Elementary I (Duke). (Also listed as CREO 1101) Essential elements of Haitian Creole or Kreyòl language and Haitian culture. Understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in contexts of health care, Haitian women’s rights, and unpaid child servants (restavèk). Vocabulary and idioms. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] CREO 5201. Intermediate Creole I (Duke). (Also listed as CREO 2201) Understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in cultural context; issues of rural life in Haiti, religion, Frenchified Creole vs popular Creole. Texts, poems, novel excerpts. Focus on contemporary events and debates in Haitian culture. Offered on a graded basis only. Prerequisite: 1102. [3]

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Hearing and Speech Sciences HRSP 8341. Seminar: Research in Audiology. [Formerly HRSP 382A] An advanced study of research for the second-year doctoral student. Directed individual research culminating in oral presentation and a manuscript. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [2-2] (Offered on demand) HRSP 8342. Seminar in the Neurobiology of Hearing and Multisensory Processes. [Formerly HRSP 342] (Also listed as Neuroscience 8342) Study at the doctoral level of the neural processes underlying auditory and multisensory perception. The course will focus on critical readings of recently published findings that emphasize the connection between plasticity, neural systems, and behavior. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FALL, SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-2] HRSP 8344. Administrative Issues in Communicative Disorders. [Formerly HRSP 344] A discussion of some of the important issues affecting the administration of programs in communication disorders. Emphasis on business management, marketing, financial management, third-party payors, grants and contracts, state and federal agencies, and fundraising. SUMMER of even-numbered years. [Variable credit: 2-3] HRSP 8351. Special Problems in Speech Pathology. [Formerly HRSP 351] Areas and problems not included in other courses in speech pathology, chosen to fit the students’ interests and the needs of their programs. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-6] HRSP 8352. Special Problems in Audiology. [Formerly HRSP 352] Areas and problems not included in other courses in audiology, chosen to fit the students’ interests and the needs of their programs. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-4] HRSP 8366. Electrophysiology and Imaging in Research. [Formerly HRSP 366] A survey of electrophysiological and imaging methods and their applications for he study of auditory processing (and related systems). SPRING of even-numbered years. [3] HRSP 8371. Research Design and Statistical Analysis. [Formerly HRSP 371A] (Also listed as AUD 5371) Covers topics in research design and statistics for students preparing for research careers in hearing science, speech science, and communication disorders. Reviews mathematical bases for probability theory and statistical inference. Covers fundamental parametric and nonparametric statistical tests, with extensive discussion of research design in the context of analysis of variance. Presents statistical properties of psychophysical methods and signal detection theory. FALL, SPRING. [3-3] HRSP 8372. Research Design and Statistical Analysis. [Formerly HRSP 371B] Covers topics in research design and statistics for students preparing for research careers in hearing science, speech science, and communication disorders. Reviews mathematical bases for probability theory and statistical inference. Covers fundamental parametric and nonparametric statistical tests, with extensive discussion of research design in the context of analysis of variance. Presents statistical properties of psychophysical methods and signal detection theory. FALL, SPRING. [3-3] HRSP 8373. Signals and Systems for Hearing and Speech Sciences. [Formerly HRSP 373] A hands-on laboratory course that concentrates on applications for communications science. The course covers: (1) the fundamentals of analog signals, including the Fourier transform and representation of signals in the time and frequency domains; (2) the fundamentals of analog systems (filters), including representation in the time and frequency domains and the analysis of signals that pass through systems; (3) an introduction to digital signals and digital systems, including digital filter design; and (4) an introduction to MATLAB, a powerful tool for understanding and implementing signals and systems. SUMMER of odd-numbered years. [3] HRSP 8376. Language Research Methods. [Formerly HRSP 376] This doctoral-level seminar provides an in-depth analysis of research methods to study language development in children of all ages. Methods used within various fields (e.g. linguistics, communication sciences and disorders, developmental psychology) are reviewed. Critical analysis of research articles with typical and atypical language learners. SPRING of even-numbered years. [3]

vanderbilt university HRSP 8377. Seminar in Speech Perception. [Formerly HRSP 377] The study of the processes and models underlying the perception of speech features. Relevant acoustic correlates for speech perception will be evaluated, and these properties will be emphasized through the generation of synthetic speech. The course will cover the contributions of speech perception research to our understanding of speech development, and language and hearing disorders. SPRING. [3] HRSP 8380. Advanced Seminar in Speech Language Pathology. [Formerly HRSP 380] A doctoral-level course focusing on special topics of interest to faculty and students and based on recent research developments in speech pathology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [3] HRSP 8381. Advanced Seminar in Language. [Formerly HRSP 381] A doctoral-level course focusing on special topics of interest to faculty and students and based on recent research developments in language. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [3] HRSP 8382. Seminar: Research in Audiology. [Formerly HRSP 382B] An advanced study of research for the second-year doctoral student. Directed individual research culminating in oral presentation and a manuscript. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. [2-2] (Offered on demand) HRSP 8383. Seminar in Auditory and Vestibular Neuroscience. [Formerly HRSP 383] The course is a full semester course that combines a small amount of didactic teaching with seminar discussions to introduce students to the neuroscience of the auditory and vestibular systems. For each topic, the short didactic component introduces/refamiliarizes the students with the basic knowledge requisite for that particular topic; the seminar component following the didactic material involves a presentation of both classic papers as well as recent papers that represent the state of art in the field. The seminar component will train students to critically read primary literature, to present scientific information in clear and concise fashion, and provide a theoretical foundation for understanding sensory coding and its relationship with perception using the auditory brain as a model system. The group discussion will also explore the impact of the findings in the papers on various aspects of the field. NOTE: For Ph.D. students, completion of an introductory neuroscience course, or advisor approval required. For other students, permission of instructor required. FALL [3] HRSP 8384. Advanced Seminar in Audiology. [Formerly HRSP 384] A doctoral-level course focusing on special topics of interest to faculty and students based on recent research developments in audiology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [3] HRSP 8385. Instrumentation for Hearing and Speech Sciences: Stimulus Generation, Measurement, and Calibration. [Formerly HRSP 385] A hands-on introduction to the principles and techniques of setting up equipment for hearing and speech perception experiments. Students are exposed to analog generators (noise generators, function generators, oscillators, computer-controlled digital-to-analog converters) processing devices (attenuators, filters, mixers, amplifiers), terminating devices (earphones, loudspeakers, analog-to-digital converters), and measurement devices (oscilloscope, voltmeter, spectrum analyzer). Students will learn to design and implement circuits involving these various devices, and to measure and calibrate various kinds of acoustic stimuli. FALL of odd-numbered years. [3] HRSP 8386. Instrumentation for Hearing and Speech Sciences: Matlab Programming with Real-Time Applications. [Formerly HRSP 386] An introduction to the standard MATLAB computing language in a Windows environment. Basic programming concepts including data types and storage, data input and output, conditional execution, iterative programming, and the use of functions. The goal is for the student to become sufficiently comfortable with MATLAB (and with the concept of programming languages in general) to develop programs to solve specific computational problems too tedious to solve by calculator. The last third of the course will be devoted to the application of MATLAB programming to real-time laboratory problems. Prerequisite: 8385. SPRING of even-numbered years. [3]

Graduate School / Courses HRSP 8387. Spatial Hearing. [Formerly HRSP 387] An advanced treatment of the perception by humans of auditory objects in space, including laboratory demonstrations. Topics include (1) binaural processing (lateralization, binaural detection); (2) localization and spatial resolution in the freefield; (3) auditory distance perception; (4) the precedence effect: localization in reverberant spaces; and (5) the central auditory nervous system: binaural pathways. FALL of even-numbered years. [3] HRSP 8388. Independent Study and Readings in Speech Pathology. [Formerly HRSP 388] FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-3] HRSP 8389. Independent Study and Readings in Audiology. [Formerly HRSP 389] FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [1-3] HRSP 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly HRSP 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] HRSP 9995. Half-Time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly HRSP 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] HRSP 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly HRSP 399]

Hebrew HEBR 5301. Advanced Hebrew Grammar. (Also listed as HEBR 2301) Emphasis on syntax and grammar supplemented by listening, speaking, and reading. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Hebrew language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2301. [3] HEBR 5302. Advanced Hebrew Composition. (Also listed as HEBR 2302W) Development of writing skills through the study of short stories, poems, articles, television, and web materials. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2302W. [3]

History HIST 5610. The Founding Generation. (Also listed as HIST 2610) American history from the 1760s to the 1820s. The Revolutionary War, the Constitution, formation of national government. Political conflict, national culture, commerce, diplomacy, and race and gender in an age of revolution. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2610. [3] HIST 6100. Introduction to Historical Methods and Research. [Formerly HIST 300A] [4] HIST 6110. Introduction to Historical Methods and Research. [Formerly HIST 300B] [4] HIST 6300. The Art and Craft of Teaching History. [Formerly HIST 301] Readings on pedagogical theory and current research on college-level teaching and learning. Hands-on exercises in course design, preparing and grading tests and assignments, lecturing, leading discussion, cooperative and service learning, and use of technology to enhance teaching. Normally limited to graduate students in history. [4] HIST 6400. Readings in American History. [Formerly HIST 302A] To the Civil War. [4] HIST 6410. Readings in American History. [Formerly HIST 302B] Civil War to the present. [4] HIST 6500. Readings in Colonial Latin American History. [Formerly HIST 303A] [4] HIST 6510. Readings in Modern Latin American History. [Formerly HIST 303B] [4] HIST 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly HIST 369] [0-12] HIST 8000. Independent Study. [Formerly HIST 390A] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3]

101 HIST 8010. Independent Study. [Formerly HIST 390B] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3] HIST 8050. Studies in Comparative History. [Formerly HIST 305] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8100. Studies in the History of Medicine, Science, and Technology. [Formerly HIST 307] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8110. Studies in the History of the Human Sciences. [Formerly HIST 308] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8150. Studies in Environmental History. [Formerly HIST 309] Approaches to writing about human interactions with the natural world and the role of the environment in human history. Methods and preoccupations characteristic of work in environmental history. Comparisons to works in intellectual and cultural history, social history, history of science, and animal studies. [3] HIST 8200. Third-Year Seminar. [Formerly HIST 397A] For third-year students preparing a dissertation prospectus and starting work on a dissertation. [4] HIST 8300. Studies in Early Modern European History. [Formerly HIST 315] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8310. Studies in European History, 1815-1914. [Formerly HIST 320] May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8320. Studies in European History. [Formerly HIST 321] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8330. Studies in Recent European History. [Formerly HIST 324] May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8340. Studies in German History. [Formerly HIST 330] May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8350. Studies in Early Modern English History. [Formerly HIST 343] May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8400. Studies in Modern England. [Formerly HIST 344] May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8500. Studies in East Asian History. [Formerly HIST 350] [4] HIST 8600. Comparative Slavery in the Colonial Americas. [Formerly HIST 358] Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of slavery and resistance in Spanish, British, French, Dutch, and Portuguese America. Does not cover antebellum slavery in the United States. [4] HIST 8610. Atlantic World History, Fifteenth to the Nineteenth Century. [Formerly HIST 359] Interdisciplinary readings examining disparate colonizations and the creation of an Atlantic world system. Major themes include the consequences of Atlantic expansion on indigenous societies, the African slave trade, and the rise of Atlantic economics, the circulation of peoples, ideas, and material culture throughout the Atlantic and how imperial competition, political ideologies, and subaltern resistance shaped the Atlantic revolutions. Optional instruction in early modern paleography. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8620. Studies in Latin American History. [Formerly HIST 361] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4]

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HIST 8630. Research Seminar in Latin American History. [Formerly HIST 365] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4]

HART 6760. Seminar: Studies in American Art. [Formerly HART 325] [3]

HIST 8700. Studies in Early American History to 1783. [Formerly HIST 371] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4]

Human Genetics

HIST 8710. Studies in the Middle Period of American History, 17831861. [Formerly HIST 372] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8720. Studies in U.S. History, 1861-1900. [Formerly HIST 373] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8730. Studies in Recent American History. [Formerly HIST 374] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8740. Research Seminar in Recent American History. [Formerly HIST 375] May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8750. Studies in American History. [Formerly HIST 381] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8760. Studies in U.S. International History. [Formerly HIST 383] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8770. Research Seminar in U.S. International History. [Formerly HIST 384] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [4] HIST 8800. Dissertation Seminar. [Formerly HIST 398] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. Offered on a pass/fail basis only. [0-4] HIST 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly HIST 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] HIST 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly HIST 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] HIST 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly HIST 399] [0-12]

History of Art HART 6010. The Methods of Art History. [Formerly HART 301] Comparative analysis of art historical methods including social history, poststructuralism, feminism, gender studies, stylistic analysis, and icionography. Assessment of methods in action through critiques and exercised in independent application. [3] HART 6285. Seminar: Problems in Medieval Architecture. [Formerly HART 312] [3] HART 6390. Seminar: Problems in Baroque Art. [Formerly HART 319] [3] HART 6600. Seminar: Problems in Eighteenth Century Art. [Formerly HART 321] [3] HART 6680. Seminar in British Art and Culture. [Formerly HART 320] [3] HART 6700. Seminar: Studies in Twentieth-Century Art. [Formerly HART 324] [3]

HART 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly HART 369] [0-12]

HGEN 8320. Human Genetics. [Formerly HGEN 320] Research/techniques in human genetics. Human genetics students only, by arrangement. [Variable credit] HGEN 8330. Special Topics in Human Genetics. [Formerly HGEN 330] This course will provide students with an introduction to special topics in human genetics research, with emphasis on unanswered questions in the field. An introductory module will give students a basic understanding of human genetic principles. This will be followed by discussion of current special topics. Potential topics include What do we know about the human genome and what do we have to learn? Is there a gene for everything? Is personalized medicine feasible? SPRING. [3]. HGEN 8335. Genetics Interest Group Seminar Part 1. [Formerly HGEN 335A] The class meets weekly and is a seminar course that involves four revolving formats: journal club presentations, clinical and ethics talks, directed discussion on current topics of interest in human genetics, and student research in progress presentations. For Human Genetics graduate students only. FALL and SPRING. [0] HGEN 8336. Genetics Interest Group Seminar Part 2. [Formerly HGEN 335B] The class meets weekly and is a seminar course that involves four revolving formats: journal club presentations, clinical and ethics talks, directed discussion on current topics of interest in human genetics, and student research in progress presentations. For human genetics graduate students only. FALL and SPRING. [1] HGEN 8340. Human Genetics I. [Formerly HGEN 340] (Also listed as Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8340) Designed to cover background and latest advances in human molecular genetics. Topics will include an overview and in-depth look at molecular genetics including DNA, RNA, and chromosome basics. Gene structure and transcriptional processing. Mutational mechanisms, biochemical genetics (gene defects in biochemical pathways). Topics will be discussed with use of real-world examples and relevance to human research. FALL. [3] HGEN 8341. Human Genetics II. [Formerly HGEN 341] (Also listed as Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8341) This course will cover the statistical, population, and analytical aspects of modern human genetics research. Topics to be covered include human population genetics, quantitative genetics, disease gene discovery (emphasizing design, statistical and molecular techniques), linkage and association analyses, computational genetics, and evolutionary genetics. Clinical examples, subject ascertainment, and study design will also be emphasized. Students must have a strong understanding of Mendelian genetics and basic biostatistics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. SPRING. [3] HGEN 8349. Genetics of Model Organisms. [Formerly HGEN 349] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology 8349, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8349) Basic genetic principles across a broad range of organisms (yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, plants, mouse, zebrafish) that are used in genetic analyses to investigate molecular pathways of interest for human disease will be presented. This course will provide students with in-depth terminology and understanding of the advantages, applications, and approaches specific to each organism. Genomic and bioinformatics tools that facilitate genetic analysis in each species will be emphasized. Specific examples of how each model organism has successfully contributed to elucidation of a human disease gene, pathway, or genetic principle will be presented. Course combines faculty lectures with student presentation and discussion of original articles to emphasize the uniqueness of each model system. Prerequisite: one statistics course at the upper undergraduate level or higher and Fundamentals of Genetic Analysis (MPB 8385), or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. SPRING. [3] HGEN 8350. Directed Study in Human Genetics. [Formerly HGEN 350] Introduction to current research through readings of the genetics literature. Given on an individual basis by arrangement. May be taken more than once, but not for more than 4 hours credit with a single adviser, nor for

Graduate School / Courses more than 5 hours total. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and DGS. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-4] HGEN 8370. Tutorials in Human Genetics. [Formerly HGEN 370] A weekly seminar critically evaluating current and past scientific literature from many areas of genetic research. The focus will be on study methods and analysis. FALL. [1] HGEN 8371. Tutorial in Statistical and Population Genetics. [Formerly HGEN 371] The class meets once weekly. Graduate students critically evaluate research publications in areas statistical methods in human genetic analysis and in the area of human population genetics. Also, there are faculty presentations on ancillary science skills, such as oral and poster presentations, and grant and proposal writing. SPRING. [1] HGEN 8381. Molecular Foundations of Medicine. [Formerly HGEN 381] Molecular Foundations of Medicine is designed to familiarize students with the cellular structures, biomolecules, and processes that constitute life, human health, and disease at the molecular level. The course employs an integrated approach to teach underlying principles of biochemistry, cell and tissue biology, and genetics with an emphasis on human systems and medical conditions. The inclusion of clinical correlation sessions, small groups, and laboratory sessions will further integrate and broaden course material and relate molecular processes to the study of human disease. Prerequisite: THSP students only. FALL. [Variable credit: 1-6] HGEN 8384. The Brain and Behavior. [Formerly HGEN 384] Brain and Behavior provides a basic understanding of the human central nervous system and human behavior. The format includes lectures, lab exercises, small group discussions, and patient and case presentations. Brain and Behavior integrates three areas of medical science: (1) neuroanatomy, physiology, and biochemistry; (2) psychopathology and systems neuroscience; and (3) pathology, pharmacology, and radiology. Prerequisite: THSP students only. SPRING. [1] HGEN 8385. Fundamentals of Genetic Analysis. [Formerly HGEN 385] This course is designed to accomplish three goals: (1) introduce students to critical topics of genetic research, (2) introduce students to important areas of genetic research not covered in first-year course work, and (3) promote an understanding of classical genetic analysis by learning genetics using the original literature. Emphasis will be placed on research problems that utilize the full power of genetic analysis. HGEN 8390. Human Genetic Epidemiology. [Formerly HGEN 390] This course will cover in detail the study design and methods of modern genetic epidemiology. This will include concepts of familial aggregation, linkage analyses, population genetics as it is applied to studies of human traits, and association studies, both candidate genes and genome-wide association. The concept of linkage disequilibrium and its use in disease-gene studies will be extensively discussed. The underlying principles of each approach will be developed and current methods and software programs used to perform these will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the advantages and disadvantages of each approach and how to best design a genetic epidemiology study. [3] HGEN 8391. BioVU Study Design. [Formerly HGEN 391] This is a practical, hands-on course on the design of research projects using the de-identified version of Vanderbilt.’s electronic medical record (Synthetic Derivative, SD) and DNA bio-repository (BioVU). Students will go through the process of developing a BioVU project proposal, from initial project design through construction of a written proposal and application process. Topics covered will include an overview of the clinical data available in the Synthetic Derivative (SD), techniques for defining phenotypes within the SD, proper control definition, limitations of BioVU for research, available genetic data, common problem with study design and how to address them, population stratification, IRB approval procedures and other RCR topics, and the BioVU application workflow. The goal of this course is to guide the student through the process of developing a practical BioVU proposal to the point of application submission. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SPRING. [2] HGEN 8392. Structure, Function, and Development. [Formerly HGEN 382] Structure, Function, and Development is designed to provide students with the means to develop an effective understanding of the normal micro and macroscopic structure, function, and development of the human body.

103 The course employs a coordinated, integrated approach to the presentation and learning of the disciplines of human gross anatomy, cell and tissue biology (histology), human development (embryology), and physiology in a context of clinical application. Prerequisite: THSP students only. SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-3] HGEN 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly HGEN 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] HGEN 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly HGEN 399]

Interdisciplinary Materials Science IMS 5320. Nanoscale Science and Engineering. [Formerly IMS 320] A multidisciplinary approach to the study of the fundamentals uniquely pertaining to the processing, structure, and performance of materials on the dimensional scale of tens to hundreds of atoms. The science and engineering of nanomaterials. Methods for synthesis and fabrication, techniques for characterization, and the attainment of special properties at the nanoscale. An examination of present and future applications in biotechnology, medicine, and engineering. FALL. [3] MSE 6310. Atomic Arrangements in Solids. [Formerly MSE 310] A basic understanding of the atomic arrangements observed in metals, ceramics, semiconductors, glasses, and polymers. Lattice geometry and crystal symmetry are discussed in detail and these concepts are used to describe important crystal structures. Nanocrystalline materials are also covered. An introduction to scattering theory and diffraction phenomena provides insight into the analytical methods used by materials scientists for structural characterization. FALL. [3] MSE 6343. Introduction to Electron Microscopy. [Formerly MSE 343] Principles and applications of transmission electron microscopy in the study of materials. Electron scattering, image contrast theory, operation of electron microscope, and specimen preparation. Use of the electron microscope in experimental investigations. Two lectures and one laboratory period. FALL. [3] MSE 6391. Special Topics. [Formerly MSE 391] Based on faculty research projects and highly specialized areas of concentration. FALL, SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] MSE 6392. Special Topics. [Formerly MSE 392] Based on faculty research projects and highly specialized areas of concentration. FALL, SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] MSE 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly MSE 369] MSE 8991. Seminar. [Formerly MSE 397] A required noncredit course for all graduate students in the program. Topics of special interest consolidating the teachings of previous courses by considering topics which do not fit simply into a single course category. FALL, SPRING. [0] MSE 8992. Seminar. [Formerly MSE 398] A required noncredit course for all graduate students in the program. Topics of special interest consolidating the teachings of previous courses by considering topics which do not fit simply into a single course category. FALL, SPRING. [0] MSE 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly MSE 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] MSE 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly MSE 399]

Interdisciplinary Social and Political Thought (GS) INTE 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly INTE 369] INTE 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly INTE 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] INTE 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly INTE 399]

104

Japanese JAPN 5101. Elementary Japanese I. (Also listed as JAPN 1101) Acquisition of oral-aural skills and basic grammar. Introduction to reading and writing Japanese syllabaries and Chinese characters. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101. [5] JAPN 5102. Elementary Japanese II. (Also listed as JAPN 1102) Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1102. [5] JAPN 5201. Intermediate Japanese I. (Also listed as JAPN 2201) Development of conversational skills and linguistic competence. Syntax, writing, and reading. Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2201. [5] JAPN 5202. Intermediate Japanese II. (Also listed as JAPN 2202) Two hours of lecture and three hours of drill per week. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2202. [5] JAPN 5301. Advanced Japanese I. (Also listed as JAPN 3301) Reading and writing in contemporary Japanese texts. Conversation, discussion, and development of pragmatic competence. No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3301. [3] JAPN 5302. Advanced Japanese II. (Also listed as JAPN 3302) No credit for students who have earned credit for a more advanced Japanese language course. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3302. [3] JAPN 5851. Independent Study. (Also listed as JAPN 3851) A reading course which may be Latinorepeated with variable content according to the needs of the individual student. Primarily designed to cover materials not otherwise available in the regular curriculum. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum of 12 credit hours total for all semesters of JAPN 3851 and 3852] JAPN 5852. Independent Study. (Also listed as JAPN 3852) A reading course which may be repeated with variable content according to the needs of the individual student. Primarily designed to cover materials not otherwise available in the regular curriculum. May be repeated for a total of 12 credit hours in 3851 and 3852 combined if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3; maximum of 12 credit hours total for all semesters of JAPN 3851 and 3852] No credit for students who have earned credit for 3852. JAPN 5891. Special Topics in Advanced Japanese. (Also listed as JAPN 3891) Reading, writing, and discussion in authentic Japanese cultural, literary, and historical texts. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3891. [3]

Jewish Studies JS 5000. Major Themes in Jewish Studies. (Also listed as JS 3000) The study of Jews, Judaism, and Jewish culture. History of Jewish studies, core perspectives, key methodologies, critical debates. Classical literature, current trends. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3000. [3] JS 5100. The New Testament in Its Jewish Contexts. (Also listed as JS 2100) Documents of the origin of Christianity and the social, literary, ideological, and theological contexts in which they emerged and which they reflect. Various critical methodologies employed in interpreting them. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2100. [3]

vanderbilt university JS 5150. Issues in Rabbinic Literature. (Also listed as JS 2150) History of Rabbinic thought from its origins to the Middle Ages through the reading of central Rabbinic texts. Capital punishment, women in Rabbinic culture, sectarianism, and the power structures of Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 6 credit hours per semester of enrollment. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2150. [3] JS 5210. Reading Across Boundaries: Jewish and Non-Jewish Texts. (Also listed as JS 3210) Jewish and non-Jewish literary and historical texts studied in parallel so as to discover the differences between them. The course will consider texts from the ancient world to the early modern period and ask what constitutes Jewish writing and how it has been defined through time and geography. All readings will be in English. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3210. [3] JS 5250. Witnesses Who Were Not There: Literature of the Children of Holocaust Survivors. (Also listed as JS 2250W) Fiction and non-fiction produced by children of Holocaust survivors. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2250W. [3] JS 5260. Coming of Age in Jewish Literature and Film. (Also listed as JS 2260) The transition of young Jewish protagonists into adulthood as portrayed in literary works and films from Europe, Africa, and the Americas. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2260 or 2260W. [3] JS 5270. Jewish Storytelling. (Also listed as JS 2270) Twentieth-century short fiction and narrative traditions. The transition from religious to secular cultural forms. Immigration and ethnic literary forms. All works are in English or English translation from Yiddish, Hebrew, and Russian. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2270 or 2270W. [3] JS 5300. Modern Jewish Thought. (Also listed as JS 2300) Jewish intellectual responses to major transformations of modernity. Impact of secularization, universalism, pluralism, nationalism, and gender theories on Jewish thought and identity. Conflicting perspectives of tradition, education, culture, and religion. Relationship between Israel and the diaspora. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2300. [3] JS 5301. Jewish Language and Paleography. (Also listed as JS 4301) Advanced study in a language of the Jewish people with a particular focus on the linguistic and paleographic features that define its cultural context. Each section focuses on one of the following languages: Aramaic, Ladino, Judaeo-Arabic, Rabbinic Hebrew, or Yiddish. May be repeated for credit up to two times when the language studied differs. Consent of instructor required. No credit for students who have earned credit for 4301. [3] JS 5320. Freud and Jewish Identity. (Also listed as JS 2320) Analysis of rhetoric and themes in selected writings of Sigmund Freud and his times, development of assimilation and of anti-Semitic repudiation. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2320. [3] JS 5330. Is G-d Guilty? The Problem of Evil in Judaism. (Also listed as JS 2330) Origin, nature, and representations of evil from Scripture through the Hasidic masters. Reflections of modern thinkers. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2330. [3] JS 5340. Jewish Philosophy after Auschwitz. (Also listed as JS 2340) Critical responses to social and political institutions and the corresponding modes of thought that made Auschwitz possible and continue to sustain the barbarism that many leading philosophers have identified at the heart of culture. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2340. [3] JS 5520. Zionism: Politics, Religion, and Ethnicity. (Also listed as JS 2520) Tensions among religion, nationalism, and political activism. Translations of Messianism into a secular program. Criticism from within and without the movement. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2520. [3] JS 5540. Power and Diplomacy in the Modern Middle East. (Also listed as JS 2540) History of the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries with an emphasis on U.S. involvement after 1945. U.S. relationship with Israel, and its impact on the region. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2540. [3] JS 5560. Social Movements in Modern Jewish Life. (Also listed as JS 2560) How social movements shape contemporary American Jewish culture and politics. Explores movements internal to Judaism and those

Graduate School / Courses bringing religion into the public sphere. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2560. [3] JS 5620. Jews in Egypt. (Also listed as JS 2620) Jewish life and experience under Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Muslim rule in Egypt from the Ptolemies to 1956. Jewish self-government, economic life, and culture over twenty-two centuries, through letters, documents, and imaginative literature. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2620. [3]

105 LAT 6100. Roman Comedy. (Also listed as LAT 3100) Reading of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence: study of the form of Roman comedy and its relation to the Greek New Comedy. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3100. [3] LAT 6110. Catullus. (Also listed as LAT 3110) Reading and interpretation of Catullus’ poems; aesthetic, political, and rhetorical contexts; fundamentals of Latin meter. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3110. [3]

JS 5640. Jews and Greeks. (Also listed as JS 2640) From the seventh century B.C.E. to ca. 1500 C.E. Sites of interaction, languages, cultural ties, religious tensions, political conflicts, and competing philosophies. Works by Elephantine, Alexander the Great, the Maccabees, the Septuagint, Aristeas, Josephus, Philo, the rabbis, the New Testament, Ezekiel the Tragedian, Byzantium. No credit for students who have earned credit for 2640. [3]

LAT 6120. Lucretius: De Rerum Natura. (Also listed as LAT 3120) Lucretius’ poem studied both in the tradition of Epicurean philosophy and as a landmark in the development of the Latin didactic epic; background material in the fragments of Epicurus and some treatment of the Epicurean movement in Italy and especially in Rome. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3120. [3]

JS 5890. Special Topics. (Also listed as JS 3890) Topics as announced. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3890. [3]

LAT 6130. Vergil: The Aeneid. (Also listed as LAT 3130) An intensive study of the entire poem, in the context of the epic tradition. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3130. [3]

JS 5892. Topics in Ancient and Medieval Jewish History. (Also listed as JS 3892) From antiquity to 1492. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3892. [3] JS 5894. Topics in Modern Jewish History. (Also listed as JS 3894) From 1492 to the present. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3894. [3]

K’iche’–Mayan Language KICH 5101. Introduction to a Maya Language. (Also listed as KICH 1101) Kaqchikel, K’iche’, or Q’eqchi’. Basic speaking, reading, and writing skills. Offered on a graded basis only. Serves as repeat credit for students who have earned credit for ANTH 2612. No credit for students who have earned credit for 1101. [3]

Latin

LAT 6140. The Lyric Poetry of Horace. (Also listed as LAT 3140) Reading and interpretation of Horace’s Epodes and Odes; relation to the GrecoRoman lyric tradition and to Augustan politics. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3140. [3] LAT 6150. Latin Elegy. (Also listed as LAT 3150) Authors who created a new type of love poetry during the rule of emperor Augustus: Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid, and Sulpicia. Construction and contestation of gender roles; political contexts; development of the elegiac couplet; modern responses. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3150. [3] LAT 6160. Ovid. (Also listed as LAT 3160) Reading and interpretation of selections from the Metamorphoses or other works of Ovid. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3160. [3] LAT 6170. Roman Satire. (Also listed as LAT 3170) The satires of Horace and Juvenal; the origins of Roman satire; history and conventions of the genre; background reading in other Roman satirists. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3170. [3] LAT 6180. Neronian Writers. (Also listed as LAT 3180) Selections from authors in the literary renaissance during the reign of the artistic Emperor Nero, including Seneca, Lucan, Persius, and Petronius. Stylistic innovations, literary merits, and cultural contexts. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3180. [3]

LAT 6010. The Writings of Caesar. (Also listed as LAT 3010) Selections from The Civil War and The Gallic War. Literary style and historical context. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3010. [3]

LAT 6200. Early Christian Writers. (Also listed as LAT 3200) Selections from the writings of Latin Christians, from the account of Perpetua’s martyrdom to the Confessions of Augustine. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3200. [3]

LAT 6020. Cicero and the Humanistic Tradition. (Also listed as LAT 3020) Study of Cicero’s career and thought, and of his contribution to the development of the concept of humanitas. Readings from his letters, speeches, or philosophical works. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3020. [3]

LAT 6890. Special Topics in Latin Literature. (Also listed as LAT 3890) May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

LAT 6030. Latin Letters. (Also listed as LAT 3030) The literary letters of Seneca and Pliny, with a brief introduction to the personal correspondence of Cicero and the letters discovered at Vindolanda. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3030. [3] LAT 6040. The Roman Historians. (Also listed as LAT 3040) Selections from Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus, with attention to their objectives and methods; analysis of Roman historiography and its relation to Greek and early Christian historiography. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3040. [3] LAT 6050. Suetonius. (Also listed as LAT 3050) Selections from the works of one of Rome’s most important biographers, read in the context of the Latin biographical tradition as well as the political and social background. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3050. [3] LAT 6060. Tacitus. (Also listed as LAT 3060) Selections from the works of one of Rome’s most important historians, read in the context of historiographical tradition and political and social background. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3060. [3]

LAT 7000. Seminar in Classical Latin Prose. [Formerly LAT 313] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] LAT 7010. Seminar in Classical Latin Poetry. [Formerly LAT 314] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] LAT 7850. Independent Study. (Also listed as LAT 3850) Designed for majors wanting to familiarize themselves with works or authors not covered in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: 6 hours above 2202. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3850. [1-3; maximum of 6 credit hours total for all semesters of LAT 3850]

Latin American Studies LAS 5851. Independent Study. [Formerly LAS 390A] A program of independent readings and research in a minimum of two disciplines, to be selected in consultation with the center’s graduate adviser. [3]

106 LAS 5852. Independent Study. [Formerly LAS 390B] A program of independent readings and research in a minimum of two disciplines, to be selected in consultation with the center’s graduate adviser. [3] LAS 6010. Culture and Music in the Mexican Borderlands. [Formerly LAS 330] Ethnographies and interpretations of social-cultural life in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. [3] LAS 6020. Music, Spirituality, and Performance. [Formerly LAS 331] How religious events invoke music and dance to bond temporal humanity with spiritual eternity. Ways in which music reconstructs understandings of physical and metaphysical being and creates sacred identities and communities. [3] LAS 6030. Fieldschool in Intercultural Education. [Formerly LAS 370] Provides training in field research directed to human, social, and community development issues. Student research sponsored and supervised by an interdisciplinary team from Vanderbilt University and the Latin American faculty of social sciences (FLACSO). Fluency in Spanish required. [3] LAS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly LAS 369] [0-12]

Law and Economics LWEC 8349. Reading Course. [Formerly LWEC 349A] Designed to permit graduate students to do more intensive study in the area of their special interest than regular course offerings provide. Admission by consent of director of graduate studies and supervising professor. [Variable credit] LWEC 8401. Law and Economics Theory I. [Formerly LWEC 401] Principles of economic analysis as applied to legal issues. Topics include, among others, torts, property, litigation, and government regulation. Pre- or corequisite ECON 8100. [3]

vanderbilt university LWEC 8421. Labor Markets and Human Resources II. [Formerly LWEC 421] Application of economic and legal analysis to labor market and demographic transformations, including changes in the gender composition of labor market participants, aging of the workforce, immigration, education, poverty, inequality, and provision of health services. Prerequisite ECON 8100, ECON 8300, ECON 8310. [3] LWEC 8430. Risk and Environmental Regulation I. [Formerly LWEC 430] Analysis of the sources of market failure that create a rationale for risk and environmental regulation. Methodologies pertaining to appropriate valuation and enforcement of these regulatory policies. Applications include procedures for estimating the value of statistical life, perception of risk, the role of hazard warnings, risk analysis by government agencies, and the enforcement of regulatory programs. Prerequisite: ECON 8100, ECON 8300, ECON 8310. [3] LWEC 8431. Risk and Environmental Regulation II. [Formerly LWEC 431] Risk and Environmental Regulation II. Analysis of the sources of market failure that create a rationale for risk and environmental regulation. Methodologies pertaining to appropriate valuation and enforcement of these regulatory policies. This course will focus on theoretical economic models of risk and environmental regulation. Among the topics included will be the economics of risk and uncertainty, discounting, and benefit-cost analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 8100, ECON 8300, ECON 8310. [3] LWEC 8490. Ph.D. Law and Economics Workshop. [Formerly LWEC 490] Research workshop on the presentation and interpretation of research and literature on law and economics. Topics vary with student and faculty interest. [0-3] LWEC 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly LWEC 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

LWEC 8402. Law and Economics Theory II. [Formerly LWEC 402] Economic analysis of the law with applications from civil and criminal procedure, law enforcement, property, torts, decision making by courts, settlement negotiation, contracts, and antitrust. Prerequisite: LWEC 8401; pre- or corequisite: ECON 8110. [3]

LWEC 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly LWEC 399]

LWEC 8403. Behavioral Law and Economics I. [Formerly LWEC 403] Economic principles underlying behavioral law and economics research. Analyses of the rationality of individual choice will be undertaken, including research that involves the interaction of economics, psychology, and decision sciences. Applications of behavioral law and economics methods will be applied to the analysis of jury behavior. Pre- or corequisite: ECON 8100. [3]

Education Policy

LWEC 8404. Behavioral Law and Economics II. [Formerly LWEC 404] Research contributions at the frontier of behavioral law and economics research. Each student will structure a controlled experiment to test the rationality of jury behavior, the effect of alternative jury instructions, or a similar kind of scientifically controlled study of behavior relating to the performance of the legal system. Students will administer and analyze the survey results and will prepare an original research paper on their chosen topic. Prerequisite: LWEC 8403. [3] LWEC 8405. Econometrics for Legal Research. [Formerly LWEC 405] Analysis and critique of empirical legal research using advanced econometric techniques. Topics will be drawn from the program’s core fields. Students will perform independent empirical research using primary data sources. Pre- or corequisite: ECON 8300, ECON 8310, LWEC 8401. [3] LWEC 8406. Research in Law and Economics. [Formerly LWEC 406] Students will develop and complete an original research paper. The paper may pose an original research question or may be a replication of an existing empirical result. [3] LWEC 8420. Labor Markets and Human Resources I. [Formerly LWEC 420] Economic, econometric, and legal analysis of the labor market. Topics include analysis of the economic impact of employment laws with a particular focus on antidiscrimination laws, use of labor market studies to estimate the value of statistical life, and behavioral labor economics and economic models of fairness in the employment relationship. Prerequisite: ECON 8100, ECON 8300, ECON 8310. [3]

Leadership and Policy Studies EDP 7500. Special Topics in Education Policy. [Formerly EDP 3500] Explores special issues or topics related to education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] EDP 7960. Readings and Research in Education Policy. [Formerly EDP 3710] Semi-independent readings and research on selected topics in education policy. May be repeated. [1-3]

Educational Leadership and Policy ELP 8150. Leadership for School Improvement. [Formerly ELP 3150] Examines issues of school improvement and instructional leadership from the perspective of effective schools literature. [3] ELP 8210. Resource Allocation and Deployment. [Formerly ELP 3210] This course covers resource allocation issues for lower and higher education, public and private education, and United States and overseas education. “Resource,” in this context principally, but not exclusively, refers to financial resource. The purpose of this course is to introduce participants to the means by which answers can be framed for questions such as: Who pays for education? Who goes to school, and who benefits from schooling? How much does education cost? How can resources be used to influence the trajectory of an organization? And how can resources for education be spent more efficiently? Additionally, the course is intended to enable participants to gain and enhance analytic and information gathering skills related to education finance and resource allocation. [3] ELP 8240. K-12 Education Law. [Formerly ELP 3240] Study of the general structure, theory, and background of the law as it applies to schools. Attention given to constitutional issues, negotiation problems, procedures, court decisions, and how to read a case. [3]

Graduate School / Courses

Higher Education Administration HEA 6200. Diversity and Equity in Higher Education. [Formerly HEA 3410] This course covers a variety of issues regarding diversity in higher education. In drawing from the literature and research on faculty, administration, and students, the course provides an overview of critical issues currently facing institutions of higher education in our society. [3] HEA 6210. Law and Higher Education. [Formerly HEA 3420] Explores the constantly growing relationship between basic law and higher education. Seeks to acquaint the student with benchmark laws and court decisions and the resulting implications for higher education. [3] HEA 6220. Institutional Advancement Proseminar. [Formerly HEA 3430] Focuses on alumni relations, government relations, public relations, publications and use of direct mail in colleges and universities, and the nature and function of philanthropy. Students will perform a number of class and group projects, and speakers will address the class. [3] HEA 6230. Strategic Marketing and Planning in Higher Education. [Formerly HEA 3431] Comprehensive review of marketing and planning for higher education, consumer behavior, market research planning, target marketing, segmentation and strategic planning, and the relationship of marketing and planning to higher education. Course uses case studies. [3] HEA 6240. Service-Learning in Higher Education. [Formerly HEA 3440] This class engages students in the analysis and application of the theory of service-learning, i.e., the integration of community service and related academic study. Students will assist a service-learning program in higher education (or K-12, if appropriate) with planning, implementation, or evaluation, and integrate this experience with study of current theory and research. [3] HEA 6300. Post Secondary Access. [Formerly HEA 3150] This seminar will explore how demographic change, public policy, and law promote and/ or impede accessibility to U.S. higher education. Students will be exposed to a variety of literature that is both multidisciplinary and multilevel in regard to governance (institutional, local, state, and federal policies). Since the primary theme of the seminar is access to post secondary institutions, course materials will focus on groups historically and currently underrepresented in U.S. higher education. These include students who are low income, race and ethnic minorities, and/or immigrant students. In addition, the course will explore the effects of educational intervention programs designed to increase college access as well as the role of state and federal legislation on higher education access rates. Upon completion of the seminar, students will have learned relevant policy analysis skills that include synthesis of research, clear and concise presentation of relevant facts to stakeholders, and strategies for making responsible policy recommendations. [3] HEA 6310. College and University Finance. [Formerly HEA 3151] Current issues in financing higher education, sources of revenue, and methods of justifying requests for funds. Includes budgeting procedures, allocation systems, budget controls, and the relation of planning to budgeting. Course is for the generalist faculty member or general administrator, not for fiscal specialists. [3] HEA 6500. Student Affairs Administration and Practice. [Formerly HEA 3120] Explores the history, philosophy, objectives, and organization of student personnel services with reference to orientation, residential and offcampus living, health services, guidance and counseling, student activities, foreign student advising, religious affairs, etc. [3] HEA 6510. The College Student. [Formerly HEA 3121] Study of the college student in contemporary society with focus on characteristics of students admitted and retained, impact of the college on the student, student values, and peer group influence. [3] HEA 6520. Theories of College Student Development. [Formerly HEA 3122] Students will explore various theories of college student development and will discuss their strengths and limitations. Through the course, participants will develop an understanding and the ability to apply these theories as practicing student affairs professionals. Course activities include discussion, classroom presentations, group activities, and lecture. [3] HEA 7250. State and Federal Government and Higher Education. [Formerly HEA 3152] This course is a seminar for advanced graduate students which focuses on the intersection of institutions, actors, and processes

107 that result in the formation of public policy for higher education at both the state and federal levels of American government. It pursues this focus by examining the fluid political environment in which government operates, the fundamental conflicts governments act to mediate, the governmental process by which policies are formulated, and the outcomes of policies that are enacted. The course emphasizes both the varied theoretical perspectives on the formation of higher education policy and the numerous contemporary policy challenges confronting campus and state officials. [3] HEA 7500. Special Topics in Higher Education Administration. [Formerly HEA 3500] Explores special issues or topics related to higher education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6]

Higher Education Leadership and Policy HLP 8150. The Academic Profession: Structure and Roles. [Formerly HLP 3150] This course focuses on the structure of the American academic profession with particular attention concentrating on institutional and disciplinary differences among college and university faculty. The teaching and research role performance of college and university faculty as well as the various psychological, sociological, and organizational forces that shape the performance of these professional roles are also examined. Additional topics include the assessment of teaching and research activities of college and university faculty members. [3]

International Education and Policy Management IEPM 6120. International Innovations in K-12 Policy Reform. [Formerly IEPM 3120] Schooling is now compulsory throughout the world, but rarely are the resources sufficient to fund it adequately. Schooling in democracies takes on similar characteristics in the effort to respond to the public’s open demands. This course reviews the policy changes of school systems in meeting these two challenges. The course concentrates on Western Europe, but expands to Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and North Africa, and Eastern Europe and Central Asia depending on student interest. [3] IEPM 6130. Comparative Issues in Higher Education. [Formerly IEPM 3130] Examines higher education from an international/ comparative perspective. The intent of the course is to provide students the framework for examining and evaluating contemporary higher education issues comparatively. [3] IEPM 6140. Education and Economic Development. [Formerly IEPM 3140] This course reviews the history and application of human capital theory. It provides students with examples of its application in economic development policy and gives practice in applying common statistical models. It exposes students to current debates in education policy in the World Bank and other international organizations which result from those models. [3] IEPM 7500. Special Topics in International Education Policy and Management. [Formerly IEPM 3500] Explores special issues or topics related to international education policy and management. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] IEPM 7950. Practicum in International Education Policy and Management. [Formerly IEPM 3700] Individual or group practicum in a school or other social institution. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] IEPM 7960. Readings and Research in International Education Policy and Management. [Formerly IEPM 3710] Semi-independent readings and research on selected topics in international education policy and management. May be repeated for credit. Consent of instructor required. [1-3]

Leadership and Organizational Performance LOP 6270. Leading Globally Diverse Organizations. [Formerly LOP 3270] The goal of this course is to enable students to improve an organization’s ability to work effectively across potential barriers imposed by culture, race, gender, and other dimensions of diversity. Students will explore the political, financial, and organization-specific issues with a focus on developing strategies to enhance inclusivity. [3]

108

Leadership, Policy, and Organizations LPO 7810. Causal Inference. The purpose of this course is to prepare participants to design and carry out social science research estimating the effects of educational interventions, programs and policies that is sufficiently credible to influence decisions about these educational practices and for publication in scholarly, social science journals including education and public policy. A second purpose is to enable participants to fairly and rigorously evaluate the contributions and limitations of empirical social science manuscripts that address significant causal questions for education practice and policymaking. The course will develop your understanding of the theoretical constructs that underlie causal inference, contribute to your understanding of some aspects of descriptive social science, and aid you in the development of appropriate criteria for assessing the contributions of particular studies to social science research literature. Prerequisite: LPO 8810 and 8851. [3] LPO 8100. History of American Education. [Formerly LPO 3460] This doctoral seminar will examine the social, political, intellectual, and organizational history of American education in the twentieth century. The class will read and analyze some of the best work on the history of K-12 and higher education together. My hope is to begin to erase the intellectually expedient but artificial boundary that scholars have erected between the two sectors by deploying a comparative approach. By thinking of the study of K-16 as a single pipeline, albeit a circuitous one with many blockages and leaks, this class will broaden students’ understanding of the American education system writ large, alerting them to the distant origins of the nation’s education debates and to the longstanding efforts to improve the system in the last century. At the end of this course, students will possess a more historically grounded conception of the American way of education—an appreciation of the system as an institution deeply rooted in the nation’s history that endures despite the many calls for its reform if not reconstruction. [3] LPO 8110. Economics of Education. [Formerly LPO 3530] This course focuses on problems of the American educational system. Most attention will be paid to primary and secondary education (grades K-12), although some issues in higher education will also be examined. The goal of the course is not merely to study what economists have said about the problems of American education, but also to understand (and use) economic tools of analysis. These tools are of wide applicability and illuminate educational policies and practices (and much else) in all nations and societies. Although the focus is on the U.S., the course will be valuable to students whose principal interest is in international issues and educational systems abroad. Ph.D. students only. [3] LPO 8120. Governance and Politics in Education. [Formerly LPO 3540] This course deals with a central question in political science and public policy-how can public institutions be redesigned to improve accountability? This question is examined with particular attention to governance and politics in public school systems. Specifically, students will examine three sets of issues: (1) What is the role of politics in allocating resources in public schools? (2) What are key political challenges in the governance of urban school systems? (3) What is the politics of school choice? Ph.D. students only. [3] LPO 8130. Social Context of Education. [Formerly LPO 3600] Explores contemporary social, philosophical, and political dimensions of education and their relationship to leadership, including issues related to social class and culture, democracy and diversity, and equality and choice. Ph.D. students only. [3] LPO 8140. International Issues in Education Policy. [Formerly LPO 3680] This course covers education outside the United States, including primary, secondary, and higher education. Depending on student demand, it can cover any country in any region. It is designed for those who intend to enter the field of education policy or administration and who need to be able to bring knowledge and experience with education in diverse global contexts to bear on issues of policy and practice. Ph.D. students only. [3] LPO 8500. Special Topics in Leadership and Policy Studies. [Formerly LPO 3460] Explores special issues or topics related to leadership and policy studies. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] LPO 8610. Ph. D. Seminar in K-12 Education Leadership and Policy. [Formerly LPO 3621] This required course for Ph.D. students in the K-12

vanderbilt university Leadership and Policy Program focuses on research and policy issues that are studied in depth by LPO faculty. The content of the course changes each year, based on the research interests and focus of the faculty member teaching it. Rotating topics have included Measurement and Assessment; Instructional Leadership: Urban School Reform: and Teacher Policy. [3] LPO 8620. Ph.D. Seminar in Higher Education Leadership and Policy. [Formerly LPO 3622] This required course for Ph.D. students in the Higher Education Leadership and Policy Program focuses on researh and policy issues that are studied in depth by LPO higher education faculty. The content of the course changes each year, based on the research interests and focus og the faculty members teaching it. Rotating topics have included History of American Higher Education; Organization and Governance of Higher Education; The Academic Profession: Structure and Roles;The College Student: Structure, Processes, and Effects; and Comparative Issues in Higher Education Policy Reform. [3] LPO 8810. Research Design and Methods of Education Policy. [Formerly LPO 3912] The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the practice of research and a survey of various research designs used in the study of education policy. The course develops understandings of the principles, processes and techniques used in educational research. The course is based on the premise that final published research develops and evolves through an iterative process. This research process requires decisions and judgements and careful consideration of alternatives. The goal for this course is for students to learn the formal principles of research design and to begin to understand how to conduct research by identifying and evaluating advantages and disadvantages and trade-offs of various research designs and data collection strategies. Ph.D. students only. [3] LPO 8840. Modeling Context Effects in Educational Organizations. [Formerly LPO 3910] This seminar explores the methodological challenges and substantive implications of studying schools as complex organizations. Substantively, this course covers the literature on school effects, moving from early input-output studies to current research that examines the organizational context of schools, particularly the impact of within- and between-school stratification on student outcomes. Methodologically, this course provides an introduction to hierarchical linear modeling, including the conceptual background of hierarchical models, preparing data sets for use with HLM software, using the HLM software, strategies for analysis of data, applications of two- and three-level models, interpreting HLM output, and presenting results. Ph.D. students only. [3] LPO 8851. Regression Analysis I. [Formerly LPO 3916] Regression analysis is a widely used technique that allows us to 1) to describe average patterns of association among multiple variables observed in a sample and 2) to make inferences about the patterns of association among these variables in a population. The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the basic methods, including their limitations, and to develop skill in using regression analysis to analyze non-experimental data. As an important part of any analysis is communicating the results to an audience, we will also place considerable emphasis on learning to present (in writing, tables, and figures) the results. [3] LPO 8852. Regression II. [Formerly LPO 3918] This is a practical, Handson course in statistical research methods. The focus is on drawing casual inferences from observational (i.e., non-experimental) data, with particular emphasis on instrumental variables and longitudinal (panel) data estimators. Additional topics include binary and categorical dependent variables models and methods for dealing with missing data, including multiple imputation. [3] LPO 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly LPO 3790] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. Ph.D. students only. [Variable credit: 0-12] LPO 9951. Ph.D. Student Research Practicum. [Formerly LPO 3921] LPO 9951, 9952, and 9953 are a single practicum that is taken over three semesters (fall, spring, Maymester) by first-year Ph.D. students in LPO. The three courses must be taken in sequence. This practicum is designed to introduce students to the practice of research, particularly the applied side of quantitative research. This class has a strong emphasis on using programming skills to aid in the replication of work and to simplify complex analyses. [1]

Graduate School / Courses LPO 9952. Ph.D. Student Research Practicum. [Formerly LPO 3922] LPO 9951, 9952, and 9953 are a single practicum that is taken over three semesters (fall, spring, Maymester) by first-year Ph.D. students in LPO. The three courses must be taken in sequence. This practicum is designed to introduce students to the practice of research, particularly the applied side of quantitative research. This class has a strong emphasis on using programming skills to aid in the replication of work and to simplify complex analyses. [2] LPO 9953. Ph.D.Student Research Practicum. [Formerly LPO 3923] LPO 9951, 9952, and 9953 are a single practicum that is taken over three semesters (fall, spring, Maymester) by first-year Ph.D. students in LPO. The three courses must be taken in sequence. This practicum is designed to introduce students to the practice of research, particularly the applied side of quantitative research. This class has a strong emphasis on using programming skills to aid in the replication of work and to simplify complex analyses. [3] LPO 9960. Readings and Research in Leadership Policy Studies. [Formerly LPO 3470] Semi-independent readings and research on selected topics in leadership policy studies. May be repeated. Consent of instructor required. [1-3] LPO 9995. Part-Time Dissertation. [Formerly LPO 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] LPO 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly LPO 3990]

Learning, Teaching, and Diversity Education EDUC 6010. Psychological Foundations of Education. [Formerly EDUC 3110] (Also listed as PSY-PC 7040) Emphasis on theories of human learning as they relate to design of instruction, educational practice, and human development at all age levels. [3] EDUC 6040. Analysis of Teaching. [Formerly EDUC 3170] Use of objective and unobtrusive evaluation procedures and methodologies in a variety of educational settings. Emphasis on theoretical base for qualitative and quantitative evaluation and methodologies. Experience given in collecting, processing, summarizing, and reporting data. [3] EDUC 6050. Parents, the School, and the Community. [Formerly EDUC 3220] Focuses on parent participation, parent education, and community involvement in school programs. Laboratory experiences in school settings will examine ecological influences and environmental transactions among the home, school, and community. [3] EDUC 6070. Foundations of Education. [Formerly EDUC 3500] An introduction to schools, classrooms, teaching, and the nature of students and learning. Intended for master’s degree students who are in the early stages of preparing for licensure as early childhood, elementary, or secondary school teachers. [3] EDUC 6080. Principles of Curriculum Development. [Formerly EDUC 3620] Examining curriculum theory and practice on multiple levels in designing responsive curricula. Emphasis on understanding complex processes in curriculum development. [3] EDUC 6100. Development in Context: the Effects of Poverty. [Formerly EDUC 3720] This graduate class is to acquaint students with the strong evidence that poverty experienced in childhood in the United States has consequences on development, health and well being both immediately and long term into adulthood. The course will focus on the outcomes as well as understanding the process by which poverty exerts its effects. [3] EDUC 6300. Advanced Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education. [Formerly EDUC 3050] Exploration of the interaction between contemporary social problems and various philosophies in relation to educational theory, policy, and practice. [3] EDUC 6310. Advanced Teaching in Secondary Schools. [Formerly EDUC 3510] Exploration of teacher decision-making regarding creating

109 conditions for learning, developing standards-based lessons, designing appropriate assessments, and balancing the personal and professional life of a teacher. [3] EDUC 6400. Literacy Development. [Formerly EDUC 3390] Survey of theories and approaches to developing reading and writing in schoolbased settings. In-depth development of theory and research related to literacy development, with an emphasis on reading/writing processes and instruction. [3] EDUC 6410. Literacy Assessment and Professional Development. [Formerly EDUC 3370] Study of literacy assessment research and practices, multiple opportunities for collecting and analyzing data using multiple assessment tools, and methods for implementing diagnostic findings in PreK-12 settings, emphasizing corrective instruction. Attention is given to professional development of teachers and para-professionals in areas of literacy development and methods for communicating the use of assessment information to guide instructional decisions. [3] EDUC 6420. Literacy for Diverse and Special Needs Learners. [Formerly EDUC 3420] Emphasis on theories, research, philosophies, principles, and procedures associated with approaches to literacy instruction for students experiencing problems with literacy development. Analysis of multiple factors and handicapping conditions contributing to literacy difficulties and how these affect diagnostic and instructional outcomes. Focus on methodologies for accommodating literacy problems in regular classrooms and special settings, and communicating with professionals, parents, and para-professionals. [3] EDUC 6430. Issues and Trends in Literacy Instruction. [Formerly EDUC 3440] A survey of issues and trends in literacy, including topics such as reading in a pluralistic society, early reading, intervention strategies, appraisal, and measurement. [3] EDUC 6450. Teaching and Learning the Language Arts: Theory and Research. [Formerly EDUC 3460] Provides in-depth study of theory and research on teaching and learning the language arts (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) and related literacies (e.g., art, drama). Special emphasis is given to writing development and the teaching of writing in the preschool and elementary years. [3] EDUC 6460. Language, Education and Diversity. [Formerly EDUC 3470] This class examines environmental factors that affect language and literacy development with special attention to the impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on development. The course surveys development from birth through early adolescence and examines promising interventions that foster acquisition of language competencies that are associated with literacy. The interventions examined are selected by students with guidance from the professor. Readings are primary source articles and chapters; discussions address research methodology, theoretical implications and practical applications. [3] EDUC 6510. Principles of English Language Learner Education. [Formerly EDUC 3520] This course, specifically designed for non-ELL majors, examines theoretically and empirically supported practices to support the education of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in grades PreK-12. Topics include the role of second language acquisition in academic achievement, instructional strategies used in a variety of program settings, appropriate assessment of ELLs in the classroom, the importance of ELLs home language and culture, and ESL research and history relating to policies and programs affecting ELLs. Consideration of how to attain more equitable outcomes for ELLs through schooling is a major focus of this course. [3] EDUC 6520. Foundations for English Language Learner Education. [Formerly EDUC 3530] This course focuses on understanding the processes of second language acquisition, learning, development, and individual, cognitive, and social factors that influence second language learning in North America (particularly in the United States). In addition, it examines the theoretical, historical, political, legal, and research bases for the education of students from linguistically and culturally diverse populations. Program models and the theoretical bases for these models are covered in this course. National policies and current issues relevant to the learning of English language learners are emphasized. Corequisite: 1 hour EDUC 6521 [3]

110 EDUC 6521. Practicum for English Language Learner Education. [Formerly EDUC 3571] The purpose of this course is to help students develop necessary dispositions, knowledge, and skills for teaching English language learners through situated learning experiences. Students will participate in a field-based practicum working with students who are English language learners. Their experience will include use of either students’ native languages and/or ESL instructional components. Identification of factors that facilitate and/or impede ELL student learning within specific contexts is a required outcome of the practicum. Students involved in the practicum will meet with a university faculty member on a bi-weekly basis to assess their progress in the field. Corequisite with EDUC 6520. [1] EDUC 6530. Educational Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition. [Formerly EDUC 3550] This course focuses on the applying of theories of linguistics and second language acquisition to the teaching of English language learners. Topics covered include the structure of the English language, English as a system, language acquisition and development, language variation, and theories of second language acquisition. [3] EDUC 6540. Methods and Materials for English Language Learner Education. [Formerly EDUC 3540] This course focuses on bilingual (native language and ESL) curriculum development and instruction for students (PreK-12) in a variety of language and program settings. Second-language instructional theory and practice, materials selection and development for LEP children, and bilingual and ESL literacy and content area instruction (mathematics, science, social studies, English education) are covered. Frameworks for evaluating curriculum materials and their instructional recommendations for ELL students are provided. Corequisite: 1 hour EDUC 6541 [3] EDUC 6541. Practicum for English Language Learner Education II. [Formerly EDUC 3572] The purpose of this course is to help students develop necessary dispositions, knowledge, and skills for teaching English language learners through situated learning experiences. Students will participate in a field-based practicum working with students who are English language learners. Their experience will include use of either students’ native languages and/or ESL instructional components. Identification of factors that facilitate and/or impede ELL student learning within specific contexts is a required outcome of the practicum. Students involved in the practicum will meet with a university faculty member on a biweekly basis to assess their progress in the field. Corequisite with EDUC 6540 . [1] EDUC 6550. Assessment of English Language Learner Students. [Formerly EDUC 3560] This course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of language testing for second-language learners. Instruments used by educators to assess the language proficiency and academic achievement of linguistically diverse students are presented and demonstrated. The course examines the purposes and types of language tests in relation to theories of language use and language teaching goals; discusses testing practices and procedures related to language teaching and language research; and includes the planning, writing, and administration of tests, basic descriptive statistics, and test analysis. Rubrics for relating assessment information to instruction and program planning are developed within this course. Corequisite: 1 hour EDUC 6551 [3] EDUC 6551. Practicum for English Language Learner Education III. [Formerly EDUC 3573] The purpose of this course is to help students develop necessary dispositions, knowledge, and skills for teaching English language learners through situated learning experiences. Students will participate in a field-based practicum working with students who are English language learners. Their experience will include use of either students’ native languages and/or ESL instructional components. Identification of factors that facilitate and/or impede ELL student learning within specific contexts is a required outcome of the practicum. Students involved in the practicum will meet with a university faculty member on a bi-weekly basis to assess their progress in the field. Corequisite with EDUC 6550. [1] EDUC 6570. Teaching Second Language Literacy. [Formerly EDUC 3580] The focus of the class will be to identify the differences between first and second language literacy, as well as how to plan instruction, how to recognize and make use of different types of curriculum, how to identify the various components of literacy, and how to teach these effectively to second language learners. Specific instructional approaches designed for second language learners will also be presented. [3]

vanderbilt university EDUC 6580. Issues in English Language Learner Education Research: Research, Policy, and Instruction. [Formerly EDUC 3590] Critically evaluates the most recent developments in research, policy, and instruction dealing with the second language learning and academic achievement of English language learners (ELLs). Research includes program evaluation studies, literature reviews focused on the learning of ELLs in specific content areas (math, science, social studies, and literature), and influential works by leading theorists and researchers. Policy focuses on citizen-sponsored ballot initiatives that directly impact ELLs, influential judicial decisions, and legislation designed to address the unique needs of these students. Instructional issues will be addressed partially by the reviews of the research and will be supplemented with a discussion of dominant instructional approaches and frameworks). [3] EDUC 6610. Learning, Diversity, and Urban Studies, Seminar I. [Formerly EDUC 3630] The Learning, Diversity, and Urban Studies Seminar I is designed to serve as a foundation for the master’s program, Learning, Diversity, and Urban Studies (LDUS). Students in the LDUS program enroll in a yearlong seminar (Seminar I and II) that has been designed to build programmatic synergy and coherence among the central strands of the program (learning, diversity, and urban studies). To build programmatic coherence, students in the LDUS Seminar I will address some of the pertinent matters regarding in-school and out-of school teaching and learning. Essential topics of the course include race and equity in urban and diverse contexts, poverty, social class and stratification, teacher and student identity development, teachers and teaching in urban contexts, learning in urban contexts, curriculum development, and classroom management. [3] EDUC 6620. Learning, Diversity, and Urban Studies, Seminar II. [Formerly EDUC 3640] The Learning, Diversity, and Urban Studies Seminar II is a continuation of Seminar I and is designed to deepen students’ knowledge related to learning, diversity, and urban studies. Students in the LDUS program have been exposed to a range of important matters related to learning, diversity and urban studies, and the goals of this second seminar are to assist students in expanding their knowledge and understanding related to some of the micro- and macro-level structures and systems that shape urban and highly diverse contexts. The seminar will expose students to the interplay between and among discourses related to policy, geography/ social context, reform, and “achievement”. While Seminar I was designed to assist students in understanding some broad, yet essential and fundamental, issues and perspectives related to diversity and urban studies, Seminar II is designed to help students deepen their knowledge and to situate and position themselves in ways that will allow them to (re)enter educational institutions and systems prepared to participate and transform them based on what they have come to know. [3] EDUC 7100. Learning Out of School. [Formerly EDUC 3770] This graduate seminar focuses on the learning of disciplinary knowledge and practices in out-of-school settings. These contexts include, for example, homes, community centers, performance troupes, workplaces, hobbyist groups, museums, zoos, prisons, hospitals, social media, and many more. We educators challenge our current notions about learning when we investigate learning in a wider variety of contexts, goals, and participants. [3] EDUC 7140. Discourse in STEM Classrooms. When people compare the teaching in various classrooms and schools, they often focus on the curriculum in use. However, empirical studies have shown that, while curriculum matters, classroom organization and discourse shape much of what students actually learn. In this course, we will examine ways of looking at discourse in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) classrooms as it relates to disciplinary knowledge, teaching practice and student learning. We will read both seminal and cutting-edge works in the study of discourse in STEM classrooms, looking at multiple school contexts and across grade levels. Reflecting research in the field, we will primarily focus on issues in science and mathematics classrooms, comparing them to out-of-school settings. In addition, we will watch videotapes of K-12 classrooms to apply the analytic tools from the readings. This course is intended to help you gain a better understanding of research on the role of discourse in learning in STEM classrooms and develop a familiarity through readings with some of the concepts used in and issues addressed through the study of classroom discourse. [3]

Graduate School / Courses

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EDUC 7160. Philosophy of Education. {formerly EDUC 3030] This course explores the classic roots of modern educational ideas and in deconstructing the hidden assumptions in, narratives underlying, and discourse shaping contemporary educational research, policy and practice.

EDUC 8100. Epistemological Foundations of Mathematics and Sciences. [Formerly EDUC 3710] Examines the social, cognitive and material mechanisms that contribute to generating, sustaining and revising knowledge in mathematics and in sciences. [3]

EDUC 7200. Race, Identity, and Agency in Education. This course is designed to explore emerging literature that is situated at the intersection of scholarship on race, identity, “success,” and education. This research examines the ways in which race, racialization processes, and identity emerge to affect learning, participation, and marginalization within educational domains. This course will also be focused on deconstructing racial and gender hierarchies of educational ability. [3]

EDUC 8200. Foundations in Learning and Development. [Formerly EDUC 3200] Provides a foundation in relevant developmental milestones related to children’s academic behaviors from pre-kindergarten through high school. Children’s development and learning is viewed in the context of school expectations with an emphasis on the diversity among learners. [3]

EDUC 7500. Special Topics in Education. [Formerly EDUC 3900] Explores special issues or topics related to education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] EDUC 7960. Readings and Research in Education. [Formerly EDUC 3930] Individual programs of research in various education fields. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] EDUC 7961. Readings and Research in English Language Learners Education. [Formerly EDUC 3931] Individual programs of research in various education fields. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] EDUC 7962. Readings and Research in Learning and Instruction. [Formerly EDUC 3932] Individual programs of research in various education fields. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] EDUC 7963. Readings and Research in Learning, Diversity and Urban Studies. [Formerly EDUC 3933] Individual programs of research in various education fields. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] EDUC 7964. Readings and Research in Reading Education. [Formerly EDUC 3934] Individual programs of research in various education fields. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] EDUC 7965. Readings and Research in Teaching and Learning in Urban Schools. [Formerly EDUC 3935] Individual programs of research in various education fields. Consent of faculty supervisor required. May be repeated. [1-6] EDUC 8010. Inquiry into Education. [Formerly EDUC 3070] An introduction to the function and means of various practices of educational research. Promotes understanding of the language of educational inquiry, aims and uses of research, various ways of framing research questions and designing studies, and procedures for obtaining, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative and quantitative data. Presents issues of procedure or design and related issues of validity: construct definition and data generation, instrumentation and data collection; and data quality, meaning, appropriateness, credibility, and inferences made based on data. For doctoral students or by permission of instructor. [3] EDUC 8020. Teaching as a Social Practice. [Formerly EDUC 3040] This course provides an investigation into teaching as situated in the social context of the school and school district. Classroom observation in tandem with a series of readings are the basis of the course. Assignments are intended to provide students opportunities to coordinate important aspects of the readings with observations of practice. For doctoral students or by permission of instructor. [3] EDUC 8030. Advanced Learning and Instruction. [Formerly EDUC 3120] Introduces theories of learning and explores their utility for the design of learning environments. Contrasts socio-cultural and cognitive approaches toward concepts and categories, problem solving, and modelbased reasoning. For doctoral students or by permission of instructor. [3] EDUC 8040. Diversity and Equity in Education. [Formerly EDUC 3080] Provides an introduction to the structural, systemic, and institutional dimensions and complexities of diversity that often emerge in education across multiple contexts. Central constructs of the course include race, culture, SES, gender, language, achievement, policy, epistemology, and learning. For doctoral students or by permission of instructor. [3]

EDUC 8410. Sociocognitive Perspectives of Literacy Theory and Practice. [Formerly EDUC 3480] This seminar critically examines literacy research from a sociocognitive perspective. Critical reading of seminal and new works on theoretical models is complimented by research on effective literacy instruction an emerging promising practices in print and digital contexts. Particular attention is paid to reading comprehension, digital literacies and new media, design of scaffolded learning environments, and students who experience learning difficulties. [3] EDUC 8420. Sociocultural Theories of Literacy. [Formerly EDUC 3490] A doctoral readings seminar on social and cultural theories in their relation to literacy and literacy learning. [3] EDUC 8800. Scientific Writing. [Formerly EDUC 3160] Students who have completed substantial reading in an area of their research interest participate in a lecture/workshop setting to conceptualize, draft, and revise a scientific manuscript. Most students who take the course will be in the process of completing a major area paper for the Department of Teaching and Learning. These papers take the form of a literature review (typically 50-100 pages), but other writing projects are welcome, as well. [3] EDUC 8810. Discourse Analysis in Education. [Formerly EDUC 3810] This course provides a rigorous introduction to the analysis of discourse in educational contexts. The course draws on critical discourse analysis, sociocultural approaches, and other traditions to consider relations of learning, identity, and power in educational texts and communicative activity. The course provides experience and instruction through processes of data collection, transcription, and analysis. [3] EDUC 8820. Methods of Educational Research: Qualitative. [Formerly EDUC 3912] Covers issues and strategies involved in collection and analysis of qualitative data. Focuses on the assumptions and related research techniques of qualitative research, framed by the post-positivist paradigm (i.e., naturalistic inquiry, ethnography). [3] Recommended for advanced doctoral students) EDUC 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly EDUC 3790] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] EDUC 9700. Research Groups. [Formerly EDUC 3700] Examination of a research issue of mutual interest in a year-long study. Multiple topics will be offered. May be repeated. [0, 3]

English Education ENED 6080. Advanced Study of Literature for Children and Adolescents. [Formerly ENED 3500] Designed to provide students who already have introductory experiences in children’s and adolescent literature advanced study in the field. A variety of current topics relevant to the field of study will be explored. Prerequisite: Prior course work or experience in the field of children’s literature required. [3] ENED 6200. Teaching Literature in Elementary Classrooms. [Formerly ENED 3000] Introduces students to the study of the field of children’s literature and the principles of teaching literature in school settings. [3] ENED 6310. Perspectives on the English Language. [Formerly ENED 3040] Examines English linguistics and language history, explores multiple methods of teaching the grammar of Standard Written English, and of teaching vocabulary and spelling. For teachers and prospective teachers of English/language arts classes of grades five through twelve. [3] ENED 6340. Reading and Learning with Print and New Media. [Formerly ENED 3400] Studies print and technology-based approaches

112 to improving reading and content area learning in grades 6–12 with a special emphasis on diverse learners and struggling readers. Drawing on research-based practice, students learn to design, enact, and assess effective reading and literacy instruction. [3] ENED 6360. Literature, Popular Culture, and New Media. [Formerly ENED 3920] Examines a wide range of multigenre, multimodal, and digital texts appropriate for readers of middle school and high school age. Considers the influence of popular culture and digital technologies on young adult literature. Includes materials and texts for readers of various ability levels. [3] ENED 6380. Teaching Writing and Multimedia Composition. [Formerly ENED 3380] Explores contemporary composition as an activity that draws on a diverse palette of media resources, while also being deeply connected to practices associated with traditional print. Emphasizes how teaching composition in print and new media, in parallel, can support student literacy development. [3] ENED 7500. Special Topics in English Education. [Formerly ENED 3900] Exploration of special topics related to English education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-3] ENED 7960. Readings and Research in English Education. [Formerly ENED 3890] Semi-independent study of selected topics in English education. Consent of supervising instructor required. May be repeated. [1-3]

Mathematics Education MTED 7330. Introduction to Literacies in Mathematics. This course is intended for licensure candidates in secondary education for mathematics and for other students who want to explore the concepts and practices of disciplinary literacy that is the links between content and communication. [3] MTED 7500. Special Topics in Mathematics Education. [Formerly MTED 3900] Seminars, conferences, workshops, or field activities focused on current issues in mathematics education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] MTED 7960. Readings and Research in Mathematics Education. [Formerly MTED 3890] Semi-independent study on selected topics in mathematics education. May be repeated. Consent of supervising instructor required. [1-3]

Science Education SCED 6100. Investigations and Trends in Science Education. [Formerly SCED 3300] Survey of trends in science teaching and science curricula at the middle school and senior high school level. Emphasis on philosophies, teaching strategies, materials, and research associated with current curriculum practices. [3] SCED 6370. Advanced Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools. [Formerly SCED 3370] A study of theory, research, issues, curriculum approaches, trends, and modern approaches to teaching science in secondary schools. Competencies that reflect effective science teaching practices will also be developed. Corequisite: SCED 6371. [3] SCED 7330. Introduction to Literacies in Science. This course is intended for licensure candidates in secondary science education at the graduate level who want to explore the concepts and practices of disciplinary literacy, that is, the links between content and communication. [3] SCED 7500. Special Topics in Science Education. [Formerly SCED 3900] Exploration of a special topic related to science education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] SCED 7960. Readings and Research in Science Education. [Formerly SCED 3890] Semi-independent study on selected topics in science education. May be repeated. Consent of supervising instructor required. [1-3] SCED 7973. Internship Seminar Secondary. [Formerly SCED 3007] Seminar to accompany EDUC 7972. A $300.00 Teacher Performance Assessment fee is associated with this course. [1]

vanderbilt university

Social Studies Education SSED 7330. Introduction to Literacies in the Social Studies. This course is intended for licensure candidates in secondary education for social studies and for other students who want to explore the concepts and practices of disciplinary literacy that is the links between content and communication. [3] SSED 7500. Special Topics in Social Studies Education. [Formerly SSED 3900] Explores special topics related to social studies education. May be repeated with change of topic. [1-6] SSED 7960. Readings and Research in Social Studies Education. [Formerly SSED 3890] Semi-independent study on selected topics in social studies education. May be repeated. Consent of supervising instructor required. [1-3]

Liberal Arts and Science MLAS 6100. Seminar in Humanities. [Formerly MLAS 260] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] MLAS 6300. Seminar in Social Science. [Formerly MLAS 270] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] MLAS 6500. Seminar in Natural Science. [Formerly MLAS 280] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] MLAS 6700. Interdisciplinary Seminar. [Formerly MLAS 290] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] MLAS 7340. Interdisciplinary Selected Topics. [Formerly MLAS 340] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] MLAS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly MLAS 369]

Management (Owen) MGT 6311. Introduction to Financial Accounting. [Formerly MGT 311] Studies the basic concepts and limitations of financial accounting. This course covers the financial reporting process and the development, interpretation, and analysis of financial statements for external users, such as investors and creditors. [2] (Limited to first-year MBA students only) MGT 6321. Business in the World Economy. [Formerly MGT 321] Addresses the impact of national and global economic developments on the business environment. The determinants of national income, inflation, interest rates, unemployment rates, business cycles, exchange rates, and foreign investment are discussed, with particular attention to the increasingly important linkages among the world’s economies as well as some key institutional differences across countries. Supplementary case studies and debates provide opportunities to integrate theory with decision analysis. [2] (Limited to first-year MBA students only) MGT 6322. Managerial Economics. [Formerly MGT 322] Teaches students to solve problems by (i) identifying profitable decisions using benefitcost analysis, and (ii) ensuring that employees have enough information to make profitable decisions, and the incentive to do so. Specific topics include investments, pricing, scale and scope economics, long-run strategy, price discrimination, bargaining, auctions, supply and demand, adverse selection, moral hazard, principal-agent relationships, and organizational design. [2] MGT 6331. Managerial Finance. [Formerly MGT 331] This class provides the framework for analyzing the various components needed to value real assets, as well as an introduction to the valuation of financial assets. Topics include the time value of money, capital budgeting, measuring risk in financial markets, market efficiency and an introduction to options. [2] MGT 6361. Marketing Management. [Formerly MGT 361] Designed to introduce students to basic marketing principles and concepts. Marketing

Graduate School / Courses is the business function that manages customer value. Successful organizations integrate the objectives and resources of the organization with the needs and opportunities in the marketplace to create customer value and (thereby) create value for the firm. Effective implementation of marketing concepts requires knowledge of key relationships between internal (company) and external (competitors and customers) environments and how they are influenced by the marketing mix (product management, pricing, distribution channels and promotion strategy). Students are challenged to apply the principles they learn in class to current, “real world” marketing situations. [2] (Limited to first-year MBA students only) MGT 6371. Operations Management. [Formerly MGT 371] An overview of operations management in both service and manufacturing organizations with an emphasis on international operations. Topics include operations strategy, process analysis, quality control, queuing, enterprise planning systems, lean manufacturing, and supply chain management. [2] (Limited to first-year MBA students only) MGT 6381. Managerial Statistics. [Formerly MGT 381] This course provides an introduction to how statistical methods provide a direct way of dealing with a wide range of managerial problems. It focuses on exploratory data analysis, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis, and uses these methods to study the most important types of business models, and to develop even better ones. Students have the opportunity to use business data of their choice to construct models for estimation and prediction, that solve problems in which they have a particular interest. [2] MGT 6413. Advanced Management Accounting. [Formerly MGT 413] This course builds on the tools learned in Mgt 6312, Introduction to Managerial Accounting. The course has more of a marketing focus than a manufacturing one and develops skills managers need to make profit enhancing decisions. It uses case studies to explore in depth the actual application of managerial accounting techniques to real world management problems. The cases relate to companies whose managers have developed innovative ways of using financial data to run their companies. Students studying Marketing or Operations would find this course very useful. Prerequisite: MGT 6311. [2] MGT 6425. Game Theory and Business Strategy. [Formerly MGT 425] Game theory is a discipline that offers a systematic way of analyzing problems of strategic behavior in interactive situations. This course develops basic concepts from game theory and applies them to business strategy. Some of the concepts to be considered include (1) decision tree analysis; (2) looking forward and reasoning backward; (3) anticipating the moves of the rival; (4) inducing cooperation; (5) strategic use of commitments, threats, promises, and credibility; (6) preemptive moves and deterrence; and (7) creating and using one’s reputation strategically. The strategic significance of these concepts will be demonstrated through business case studies. Prerequisite: MGT 6321. [2] MGT 6430. Investments. [Formerly MGT 431] Studies solutions to fundamental problems faced by individual and institutional investors. First, we cover a number of topics in fixed income markets including the different ways of computing bond yields, forecasts of interest rates using the yield curve, and duration and convexity as measures of bond risk. Second, we solve the asset allocation problem to determine an optimal portfolio mix. We review the relevant theory, use an advanced spreadsheet to find an answer, and discuss issues faced by portfolio managers. Third, we use two methods to value options, the Black-Scholes formula and the binomial tree, and show how investors can use options to customize their risk-reward profile. This course is equivalent to MGT 6404 so it is not available for MSF students. Prerequisite: MGT 6331. [2] MGT 6431. Corporate Valuation. [Formerly MGT 432A] This course focuses on providing students with a strong theoretical and applied understanding of the key tools used in equity valuation and stock selection. Approaches to valuation include dividend discount models, cash flow models, and valuation by multiples. Financial statement data are used in developing cash flow forecasts, and market data are used in estimating the cost of capital. The effects of firm financing policy, corporate taxes, and potential investment options are given special consideration. Applications include capital budgeting, the evaluation of potential mergers and acquisitions, and corporate restructuring. The objective of the course is to show how to manage companies to add value. Prerequisite: MGT 6331. [2]

113 MGT 6432. Corporate Financial Policy. [Formerly MGT 432B] Examines major policies and financial decisions of a corporation. The topics considered are corporate governance and management compensation plans, optimal capital structure, uses of various financial instruments, bankruptcy and reorganization, security issuance and going private, dividend policy, and repurchase decisions. Prerequisite: MGT 6431. [2] MGT 6433. International Financial Markets. [Formerly MGT 433A] Presents financial issues for firms and investors participating in global markets. The topics considered are the international monetary system, foreign exchange markets and the determinants of exchange rates, managing exchange risk, international investments and raising capital in global financial markets. Prerequisite or corequisite: MGT 6431. [2] MGT 6435. Applied Investment Management. [Formerly MGT 435A] The range of available investment opportunities continues to grow at an increasing rate. The ability to (a) quantify the expected return/risk properties of these different opportunities, (b) decide on the optimal allocation of investment funds across available opportunities, and (c) assess the performance of specific strategies after the fact is called applied investment management. This course is intended to provide students with an operational knowledge of applied investment management. The problems addressed are those of the managers of pension funds, endowments, private wealth accounts, mutual funds, hedge funds, and the like. A variety of quantitative techniques including simulation are used to show the actual practice of investment management. Prerequisite: MGT 6430. [2] MGT 6436. Bond Markets. [Formerly MGT 435B] Explores the government, municipal, and corporate debt markets. Topics reviewed include the term structure of interest rates, interest rate risk, duration and convexity, and mortgage backed securities. Prerequisite: MGT 6430. [2] MGT 6558. Creating a Business Plan. [Formerly MGT 554B] A hands-on course in which students work in teams to develop a business idea. The course uses a structured approach that students follow to build a business plan, and students give frequent presentations of their ideas to their classmates, investors, and experienced entrepreneurs for critical feedback that accelerates the development of their business idea. At the end of the course students present their plans to a panel of entrepreneurs and investors. [2] MGT 6560. Marketing Strategy. [Formerly MGT 560] Builds on the strategic groundwork laid in core marketing and offers students an opportunity to apply their marketing strategy skills. Students will compete in an elaborate, multi-period marketing simulation (StratSimMarketing). As in the real market, there will be winners and losers, and students’ grades will be based partially on how well they perform against competitors in this simulation. In addition, the course will introduce research on special topics such as competitive conjectures and response, channel management, and multi-firm collaboration. Prerequisite: MGT 6361. [2] MGT 6562. Customer Relationship Management. [Formerly MGT 562] Provides an introduction to the study of customer satisfaction and customer relationship management. Topics addressed included satisfaction measurement, linking satisfaction to firm performance, customer profitability and lifetime value, and predictive analytics for database marketing. This course is taught from a quantitative perspective, with particular emphasis placed upon measuring (and ultimately optimizing) the behavioral and financial impact of customer satisfaction and loyalty programs. To this end, a variety of data analysis techniques will be utilized throughout the term, including logistic regression, simulation, and optimization. Measurement (survey) methods and issues are also an integral focus of the course. Prerequisite: MGT 6460 or 6462 or consent of instructor. [2] MGT 6565. Internet Marketing Strategy. [Formerly MGT 565] This covers the fundamentals of Internet Marketing, Search Engine Marketing, Email Marketing, E-Commerce Promotions and Online Merchandising. We’ll cover topics such as working with interactive agencies, structuring Internet business development deals, creating online promotional campaigns, tracking and reporting online marketing initiatives, budgeting and forecasting for online customer acquisition efforts, user interface and design strategies, and understanding key drivers of success for affiliate marketing, search engine marketing, email marketing, and new and upcoming forms of online marketing within virtual worlds, online gaming, and social media. Prerequisite: MGT 6361. [1–short course]

114 MGT 6568. Pricing Strategies. [Formerly MGT 568] Considers the theory and practice of setting prices. We will bring together economic frameworks and models of consumer behavior to analyze different pricing frameworks (e.g., value pricing, cost-plus) and tactics (segmentation, bundling). Pricing examples from various industries and legal aspects of pricing will also be discussed. Prerequisite: MGT 6355, 6361. [2] MGT 6577. Managing and Improving Processes. [Formerly MGT 577] Processes are the fundamental way in which work gets done in organizations. This course is all about processes—how to analyze, control, and improve them. Students learn to map a process, analyze it for waste and value-added content, and apply essential principles of lean work systems to bring about improvement. The course introduces the improvement model and also covers statistical process control—a foundational tool in Six Sigma programs. Students learn how to construct, analyze and use statistical process control charts in both manufacturing and service settings. The course includes opportunities for experiential learning: students engage in a hands-on teambased process improvement simulation and complete a field assignment in which they analyze a process in an organization. Prerequisite: MGT 6371. [2] MGT 6642. Talent Management Directed Study. [Formerly MGT 642] [Variable credit] MGT 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly MGT 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] MGT 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly MGT 399]

Mathematics MATH 6100. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. [Formerly MATH 330A] The real number system, transfinite numbers, spaces, point sets in metric spaces, sequences and series of functions, measure. Lebesgue integration, convergence theory, inversion of derivatives. Prerequisite: 3100. [3] MATH 6101. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. [Formerly MATH 330B] Continuation of 6100. The real number system, transfinite numbers, spaces, point sets in metric spaces, sequences and series of functions, measure. Lebesgue integration, convergence theory, inversion of derivatives. Prerequisite: 6100. [3] MATH 6210. Differential Topology. [Formerly MATH 370] Manifolds; submanifolds; tangent and vector bundles. Vector fields and flows, Lie brackets, distributions, and the Frobenius theorem. Sard’s theorem; transversality and intersection theory; degree theory and applications. Tensors and differential forms; the exterior derivative; Stokes’ theorem and integration; de Rham cohomology. No credit for students who have earned credit for 270. Prerequisite: either 2410, 2600, or 2501, and either 3200, 4220, or 4200. [3] MATH 7100. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. [Formerly MATH 331A] Complex integration, calculus of residues, harmonic functions, entire and meromorphic functions, conformal mapping, normal families, analytic continuation, Riemann surfaces, analytic functions of several complex variables. Prerequisite: 3110. [3] MATH 7101. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. [Formerly MATH 331B] Continuation of 7100. Complex integration, calculus of residues, harmonic functions, entire and meromorphic functions, conformal mapping, normal families, analytic continuation, Riemann surfaces, analytic functions of several complex variables. Prerequisite: 7100. [3] MATH 7120. Functional Analysis. [Formerly MATH 362A] Function spaces, topological vector spaces, linear operators, conjugate spaces, Hilbert and Banach spaces, Banach algebras. Applications to function theory, differential equations, and integral equations. Prerequisite: 6100. [3] MATH 7121. Functional Analysis. [Formerly MATH 362B] Continuation of 7120. Function spaces, topological vector spaces, linear operators, conjugate spaces, Hilbert and Banach spaces, Banach algebras. Applications to function theory, differential equations, and integral equations. Prerequisite: 7120. [3] MATH 7130. Harmonic Analysis. [Formerly MATH 360] Fourier series; Wiener’s Lemma; Fourier integral; Plancherel Theorem; Haar measure on an LCA group G, Dual group and the Fourier integral; HausdorffYoung inequality;

vanderbilt university Hilbert transform; Hardy-Littlewood maximal functions; Marcinkiewicz Interpolation theorem; Singular integrals and the Calderon-Zygmund decomposition; multiresolution approximations; special topics from harmonic analysis, such as wavelets, frames, abstract harmonic analysis, symmetric spaces. Prerequisite: 6101. [3] MATH 7140. Approximation Theory. [Formerly MATH 325] Best approximation in metric and normed vector spaces; Tchebycheff approximation, Weierstrass-type theorems, rational approximation, orthogonal polynomials, trigonometric approximation, moduli of continuity, spline approximation; expansions and bases in function spaces. Prerequisite: 3110 and 6100. [3] MATH 7200. Algebraic Topology. [Formerly MATH 312] Homology, cohomology, homotopy theory. Prerequisite: 4201. [3] MATH 7210. Riemannian Geometry. [Formerly MATH 313] Vector fields, brackets; Riemannian metrics; Riemannian connections; geodesic flow; curvature: sectional curvature, Ricci curvature, scalar curvature; Jacobi fields; Hopf-Rinow Theorem; Hadamard Theorem. Complex manifolds, Hermitian metrics, Kahler metrics, complex projective space, first Chern class of a line bundle. Prerequisite: 270. [3] MATH 7300. Universal Algebra. [Formerly MATH 323] Theory of general algebraic systems. Concepts discussed will include subalgebras, congruences, automorphism groups, direct and subdirect products, ultraproducts, free algebras, varieties and quasi-varieties, with applications to groups, rings fields, lattices, Boolean algebras, semilattices, and semi-groups. Connections with model theory and category theory will be included as time permits. Prerequisite: 4300. [3] MATH 7899. Selected Advanced Topics. [Formerly MATH 367] Topics of special interest at a level suitable for graduate students in mathematics. [Variable credit: 1-3] MATH 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly MATH 369] [0-12] MATH 8100. Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. [Formerly MATH 333] Existence and uniqueness theorems, systems of linear differential equations, self-adjoint eigenvalue problems, asymptotic behavior, stability properties, perturbation theory, and applications. Prerequisite: 6100 and either 2420 or 2610. [3] MATH 8110. Theory of Partial Differential Equations. [Formerly MATH 334] Equations of the first order. Classification of equations of second order, existence and uniqueness, methods for solving elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Prerequisite: 3120 and 6100. [3] MATH 8120. Operator Algebras. [Formerly MATH 366] Banach algebras. The Gelfand transform. C*-algebras and von Neumann algebras. Positivity. States. The Gelfand-Naimark-Segal construction. *-representations of C*-algebras. Von Neumann’s bicommutant theorem. Kaplansky’s density theorem. Comparison theory of projections. Examples and applications. Prerequisite: 6101 and 7120. [3] MATH 8300. Combinatorial and Geometric Group Theory. [Formerly MATH 324a] Generators and defining relations of groups; Cayley graphs and Van Kampen diagrams; subgroups and automorphisms of free groups; graphs of groups; fundamental groups of topological spaces; Magnus embedding; homology of groups; residual properties of groups; hyperbolic groups; small cancellation groups; 1-relator groups; algorithmic problems in groups. Prerequisite: 4300. [3] MATH 8301. Combinatorial and Geometric Group Theory. [Formerly MATH 324b] Continuation of 8300. Generators and defining relations of groups; Cayley graphs and Van Kampen diagrams; subgroups and automorphisms of free groups; graphs of groups; fundamental groups of topological spaces; Magnus embedding; homology of groups; residual properties of groups; hyperbolic groups; small cancellation groups; 1-relator groups; algorithmic problems in groups. Prerequisite: 8300. [3] MATH 8310. Lie Groups and Lie Algebras. [Formerly MATH 310] Continuous groups; classical groups; real and complex Lie algebras; applications to physics, geometry, and mechanics. Prerequisite: 3300 or 4300. [3] MATH 8997. Advanced Independent Study. [Formerly MATH 368] Reading and independent study in an advanced area of mathematics

Graduate School / Courses under the supervision of an adviser. Requires approval of director of graduate studies. [Variable credit: 1-3] MATH 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly MATH 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] MATH 9100. Seminar in Analysis. [Formerly MATH 390a] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9101. Seminar in Analysis. [Formerly MATH 390b] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9200. Seminar in Topology. [Formerly MATH 372a] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9201. Seminar in Topology. [Formerly MATH 372b] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9300. Seminar in Algebra. [Formerly MATH 383a] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9301. Seminar in Algebra. [Formerly MATH 383b] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9600. Seminar in Applied Mathematics. [Formerly MATH 394a] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9601. Seminar in Applied Mathematics. [Formerly MATH 394b] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9700. Seminar in Discrete Mathematics. [Formerly MATH 375a] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9701. Seminar in Discrete Mathematics. [Formerly MATH 375b] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9800. Seminar in Number Theory. [Formerly MATH 381a] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9801. Seminar in Number Theory. [Formerly MATH 381b] Recent topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MATH 9996. Directed Study. [Formerly MATH 398] A reading course designed to give graduate students more background. [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] MATH 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly MATH 399] [0-12]

115

Mechanical Engineering ME 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly ME 369] ME 8320. Statistical Thermodynamics. [Formerly ME 320] Old and modern quantum theory, including H atom, rigid rotor, and harmonic oscillator. Atomic and molecular structure and spectra. Maxwell-Boltzmann statistical model for ideal, chemically reacting, electron, or photon gas. Introduction to Gibbs method. Prerequisite: ME 2220. [3] ME 8326. Gas Dynamics. [Formerly ME 326] Study of compressible fluid flow from subsonic to supersonic regimes in confined regions and past bodies of revolutions. Includes heat transfer, frictional effects, and real gas behavior. Prerequisite: ME 3224. [3] ME 8327. Energy Conversion Systems. [Formerly ME 327] An advanced study of energy conversion systems that include turbomachinery, positive displacement machinery, solar energy collection and combustion, with consideration for optimizing the systems. [3] ME 8331. Robot Manipulators. [Formerly ME 331] Dynamics and control of robot manipulators. Includes material on Jacobian matrix relating velocities and static forces, linear and angular acceleration relationships, manipulator dynamics, manipulator mechanism design, linear and nonlinear control, and force control manipulators. Prerequisite: ME 4271. [3] ME 8333. Topics in Stress Analysis. [Formerly ME 333] An investigation of thermal stress, transient stress, and temperatures in idealized structures; consideration of plasticity at elevated temperatures; and some aspects of vibratory stresses. [3] ME 8340. Wireless Mechatronics. [Formerly ME 340] Design of mechatronic devices with emphasis on miniaturization and wireless transmission of data. Programming of wireless microcontrollers with data acquisition and transmission from sensors and to actuators. Group design project to simulate, fabricate, and test a miniaturized wireless robot. [3] ME 8348. Convection Heat Transfer. [Formerly ME 348] A wide range of topics in free and forced convection is discussed. Solutions are carried out using analytical, integral, and numerical methods. Internal and external flows are considered for both laminar and turbulent flow cases. Convection in high speed flow is also studied. Prerequisite: ME 3248. [3] ME 8351. Adaptive Control. [Formerly ME 351] Introduction to adaptive control systems. Real-time parameter estimation methods. Self-tuning regulators. Model reference adaptive control. Adaptive control for nonlinear systems. A research project is required. Prerequisite: ME 5236. [3] ME 8352. Non-linear Control Theory. [Formerly ME 352] Introduction to the concepts of nonlinear control theory. Topics include phase plane analysis, nonlinear transformations, Lyapunov stability, and controllability/ observability calculations. A multidimensional geometric approach to these problems is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 2410. [3] ME 8353. Design of Electromechanical Systems. [Formerly ME 353] Analog electronic design for purposes of controlling electromechanical systems, including electromechanical sensors and actuators, analog electronic design of filters, state-space and classical controllers, and transistorbased servoamplifiers and high voltage amplifiers. Significant laboratory component with design and fabrication circuits to control electromechanical systems. Implementation of digital controllers. Prerequisite: ME 3234. [3] ME 8359. Advanced Engineering Vibrations. [Formerly ME 359] The development and application of Lagrange’s equations to the theory of vibrations. Nonlinear systems and variable spring characteristics are analyzed by classical methods and by digital computer techniques. Applications to the design of high speed machines are emphasized. Prerequisite: ME 4259; MATH 3120, MATH 4110. [3] ME 8363. Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer. [Formerly ME 363] A comparative study of available methods for solution of single and multidimensional conduction heat transfer problems. Both steady and transient problems are considered. Mathematical and numerical methods are stressed. Radiant exchange between surfaces separated by non-participating media is studied. Numerical methods are developed and discussed for non-isothermal surfaces and combined radiation and conduction problems are solved. Prerequisite: ME 3248. [3]

116 ME 8365. Micro/Nano Energy Transport. [Formerly ME 365] Theoretical examination of energy transport by electrons and phonons and modeling of transport phenomena in crystalline solids at reduced length scales. Particle transport models and solution methods for energy carriers in the context of semiconductor electronics, direct energy conversion devices and nanostructure. [3] ME 8366. Combustion. [Formerly ME 366] Introduction to combustion processes. Topics include combustion thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, premixed flame theory, diffusion flame theory, ignition and detonation. Prerequisite: ME 4221, ME 3224. [3] ME 8391. Special Topics. [Formerly ME 391] A course based on faculty research projects and highly specialized areas of concentration. [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] ME 8393. Independent Study. [Formerly ME 393] Readings and/or projects on advanced topics in mechanical engineering under the supervision of the faculty. Consent of instructor required. [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] ME 8991. Seminar. [Formerly ME 397] [0] ME 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly ME 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit 0-12] ME 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly ME 399]

Medical Scientist Training Program MSTP 8310. MSTP Seminar Series. [Formerly MSTP 310] The MSTP Seminar Series is a student-driven course in research guided by faculty preceptors. Formal objectives are to: (1) foster development of critical-thinking skills by appraisal of contemporary scientific literature; (2) enhance scientific creativity through discussion of experimental approaches and techniques; and (3) develop oral presentation skills. The seminar series is interdisciplinary in scope with topics drawn from all areas of biomedical research. The primary focus is on cutting-edge, discovery-based, and hypothesis-driven science. Students in the MSTP have primary responsibility for choosing the manuscripts to be presented as centerpieces of the seminars. More advanced students are expected to play a key role in mentoring before, during, and after junior student presentations. Prerequisite: None. MSTP students only. Other students with specific permission of the course director.

vanderbilt university MSTP 8316. Foundations of Biomedical Research II. [Formerly MSTP 316] The major goals of Foundations of Biomedical Research II (for MSTP students in their second year of Medical School) will be to: 1) enhance critical analysis skills with primary research literature, including emphasis on understanding statistical techniques; 2) assist in understanding of appropriate mentor/mentee expectations; and 3) begin to discuss effective predoctoral fellowship strategies. These goals will be accomplished in a small group, informal casual setting through discussion with course faculty and peers and through primary literature analysis. Students will be assessed based upon attendance, presentations, and class contributions. Prerequisite: For MSTP students only. FALL, SPRING. [2] MSTP 8317. Responsible Conduct of Research Training, Phase I. [Formerly MSTP 311A] The MSTP RCR Training Phase I course is offered at the end of June to coincide with the arrival of the entering class of MSTP students and immediately prior to the first laboratory rotation. The course consists of four two-hour sessions. The topics covered include (1) Mentor/ Trainee Responsibilities; (2) Research Misconduct, (3) Publication Practices, Responsible Authorship, and Peer Review; and (4) Data Acquisition, Management, Sharing, and Ownership. Each session consists of didactic presentations, followed by small-group case-based discussions focusing on the issues presented. The course is P/F. Prerequisite: None. For MSTP students only. Others with permission of the course director. MSTP 8318. MSTP Responsible Conduct of Research, Phase II. [Formerly MSTP 311B] The MSTP RCR Phase II course is offered at the beginning of the first year of graduate research. This component of the RCR curriculum is offered in a single four-hour session, which begins with a brief review of the RCR Phase I course. The topics covered in this session include (1) Ethics of Human Research; (2) Ethics of Animal Welfare and Use of Animals in Research; (3) Conflict of Interest; and (4) Collaborative Science. Similar to the format for the RCR Phase I course, topics in the Phase II course are presented first in didactic form, followed by small-group case-based discussions for analysis and debate. All nine topics in the NIH RCR guidelines are covered during the two courses. The course is P/F. Prerequisite: None, but MSTP RCR Phase I normally completed first. For MSTP students only. Others with permission of the course director. MSTP 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly MSTP 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

MSTP 8314. MSTP Clinical Preceptorship Program. [Formerly MSTP 314] The MSTP Clinical Preceptorship Program (CPP) provides MSTP students with exposure to clinical medicine during the period of research training. CPP course objectives are to: (1) provide exposure to clinical medicine for MSTP students during research training; (2) retain competency in historytaking and physical-examination skills; and (3) facilitate the transition from Graduate School to the clinical years of Medical School. The program is a required component of the MSTP curriculum for all students initiating graduate studies following completion of the second year of Medical School. Each class is assigned two clinical mentors, an internist and a pediatrician, who work with the class for the duration of their graduate training. One-half of each class works with the internist in the fall semester, and the other works with the pediatrician. The classes switch mentors for the spring semester. Students meet with mentors monthly during the academic year. Students are provided with written feedback by the clinical mentors following each semester. The course is P/F. Prerequisite: None. For MSTP students only.

Medicine, Health, and Society

MSTP 8315. Foundations of Biomedical Research I. [Formerly MSTP 315] The major goals of Foundations of Biomedical Research I (form MSTP students in their first year of Medical School) will be: 1) to aid MSTP students in the selection of a thesis mentor and understanding of appropriate expectations for both mentor and mentee, and 2) to gain familiarity in working with the primary research literature. These goals will be accomplished in small group, informal setting through interactions with potential MSTP-eligible faculty and lab members, consultation with the course directors, and through primary literature paper discussions. Students will be assessed based upon attendance, course presentations, and class contributions. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. FALL, SPRING. [2]

MHS 7100. Research Workshop. [Formerly MHS 302] Research presentations by faculty members, visiting scholars, and graduate students. Assists students in the selection of research topics and in the presentation of research. May be repeated for credit. [1]

MHS 6100. Graduate Colloquium. [Formerly MHS 300] Introduction to graduate-level interdisciplinary work in medicine, health, and society, drawing on the perspectives of anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, political science and policy studies, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. [3] MHS 6500. Special Topics in the Social Foundations of Health. [Formerly MHS 320] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [1-3] MHS 7000. Interdisciplinary Research Methods. [Formerly MHS 310] Key methods in the analysis of health and medicine from epidemiology, anthropology, sociology, history, and philosophy. No credit for students who earned credit for 295 section 1 in fall 2013. [3]

MHS 7200. Thesis Seminar. [Formerly MHS 370] Preparing a thesis proposal and working on a thesis. [1] MHS 7305. Foundations in Global Health. [Formerly MHS 305] Determinants of health and interventions used to better health, particularly in low-resource settings. Core research and evaluation methodologies used in the field. [3]

Graduate School / Courses MHS 7306. Essential Skills in Global Health. [Formerly MHS 306] Core field tools, needs assessment, implementation techniques, and methodologies in global health program implementation. Determinants of global health and development from an interdisciplinary perspective. Global health theories and practices with an emphasis on collective, partnership-based action. No credit for students who have earned credit for IGHM 5240 or PUBH 5550. [3] MHS 7308. Ethics, Law, and Medicine. [Formerly MHS 308] Explores intersection of ethical, legal, and medical concerns in the modern world of health care. Case-based and discussion format. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed DIV 3452, MED 5240, or LAW 9078 [3] MHS 7311. Ethics in Global Health. [Formerly MHS 311] Overview of ethical issues and standards in global health, particularly ethics in international research. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed VIGH 5244 or IGHM 5244. [1] MHS 7312. Informatics for Global Health Professionals. [Formerly MHS 312] Medical informatics with emphasis on a global health care setting. As global health bridges both patient care and public health, so informatics. Patient-based information systems and public health information systems. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed VIGH 5242 or IGHM 5242. [1] MHS 7313. Introduction to Medical Anthropology. [Formerly MHS 313] The study of illness, suffering, and healing in cultures around the world. Medical anthropology topics, theoretical approaches, and research techniques. Case studies on chronic illness, sorcery and traditional healing, modern pandemics, and treatment/illness expectations. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed PUBH 5548 or IGHM 5248. [1] MHS 7314. Global Health Politics and Policy. [Formerly MHS 314] Global health problems facing the world’s populations today and efforts taken to improve health at a global level. Political movements of global health issues in the US and among the G8 nations from 2000-2011. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed PUBH 5550 or IGHM 5250. [1] MHS 7315. Leadership and Development in Global Health. [Formerly MHS 315] Leadership theory and practice in the area of global health. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed VIGH 5246 or IGHM 5246. [1] MHS 7316. Case Studies in Tropical Diseases. [Formerly MHS 316] Tropical diseases and parasitology in a clinical case study format. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed VIGH 5249 or IGHM 5249. [1] MHS 7317. Introduction to Quality Improvement. [Formerly MHS 317] Concept and methodology of Quality Improvement (QI) science as it applies to health care delivery in the U.S. and in the developing world. Serves as repeat credit for students who have completed VIGH 5252 or IGHM 5252. [1] MHS 7319. Laboratory Technologies in Low Resource Settings. [Formerly MHS 319] Core laboratory principles, technologies, and applications used in the delivery of care and the performance of clinical research in resource-limited settings. Strengths, limitations, and appropriate use of laboratory technologies in the changing landscape of international research and clinical care. [3] MHS 7830. Graduate Service Learning. [Formerly MHS 394a] Must be taken concurrently with 7831 and/or 7832. After completing the experience, all students must write a thorough report. [1-3]. MHS 7831. Service Learning Research. [Formerly MHS 394b] Students will write a substantial research paper under the supervision of a Vanderbilt faculty member, on a topic related to their service learning experience. [1-3] MHS 7832. Service Learning Readings. [Formerly MHS 394c] Readings and a substantial interpretive essay on topics related to the service learning experience, under the supervision of a Vanderbilt faculty member. [1-3] MHS 7850. Independent Study. [Formerly MHS 390a] Readings and research in a minimum of two disciplines, to be selected in consultation with a faculty adviser and subject to the approval of the program director. [1-3] MHS 7851. Independent Study. [Formerly MHS 390b] Readings and research in a minimum of two disciplines, to be selected in consultation with a faculty adviser and subject to the approval of the program director. [1-3]

117 MHS 7880. Internship Training. [Formerly MHS 393a] Must be taken concurrently with 7881 and/or 7882. [1-3] MHS 7881. Internship Research. [Formerly MHS 393b] Students will write a substantial research paper under the supervision of a Vanderbilt faculty member. [1-3] MHS 7882. Internship Readings. [Formerly MHS 393c] Readings and a substantial interpretive essay on topics related to the internship training, under the supervision of a Vanderbilt faculty member. [1-3] MHS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly MHS 369] [0-12]

Microbiology and Immunology M&IM 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly M&IM 369] M&IM 8327. Experimental Methods In Microbiology. [Formerly M&IM 327] Laboratory work concerned with (a) regulation of gene transcription; (b) signal transducing molecules and pathways; (c) entry and replication of mammalian viruses; (d) techniques in nucleic acid and peptide chemistry, rapid methods of DNA sequencing, gene knock-out in transgenic animals, design of probes, antigens, and synthetic vaccines; and (e) structure-function analysis of ligands, receptors, toxins, and transcription factors. Available only to M&IM students. Admission to course, hours, and credit by arrangement. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [2-4]. M&IM 8328. Molecular Virology. [Formerly M&IM 3282] The interaction of animal viruses with their host cells, discussed at the molecular and cellular level as model systems. Special emphasis is placed on current literature and methodology. Prerequisite: IGP 8001 or an undergraduate course in biochemistry or microbiology. FALL. [3] M&IM 8329. Molecular and Cellular Immunology. [Formerly M&IM 3283] The cellular and molecular foundations of the immune response system and the humoral and cellular reactions that result from immunologic interactions. Two lectures per week and seminars presented by students. Prerequisite: IGP 8001 or any microbiology course. FALL. [3] M&IM 8332. Foundations in Microbiology and Immunology I. [Formerly M&IM 332] The objectives of this course are to alert students to important original research articles in microbial genetics and pathogenesis, to apply methods of scientific logic for critical analysis of the knowledge presented in the articles, and to help students present complex data and conclusions to an audience. SUMMER. [2] M&IM 8333. Foundations in Microbiology and Immunology II. [Formerly M&IM 333] Second semester of required course work. Original research articles focus on virology. FALL. [2] M&IM 8334. Foundations in Microbiology and Immunology III. [Formerly M&IM 334] Third semester of required course work. Original research articles focus on immunology. SPRING. [2] M&IM 8335. Research Proposals: Preparation and Critical Review. [Formerly M&IM 335] An essential skill for scientists in an academic setting is the ability to obtain extramural research funding through peer reviewed grant applications. This course will offer didactic sessions in which the process of preparing and reviewing grant applications is discussed. Each student will write a grant application using the NRSA format for postdoctoral fellowships. The student should propose research in one of the four major emphasis areas of the department: microbial genetics, virology, immunology, or microbial pathogenesis. The initial grant submission will be reviewed by the faculty thesis mentor and a course instructor. The student will amend the application according to the reviewer’s comments and submit a final version. Procedures for reviewing grant applications will then be discussed. A student and a faculty member will provide a written review for each of the final grants. The course will conclude with a mock NIH study section in which grants are reviewed orally and scored. SPRING. [2] M&IM 8350. Cellular Microbiology of the Pathogen-Host Interaction. [Formerly M&IM 350] This course will emphasize bacterial pathogenesis. As an interdisciplinary course, it is designed to train students at the interface of molecular microbiology and cell biology. The course will focus on the molecular mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens cause disease. Prerequisite:

118 A solid background at the graduate or undergraduate level in natural science curriculum such as molecular cell biology, microbiology and immunology. All students must receive course director approval prior to registration. M&IM 8351. Functional Genomics and Proteomics: Applications to Immunobiology. [Formerly M&IM 351] Biological applications of functional genomics and proteomics in immunology. Topics include 1) proteomic analysis of blood cells, vascular endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells involved in immunity and inflammation, 2) functional genomics of immunobiology using genome-wide mutagenesis, 3) gene expression profiling of immune/inflammatory responses based on DNA microarray technology, 4) peptide/protein transduction and its applications to cell-based proteomics and intracellular protein therapy, 5) proteomic analysis of MHC antigens, 6) genomics and proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions, 7) genomic and proteomic analysis of immunological diseases, and 8) development and application of new genomic and proteomic strategies in immunology. SPRING. [2] M&IM 8352. Special Topics in HIV/AIDS Research. [Formerly M&IM 352] This advanced course reviews recent progress in AIDS research as a platform for discussions of current research frontiers, with an emphasis on molecular interactions of the virus with host cells. Prerequisite: A graduatelevel course in virology or immunology. SPRING. [3] M&IM 8353. Microbial Diseases. [Formerly M&IM 353] Microbial Diseases is a 1 credit lecture based course that will survey the infectious diseases that are of the greatest importance to global public health. Infections diseases are responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality, and the diseases covered in this course are the most common causes of lethal infection in the world. Microbial Diseases is open to all graduate students and postdoctoral fellows and there are no prerequisites for this course. The course will survey the leading causes of infection with a focus on incidence, route of infection, symptoms, and treatment. Upon completion of this course, students will have a strong understanding of the infectious diseases of global medical significance. M&IM 8377. Critical Issues in Cancer Biology. [Formerly M&IM 377] This seminar/tutorial will examine primary research papers to develop critical thinking skills on current topics in cancer research, including: cell growth control, signal transduction, regulation of gene expression, programmed cell death. The discussions will focus on discredited and controversial areas as well as cutting edge studies. Students can write a paper for additional credit. This course is offered to graduate students only. Post doctoral fellows may audit if space permits by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: IGP 8001, 8002, or equivalent. SUMMER. [2-3] M&IM 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly M&IM 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] M&IM 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly M&IM 399]

Molecular Physiology and Biophysics MP&B 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly MP&B 369] MP&B 8322. Physiological Techniques and Preparations. [Formerly MP&B 322] Students sign up for this course number for research credit hours prior to admission into candidacy for Ph.D. degree. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. Hours and credit by arrangement. MP&B 8323. Advanced Neurophysiology. [Formerly MP&B 323] (Also listed as Pharmacology 323 and Neuroscience 324) This class is a tutorial in methods for recording electrical signals in neurons. We will begin with a crash course on ion channels and transporters, spending a significant proportion of class time on discussion of recent primary research papers. In the latter part of the semester, we will move on to live demonstrations and personal training in the details of electrophysiological recording methods in several preparations. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to perform electrophysiological experiments as part of their dissertation research. MP&B 8324. Tutorials in Physiology. [Formerly MP&B 324] The class meets once weekly. In the fall semester, graduate students critically evaluate research publications in areas of active research in the department (e.g.,

vanderbilt university gene transcription, molecular biology, electrophysiology, membrane transport, intercellular signaling, beta cell biology, and regulation of intermediary metabolism). Also, there are faculty presentations on ancillary science skills, such as oral and poster presentations, and grant and proposal writing. In the spring semester, each student presents and defends a short research proposal based on their current research area in preparation for their candidacy examination. FALL, SPRING. [1] MP&B 8326. Exercise Physiology. [Formerly MP&B 326] The responses of different physiological systems to exercise. The effect and role of exercise under special conditions such as diabetes, reproduction, heart disease, and orthopedics and rehabilitation. Invited speakers will discuss the clinical and scientific aspects of the above topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SPRING, even-numbered years. [1] MP&B 8327. Molecular Endocrinology. [Formerly MP&B 327] A survey of the molecular biology of hormone action from the target cell surface to the nucleus. Special emphasis on (i) diabetes and obesity and (ii) how receptors and intracellular messengers mediate hormone action, (iii) how hormones regulate gene expression, and (iv) signaling in adipocytes. Discussion of the use of genetic, molecular biology, and biochemical techniques to study hormone action. The faculty encourage an interactive atmosphere in the class through the discussion of seminal papers. This is an advanced course so some prior background in cell signaling is recommended. FALL. [2] MP&B 8329. Experimental Statistics Short Course. [Formerly MP&B 329] The goal of this course is to insure basic proficiency in statistical concepts, methods for analysis of experimental data, and enhance statistical communication skills. Core concepts to be discussed are: (1) Sources of data variation, data types that lead to different analyses (e.g. parametric vs nonparametric); (2) Variation in samples and populations, real world vs theoretical data distributions; (3) Importance and use of confidence intervals, effect size, power related to experimental design; (4) Meaning of statistical vs functional significance; and (5) Aspects of data analysis pitfalls (e.g., outliers, multiple tests, clustered data). Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. SUMMER. [1] MP&B 8330. Human Physiology and Molecular Medicine. [Formerly MP&B 330] Lectures and research correlations on advanced aspects of human physiology, with emphasis on communication between and control of the major tissue types and organ systems. Recent biochemical and molecular biology research findings will be incorporated into the study of normal physiology and pathophysiology. This course is required of all graduate students majoring in Molecular Physiology and Biophysics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. FALL. [3] MP&B 8332. Scientific Reasoning and Logic in Gene Regulation. [Formerly MP&B 332] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology CBIOGS 332) Objective: To gain a detailed understanding of rigorous approaches to experimental design, strategies, and data interpretation using one of the most developed fields in modern biology—gene regulation—as a contextual backdrop. Drawing on over 40 years of primary research papers in gene control, this course will dissect how important problems are identified, how questions are framed to give rigorous answers, and how data are interpreted and new hypotheses generated. The topics to be covered include eukaryotic RNA polymerase and basal factor structure and function, chromatin and nucleosome structure, DNA and nucleosome modification and the effects of these components and factors on transcription, cell- and tissue-specific transcription factors and molecular mechanisms of gene control. As these topics are discussed, particular emphasis will be placed upon accessing the appropriateness of controls, techniques, data interpretation, and formulation of future experimentation in these areas. Class meetings are fully interactive, and require extensive input and critical evaluation from students. All class meetings revolve around the detailed discussion of assigned reading materials and require students to perform extensive reading of the original research literature. Prerequisite: IGP Bioregulation I. SPRING. [2] MP&B 8333. Molecular Aspects of Obesity and Diabetes. [Formerly MP&B 333] This course is designed to introduce first-year IGP students to some of the major areas of interest in the fields of obesity and diabetes research. In the first part of the course the lecturers will discuss the characteristics of diabetes and obesity in terms of whole-body metabolism. The use of mouse models, a major tool to study metabolism, will be emphasized.

Graduate School / Courses The second part of the course will focus on the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas: how they develop, how insulin secretion is regulated, and how insulin gene transcription is controlled. The third part of the course will focus on the mechanism of insulin action at the molecular level. The final part of the course will focus on the regulation of lipid metabolism and the latest theories on the molecular causes of insulin resistance and obesity. Each lecture will be presented by faculty followed by a discussion of a research paper on a related topic led by a current IGP student. The NIH-funded Molecular Endocrinology Training Program (METP) provides support for eight IGP students in the second and third years of their graduate studies. The METP strongly encourages students who wish to be considered for METP funding take this spring elective. JANUARY-FEBRUARY. [2] MP&B 8335. Assessment of Metabolism in vivo: A Laboratory Course. [Formerly MP&B 335] The objective of the course is to give students the tools needed to assess whether an experimental intervention (pharmacologic, genetic, dietary, or environmental) alters macronutrient metabolism, energy balance, cardiovascular homeostasis, or animal behavior. Students will learn how to measure whole body and tissue specific kinetics, the principles of which can be applied to the kinetics of drugs, substrates, and hormones. To accomplish this, we will use a combination of lectures, hands-on laboratories, demonstrations, and data-problem sessions. MP&B 8340. Human Genetics I. [Formerly MP&B 340] (Also listed as Human Genetics 8340) Designed to cover background and latest advances in human molecular genetics. Topics will include an overview and in-depth look at molecular genetics including DNA, RNA, and chromosome basics. Gene structure and transcriptional processing. Mutational mechanisms, biochemical genetics (gene defects in biochemical pathways). Topics will be discussed with use of real-world examples and relevance to human research. FALL. [3] MP&B 8341. Human Genetics II. [Formerly MP&B 341] (Also listed as Human Genetics 8341) This course will cover the statistical, population, and analytical aspects of modern human genetics research. Topics to be covered include human population genetics, quantitative genetics, disease gene discovery (emphasizing design, statistical and molecular techniques), linkage and association analyses, computational genetics, and evolutionary genetics. Clinical examples, subject ascertainment, and study design will also be emphasized. Students must have a strong understanding of Mendelian genetics and basic biostatistics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SPRING. [3] MP&B 8345. Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience. [Formerly MP&B 345] (Also listed as Cell Biology 8345, Neuroscience 8345, Pharmacology 8345) This course is a required entry-level course for students in the Cell and Molecular Track of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vanderbilt that should be taken in the first graduate school year. It also serves as an elective for medical students and graduate students in a number of other programs. Its goal is to expose students to fundamental concepts and techniques in molecular and cellular neuroscience and provide a theoretical context for experimental analysis of brain function and disease. The course is divided into three modules. Module I: Neural Anatomy and Development provides an overview of the anatomy of the nervous system and neurotransmitters and examines concepts in neural pattern formation, neuronal migration, axon guidance, and synapse formation. Module II. Signaling, Plasticity, and Modulation reviews biophysical and molecular concepts relating to neuronal membrane excitability, secretion, and plasticity. Module III: Neural Diseases and Disease Models focuses on specific brain disorders such as epilepsy, pain disorders, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and schizophrenia and current models used to investigate their origin and/or treatment. This course combines faculty lecture with discussion of original articles, with an emphasis on fundamental concepts and the elucidation of important research paradigms in the discipline. Faculty and assistants guide students through important research paradigms with a critical analysis of the primary literature in the topic area. Prerequisite: Bioregulation I (IGP 8001) or consent of instructor. Course directors may consider undergraduate course work in cell biology or biochemistry to meet this requirement. SPRING. [4] MP&B 8349. Genetics of Model Organisms. [Formerly MP&B 349] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology 8349, Human Genetics 8349) Basic genetic principles across a broad range of organisms (yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, plants, mouse, zebrafish) that are used in genetic analyses to investigate molecular pathways of interest for

119 human disease will be presented. This course will provide students with indepth terminology and understanding of the advantages, applications, and approaches specific to each organism. Genomic and bioinformatics tools that facilitate genetic analysis in each species will be emphasized. Specific examples of how each model organism has successfully contributed to elucidation of a human disease gene, pathway, or genetic principle will be presented. Course combines faculty lectures with student presentation and discussion of original articles to emphasize the uniqueness of each model system. Prerequisite: One statistics course at the upper undergraduate level or higher and Fundamentals of Genetic Analysis (MPB 8385), or permission of instructor. Offered every other year. SPRING. [3] MP&B 8350. Independent Study. [Formerly MP&B 350] Independent Study may be repeated. MP&B 8370. Tutorials in Human Genetics. [Formerly MP&B 370] A weekly seminar critically evaluating current and past scientific literature focusing on study design and molecular genetics. The focus will be on study methods and analysis. FALL. [1] MP&B 8371. Tutorial in Statistical and Population Genetics. [Formerly MP&B 371] The class meets once weekly. Graduate students critically evaluate research publications in areas of statistical methods in human genetic analysis and in the area of human population genetics. Also, there are faculty presentations on ancillary science skills, such as oral and poster presentations, and grant and proposal writing. SPRING. [1] MP&B 8381. Molecular Foundations of Medicine. [Formerly MP&B 381] Molecular Foundations of Medicine is designed to familiarize students with the cellular structures, biomolecules, and processes that constitute life, human health, and disease at the molecular level. The course employs an integrated approach to teach underlying principles of biochemistry, cell and tissue biology, and genetics with an emphasis on human systems and medical conditions. The inclusion of clinical correlation sessions, small groups, and laboratory sessions will further integrate and broaden course material and relate molecular processes to the study of human disease. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. FALL. [Variable credit: 1-5] MP&B 8382. Structure, Function, and Development. [Formerly MP&B 382] Structure, Function, and Development is designed to provide students with the means to develop an effective understanding of the normal micro and macroscopic structure, function, and development of the human body. The course employs a coordinated, integrated approach to the presentation and learning of the disciplines of human gross anatomy, cell and tissue biology (histology), human development (embryology), and physiology in a context of clinical application. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-4] MP&B 8384. The Brain and Behavior. [Formerly MP&B 384] Brain and Behavior provides a basic understanding of the human central nervous system and human behavior. The format includes lectures, lab exercises, small group discussions, and patient and case presentations. Brain and Behavior integrates three areas of medical science: (1) neuroanatomy, physiology, and biochemistry; (2) psychopathology and systems neuroscience; and (3) pathology, pharmacology, and radiology. Prerequisite: MSTP students only. SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-2] Norden, Heckers. MP&B 8385. Fundamentals of Genetic Analysis. [Formerly MP&B 385] This course is designed to accomplish three goals: (1) introduce students to critical topics of genetic research, (2) introduce students to important areas of genetic research not covered in first-year course work, and (3) promote an understanding of classical genetic analysis by learning genetics using the original literature. The approach will be to use classic literature that defined significant problems in genetic research. Specific topics will include genetic analysis (segregation, independent assortment and locus mapping), human pedigree analysis and disease gene mapping, and population/quantitative genetics. FALL. [4] MP&B 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly MP&B 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] MP&B 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly MP&B 399] This course is used for research following entry into Ph.D. candidacy (following successful completion of the candidacy examination).

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Music MUSC 5110. Intensive Musicianship I. [Formerly MUSC 341A] Intensive immersive musical instruction modeled on language acquisition process, designed to provide musicians with practical skills in real-time aural processing, including interval identification, reading and notating pitch and rhythm, facility in each of the diatonic modes, aural tracking of multiple simultaneous parts. Open by instructor approval. SUMMER. [1] MUSC 5120. Intensive Musicianship II. [Formerly MUSC 341B] Intensive immersive musical instruction modeled on language acquisition process, designed to provide musicians with practical skills in real-time aural processing, including interval identification, reading and notating pitch and rhythm, facility in each of the diatonic modes, aural tracking of multiple simultaneous parts. Open by instructor approval. SUMMER. [1] MUSC 5130. Intensive Musicianship III. [Formerly MUSC 342] Continuation of materials covered in Intensive Musicianship MUSC 5110 and 5120, including further real-time aural processing, with discussion of pedagogical approaches to teaching musicianship using a language-acquisition model. Prerequisite: MUSC 5120. SUMMER. [1] MUED 5000. Philosophical Foundations and Contemporary Issues in Music Teaching. [Formerly MUST 300] A comprehensive study of historical trends and philosophies relevant to music teaching. Readings and discussions of the practical application of educational research studies to music teaching. SUMMER. [3] MUED 5010. Methods and Materials in Instrumental Music. [Formerly MUST 320] Techniques and materials for teaching instrumental music from elementary through senior high school. Emphasizes instrumental organization, administration, pedagogical practices, and developing school instrumental music programs. FALL. [3] MUED 5020. Methods and Materials in Vocal/Choral Music. [Formerly MUST 330] Techniques and materials for teaching vocal/choral music from elementary through senior high school. Emphasizes vocal music organization, administration, and pedagogical practices. FALL. [3] MUED 5030. Methods and Materials in General Music, PreK through 12. [Formerly MUST 340] Techniques and materials for teaching general music, PreK through 12. Classroom organization, administration, pedagogical practices, and general musical activities such as Orff, Kodály, Dalcroze. FALL. [3] MUED 5100. Advanced Studies for the Wind Band Conductor. [Formerly MUST 317] Knowledge of concert band repertoire as applicable to band programs from intermediate to advanced levels. Score preparation, rehearsal strategies, and expansion of conducting skills to include longer and more complex musical structures. Specific emphasis on developing historical and pedagogical context for repertoire evaluation and selection. Repertoire to encompass a broad range of genres, styles, and levels of difficulty. FALL. [2]

Neuroscience (GS) NURO 8302. Techniques and Preparations. [Formerly NURO 302] Laboratory rotations undertaken by Integrative Track students that culminate in the selection of a thesis adviser. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication of topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. FALL, SPRING. [0-6] NURO 8320. Neuroscience Research Forum. [Formerly NURO 320] Required of all students, and second-year students are required to take this course for credit. Students make oral presentations and are evaluated based on the clarity of the presentation and visual aids, as well as the ability of the presenter to answer questions. The course meets every other week for one hour with two students presenting at each session. FALL, SPRING. [0] NURO 8324. Advanced Neurophysiology. [Formerly NURO 324] (Also listed as Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8323 and Pharmacology 8323) This class is a tutorial in methods for recording electrical signals in neurons. We will begin with a crash course on ion channels and transporters, spending a significant proportion of class time on discussion of recent

vanderbilt university primary research papers. In the latter part of the semester, we will move on to live demonstrations and personal training in the details of electrophysiological recording methods in several preparations. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to perform electrophysiological experiments as part of their dissertation research. SPRING. [3] NURO 8325. Neuroscience Discussions. [Formerly NURO 325] This twosemester course provides discussions on a broad range of neuroscience topics, ranging from reviews of historical concepts and individuals in neuroscience to science journalism. Other topics include scientific ethics, science policy, good grantsmanship, and communication skills. FALL, SPRING. [1-1] NURO 8327. Graduate Neuroanatomy. [Formerly NURO 327] An intensive course on the structure and function of the brain designed specifically for neuroscience graduate students. The course is centered around a large lab portion supplemented by lectures. The course is geared towards hands-on experience and is intended to foster the ability to identify and characterize important structures and subdivisions of the rodent and primate brain using gross, histological and histochemical methods. Histological identification of specific brain structures using different types of stains, markers, and connectional methodologies will be covered. The emphasis will range from macroscopic analyses of brain structures and pathways to the cellular composition and molecular characteristics of specific brains regions, and will employ a number of modern neuroanatomical techniques. In addition, neuropathological materials will be used. The course will equip students with practical knowledge of neuroanatomy as well as modern neuroanatomical methods and approaches, which will be useful in their professional career in the neurosciences. NURO 8330. Cognitive Neuroscience. [Formerly NURO 330] This course provides a broad understanding of the state of our knowledge in cognitive neuroscience. The emphasis is on the findings and concepts in the major branches of cognitive neuroscience, rather than techniques (although these will be discussed). The level of analysis will focus on human and non-human primate systems. Prerequisite: an introductory-level undergraduate course in neuroscience or physiological psychology. Basic knowledge of experimental cognitive psychology is desirable but not necessary. FALL. [3] NURO 8331. Mammalian Developmental Neurobiology. [Formerly NURO 331] This seminar course emphasiszes classic and cutting-edge research in mammalian brain development, with a particular emphasis on the forebrain. It is also intended to introduce the students to modern techniques used to examine the generation of proper brain architecture and connectivity. Prerequisite: NURO 8345. NURO 8332. Experimental Statistics Short Course. [Formerly NURO 332] The goal of this course is to insure basic proficiency in statistical concepts, methods for analysis of experimental data, and enhance statistical communication skills. Core concepts to be discussed are: (1) Sources of data variation, data types that lead to different analyses (e.g. parametric vs nonparametric); (2) Variation in samples and populations, real world vs theoretical data distributions; (3) Importance and use of confidence intervals, effect size, power related to experimental design; (4) Meaning of statistical vs functional significance; and (5) Aspects of data analysis pitfalls (e.g., outliers, multiple tests, clustered data). Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. SUMMER. [1] NURO 8340. Fundamentals of Neuroscience II. [Formerly NURO 340] This is the second part of a 2-semester course required for all Neuroscience graduate students. Parts I and II can be taken individually as electives for medical students and graduate students in other programs. The goal is for students to learn the general organization of the nervous system and its circuitry and understand the fundamental molecular and cellular bases underlying its development and function in normal and pathological conditions. In addition, the students learn how the cellular systems in the brain relate to the major branches of cognitive neuroscience. There are 3 themes that will be woven into the course to provide a continuum from molecules to cognition and disease: sensory systems, motor systems and memory. This course combines faculty lecture with discussion of original articles with an emphasis on fundamental concepts and the elucidation of important research paradigms in the discipline. Part I (NURO 8345) will emphasize the cellular and molecular aspects of neuroscience. Part II (NURO 8340) will emphasize systems in the brain and principles of cognition. FALL. [4].

Graduate School / Courses NURO 8342. Seminar in the Neurobiology of Hearing and Multisensory Processes. [Formerly NURO 342] (Also listed as Hearing and Speech Sciences 8342) Study at the doctoral level of the neural processes underlying auditory and multisensory perception. The course will focus on critical readings of recently published findings that emphasize the connection between plasticity, neural systems, and behavior. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FALL, SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-2] NURO 8345. Fundamentals of Neuroscience I. [Formerly NURO 345] This is the first part of a two-semester course required for all neuroscience graduate students. Parts I and II can be taken individually as electives for medical students and graduate students in other programs. The goal is for students to learn the general organization of the nervous system and its circuitry and understand the fundamental molecular and cellular bases underlying its development and function in normal and pathological conditions. In addition, the students learn how the cellular systems in the brain relate to the major branches of cognitive neuroscience. There are 3 themes that will be woven into the course to provide a continuum from molecules to cognition and disease: sensory systems, motor systems and memory. This course combines faculty lecture with discussion of original articles with an emphasis on fundamental concepts and the elucidation of important research paradigms in the discipline. Part I (NURO 8345) will emphasize the cellular and molecular aspects of neuroscience. Part II (NURO 8340) will emphasize systems in the brain and principles of cognition. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course work in cell biology or biochemistry or permission of the course directors. SPRING [4] NURO 8346. Advanced Molecular Neurobiology. [Formerly NURO 346] (Also listed as Pharmacology 8346) This course examines molecular components and interactions that regulate neuronal development, signaling, and disease. Topics include development of neuronal identity, axonal transport, growth factors and cell death, axon guidance and synapse formation, electrical and chemical transmission, regulation of neuronal excitability and genetic analysis of signaling and neural disorders. Didactic and literature discussions provide students with a sound foundation for understanding the molecular bases underlying the development and function of the nervous system. Prerequisite: Neuroscience 8345 or Pharmacology 8320, or consent of instructor. SPRING. [3] NURO 8347. The Visual System. [Formerly NURO 347] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology 8347, Psychology 5780) An interdisciplinary approach to how humans see and interpret their visual environment. Topics include the structure of the eye and brain (including optics), the physiology of individual cells and groups of cells, machine vision and models of visual function, visual attention, and mechanisms of complex visual perception. Lectures by faculty from Psychology and Cell and Developmental Biology. Graduate students attend one hour discussion section per week in addition to lecture, and turn in a more extensive paper than undergraduates. SPRING. [3] NURO 8350. Independent Study. [Formerly NURO 350] Qualified students work with individual faculty members in areas not covered in available courses. Prerequisite: approval by individual faculty member and program director. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-3, with total credit limited to 3] NURO 8352. Seminar in Neuroscience I and II. [Formerly NURO 352] This course focuses on critical analysis of primary literature, both current and classic publications, in faculty-led “journal club” discussion format. The topics will parallel the material presented in the Fundamentals of Neuroscience I (8345) and II (8340) courses, but can be taken independently. FALL and SPRING. [1] NURO 8365. Neurobiology of Disease. [Formerly NURO 365] Neurobiology of Disease. The goal of this graduate-level neuroscience course is to provide comprehensive understanding of pathology and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The course is divided in three modules: neurodevelopmental, neurological/neurodegenerative and psychiatric/addiction diseases. The course prepares students for intensive collaborations along the basic-translational-clinical continuum. The lectures will discuss clinical presentation and pathological features epidemiology, treatment, status of clinical research, animal models, and postulated cellular/molecular bases for >30 diseases. This course is mandatory for neuroscience majors. Prerequisite: introductory neuroscience course and consent of instructor. FALL. [3]

121 NURO 8366. Molecular Basis of Neural Disease. [Formerly NURO 366] This advanced course covers current concepts and models for neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, depression, and autism, as well as Parkinson’s Disease, trinucleotide repeat disorders, and stroke. Didactic presentations will focus on the molecular and genetic bases of these disorders, and will be complemented by presentations of new papers as well as patient interviews when possible. Prerequisite: 8345 or consent of instructor. SPRING. [2] NURO 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly NURO 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] NURO 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly NURO 399]

Nursing Science NRSC 8302. Advanced Doctoral Seminar I. [Formerly NRSC 302] This course consists of a series of seminars focusing on issues related to qualifying examinations, the dissertation, and continued development of a program of research. The topics are selected by course faculty and the students who plan to take the comprehensive examinations withing the next 9–12 months. Topics and experiences may include proposal development, grant applications, mock proposal reviews, qualifying examination situations, and dissemination of research findings. The seminar is required for two consecutive semesters. Prerequisite: Core Ph.D. course completion consistent with ability to complete the qualifying examination within 9–12 months after registration. SPRING. [1] NRSC 8303. Advanced Doctoral Seminar II. [Formerly NRSC 303] This is the second seminar course in this series. Prerequisite: Completion of NRSC 8302. SUMMER. [1] NRSC 8304. Ethical and Legal Issues in Research. [Formerly NRSC 304] This course provides an overview of issues related to the responsible conduct of research, including data management, vulnerable populations, authorship and publication, conflicts of interest and collaboration. Federal and institutional guidelines are included. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. SPRING. [1] NRSC 8305. Informatics and Scholarly Inquiry. [Formerly NRSC 305] This course provides an overview of informatics, the transformation of data into information, knowledge, decisions, and actions to improve outcomes. To take advantage of electronic data mines, scholars of the future will need to understand the basics of databases and the structure of nursing vocabularies. Knowledge management to support evidence-based practice in nursing will be a critical skill. In addition, this course prepares the student to use available technology tools to present, interpret, and organize data. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. FALL. [2] NRSC 8306. Research Design and Statistics I. [Formerly NRSC 306] This course focuses on understanding and applying the basic concepts of descriptive and relational research design and statistics. Students will be introduced to the full range of designs available to address research aims, moving from descriptive to experimental and quasi-experimental. After examining the relationship of research aims to research design, the nature of measurement, and causal inference, relevant statistical methods for visualizing, describing, and making inferences from data will be introduced. The focus will be on univariate and bivariate descriptive methods. Statistical computing packages will be used. Published research will be used to develop the student’s ability to evaluate the design and statistical methods used to describe health care phenomena as well as relationships among them. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. FALL. [3] NRSC 8307. Research Design and Statistics II. [Formerly NRSC 307] The course expands the concepts and applications of RD&S I including an introduction to longitudinal and randomized control design issues. Topics related to internal validity, experimental designs, and issues in comparing individuals and groups cross-sectionally and longitudinally will be detailed. Students will be introduced to issues in external validity and the relationships between internal and external validities. Parametric and nonparametric univariate comparative statistical methods used to analyze data resulting from cross-sectional and randomized controlled designs will be

122 included. Students will be expected to generate and interpret results from statistical software and present relevant information in figures, tables, and text. Concepts will be studied within the context of evaluating published research. Prerequisite: Completion of Research Design and Statistics I or consent of faculty. SPRING. [3] NRSC 8308. Research Design and Statistics III. [Formerly NRSC 308] This course is focused on advanced designs and multivariate statistical techniques. Design topics include advanced issues in external validity, field experimentation versus laboratory experiments, quasi-experimental and blended designs as well as special considerations for nested and complex longitudinal designs. Related statistical topics include advanced multiple linear regression methods (e.g. path and structural equation modeling), log-linear models and advanced techniques in survival and longitudinal data analysis. These methods and concepts will be discussed and evaluated through educational resources and published research using them. Students will have the opportunity to develop advanced skills in statistical applications most commonly used in their respective areas of interest. Prerequisite: Completion of Research Design and Statistics II or consent of faculty. SUMMER. [3] NRSC 8309. Special Topics in Quantitative Methods. [Formerly NRSC 309] This course provides an overview of varied and timely topics in the field of quantitative methods. Exemplar topics may include issues in data collection methods such as using online or other resources, an examination of how quantitative data collection methods influence data management and analytic approaches, collection methods for physiological or psychosocial outcomes, and the benefits and drawbacks of using public data sets, conventional and new analytic techniques, as well as broader issues in the evolution of quantitative methods. Prerequisite: NRSC 8308, NRSC 8313; NRSC 8352 or NRSC 8382; or permission from instructor(s). FALL. [2] NRSC 8310. Health, Health Care, Research, and Public Policy. [Formerly NRSC 310] This course explores and critically analyzes theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding dynamic synergies between research, nursing practice, health care organization, and public policy and their impact on health. Strategies for dissemination, translation, and evaluation of evidence-based research findings to support health care practices and public policies to measurably improve health outcomes for selected populations and the student’s phenomenon of interest will be discussed. Local, national, and global implications will be explored. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. SPRING. [2] NRSC 8311. Role of Scientist in Academe, Community, and World. [Formerly NRSC 311] This seminar course assists the student to develop a personal framework for behavior within academe, the scientific community, and the world beyond. Through readings and discussions, the student will explore a variety of viewpoints about the duties and responsibilities of an educated citizen scientist in an interdependent world. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [1] SPRING. NRSC 8312. Programs of Research and Grantsmanship. [Formerly NRSC 312] This course provides the foundational information necessary for developing a program of research. Focus is placed on acquiring practical skills necessary to develop a program of research, narrowing the focus of student’s area of research, and for basic grantsmanship. Focus is placed upon developing the knowledge and practical skills necessary to investigate an area of research interest and draft a research proposal appropriate to current level of career development needs and/or phenomenon of interest. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. FALL. [2] NRSC 8313. Theories of Science. [Formerly NRSC 313] This course provides students with an introduction to the central theoretical and philosophical issues concerning the nature of science, the patterns of knowing and knowledge development, criteria for evaluating knowledge claims, and philosophy of science. The course will enable students to become knowledgeable about the forces affecting the development of knowledge and critical analyses of theories commonly used in nursing research. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. FALL. [2] NRSC 8350. Conceptual Foundations for Clinical Research. [Formerly NRSC 350] Critical analysis of theories, concepts, and research related to the promotion, protection, and restoration of health across the lifespan at individual, family, and community levels. Emphasis will be on the individual level. Students conduct a critical analysis of existing and emerging scientific

vanderbilt university knowledge in a chosen field of study. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. SPRING. [3] NRSC 8352. Measurement in Clinical Research. [Formerly NRSC 352] This course examines the principles of measurement, sources of measurement error, and procedures used for critical evaluation of the psychometric properties of clinical measures including techniques for assessing validity and reliability. Selected measures, commonly used in clinical research and specific to student research interests, will be evaluated for psychometric properties and fit with a proposed focus of study. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program and completion of NRSC 8307 and NRSC 8350; or consent of faculty. SUMMER. [3] NRSC 8353. Designing and Testing Clinical Interventions. [Formerly NRSC 353] Analysis of methodological, ethical, and practical issues related to the design and implementation of theory-based intervention studies. Students conduct a critical analysis of existing and emerging interventions related to their chosen field of study. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] NRSC 8366. Curriculum Strategies for Health Professional Education. [Formerly NRSC 366] This course introduces the student to the foundations of learning theory and learning styles. The impact of technology on learning practices and the appropriate use of technology to facilitate learning is emphasized. Students will create electronic elements for effective learning and use a course management system. Copyright and fair use issues are discussed. Overall curriculum strategies that integrate content, organization, informatics, and sequencing of courses are discussed. Students will design a learning program that integrates learning styles, technology use, and a course management system. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] NRSC 8367. Educational Evaluation for Learning in the Health Professions. [Formerly NRSC 367] This course is designed to facilitate expertise in the application of fundamental educational concepts, principles, and theories to techniques of educational measurement and evaluation. The underlying premise for the value of such knowledge is that evaluation provides evidence for sound decision-making in programs of higher education. Moreover, students will acquire competence in the planning and development of classroom and clinical performance evaluation tools, as well as analyzing and interpreting test results within the context of current ethical, legal, and social educational guidelines. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty. SUMMER. [3] NRSC 8368. Contextual Nature of Health and Health Behaviors. [Formerly NRSC 368] This course explores and critically analyzes theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the interaction of health and environment in affecting health by examining contextual factors that impact health and health behaviors of various system levels. Examines disparity (e.g., social and economic) as a determinant of health among individuals and sub-populations. Critique selected models of health, health behavior, community organization, and health care delivery and their usefulness to understand and impact selected health phenomena and various ethnocultural populations and communities. Students critically analyze and synthesize the literature related to a selected phenomenon of interest. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. NRSC 8380. Knowledge Synthesis in Nursing Science. [Formerly NRSC 380] This course provides a critical appraisal of the theoretical and empirical basis of nursing science. Theories and research generated to study phenomena related to nursing are evaluated and synthesized. Strategies for synthesizing extant knowledge in nursing are discussed. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. SPRING. [3] NRSC 8381. Current Topics in Health Services Research. [Formerly NRSC 381] This course is designed to assist the student to develop expertise concerning the objectives, support mechanisms, limitations, and controversies of current HSR research initiatives and HSR organizations. Examples of initiatives include (but are not limited to) those of the IOM, governmental and private safety studies, QI/QA consortia, JCAHO, IHI, and other projects. The student will be expected to assess the relative place of her/his research interest in the current HSR environment and to begin to function within the professional role of a health services researcher. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3]

Graduate School / Courses NRSC 8382. Measuring Outcomes: Issues in Health Service Research Designs. [Formerly NRSC 382] In this course, the student will develop expertise in the design, measurement, and analysis of studies employing the five generic outcomes of greatest interest in outcomes studies: satisfaction, cost-effectiveness, mortality, health-related quality of life, and morbidity. The student will also be expected to develop an overview including measurement and analysis plans for a condition-specific outcome. The impact of the researcher’s decisions regarding conceptual models, treatment definition, risk adjustment strategies, and the application of statistical techniques will be explored. At least one controversy attendant to each of the five generic outcomes will be debated in class. Prerequisite: Completion of Research Design and Statistics I and II. [3] NRSC 8383. Issues in Health Services Research Intervention Studies. [Formerly NRSC 383] The student will develop expertise in the design and execution of intervention studies in health services research. Emphasis will be placed on the selection of interventions and the valid and reliable execution of the interventions through examination of issues such as treatment fidelity, intervention duration, location and interventionist expertise. The intervention categories studied include labor, capital and processes (e.g., working conditions and work design.) Strategies of attending to the execution and analysis of multilevel, multi-organizational studies will be addressed. FALL. [3] NRSC 8390. Independent Study in Nursing Science. [Formerly NRSC 390] Individualized study and reading in areas of mutual interest to the student and faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [Variable credit: 1-3] NRSC 8394. Qualitative Research Methods. [Formerly NRSC 394] This course introduces and explores qualitative research methods, including their theoretical and methodological foundations, and practical applications. Course participants will explore and pilot test one method in the context of their topic of interest. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [3] NRSC 8395. Research Practicum. [Formerly NRSC 395] This course provides students with exposure to and involvement in the research process. Learning activities are based on student need and interest and determined according to best fit with available faculty research programs. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 1-3] NRSC 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly NRSC 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program or consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 0-6] NRSC 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly NRSC 399] Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Ph.D. program and consent of faculty. [Variable credit: 0-6]

Pharmacology PHAR-GS 8320. Targets, Systems, and Drug Action. [Formerly PHARGS 320] Introduction to human physiology is integrated with the pathophysiology, pathological manifestations, and therapeutic interventions. Lectures and laboratories emphasize the molecular and cellular underpinnings of normal organ function and disease. Mechanisms of drug action are discussed in a systemic fashion and supported by guided readings on drug discovery and design. Paradigm shifting experiments will be discussed to illustrate clarity of thinking, how focused experimental strategies lead to discovery, and potential difficulties in interpretation of experimental results. FALL, SPRING. [1-10] PHAR-GS 8321. Pharmacological Targets and Mechanisms, Part 2. [Formerly PHAR-GS 320B] Introduction to human physiology is integrated with the pathophysiology, pathological manifestations, and therapeutic interventions. Lectures and laboratories emphasize the molecular and cellular underpinnings of normal organ function and disease. Mechanisms of drug action are discussed in a systemic fashion and supported by guided readings on drug discover and design. Paradigm shifting experiments will be discussed to illustrate clarity of thinking, how focused experimental

123 strategies lead to discovery, and potential difficulties in interpretation of experimental results. SPRING. [1-5] PHAR-GS 8323. Scientific Communication Skills II. [Formerly PHARGS 322B] This course will leverage the writing assignments of he fall Scientific Communications course (8322) to accelerate preparation of a draft NRSA fellowship (or equivalent such as AHA) application. During the fall course, a draft Specific Aims page is written and critiqued. In this spring course, students will write the next two sections of their application and have it peerreviewed. These writing assignments are intended to be self-guided with significant support by the student’s mentor. The applications will subsequently be submitted for funding to the proper agency. SPRING. [1] PHAR-GS 8324. Receptor Theory and Signal Transduction. [Formerly PHAR-GS 324] Structure and function of cell-surface receptors and the molecular bases by which they activate cellular function. Topics include receptor identification; quantitation of simple and complex binding phenomena; molecular bases for receptor coupling to GTP-binding proteins; the structure and function of ligand-operated ion channels, receptor-tyrosine kinases and receptor-induced signal transduction cascades receptors as oncogenes and proto-oncogenes. SUMMER. [1-3] PHAR-GS 8327. Modern Drug Discovery. [Formerly PHAR-GS 327] The course will provide an introduction and overview to the drug discovery process. Focus will be on target selection, target validation, and the process of discovery early drug leads and optimization of those leads into compounds suitable for clinical development. This will include approaches used to transition from discovery to the early clinical development phase of a program as well as medical and market considerations that impact launching and progress of a drug discovery program. FALL. [2] PHAR-GS 8332. Experimental Statistics Short Course. [Formerly PHAR-GS 332] The goal of this course is to insure basic proficiency in statistical concepts, methods for analysis of experimental data, and enhance statistical communication skills. Core concepts to be discussed are: (1) Sources of data variation, data types that lead to different analyses (e.g. parametric vs nonparametric); (2) Variation in samples and populations, real world vs theoretical data distributions; (3) Importance and use of confidence intervals, effect size, power related to experimental design; (4) Meaning of statistical vs functional significance; and (5) Aspects of data analysis pitfalls (e.g., outliers, multiple tests, clustered data). Prerequisite: Permission of faculty. SUMMER. [1] PHAR-GS 8345. Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience. [Formerly PHARGS 345] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology 8345, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics 8345, Neuroscience 8345) This course is a required entry-level course for students in the Cell and Molecular Track of the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Vanderbilt that should be taken in the first graduate school year. It also serves as an elective for medical students and graduate students in a number of other programs. Its goal is to expose students to fundamental concepts and techniques in molecular and cellular neuroscience and provide a theoretical context for experimental analysis of brain function and disease. The course is divided into three modules. Module I: Neural Anatomy and Development provides an overview of the anatomy of the nervous system and neurotransmitters and examines concepts in neural pattern formation, neuronal migration, axon guidance, and synapse formation. Module II. Signaling, Plasticity, and Modulation reviews biophysical and molecular concepts relating to neuronal membrane excitability, secretion, and plasticity. Module III: Neural Diseases and Disease Models focuses on specific brain disorders such as epilepsy, pain disorders, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and schizophrenia and current models used to investigate their origin andor treatment. This course combines faculty lecture with discussion of original articles, with an emphasis on fundamental concepts and the elucidation of important research paradigms in the discipline. Faculty and assistants guide students through important research paradigms with a critical analysis of the primary literature in the topic area. Prerequisite: Bioregulation I (IGP 8001) or consent of instructor. Course directors may consider undergraduate course work in cell biology or biochemistry to meet this requirement. SPRING. [4] PHAR-GS 8346. Advanced Molecular Neurobiology. [Formerly PHARGS 346] (Also listed as Neuroscience 8346) This course examines

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molecular components and interactions that regulate neuronal development, signaling, and disease. Topics include development of neuronal identity, axonal transport, growth factors and cell death, axon guidance and synapse formation, electrical and chemical transmission, regulation of neuronal excitability and genetic analysis of signaling and neural disorders. Didactic and literature discussions provide students with a sound foundation for understanding the molecular bases underlying the development and function of the nervous system. Prerequisite: Neuroscience 8345 or Pharmacology 8320, or consent of instructor. SPRING. [3]

Physics

PHAR-GS 8350. Independent Study. [Formerly PHAR-GS 350] Qualified students work with individual staff members in areas not covered in other available courses. Prerequisite: Approval of staff member and department chair. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER. [Variable credit: 1-2, with total credit limited to 2 hours]

PHYS 8000. Seminar. [Formerly PHYS 300] [1]

PHAR-GS 8360. Current Issues in Pharmacology. [Formerly PHAR-GS 360] Presentation of current advances, paradigm shifts, and problems in pharmacology with an emphasis on experimental approaches and their interpretation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SPRING. [Variable credit: 1-3] PHAR-GS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PHAR-GS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PHAR-GS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PHAR-GS 399]

Philosophy PHIL 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly PHIL 369] [0-12] PHIL 8000. Teaching and Research Methods. [Formerly PHIL 301] Survey of methods of research in philosophy and examination and discussion of teaching methods. Required of all first-year graduate students. [2] PHIL 8001. Philosophical Readings in French. [Formerly PHIL 302] Selected major philosophical works or a selected bibliography about a major philosophical problem, read in French. A translation examination and appropriate reports. Prerequisite: Department approval. [3] PHIL 8002. Philosophical Readings in German. [Formerly PHIL 303] Selected major philosophical works or a selected bibliography on a major philosophical problem. A translation examination and appropriate reports. Prerequisite: Department approval. [3] PHIL 8003. Philosophical Readings in Classical Languages (Latin or Greek). [Formerly PHIL 304] Reading in Latin or Greek of selected major philosophical works or a selected bibliography on a major philosophical problem. A translation examination and appropriate reports. Prerequisite: department approval. [3] PHIL 8050. Readings in Philosophy. [Formerly PHIL 350] Selected major philosophical works or a selected bibliography about a major philosophical problem. Appropriate reports and examination. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PHIL 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PHIL 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PHIL 9000. Figures in Philosophy. [Formerly PHIL 353] Survey of figures in the history of philosophy. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PHIL 9010. History of Philosophy. [Formerly PHIL 351] Survey of figures and/or topics in history of philosophy. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PHIL 9020. Topics in Philosophy. [Formerly PHIL 352] Survey of topics in philosophy. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PHIL 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PHIL 399] [0-12]

PHYS 7007. Radiation Dose Assessment. [Formerly PHYS 307] Advanced physics of radiation interactions, shielding, and dosimetry. Gamma ray and neutron shielding; internal and external dosimetry methods and models; radiation protection regulations; environmental monitoring for radioactive materials; and response to radiation accidents and emergencies. Use of specialized computer programs. Prerequisite: 3125. [3] PHYS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly PHYS 369] [0-3] PHYS 8002. Learning to Teach, Teaching to Learn. [Formerly PHYS 302] Directed readings and discussion of topics in the teaching of science and engineering. Practical application of best teaching practices will be emphasized. Intended primarily for first-time teaching assistants and firstyear graduate students. [1] PHYS 8005. Mathematical Methods for Physicists. [Formerly PHYS 308] Linear spaces and operators; matrix algebra; differential equations; Green’s function; and complex analysis. May include variational calculus; perturbation methods; group theory. [3] PHYS 8010. Particle and Continuum Mechanics. [Formerly PHYS 305] Least action principle, Lagrange formalism, conservation laws, two-body problem, small-amplitude vibrations, non-inertial reference frames, canonical formalism, rigid body motion, continuous media, and field theory. Includes programming on scientific work stations. Prerequisite or corequisite: 8005. [3] PHYS 8020. Advanced Electrodynamics. [Formerly PHYS 329A] Electrostatics, potentials, boundary value problems, multipole moments, polarization, magnetostatics, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic wave propagation, dissipative and conductive media. Prerequisite or corequisite: 8005. [3] PHYS 8021. Advanced Electrodynamics. [Formerly PHYS 329B] Continuation of 8020. Covariant formulation, least-action principle and Lagrange density, energy momentum tensor, charges in external fields, radiation from accelerated changes, multipole radiation. Prerequisite: 8020. [3] PHYS 8030. Quantum Mechanics. [Formerly PHYS 330A] Wave and matrix forms of the theory, transformation theory, theory of angular momentum, systems of indistinguishable particles, approximate methods of solution, energy levels and scattering processes, and introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Prerequisite or corequisite: 8005. [3] PHYS 8031. Quantum Mechanics. [Formerly PHYS 330B] Continuation of 8030. Wave and matrix forms of the theory, transformation theory, theory of angular momentum, systems of indistinguishable particles, approximate methods of solution, energy levels and scattering processes, and introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: 8030. [3] PHYS 8040. Statistical Mechanics. [Formerly PHYS 341] Phase space, entropy and reversibility; ensemble theory; Fermi and Bose Statistics; systems of interacting particles; equation of state, critical phenomena, and phase transitions; pairing and superfluidity. [3] PHYS 8100. Selected Topics in Theoretical Physics. [Formerly PHYS 350] Topics such as Lie groups and symmetry principles in quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics of strong field, phenomenological modes of nuclear structure. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. [3] PHYS 8105. Special Topics in Experimental Physics. [Formerly PHYS 352A] Current topics in experimental physics relevant to research areas in the department, such as biological, condensed-matter, elementary-particle, nuclear, and optical physics, astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology. [Variable credit: 1-3] PHYS 8120. Biomolecular Physics. [Formerly PHYS 306] Physical principles applied to the structure and dynamics of biological molecules on the nanometer scale. Emphasis on the random Brownian motion that dominates at all length scales, and how bimolecular structures move, function, and interact amid chaotic thermal fluctuations. Selected measurement techniques. [3] PHYS 8124. Physical Measurements on Biological Systems. [Formerly PHYS 325] (Also listed as Biomedical Engineering 7425) A survey of the state of the art in quantitative physical measurement techniques applied

Graduate School / Courses to cellular or molecular physiology. Topics include the basis for generation, measurement, and control of the transmembrane potential; electrochemical instrumentation; optical spectroscopy and imaging; X-ray diffraction for determination of macromolecular structure; magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. One lecture and one recitation. [3] PHYS 8126. Theoretical and Experimental Systems Biology. [Formerly PHYS 326] An introduction to systems biology from the perspective of the emergence of complexity in toy models. Examination of simple biological subsystems, their reductionist and equivalent models, and the measurements required to specify model architecture and parameters. Serves as repeat credit for students who completed 352a section 1 or 240 section 1 in fall 2010 or fall 2011. [3] PHYS 8128. Biophysical Electrodynamics. [Formerly PHYS 356] The physics of bioelectric phenomena: the mechanisms that lead to the transmembrane resting and action potentials in nerve and muscle cells, the differential equations describing propagation of the nerve action potential, and the relationship between the transmembrane and extracellular potentials in nerve and cardiac muscle. [3] PHYS 8140. Nuclear and Heavy-Ion Theory. [Formerly PHYS 340A] Basic experimental facts and phenomenological models of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Quark-gluon plasma formation, signatures, and properties. Thermodynamics and hydrodynamical evolution of nuclear matter in extreme conditions. Prerequisite or corequisite: 8030 and 8040. [3] PHYS 8142. Nuclear and Heavy-Ion Theory. [Formerly PHYS 340B] Basic experimental facts and phenomenological models of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Quark-gluon plasma formation, signatures, and properties. Thermodynamics and hydrodynamical evolution of nuclear matter in extreme conditions. Prerequisite: 8030, 8040. [3] PHYS 8144. Experimental Nuclear Physics. [Formerly PHYS 303] Interactions of charged particles and photons in matter, coordinate transformations, statistics of nuclear processes, radiation detectors and analyzers, and selected topics in the design and application to experiments of particle accelerators and instrumentation used in nuclear and high energy physics. [3] PHYS 8150. Electromagnetic Spectroscopy. [Formerly PHYS 353] Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter as a function of photon energy and flux. Mechanisms of absorption, emission, and scattering of light within the visible, infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray wavelength regimes. Experimental and computational techniques and instrumentation for assessing and analyzing spectroscopic information. Prerequisite: 8030. [3] PHYS 8152. Condensed Matter Theory. [Formerly PHYS 354] Freeelectron theory of metals; elementary band theory of solids; quantum theory of the harmonic crystal; elementary excitations; optical properties of materials; electronic basis of magnetic interactions; density-functional theory; relativistic band structure; electronic localization and amorphous solids; two-dimensional phase transitions and superlattices. Consent of instructor required. [3] PHYS 8154. Nanoscale Condensed Matter. [Formerly PHYS 355] Evolution of elementary excitations; optical, magnetic, electronic, and mechanical characteristics of matter at nanometer length scales. Effects of one, two, and three dimensional electron confinement. Novel single-particle and collective properties of nanometer-size objects, including optical, magnetic, thermal, and transport phenomena. Prerequisite: 8030. [3] PHYS 8156. Surface Structure and Dynamics. [Formerly PHYS 359A] Geometrical and electronic structure of surfaces, including surface reconstruction, density of states, and effects of adsorbates, impurities, and electronic defects. Prerequisite: 8030-8031. [3] PHYS 8158. Interactions of Photons with Atoms, Molecules, and Solids. [Formerly PHYS 362] Quantum mechanical description of optical excitation, radiative and non-radiative relaxation, and dephasing in the two level approximation. Born-Oppenheimer approximation in molecular systems; interband and intraband transitions; and Maxwell-Bloch equations. Excitons, phonons, plasmons, and polaritons. Prerequisite: 8030 or CHEM 5360. [3] PHYS 8159. Experimental Nanoscale Fabrication and Characterization. [Formerly PHYS 366] Laboratory introduction to nanofabrication and characterization. Preparation for independent and original research in

125 nanotechnology and nanoscience. Review of nanomaterials, nanofabrication, characterization, nanoelectronics, and photonics. [3] PHYS 8160. General Relativity and Cosmology. [Formerly PHYS 360A] Einstein’s geometric theory of gravity in terms of tensor analysis and differential geometry. Einstein’s field equations are derived and solutions are discussed. Applications of general relativity are explored, including those to very strong gravitational fields, gravitational collapse, neutron stars, black holes, and quantum gravity. Topics in cosmology will include red shifts and cosmic distance relations, big bang cosmology, primordial nucleosynthesis, the very early universe and inflationary cosmologies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [3] PHYS 8161. General Relativity and Cosmology. [Formerly PHYS 360B] Continuation of 8160. Einstein’s geometric theory of gravity in terms of tensor analysis and differential geometry. Einstein’s field equations are derived and solutions are discussed. Applications of general relativity are explored, including those to very strong gravitational fields, gravitational collapse, neutron stars, black holes, and quantum gravity. Topics in cosmology will include red shifts and cosmic distance relations, big bang cosmology, primordial nucleosynthesis, the very early universe and inflationary cosmologies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [3] PHYS 8164. Many-Particle Quantum Theory. [Formerly PHYS 365] Nonrelativistic theory of atoms, solids, and nuclei; operators in second quantization, fermions and bosons, pair correlation function, interacting electron gas (metal), propagators, Wick’s theorem and Feynman diagrams, Hartree-Fock theory, shell model, pairing forces in nuclei, and superconductivity. Prerequisite: 8031. [3] PHYS 8170. Quantum Field Theory. [Formerly PHYS 370a] Relativistic quantum mechanics, canonical and path-integral field quantization, relativistic scattering theory, perturbation expansions; Feynman diagrams and radiative corrections, renormalization and regularization, with applications to quantum electrodynamics and non Abelian gauge theories. Prerequisite: 8010, 8020, 8030, and 8031. Corequisite: 8021. [3] PHYS 8171. Quantum Field Theory. [Formerly PHYS 370b] Relativistic quantum mechanics, canonical and path-integral field quantization, relativistic scattering theory, perturbation expansions; Feynman diagrams and radiative corrections, renormalization and regularization, with applications to quantum electrodynamics and non-Abelian gauge theories. Prerequisite: 8170. [3] PHYS 8190. Independent Study. [Formerly PHYS 390a] May be repeated for credit more than once, but students may earn only up to 3 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-3] PHYS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PHYS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PHYS 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PHYS 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] PHYS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PHYS 399] [0-13]

Political Science PSCI 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly PSCI 369] [0-12] PSCI 8300. Political Theory. [Formerly PSCI 300] Basic course in political theory. Surveys major texts in political theory, as well as central concepts and debates in the current literature. [3] PSCI 8301. Human Rights. [Formerly PSCI 301] Provides a historical and contemporary context for reflection on the meaning of human rights. Focus on the theory of human rights. [3] PSCI 8302. Democratic Theory. [Formerly PSCI 302] Growth of democratic theory in political philosophy and historical application. Connections between democratic theory and political institutions. [3] PSCI 8305. Feminist Social and Political Thought. [Formerly PSCI 305] Feminist political theorists, both as critics of the history of political thought and as authors of contemporary social and political theory. [3]

126 PSCI 8308. Studies in Historical Political Thought. [Formerly PSCI 308] Major texts and themes focusing on a single thinker, a school of thought, or a theme. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSCI 8309. Research in Political Theory. [Formerly PSCI 309] Supervised individual research and reading on selected topics in political theory. [3] PSCI 8310. Studies in Comparative Analysis. [Formerly PSCI 310] A survey of important literature and concepts in the field of comparative politics. [3] PSCI 8311. Regional and International Dimensions of European Integration. [Formerly PSCI 311] Theories of political and economic integration; key actors in the European Union (including national and subnational governments, EU institutions, interest groups, and citizens); principal EU policy arenas and issues (including economic and monetary union, the single market, the common agricultural policy, regional policies, joint foreign and security policies). [3] PSCI 8314. Comparative Political Parties. [Formerly PSCI 314] Origin of political parties, party organizations and ideologies, party systems, democratic representation. [3] PSCI 8315. Research in Latin American Politics. [Formerly PSCI 315] Recurring and novel topics in Latin American politics, such as the relation between economic growth and political regimes, the role of the Church, human rights, and U.S. foreign policy. Particular issues vary from semester to semester. [3] PSCI 8317. The Political Economy of Development. [Formerly PSCI 317] The causes of international and national inequalities in the distribution of wealth. Factors related to economic development and tied to domestic and international income distribution, such as geography, natural resources, culture, democracy, and dependency. Examples from throughout the world, especially Asia and Latin America. [3] PSCI 8319. Research in Comparative Analysis. [Formerly PSCI 319] Supervised individual research and reading on selected topics in comparative politics. [3] PSCI 8320. International Politics. [Formerly PSCI 320] Basic course in international politics. Surveys major subfields, focusing on concepts and theories that orient research—e.g., balance of power, interdependence, imperialism, decision-making, crisis-behavior. [3] PSCI 8321. International Conflict: Theories and Methods. [Formerly PSCI 321] Analysis of international conflict and war. [3] PSCI 8328. Ideas and International Security. [Formerly PSCI 328] Role of collectively-held meanings and shared ideas (identity, norms, beliefs, values) in national security and political behavior. Texts from political science, economics, philosophy, military strategy and history, and sociology. Real world applications include perceptions of war and war outcomes, security strategy formulation, and impact of identity on international relations. [3]

vanderbilt university PSCI 8338. Comparative Representations and Accountability. [Formerly PSCI 338] Political representation and democratic accountability in advanced industrial societies and in developing democracies. [3] PSCI 8340. Gender, Institutions, Behavior. [Formerly PSCI 340] Empirical research on gender, political institutions, elite and citizen behaviors. [3] PSCI 8355. Research Design. [Formerly PSCI 355] Introduction to Analysis of Tables, Measures of Association, OLS regression. Coverage of research design. Experimental design, survey research, elite interviewing, in-depth interviewing, aggregate data, field research, content analysis, case studies, and small-n analysis. Emphasis on concept formation and measurement. [3] PSCI 8356. Statistics for Political Research I. [Formerly PSCI 356] Introduction to statistical analysis with applications in political science, statistical distributions, statistical inference, bivariate and multiple regression, logit, and probit. [3] PSCI 8357. Statistics for Political Research II. [Formerly PSCI 357] Advanced topics in statistical analysis with research applications in maximum likelihood estimation, logit and probit analysis, simultaneous equation models, generalized least squares, and introductory time series concepts. [3] PSCI 8358. Topics in Political Methodology. [Formerly PSCI 358] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSCI 8359. Introduction to Formal Theory and Modeling. [Formerly PSCI 359] Social choice and game theory. Instability and disequilibria of group decisions under different decision-making rules. Theoretical model building as a way to generate hypotheses. Rules in decision making, manipulability of outcomes, bargaining strategies and the evolution of cooperation. [3] PSCI 8360. Topics in Formal Theory and Modeling. [Formerly PSCI 360] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSCI 8361. Writing Proposals and Securing Grants in the Empirical Social Sciences. [Formerly PSCI 361] [3] PSCI 8370. Topics in Political Science. [Formerly PSCI 370] An inquiry into selected topics. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSCI 8901. Independent Study. [Formerly PSCI 390A] [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] PSCI 8902. Independent Study. [Formerly PSCI 390B] [Variable credit: 1-3 each semester] PSCI 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PSCI 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

PSCI 8329. Research in International Politics. [Formerly PSCI 329] Supervised individual research and reading on selected topics in international politics. [3]

PSCI 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PSCI 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0]

PSCI 8330. Studies in American Politics. [Formerly PSCI 330] A survey of important literature and concepts in the field of American politics. [3]

PSCI 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PSCI 399] [0-12]

PSCI 8332. Electoral Behavior and Public Opinion. [Formerly PSCI 332] Theories of voting and behavior of candidates in American elections; models of electoral change; the development and dynamics of public opinion. Effects of elections and public opinion on policy and governmental action. [3]

Portuguese

PSCI 8334. Political Psychology. [Formerly PSCI 334] The psychological roots of individual choice and judgment in politics. Cognitive and affective theories of political decision-making. Survey responses, political identity, and explicit or implicit attitudes. [3] PSCI 8335. Politics of American Legislation. [Formerly PSCI 335] The structure and function of American legislative institutions, especially Congress, and their relation to the wider setting. [3]

PORT 6010. Literary Analysis and Theory. [Formerly PORT 301] (Also listed as Spanish 6010) Methods of literary analysis for the teaching of literature. The systematic application of contemporary theories—structuralist and poststructuralist—in the analysis of poetry and narrative. [3] PORT 6020. Ibero-Romance Philology. [Formerly PORT 302] (Also listed as Spanish 6020) Study of the evolution of the languages and dialects of the Iberian Peninsula. Analysis of selected linguistic developments and readings from medieval texts. [3] PORT 6030. Foreign Language Learning and Teaching. [Formerly PORT 310] (Also listed as Spanish 6030) Principles and practices of teaching a second language with concentration on recent interactive and communicative

Graduate School / Courses models of foreign language instruction. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project are expected. Required of all entering teaching assistants. [3] PORT 7050. Introduction to Latin American Colonial Studies. [Formerly PORT 314] (Also listed as Spanish 7050) Provides a panoramic introduction to the canonical works of the colonial period from “discovery” to “independence,” as well as an overview of the theoretical debates in colonial studies within the Latin American context. Topics include the construction and reshaping of identities and otherness through various stages of Latin American cultural history, the emergence of what has been called the American consciousness during the “New World Baroque,” and the discourses of “independence” and early nation building. [3] PORT 7070. Spanish American and Brazilian Literature I. [Formerly PORT 341] (Also listed as Spanish 7070) Literature in a comparative perspective: from the conquests to the end of the nineteenth century. Authors may include Sor Juana, Matos, Alencar, Assis, and Carrasquilla. [3] PORT 7071. Spanish American and Brazilian Literature II. [Formerly PORT 342] Literature in a comparative perspective, twentieth century to the present. Texts may include Os Sertões, La Guerra del Fin del Mundo, Ficciones, Perto do Coração Selvagem, and Água Viva. [3] PORT 8200. Seminar: Studies in Colonial Literature. [Formerly PORT 338] (Also listed as Spanish 8200) May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PORT 8210. Seminar: Hispanic American Essay. [Formerly PORT 340] (Also listed as Spanish 8210) May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PORT 8400. Seminar: Studies in Inter-American Literature. [Formerly PORT 374] (Also listed as Spanish 8400) Comparative approaches to literary texts from such New World cultures as Brazil, Spanish America, the United States, the Caribbean, and Canada (both its French and English traditions). Fluency in Spanish and/or Portuguese required; reading competency in English and French. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PORT 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PORT 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PORT 9300. Comparative Methodology. [Formerly PORT 351] (Also listed as Spanish 9300) Comparative methodology of the literatures of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking world; emphasis on issues of theme, genre, period and movement, translation, and the relationship of literary scholarship to other humanistic endeavors, such as music, film, philosophy, painting, and the plastic arts. [3] PORT 9520. Seminar: Studies in Contemporary Literature of the Portuguese-Speaking World. [Formerly PORT 385] Variable topics to be announced. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PORT 9670. Special Studies in Brazilian Literature. [Formerly PORT 398] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 6 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [1-6] PORT 9995. Half-time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PORT 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a half-time effort to dissertation research. [0] PORT 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PORT 399] [0-12]

Psychology (A&S) PSY 5780. The Visual System. [Formerly PSY 336] (Also listed as Cell and Developmental Biology 8347 and Neuroscience 8347) An interdisciplinary approach to how humans see and interpret their visual environment. Topics include the structure of the eye and brain (including optics), the

127 physiology of individual cells and groups of cells, machine vision and models of visual function, visual attention, and mechanisms of complex visual perception. Lectures by faculty from Psychology, Engineering, and Cell and Developmental Biology. Graduate students attend one hour discussion section per week, in addition to lecture, and turn in a more extensive paper than undergraduates. [3] PSY 6104. Quantitative Methods and Experimental Design. [Formerly PSY 304b] Principles and methods for the design and analysis of experiments and for the investigation of individual differences. Principles of experimental design and descriptive and inferential statistics. [3] PSY 6300. Research Seminar. [Formerly PSY 300a] [Variable credit: 1-4] PSY 6310. Advanced General Psychology. [Formerly PSY 301a] Physiological psychology, perception and sensation, learning, complex processes, developmental, personality, social psychology, and psychopathology. Participation in various sections determined by each student’s background and career interests. [3] PSY 6370. Independent Study. [Formerly PSY 370] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. [1-6] PSY 7031. Advanced Investigational Techniques. [Formerly PSY 331a] A non-thesis research project. [0-6] PSY 7032. Advanced Investigational Techniques. [Formerly PSY 331B] A non-thesis research project. [0-6] PSY 7033. Second-Year Research. [Formerly PSY 365] Second-year research project in psychological sciences. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 12 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [0-12] PSY 7034. Advanced Research in Psychological Sciences. [Formerly PSY 367] Advanced research project in psychological sciences leading to the dissertation proposal. May be repeated for credit. [0-12] PSY 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly PSY 369] [0-12] PSY 8120. Categorical Data Analysis. [Formerly PSY 320] Analysis of categorical data. Statistical analysis of binary, nominal, ordinal, and count data from the perspective of generalized linear models. Logistic and Poisson regression models. Population-averaged and subject-specific approaches to repeated measures. Prerequisite: 6104, 8310, or equivalents. [3] PSY 8216. Brain Imaging Methods. [Formerly PSY 316] Principles and methods used in human neuroimaging, with emphasis on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). [3] PSY 8218. Computational Modeling. [Formerly PSY 318] Developing and testing computational models of human cognition and brain function. How to implement models, recognize good modeling, fit models to data, evaluate models, contrast competing models, develop and test new models. Discussion of Monte Carlo simulations, statistical numeric methods, and high-performance computing. [3] PSY 8219. Scientific Computing for Psychological and Brain Science. [Formerly PSY 319] Computer programming, numerical and computational methods, and high performance computing applied to psychological and brain sciences, such as experimental control, automated data analysis, and model simulation. Prerequisite: one semester of introductory computer programming. [3] PSY 8305. Linear and Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models. [Formerly PSY 305] The analysis of data from hierarchical and multilevel designs. Theory and computational methods, specification and testing of fixed effects, random effects and residuals, assessment of fit, graphical examination, applications to repeated measures data, and missing data models. Prerequisite: 6401 or equivalent. [3] PSY 8310. Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. [Formerly PSY 310] Major methodological and quantitative issues in clinical psychology, including statistical significance testing and its alternatives; threats to internal and external validity; psychometric theory; quantitative approaches to classification; behavioral, genetic, and psychophysiological methods; animal models; analysis of change, mediation, and moderation. [3]

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vanderbilt university

PSY 8312. Psychological Assessment. [Formerly PSY 312] Major techniques of psychological assessment, with an emphasis on the rationale, administration, and interpretation of measures assessing personality and psychopathology. [3]

PSY 8758. Seminar in Neuroscience. [Formerly PSY 358] Integration of the subareas of neuroscience. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may earn only up to 2 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [0-2]

PSY 8315. Theories of Psychotherapy. [Formerly PSY 315] Advanced study on the major principles, concepts, techniques, and issues relevant to the theory and practice of psychotherapy. Experience in supervised clinical settings or observation of clinical sessions is provided to further understanding of psychotherapeutic processes. [3]

PSY 8906. Evolutionary Psychology. [Formerly PSY 306] Interdisciplinary analysis of the origins of mind, with particular emphasis on the mind/ brain as a product of biological evolution. [3]

PSY 8323. Practicum in Psychological Assessment. [Formerly PSY 323] [Variable credit: 1-5 each semester] PSY 8324. Practicum in Psychotherapy. [Formerly PSY 324] [Variable credit: 1-5 each semester] PSY 8325. Advanced Standing in Psychological Assessment. [Formerly PSY 325] [Variable credit: 1-5 each semester] PSY 8326. Advanced Standing in Psychotherapy. [Formerly PSY 326] [Variable credit: 1-5 each semester] PSY 8352. Seminar: Clinical Psychology. [Formerly PSY 352] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

PSY 8942. Seminar: Social. [Formerly PSY 342] In-depth investigation of a specialized topic in Social Psychology. The topic might cover any and all aspects of social psychology, emphasize intra-personal and/or extra-personal perspectives, and focus on theoretical and/or experimental approaches. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSY 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PSY 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PSY 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PSY 399] [0-12]

Psychology and Human Development (GS)

PSY 8353. Professional Ethics in Clinical Psychology. [Formerly PSY 353] Issues and practical applications of ethical principles in clinical and research settings. Cultural context for clinical and ethical issues. [3]

PSY-GS 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly PSY-GS 369] Open only to candidates for the Master of Science degree engaged in thesis research and writing. Consent of major professor required. [Variable credit: 1-6]

PSY 8354. Clinical Neuropsychology. [Formerly PSY 354] Cognitive and behavioral disorders associated with brain injury and disease. Methods of neuropsychological assessment. Prerequisite: PSY-GS 8300 or permission of instructor. [3]

PSY-GS 8100. Behavioral Pediatrics and Child Health Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 336] Behavioral pediatrics and child health psychology for advanced predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees. Topics include the scope and definition of behavioral pediatrics, measurement of child behavior, children’s health beliefs and understanding of illness, theories of psychosomatic illness, immunologic and endocrinologic aspects of stress, compliance, psychological effects of physical illness, families’ responses to stress, and psychological intervention strategies. [3]

PSY 8355. Diversity and Differentness. [Formerly PSY 355] Theory, issues, and practical application of cultural sensitivity and competency in research and clinical settings. [1-3] PSY 8360. Seminar in Clinical Science. [Formerly PSY 360] Integration of the subareas of clinical science. Includes history and systems of psychology as related to clinical science, ethical issues, and problems encountered in professional psychology. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may earn only up to 2 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [0-2] PSY 8398. Internship. [Formerly PSY 398] [0] PSY 8503. Models of Human Memory. [Formerly PSY 303] Survey of contemporary models of human memory, especially formal models. Methods of fitting models to data will be discussed. Prerequisite: graduate course on cognition. [3] PSY 8543. Seminar: Perception. [Formerly PSY 343] In-depth discussion and exploration of a specialized topic in Perception. The topic can cover any and all aspects of perception, from the molecular neurobiology of retinal processing to the phenomenology of consciousness, and can emphasize particular methodological approaches (e.g. single-cell recording, neuroimaging). May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSY 8551. Seminar: Cognitive Psychology. [Formerly PSY 351] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSY 8557. Seminar in Cognitive Science. [Formerly PSY 357] Integration of the subareas of cognitive science. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may earn only up to 2 credit hours per semester of enrollment. [0-2] PSY 8744. Seminar: Neuroscience. [Formerly PSY 344] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] PSY 8750. Scientific Writing in Psychology and Neuroscience. [Formerly PSY 350] Journal articles, grants, scientific papers, press releases, and dissertations. Revising and editing. [3]

PSY-GS 8120. Psychological Intervention with Children. [Formerly PSY-GS 386] Various intervention approaches with children, including parent training, behavior therapy, group therapy, psychopharmacological intervention, individual psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral intervention, psychoanalytic play therapy, and residential treatment. [3] PSY-GS 8200. Psychopathology. [Formerly PSY-GS 340] Focuses on descriptive, epidemiological, and casual psychopathology research, with an emphasis on developmental and cultural influences. The course goal is to increase students’ ability to think creatively and critically about psychopathology research and to conduct their own psychopathology-related research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor [3] PSY-GS 8300. Psychological Assessment. [Formerly PSY-GS 343] A general introduction to clinical assessment, with a particular emphasis on children. The major purpose is to familiarize students with the theoretical issues and psychometric properties of several different methods of assessment including objective and projective personality measures, behavior checklists, behavioral observation, and clinical interviews. Required before taking practica. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. [3] PSY-GS 8350. Individual Differences. [Formerly PSY-GS 318] Focuses on traditional concepts and findings in the area of individual differences broadly defined. The psychological content will primarily involve abilities, interests, and personality; methodological issues encountered in assessing these attributes will be stressed throughout; and particular attention will be devoted to how these concepts can enhance research programs in both applied and theoretical areas. The specific variables discussed within each domain will be restricted to those that have empirically “panned out” (viz., variables that are reliable and related to meaningful behaviors and outcomes that psychologists are interested in predicting and better understanding), rather than theoretical constructs and measures whose external validity is unknown. [3] PSY-GS 8360. Human Cognition. [Formerly PSY-GS 352] Current research and theory in cognitive psychology. Emphasis on memory, perception, and language. Some applications of cognitive theories are explored. [3]

Graduate School / Courses PSY-GS 8400. Developmental Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 360] Central issues, theories, and methods. [3] PSY-GS 8410. Advanced Seminar in Educational Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 339] May be repeated with change of topic. [Variable credit: 1-3] PSY-GS 8420. Advanced Seminar in Clinical Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 349] May be repeated with change of topic. [3] PSY-GS 8430. Advanced Seminar: Cognitive Studies. [Formerly PSYGS 353] Special topics in cognitive studies. May be repeated with change of topic. [3] PSY-GS 8440. Seminar in Behavioral Biology. [Formerly PSY-GS 357] Selected topics in behavioral biology—e.g., ethology. Content varies according to student needs and interests. May be repeated. [3] PSY-GS 8450. Seminar in Cognitive Development. [Formerly PSY-GS 361] Major theoretical and conceptual issues in cognitive development. Emphasis in current research topics like memory development, reading, conceptual development, semantic development, problem solving, and reasoning. Recommended background: 352P and/or 8400 [3] PSY-GS 8460. Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 368] May be repeated with a change of topic. [3] PSY-GS 8470. Cognitive Science to the Classroom. [Formerly PSY-GS 362] This course focuses on the interplay between basic research in cognitive science and educational innovation. There is a major push to design learning environments that are based on cognitive science research and theory and to rigorously evaluate these environments. How do we go about doing this? We will use a case study approach of successful educational innovations, the basic research behind them, and their impact on basic research in turn. This will allow us to develop a framework for developing and evaluating educational innovations. [3] PSY-GS 8480. Educational Neuroscience. [Formerly PSY-GS 367] Seminar that examines the interdisciplinary intersection between cognitive neuroscience investigations of the development of brain structure and function and studies of cognitive development relevant to education. Topics including the emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to understanding the typical and atypical development of domain specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as the neural basis of domain general processes crucial for educational success such as working memory, motivation, attention, and social cognition. [3] PSY-GS 8500. Special Topics in Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 396] May be repeated with change of topic. [Variable credit: 1-4] PSY-GS 8600. Seminar in Social and Personality Development. [Formerly PSY-GS 363] Development of personality and social processes, with emphasis on methods of inquiry. Trait theory, socialization processes, origins of gender differences, cultural differences in childbearing practices, experimental and observational methods in developmental research, and development of motivational systems. [3] PSY-GS 8690. Cognitive Science of Learning and Development Research Forum. [Formerly PSY-GS 365] The Cognitive Science of Learning and Development Research Forum serves as a venue for delivering and hosting research presentations relevant to cognitive science, learning, and development hosted by graduate students and faculty within the Psychological Sciences program, as well as researchers from other departments and universities. May be repeated for credit. This is a 1-credit-hour, year-long course. Students register for 0 credit hours in the fall and 1 credit hour in the spring. PSY-GS 8810. Methods of Psychological Research. [Formerly PSYGS 301] Methods for collecting and analyzing empirical information about behavior. Serves as a base upon which to build research competence through more advanced courses and research apprenticeships. [3] PSY-GS 8815. Advanced Research Methods in Developmental Psychology. [Formerly PSY-GS 303] Major empirical approaches to the study of development. Emphasis on human behavioral development, although elements from comparative psychology and biomedical sciences included. [3] (Offered by independent study)

129 PSY-GS 8820. Program Evaluation. [Formerly PSY-GS 315] The evaluation of social programs. The design of evaluations to produce both theoretically meaningful and practical information about the program and its effectiveness. Such topics as needs assessment, monitoring, impact assessment, and cost/effectiveness evaluations. Covers programs in education, health, and human services. [3] PSY-GS 8850. Advanced Seminar in Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation. [Formerly PSY-GS 319] Special topics in measurement, statistics, and program evaluation. May be repeated with change of topic. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. [3] PSY-GS 8855. Quantitative Methods Forum. [Formerly PSY-GS 300] The Forum serves as a venue for delivering and hosting methodological research presentations by graduate students and faculty within the Quantitative Methods program, as well as researchers from other departments. Periodically, the Forum will also provide workshops on methodological topics, feature panels on professional development topics, and host invited talks by visiting scholars. May be repeated for credit. [0-1] PSY-GS 8858. Introduction to Statistical Inference. [Formerly PSY-GS 309] Introduction to statistical methods for graduate students in education and psychology with minimal undergraduate statistical background. The course will present descriptive and inferential methods for assessing distributional shape, central tendency, variability, and association. An introduction to statistical computing with popular general purpose statistical computer programs will be provided. [3] PSY-GS 8861. Statistical Inference. [Formerly PSY-GS 310] Introductory course designed to familiarize doctoral students with the principles and procedures of statistical inference and to prepare them for more advanced work in research design and analysis. [3] PSY-GS 8864. Experimental Design. [Formerly PSY-GS 311] Application of statistical concepts and inferential techniques to the design and analysis of experiments in the behavioral sciences. Advanced procedures for analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. Prerequisite: 8861 or equivalent. [3] PSY-GS 8867. Multivariate Statistics. [Formerly PSY-GS 312] Psychological measurement theory, along with correlational and regression analysis techniques essential to the development of that theory. Prerequisite: 8861 or equivalent. [3] PSY-GS 8870. Correlation and Regression. [Formerly PSY-GS 313] Fundamental concepts in bivariate and multiple regression and correlation techniques. Emphasizes the theory and assumptions underlying OLS and logistic regression, computational procedures, and interpretation of results. Specific applications include (1) coverage of the full range of correlation indices; (2) a range of regression strategies (e.g., reduced-form regression, path analysis, ordered and unordered step-wise inclusion); (3) statistical power; (4) regression diagnostics; (5) nonlinear regression and linearizing transformations; (6) testing interactions; and (7) conditions for causal analysis and analysis of change. [3] PSY-GS 8873. Structural Equation Modeling. [Formerly PSY-GS 314] This course introduces the basic principles of path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and latent variable structural modeling, which constitute a powerful set of statistical tools for examining correlational, observational, and even experimental data in the social sciences. Computer techniques for conducting these analyses will also be taught: the LISREL program in particular, but AMOS will also be introduced. [3] PSY-GS 8876. Psychological Measurement. [Formerly PSY-GS 317] Fundamental concepts, methods, and principles of psychological measurement. Particular attention will be devoted to reliability and validity issues underlying psychometric theory, and how psychometric theory relates to the assessment of individual differences or human variation more generally. Topics will include multiple regression, factor analysis, and item response theory. [3] PSY-GS 8879. Factor Analysis. [Formerly PSY-GS 320] This course covers primarily Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA), which is extensively used in psychology, education, medicine, and management. The course covers the theory behind factor analysis, hands-on application to data, exposure to uses of factor analysis in the applied literature, and instruction in popular EFA software. Key topics include model specification, fit and evaluation,

130 rotation methods, questionnaire development, sample size and power issues, and extensions to confirmatory factor models. [3] PSY-GS 8880. Introduction to Item Response Theory. [Formerly PSYGS 326] In this course, students are introduced to the basic concepts of educational and psychological measurement, classical test theory (CTT), and item response theory (IRT). These concepts will be taught with the practice by illustrating the construction of instruments using the ‘Four Building Blocks’ approach (Wilson, 2005) and investigating their measurement properties (e.g., validity and reliability). This class will present both the ‘how to’ and the ‘why’ of IRT. The primary objective of the course is to sharpen the skill, sophistication, and intuition of the student in the interpretation of educational and psychological test data, and in the construction and use of tests as instruments of educational and psychological theory and as tools in the practical problems of selection, evaluation, and guidance in the light of IRT. [3] PSY-GS 8881. Item Response Theory II. [Formerly PSY-GS 318] Item Response Theory (IRT) II covers IRT models commonly used in education and psychology and their parameter estimation techniques using currently available software. This course will focus on developing a conceptual understanding of the mathematical concepts underlying the IRT models in so far as this is necessary for appropriate use of IRT models. In addition, the class covers topics in applications of IRT including equating/linking (as preliminary procedures for complex IRT models) and differential item functioning (DIF) analysis. [3] PSY-GS 8882. Multilevel Modeling. [Formerly PSY-GS 321] This course covers multilevel (or hierarchical linear) modeling, which is used extensively in psychology, education, sociology, and medical research. The course covers the theory behind multilevel modeling, hands-on application to data, exposure to uses of multilevel modeling in the applied literature, and instruction in popular multilevel modeling software. Key topics include random effects ANOVA, random slopes, cross-level interactions, multivariate and multi-group models, centering, growth models, discrete outcomes, and dealing with cross-classified data. [3] PSY-GS 8885. Applied Latent Class and Mixture Modeling. [Formerly PSY-GS 323] Often social science and educational researchers hypothesize that there are unobserved groups—or latent classes—of persons who show different behavioral patterns, or different patterns of change over time. This course covers mixture modeling, a statistical approach that allows assessment of the number and size of classes, as well as class homogeneity or heterogeneity. Longitudinal mixture models are also covered, which allow classes to transition between states at different rates and/or have different functional forms of change. [3] PSY-GS 8888. Latent Growth Curve Modeling. [Formerly PSY-GS 322] The analysis of longitudinal data (repeated measurements on the same people over time) is central for evaluating many theories in social science and educational research. This applied course will focus on one flexible and powerful approach for analyzing within-individual change over time, and between-individual differences in change: the latent growth curve model. Emphasis will be placed on attaining a solid understanding of the statistical model, applications to real data, and interpretation of results. [3] PSY-GS 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly PSY-GS 379] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12] PSY-GS 9950. Clinical Applications and Practicum I. [Formerly PSYGS 390] This two-semester sequence is required for doctoral students in clinical psychology. The sequence involves applications of theoretical principles of behavior change in clinical settings. Didactic meetings will integrate the empirical and theoretical literatures with problems in clinical application. Students will participate in clinical practice (assessment and intervention) under program faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Psychopathology, clinical assessment, and intervention, as well as consent of instructor. [1-3] PSY-GS 9951. Clinical Applications and Practicum II. [Formerly PSYGS 391] This two-semester sequence is required for doctoral students in clinical psychology. The sequence involves advanced application of theoretical principles of behavior change in clinical settings. Students will participate in clinical practice (assessment and intervention) under the joint supervision of program faculty and adjunct faculty in community settings. Prerequisite: 9950 [1-3]

vanderbilt university PSY-GS 9960. Readings and Research in Psychology. [Formerly PSYGS 397] Individual programs of reading or empirical research in psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty supervisor. May be repeated. [Variable credit: 1-3] PSY-GS 9980. Clinical Psychology Internship. [Formerly PSY-GS 392] Required of all Ph.D. students in the clinical program. Specialty rotations, generalized training, didactic instruction, and supervised research are offered during one full year of clinical experience in an academic clinical setting or similar internship facility accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). Credit hours: students register for zero hours to reflect full-time involvement in supervised clinical psychology internship. Grading is on a Pass/Fail basis. [0] PSY-GS 9995. Half-Time Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PSYGS 3995] For students who have completed 72 hours and devote a halftime effort to dissertation research. [0]. PSY-GS 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly PSY-GS 399]

Psychology and Human Development (Peabody) PSY-PC 7040. Psychological Foundations of Education. [Formerly PSY-GS 334] (Also listed as Education 6010) Psychological theories and research as related to the design and practice of education. Specific consideration of the developmental bases of teaching, learning, and student performance (early childhood through adult); individual differences in education with particular reference to socioeconomic status, disabling conditions, learning style, and gender; evaluation of learning; classroom and organizational influences on school effectiveness; family-school relations. [3]

Religion REL 2502. Aspects of World Religiosity. An introduction to the diverse modes and manners of world religiosity and to their study. Explores some of the primary forms of human religious practice through encounters with a variety of primary and secondary sources drawn from around the world. The student will come to appreciate the variety and complexity by which homo religiosus (the human defined by religiosity) makes it through the day (and night). [3] REL 2567. Music and Religion. An investigation into the many ways in which religion and music contribute to community formation throughout the world. Topics include music’s interdependent relationship with religious texts, religious performance, trance, sacrifice, and folk origins. [3] REL 2704. Modern European Christianity. Institutional and intellectual developments in European Christianity between the mid-seventeenth and the twentieth centuries. Major personalities and movements of this period. Political, social, cultural, and philosophical developments that influenced Christian existence during this time. [3] REL 2708. Sacred Time/Christian Liturgy. The course examines the construction of the Christian calendar (daily hours, weekly patterns, seasons, and special occasions) with attention devoted to comparative sacred cycles in other ancient religions. Students will explore the structure as well as the theory of consecrated time and its role in structuring and enacting religious practices as well as sacred story. The differences among various Christian groups will be examined, as well as the theological, social, and cultural distinctions that may explain, in part, such distinctions. [3] REL 2709. Images of God in Visual Art. Considers the way visual artists of past and present have indicated and provided analogies for the Divine reality. Issues will include various religious perspectives on idolatry and iconoclasm, the place of censorship and the problems of transgressive art, and the role of art in Christian practices. [3] REL 2759. Theology of Proclamation. Reflection on the phenomena of public worship and forms of speaking the gospel. Theological issues in Christian worship; theological issues in the sacraments; the hermeneutic problem as a problem for preaching; theological understandings of proclamation. [3] REL 2814. Religion and Society. Examination of religion as a social phenomenon. Explores the writings of classical sociologists (especially Marx,

Graduate School / Courses Weber, and Durkheim). Readings in the areas of social theory, cultural analysis, and sociology of religion. Focus on the use of sociological insights toward understanding the relation between religion and Western social life. [3] REL 2816. Early Christian Political Thought. What are the roots of contemporary Christian understandings of the state and political life? How were early justifications of the divine right of kings maintained and challenged by Christian writers? Can the origins of democracy and human rights be traced back to early and medieval Christian thinkers? In what ways are our views of political violence formed by early traditions? Through a careful examination of some of the widely read (e.g. Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin) and lesser known (e.g. John of Salisbury, Grotius) Christian political thinkers, we will trace the development of Christian political thought from the patristic to reformation periods. [3] REL 3014. Advanced Homiletic Problems. Advanced seminar in which selected homiletic problems are addressed through an analysis of students’ sermons. Hermeneutic approach to Hebrew scripture, preaching of eschatological texts, addressing of social issues. [3] REL 3025. Preaching and Social Justice. This seminar and preaching practicum explores the impact of preaching and worship on personal and social transformation. The course takes as its starting point the “brokenness” (i.e., suffering and injustice) that affects individuals and communities. Through readings, seminar discussions, sermons, and worship planning, students will receive resources for constructing a more effective ministry of healing and social transformation. [3] REL 3035. Paul and Politics. Paul formed his gospel in the cauldron of an apocalyptic theology that mingled religion and politics. This volatile mixture produced a provocative counter-claim to Roman imperial culture. This seminar will explore Paul’s responses to pressing religious and political issues of his time such as Roman imperialism, slavery, the role of women, ethnic reconciliation, and sexual identity. Additionally, the seminar will examine the enduring role of Paul’s letters in contemporary conversations around cultural and political issues. [3] REL 3038. Preaching in the Postmodern Context. Students will consider what it means to preach in a context in which the authority of the preacher and the authorities for preaching (scripture, reason, experience, tradition) become de-centered. The class will investigate the nature of cultural and intellectual postmodernism in relation to the “turn to the listener” in recent homiletics, and the role of technology, dialogue, participation, drama, collaboration, and testimony in preaching. [3] REL 3045. Narrative, Communication, and Religious Identity. Within the religious imagination, mythical, historical, traditional, communal, ritual, homiletical, and personal narratives work together to shape communal and personal identities. This course investigates the ways in which narrative functions, especially in local religious communities, to shape, subvert, and transform human identities. [3] REL 3055. Families: Theory and Practice. Course focusing on practical concerns and theoretical understandings of current family issues and strategic solutions in theology, the human sciences, and ministry. [3] REL 3058. Multicultural Pastoral Care and Counseling. Multicultural pastoral care and counseling through a consideration of the biases of traditional western approaches to counseling and the issues for a pluralistic world. [3] REL 3064. Theories of Human Development. This course provides a general introduction to human development across the lifespan and is a survey of developmental processes that influence the growth of the physical, intellectual, socio-emotional and spiritual aspects of the person and the family. It includes a holistic approach to developmental changes that integrates theories, research, and application. Participants are encouraged to formulate a personal philosophy of what constitutes optimum growth and development. Some consideration is also given to practical implications (for example, for child-rearing and educational practices). [3] REL 3073. Pastoral Theology: Histories and Horizons. It is important for pastoral and practical theologians to situate themselves historically, theoretically, and theologically in the field. This course will provide an overview of the history of pastoral theology from Augustine to the present, and ask, What is the operative theological anthropology? How is illness/healing understood?

131 What practices were designed to address the “ills”? Who were the detractors of the theories and practices, both internal and external? Where is the field now, and where does it appear to be headed? Answering these questions will help students broaden their understanding of themes and issues in the field and to situate themselves in the conversation. [3] REL 3074. Pastoral Theology: Issues and Methods. A study of methods and topics in pastoral theology, focusing on the history of the field, the development of its procedures and subject matter, and a variety of contemporary approaches, problems, and revisions. [3] REL 3081. Christian Spirituality and Pastoral Care. An exploration into the history and contemporary literature on spirituality within the pastoral care tradition. Topics include the differentiation between spiritual direction and pastoral care; the history of the cure/care of souls; feminist spirituality, African American spirituality, and spirituality from the margins. [3] REL 3084. Readings in Heinz Kohut and Self-Psychology. Investigates the writings on self-psychology of theorist and analyst Heinz Kohut with attention to the implications of his ideas about the formation and fragmentation of the self for individual health and development,cultural context, psychotherapy, and pastoral care and counseling. Evaluation of the theory in conversation with various critical theological perspectives. [3] REL 3109. Exilic Prophecy. A study of Hebrew prophecy from the seventh and sixth centuries B.C.E., with emphasis on the prophets Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Deutero-Isaiah. The work, literature, and thought associated with these great prophets are studied against the background of the events surrounding the Babylonian exile. [3] REL 3111. The Pentateuch. A study of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible as the key for understanding Israelite history and theology and as the base point for some of the most critical questions in the study of biblical literature. [3] REL 3112. Apocalyptic. A study of the early Jewish and Christian apocalyptic movements and literature. [3] REL 3113. The Wisdom Literature in the Ancient Near East. Israel’s wisdom corpus (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Sirach, Wisdom of Solomon) in light of comparable literature from Egypt and Mesopotamia. Attention to the structure of wisdom thought, to literary forms, and to traditions. [3] REL 3115. The Psalms. A study of the Book of Psalms in general, along with readings of selected Psalms in Hebrew. The course will include an analysis of the types and setting of the Psalms in the life of Israel, a discussion of the religion of the poems and their poetic form, and a survey of modern scholarship in the area. [3] REL 3117. The Ethics of Ancient Israel. A descriptive study of the ethics of Israel, seeking to understand the effect of religion and history on the Israelites’ effort to order their society and to influence moral behavior. Views of humanity, the relationship between the individual and the community, the place of politics in establishing justice, the treatment of socially vulnerable persons, and other topics. Connections drawn to such theological concepts as covenant, righteousness, and wholeness. [3] REL 3124. Esther and Ruth. Explores the two books in the Hebrew Bible named for women. Examines Hebrew narrative technique and feminist and postmodern criticism. [3] REL 3127. Cultures of Ancient Near East. A consideration of the cultural and religious milieus of the third and second millennia B.C.E., as they shed light on Biblical origins. [3] REL 3128. Jewish Messianism. A study of messianism and messianic movements in Jewish history in the common era, including contemporary manifestations in Europe, Israel, and North America. [3] REL 3129. Book of Judges. General exegesis of the Book of Judges, concentrating on its major themes, purpose, and narrative techniques. If necessary, additional time may be allotted for those requiring extra work in Hebrew. [3] REL 3130. Book of Jeremiah. General exegesis of the Book of Jeremiah, concentrating on its structure, major themes, purpose, and the history of ancient Judah as it is embedded in the book. [3]

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REL 3131. Voices of Women in the Ancient Near East. An introductory examination of the place and portrayal of women in Near Eastern antiquity and in contemporary scholarship, with special consideration of the role genre plays in their representations. [3]

REL 3211. Roman Catholicism: French Revolution to Vatican II. Studies in modern Catholic history in Europe and America. Such topics as institutional and intellectual developments, church-state issues, and the relation between religion and culture. [3]

REL 3139. Book of Amos. This seminar focuses on the meanings and messages of the rhetoric attributed to the Hebrew prophet Amos; the course will raise questions about the Sitz im Leben and the social context that might have given rise to such strident social critique; the seminar will devote ample attention to the stylized presentation of the prophet’s voice in Hebrew poetry. Of paramount concern for the discussions will be the junctures where the prophet’s rhetoric offers relevant critique for the contemporary world. [3]

REL 3214. Women and Religion in America. The role of women in American religious history. Topics include patterns of women’s ministries, religious perceptions found in different movements or groups, contrasting experiences of women in various religious traditions, and issues of historical interpretation. [3]

REL 3142. The Old Testament In Greek. An introduction to all aspects of the Old Testament in Greek: the origins and purpose of the LXX; its translation technique; differences between various books; Origen’s Hexapla; the later translators Theodotion, Symmachus, and Aquila; contacts through St. Jerome and the Latin Bible; relations with the Dead Sea Scrolls; practical use of the modern editions; practice in use for textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: knowledge of Greek, together with at least an elementary knowledge of Hebrew. [3] REL 3150. Lives of Jesus: Ancient and Modern. An exploration of ancient and modern interpretations of the story of Jesus to see the ways in which generations of Christians have told this story to fit the needs of their own particular settings and cultures. [3] REL 3151. Jesus and the Early Christian Communities. How the Gospel writers present the traditions about Jesus in response to historical problems and religious questions current in first-century communities. The relation of the Jesus of history to the Gospel portrayals. Prerequisite: 2511, or its equivalent. [3] REL 3154. Gospel According to Luke. Exploration of Luke’s compositional techniques, possible sources, Christology, community formation, and ethics, using a variety of approaches (sociohistorical, literary, ideological, feminist). Knowledge of Greek required. [3] REL 3156. Jewish and Christian Self-Definition. Students will examine the various options (social, theological, Scriptural, practical) that confronted Jews and Christians in the first three centuries of the Common Era and the processes by which the various communities narrowed these options in their attempts to establish a normative identity. [3] REL 3176. Cultural Criticism and the New Testament. An introduction to the paradigm of cultural criticism in biblical studies, with a focus on theoretical orientations, approaches to the text, and interpretations of texts. Previous work in biblical criticism required. [3] REL 3180. Readings in the Greek New Testament. A reading course in selected New Testament texts for students who have taken 2600-2601 or its equivalent. [1] REL 3200. Puritanism. Its rise, development, and effects, in England and America. Theology, worship, and political and social life and thought. Readings in Puritans and their interpreters. [3] REL 3204. Religious Life in Nineteenth-Century England. The historical background of modern religious consciousness, as illustrated in Evangelicalism, the Oxford Movement, Christian Socialism, Methodism, Roman Catholicism, and other religious groups. The influence of culture, intellectual currents, and politics on religious life and thought. [3] REL 3208. The Theology of Martin Luther. Students who enroll in this seminar will explore the basic shape of Luther’s thought with particular emphasis upon the systematic interconnections of the doctrines of God, Christ, Scripture, the church, and civil society based on their relation to the central themes of justification and faith. [3] REL 3209. Calvin’s Institutes. An examination of Calvin’s great treatise and its major topics: creation, providence, and predestination; Christology and anthropology; interrelation of justification and sanctification; the sacraments; the Church and civil society. Focus on close reading of the text and its topical organization, as well as reflection on the basic issues raised by Calvin’s thoughts as a whole. [3]

REL 3220. Material History in American Religion. Enables students to become familiar with the use of non-textual sources to help recover the historical record, and aid in the interpretation, of people and movements in American religious history. The first half of the seminar will consist of analysis of exemplary techniques for reading the material culture and evidence of the religious past. The second half will consist of hands-on fieldwork and interpretation of aspects of American religion such as dress, architecture, food ways, rituals, money practices, visual imagery, music, and the use of time. [3] REL 3229. Seminar in Wesleyan Theology. The development of Wesley’s doctrines of God, grace, and sanctification and their contribution to ecumenical theology. [3] REL 3232. The Long Reformation in Britain and America. (Also listed as History 317) How protestantism was imposed from above, received in the pew, and negotiated across the gap between the two, during the century and a half following the Reformation in England, Scotland, AngloIreland, the Gaidhealtachd, and the British American colonies. Readings in anthropology of religion and of ritual supplement those in recent secondary historical literature, with a sampling of primary sources including spiritual autobiographies, diaries, church court records, and sermons. Each participant will produce a short work of original research in primary materials. [3] REL 3235. Twentieth-Century African American Religious History. Examines the rise of Pentecostalism, the spread of the gospel blues, how urbanization and industrialization affected black churches, the pivotal role of religion in the civil rights movement, relationship between black power and black theology, the changing roles of women in religious institutions, and the impact of post-denominationalism. [3] REL 3240. The Theology of Jonathan Edwards. Edwards’ thought with reference to the Reformed theological tradition, the Enlightenment, and the religious ethos of colonial New England, focusing on Edwards’ writings. [3] REL 3249. Colonial American Religious History. From 1492 through the American Revolution, the Western Hemisphere saw the importation of a wide range of African and European religious practices and interaction with indigenous peoples who also observed a wide range of religions. Examines the primary and secondary literature about American religion in the colonial era, with special attention to the processes of colonization, religious competition, differentiation, and innovation. [3] REL 3262. Baptism and Eucharist in Ancient and Medieval Christianity. The development of the practice and the theory of the Christian ritual of baptism and eucharist considered. Readings include descriptions and explanations of the rituals, as well as primary texts that discuss their significance and role in the Christian Church. [3] REL 3271. Worship in the Reformed Tradition. Sources and contemporary development of liturgical theology in the Reformed tradition. [1] REL 3304. Rabbinic Thought and Theology. The Hebrew Bible, though foundational to traditional Judaism, is not central. Traditional Judaism is the heir of Rabbinic Judaism, which emerged from the academics of the Land of Israel and Babylonia in the first through seventh centuries of the Common Era. We will focus on the Rabbinic texts that helped define Judaism for over a thousand years in the post-Temple environment. Rabbinic Judaism constitutes a revolution in religiosity, and the weapon of the revolution was the midrash, or the creative Rabbinic rereadings of the Torah. Together we will explore both the messages and the methods of Rabbinic Judaism. [3] REL 3309. Gender, Theology, and the Religious Imagination. Explores the influence of gender (as both difference and identity) on Western theological discourse and the human religious imagination. This exploration is

Graduate School / Courses guided by the notion that there is much work left to do in unveiling the impact of gender in its broadest sense on where we’ve been, where we want to go, and how we’re going to get there—religiously speaking. Particular emphasis will be placed on naming the influence of gender on theological understandings of self, world, and god. A second major emphasis will be to explore the ways in which religious experience and community reflect gendered priorities. Questions related to the pursuit of gender equality will be used to frame the course as a whole. [3] REL 3312. Theologies, Traditions, and Difference. Contemporary concerns with the historical marginalization of particular groups in North American society have resulted in much attention to the topic of “difference,” whether it be ethnic, religious, racial, class, sexual, gender, or other markers of particularity. This course looks at how three important traditions have framed and responded to these issues-liberal political, Christian theological, and postmodern. Not typically read together, these theories offer modes of ethical and communal thinking and will shape the focus of the course in its investigation of how communities ought to engage difference within and beyond their bounds. Seminar. Readings will include John Rawls, Kent Greenawalt, Donald Moon, William Connolly, Derrida, A. MacIntyre, John Yoder, John Milbank, and S. Welch, among others. [3] REL 3315. Creation and Ecology. Recent theological treatments of creation in light of ecological crises and scientific-technological developments. Readings include various views of nature, evolution, and biogenetic intervention and differing theological responses. [3] REL 3317. The Doctrine of the Trinity. Classical and modern formulations of the doctrine of the Trinity, with reference to questions concerning divine process, the relation of God and the world, and the problem of belief in God. [3] REL 3318. Economy and Theology. Critical retrieval of biblical and trinitarian understandings of the “economy of God” in relation to contemporary economic theory. Focus on the church’s response to major economic problems related to property/inclusion, work/income, and consumption/ sustainability. [3] REL 3319. Ecclesiology. The study of recent theologies of the church with concentration on the nature, sacraments, ministries, and mission of the church in twenty-first century societies. [3] REL 3320. Christology. Contemporary theologies of the life, work, death, resurrection, and presence of Jesus Christ. Focus on ways in which views of salvation, self, society, and nature interact with the memory of Israel’s Jesus. Readings from Jewish, eschatological, feminist, black, and ecological perspectives. [3] REL 3322. Theology of World Religions. The recent interreligious dialogue and its implications for Christian theology. The way in which global religious pluralism affects the nature and task of theology and the relation among major world religions as claims to truth. [3] REL 3323. Spirit, Community, and Social Theory. Study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in contemporary theology in dialogue with recent social theories (Bourdieu, Walzer, McIntyre, Taylor, Milbank). Focus on problems of embodiment, identity, law, language, community formation, gifting, etc. [3] REL 3339. Latin American Theology. A survey of theological production in Latin America, Catholic and Protestant, with a focus on Liberation Theology—origins and development, concerns and parameters, critical reception and present status. [3] REL 3342. Feminist Hermeneutics. The revisionary interpretation feminists are currently proposing in such areas as literary theory, anthropology, psychology, ethics, and philosophy and their possible effect on contemporary theology and biblical analysis. [3] REL 3354. Philosophies of Classical India. This course will introduce students to the central themes of classical Indian philosophy in both Hindu and Buddhist traditions. Is Indian philosophy really a type of philosophy? Why has ancient Indian thought generally been excluded from the history of philosophy? These questions will be examined as will the nature of Indian philosophy itself. The course will then proceed to explore the varieties of Indian thought with an examination of the philosophical perspectives of the six “mainstream” schools (darsana) of Hindu thought and their interaction

133 with the diverse forms of Buddhist philosophy in ancient India. The topics for discussion will cover a range of epistemological and metaphysical issues of importance to these traditions; for example, the nature of the self, the relationship of consciousness and matter, creation, the nature and role of yoga, philosophical conceptions of the divine, and the status of the external world. [3] REL 3400. Social Ethics. Focuses on an examination of religious and philosophical traditions that give rise to understandings of justice, duty, rights, and community. Attention paid to how these traditions inform moral judgments and shape the responses of moral communities. Particular examples, such as abortion, poverty, and racism employed to show how different moral traditions issue in social analysis and provide backing for normative moral judgments. [3] REL 3402. Ethical Issues in the Women’s Movement. An examination of some of the central issues concerning women’s status in present-day society through a sympathetic, yet critical, reading of key feminist texts. Authors examined include Brownmiller, Daly, Beauvoir, Friedan, Greer, and Jaggar. [3] REL 3413. Ritual and Religious Experience. Four themes that appear in classical and contemporary literature in the social sciences: religion, religious experience, ritual, and symbol. [3] REL 3417. Tolerance, Identity, and Diversity in Modern Society. This course will introduce students to modern political theory through concrete questions of religious tolerance, identity, and diversity. Readings will combine classic texts in early modern political thought (e.g., Hobbes, Locke, Mill), significant contemporary works (e.g., K. A. Appiah, C. Taylor, U. Narayan, W. Cavanaugh), and case studies (e.g., John Brown and Theo van Gogh). At every point the theological perspectives implicit and explicit in the readings and cases will be given special attention. The course will also attend to the limits and paradoxes built into each of its key terms and to practical, political, and theological resources for working through and living with them. [3] REL 3422. African American Political Theology. Examination of the writings, speeches, and other cultural products (literature, films, music) of African Americans in their attempts to give prophetic expression to the politics of race, gender, and class in the North American context. The politics of abolition and reconstruction, the politics of race, and the new cultural politics of difference approached theologically, historically, and critically. [3] REL 3452. Seminar in Medical Ethics. Explores a variety of topics and problems in medical ethics. Topics may include ethics, law and medicine, health care delivery, euthanasia and end of life decisions, life before birth, issues in reproductive technologies, and genetics and ethics. [3] REL 3476. Developing Grounded Theories of Preaching and Worship. Most, if not all, theories of preaching and worship are logically deduced and based primarily on philosophical, theological, personal, or tradition assumptions. But what if theories were sought through the careful phenomenological, comparative, and theological analysis of a sampling of actual practices of preaching and worship? In this course, students will learn to investigate such practices with an eye to the development of grounded theories of preaching and worship. Methods of qualitative research taught in this course may be applicable to other fields of theological inquiry as well. This course will meet the requirement for Seminar I for doctoral students in homiletics and liturgics. [3] REL 3501. Judaism in New Testament Times. The varieties of Judaism that emerged from 200 B.C.E. to approximately 200 C.E. Discussions of the Maccabees, the politics and religion of the Hasmonean dynasty, the Dead Sea Scroll community at Qumran, the Sadducees, Pharisees and Essenes, Philo, the early church and early rabbinic Judaism all placed in their Hellenistic and Roman contexts. Major themes in the development of Messianism and Apocalypticism. [3] REL 3502. Judaism and Modernity. This course undertakes a historical and cultural analysis of the dilemmas Jewish Emancipation presented to both Jews and non-Jews in Europe, pre-eminently in Central Europe. By examining representations of Jews in a variety of popular and elite, political and philosophic, scientific and literary texts (including films) this course traces how antisemitism became entangled in the problems of gender, sexual, racial (ethnic), class, and self identity. The course has two goals. First,

134 it seeks to explore the pervasiveness of antisemitic discourse in nineteenthand twentieth-century European culture. Second it analyzes the implications upon Jewish identity of the double bind of modern Jewish existence before the Shoah: The European society into which many Jews sought admission demanded complete assimilation of the dominant culture, even to the point of obliterating any traces of Jewishness or Judaism; yet, often accompanying the demand was the assumption that Jews were constitutionally incapable of eliminating their difference. To fulfill these goals this course undertakes a series of close readings of primary texts supplemented by contextual histories. [3] REL 3503. The Jewish Heritage. A survey of Jewish history and literature for a better understanding of Jesus’ Jewish roots and its important foundation of both Christianity and Islam. Sponsored by the Jewish Chautauqua Society. [3] REL 3505. Jewish Ethics. By tracing environmental issues through the Bible, Talmud, medieval codes and mystical texts, we will analyze how contemporary Jewish environmentalists are using these traditional sources to further their own agendas. The course will be two-pronged: (1) understanding the primary genres of Jewish law and ethics as well as the mechanisms of Jewish legal development, and (2) analyzing the specific issues involved in Judaism’s complicated relationship to the environment. [3] REL 3509. Introduction to the History and Critical Theories of Religion. Overview of the major thinkers and critical writings that have defined the scientific and critical study of religion. Not available for graduate credit. [3] REL 3534. Freud and Jewish Identity. This course examines selected writings of Sigmund Freud within the context of contemporary Viennese Jewish life and antisemitic discourses. Through an analysis of Freud’s rhetoric-figures, topoi, exemplar, emphases, omissions, anomalies-it explores how psychoanalytic theory developed in response to the traumas of Jewish assimilation and of antisemitic repudiation-whether by acting them out or working through them. In particular it examines the intersections of notions of gender, sexuality, and race/ethnicity in Freud’s work where those responses especially emerge. Freud’s psychoanalytic writings will be supplemented by his letters as well as by material on the social and cultural history of his times. [3] REL 3535. Black Islam in America. Varied expressions of African American Islam beginning with the bringing of Muslims as slaves from West Africa. Developments extending from the Moorish Science Temple to the Nation of Islam, other communities, and their leaders, including Malcolm X. [3] REL 3538. The Black Church in America. The development of the black church from the late eighteenth century to present. Major attention to black denominationalism, church leadership, and the involvement of the church in the social, cultural, intellectual, political, and economic areas of African American life. [3] REL 3752. The Religious Self According to Jung. The religious core of human existence, as related to the concepts of the archaic unconscious and the birth of the self in C. G. Jung’s analytical psychology. Study of the life and thought of Jung as illustrated by his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections. Critical assessment of his theory as a means to understand religious phenomena. [3] REL 3800. The Dead Sea Scrolls. The materials from Qumran and other locations in the Judean Desert and Jordan Valley, with reference to their contributions to the understanding of Judaism in the period 200 B.C.E. to 100 C.E. and of earliest Christianity. Open to graduate and advanced Divinity students. Prerequisite: Hebrew. [3] REL 3801. The Megillot. Five scrolls, each a different genre of literature, are customarily read in synagogues throughout the year: Esther (Purim), Song of Songs (Passover), Ruth (Shavuot), Ecclesiastes (Sukkot), and Lamentations (Ninth of Av). We sample them and discuss them within the context of ancient Near Eastern literature. For students with at least one year of Hebrew. [3] REL 3803. Ben Sira with Introduction to Mishnaic Hebrew. Introduction to grammar and vocabulary of Mishnaic Hebrew, with practice in reading and guidance for further study. Reading of selected portions of the Hebrew text of Ben Sira. Emphasis on experience in reading unpointed Hebrew text of this period, relevance for textual criticism, use of the Greek

vanderbilt university version, and the place of the book and its theology in the development of Israelite wisdom in general. [3] REL 3809. The Sociology of Early Israel. The nature of Israelite society, especially in its early periods, through readings in source materials and selected sociological interpretations. [3] REL 3810. West Semitic Inscriptions. Readings in selected Phoenician, Aramaic, and Punic texts, with relevant grammatical analysis. Knowledge of Hebrew required. [3] REL 3816. Advanced Biblical Hebrew. Reading of selections from the Hebrew Bible, with emphasis on syntax and text criticism. Prerequisite: Elementary Biblical Hebrew. [3] REL 3818. Aramaic. Vocabulary, forms, and syntax of Aramaic through reading of the Aramaic sections of Daniel and Ezra and of specimens of material from the Elephantine papyri, the Targums, etc. Prerequisite: 3816. [3] REL 3822. The Amarna Period. The Amarna Period (sixteenth-twelfth century B.C.E.) has been a focus of research and speculation ever since excavations at the palaces and temples of Anatolia, Canaan, Assyria, and Babylon produced rich archives that illumined in remarkable detail this age, famous for its theological speculation. There were powerful personalities (Thutmoses III, Suppiluliumas I, Ramses II, Aziri, Niqmaddu) who sponsored ferocious classes of empires and cultures but also led powerful drives toward peacemaking. There were enormous commercial undertakings, incredible artistic achievements, and vast spiritual thirst (Akhnaten, Moses). Above all, there were wonderful documents-historical, theological, mythological, epistolary, legal, and belletristic-which will be examined in this course. [3] REL 3826. Advanced New Testament Greek. Knowledge of Greek required. [3] REL 3834. Literary Criticism and the New Testament. The tradition of literary criticism from Plato to the present as a critical background for exploring recent literary studies of the New Testament. Knowledge of Greek required. [3] REL 3841. Seminar in New Testament. [Variable credit] REL 3843. Hellenistic Culture and Literature. Primary and secondary texts, presenting aspects of the history, literature, and religious traditions of the Hellenistic period (ca. 4th century B.C.E. to 4th century C.E.). Knowledge of Greek required. [3] REL 3881. Historiography and Ancient Israel: Chronicles. Examines issues of historiography as they relate to Ancient Israel with a particular focus on the Book of Chronicles. Focuses on the content of Chronicles as well as sociohistorical contexts and methodological issues. Ph.D. students will do an extra session with the Hebrew text. [3] REL 3883. Ancient Goddesses. Ancient concepts of the feminine divine in literature and iconographic evidence. Specific goddesses, their spheres of influence, and their place in the various pantheons. Cultic practices and religious syncretism across cultures, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Ancient Israel. [3] REL 3912. Mystical Literature from Plotinus to John of the Cross. Traces the various inflections of what emerges as a strikingly unified tradition of discourse about the experience of union, unio mysticus, across the Middle Ages from Plotinus to John of the Cross. Particular emphasis placed on apophasis, or the failure of language, prior to this experience. [3] REL 3952. Ethics and Public Policy. Students in this course, which is cross-listed with Vanderbilt Law School’s curriculum, will explore the relationship between ethical principles and public policy decisions and analyze selected public policy issues within the framework developed in the students’ reflection on ethics and the public policy process. [3] REL 3954. Methods in the Sociology of Religion. Explores the research methods employed in sociology: research design-including theory, hypothesis formation, and measurement; univariate and simple multivariate analyses. Qualitative methods also will be addressed, and ethical issues in human research will be examined. [3]

Graduate School / Courses REL 3956. Philosophical Ethics in the Western Tradition. Major thinkers, movements, and issues in the western philosophical tradition-e.g., the ethical and political thought of Aristotle and Immanuel Kant. [3] REL 3957. Seminar in Advanced Theological Ethics. REL 4017. Children and Christian Faith. Explores primary cultural and religious revolutions in perceptions of childhood, classical and contemporary Christian views of children, and the role of families and congregations in promoting the well-being of children within and beyond the church. [3] REL 5101. Elementary Biblical Hebrew I. [Formerly REL 2500] This is the first course in a two-semester sequence leading to a reading knowledge of the Hebrew Bible; concentration is on the basic elements and grammatical study of the language, leading students to begin reading from the original texts. [3] REL 5102. Elementary Biblical Hebrew II. [Formerly REL 2501] This is the second course in a two-semester sequence leading to a reading knowledge of the Hebrew Bible; concentration is on the basic elements and grammatical study of the language, leading students to begin reading from the original texts. [3] REL 5103. Beginning Koiné Greek I. [Formerly REL 2600] This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of study leading to a knowledge of the New Testament. [3] REL 5104. Beginning Koiné Greek II. [Formerly REL 2601] This is the second course in a two-semester sequence of study leading to a knowledge of the New Testament. [3] REL 5105. Intermediate Greek I. [Formerly REL 2602] Classical and Koiné Greek. Review of Greek grammar and readings from classical and biblical texts. Open for credit to M.A. students only. [3] REL 5106. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. [Formerly REL 2514] Introduction to alphabet, the basics of grammar, and elementary conversation. [3] REL 5107. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. [Formerly REL 2515] Emphasis on conversation and grammar. [3] REL 5108. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I. [Formerly REL 3102] Modern Hebrew reading, conversation, and advanced grammar. Spring: Greater emphasis on reading and writing. Prerequisite: One year of Modern Hebrew or its equivalent. [3] REL 5109. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. [Formerly REL 3103] Modern Hebrew reading, conversation, and advanced grammar. Spring: Greater emphasis on reading and writing. Prerequisite: One year of Modern Hebrew or its equivalent. [3] REL 5120. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew. [Formerly REL 3814] Designed for students who have completed an elementary course in Hebrew and need more work in the areas of grammar, syntax, and reading of Hebrew texts. [3] REL 5125. Ugaritic. [Formerly REL 3815] Elements of Ugaritic grammar, with reading in selected texts. Prerequisite: Elementary Biblical Hebrew. [3] REL 5353. Baptist History and Polity. [Formerly REL 2857] Investigates the origins, development, and theological positions throughout the history of the Baptist tradition and examines current trends in the tradition’s polity. [3] REL 5355. History and Theology in the Christian Church, Disciples of Christ. [Formerly REL 3215] Study of the Disciples’ origins and developments with particular emphasis on polity and current issues confronting the church. [3] REL 5411. Songwriting from a Theological Perspective. [Formerly REL 2566] This is a studio class where students concentrate on the production of songs in a theologically reflective environment. The course aims to meet the needs of students who come to VDS each year with an interest in communicating and educating through music. REL 5456. Islam in Africa. Social and cultural development of Islam across Africa from the eighth century to the present, as illuminated by historical, ethnographic, and literary sources. Interplay between Muslims and outside religious groups, jihads in pre-colonial Africa, and Islam during European colonization. Attention to Sub-Saharan Africa. [3]

135 REL 6100. Ethics in Theological Perspectives. [Formerly REL 2758] This class will examine the central themes of morality, moral agency, deliberation, and moral discernment that define ethics as a discipline; students investigate the moral arguments from teleological, deontological, and utilitarian perspectives and study the philosophical and theological figures and different theological ethics that have had a sustaining influence on Christian ethics in the West. [3] REL 6500. The Hebrew Bible. [Formerly REL 2503] The life and thought of ancient Israel, with emphasis on the community’s understanding of itself and of its role in history, are addressed in this course; concentration is upon both the problems of historical and literary interpretations and the Israelites’ religious practices and faith. Not available for Ph.D. credit in biblical studies. [3] REL 6501. Literary Analysis of the Hebrew Bible. [Formerly REL 2513] This course focuses on narrative criticism of the Hebrew Bible, comparing it to similar methodologies (poetics, rhetorical criticism, etc.) and contrasting it with other forms of exegesis (historical criticism, deconstruction, etc.). Students will study key literary terms and discuss the elements that work together to form a story. The class will consider the narrator’s voice in relation to the text and the reader, examining narrative omniscience, key type scenes, and themes in the Hebrew Bible and ancient Near Eastern literature. REL 6502. Leadership in Hebrew Bible. [Formerly REL 3122] Using Jotham’s fable (Judges 9) as a paradigm for leadership, this course examines various types of leaders in the Hebrew Bible and ancient Near East. Employing folkloristics, socio-historical criticism, and other methodologies, students will study the roles of kings, queens, priests, prophets, prophetesses, and other leaders in the ancient world. As students compare and contrast the ideologies and imagery associated with different types of authority, the class invites them to explore practical applications in their own vocations. [3] REL 6503. History of Ancient Israel. [Formerly REL 3813] Examination of the major areas of debate in the reconstruction of the history of ancient Israel and analysis of the important extra-biblical sources that have contributed to the scholarship on ancient Israel’s history. The course will also address the roles that ancient Israel’s Near Eastern neighbors played in the development of ancient Israel’s history. [3] REL 6504. Modern Interpreters of Ancient Israel. [Formerly REL 3811] Characteristic approaches to the history and religion of ancient Israel, as seen in selected writings by prominent scholars since the Enlightenment. Attention to the presuppositions of each scholar and to the view of Israel afforded in each study. Reading ability in German desired. Consent of instructor needed for non-Ph.D. students. [3] REL 6505. Biblical Law and Ancient Israel. [Formerly REL 3116] The legal materials in the Pentateuch, their relation to the prophetic movement, and the role of law in ancient Israel’s thought and society against the ancient Near Eastern background. [3] REL 6506. Politics and the Economy in Ancient Israel. [Formerly REL 3120] The political and economic systems of ancient Israel, with attention to the impact of the centralized monarchic government on the economy of the country. Political processes, rights, and obligations are examined, as well as economic options, stratification, and commercial and property law. Biblical evaluations, especially prophetic critiques of the abuse of power, are explored. [3] REL 6508. Death and Transfiguration in Pharaonic Egypt. [Formerly REL 3143] This course explores the conceptual world of Ancient Egyptian mortuary religion: how the ancient Egyptians viewed death and the afterlife, prepared the body for eternity, and created lasting funerary monuments. Attention will be given to how these concepts are evoked in Ancient Israel, and how they are presented today through museum exhibitions and in popular culture. REL 6509. Exegesis Seminar. [Formerly REL 3802] Study of the principles, methods, and tools used in the critical study of the Hebrew Bible, including textual, historical-critical, ideological, literary, and other exegetical methods. [3] REL 6510. Empire and Canon. [Formerly REL 3806] Arguably, two eras of imperial domination,the Persian and Hellenistic periods, are the most literarily active inthe formation of the Hebrew Bible. This advanced-level seminar looks at the Persian imperial context as the social world from which much

136 of the Hebrew Bible emerged. Its seminal question, “How much did Persian imperial policy shape the writings of the early Second Temple priesthood?” will guide both the discussions and the readings. With this in mind, the course examines struggles between the priesthood, imperial authorities, and the Jerusalem populace and raises questions about specific biblical texts which may provide insights into these relationships. [3] REL 6511. Book of Genesis. [Formerly REL 3125] General exegesis of the Book of Genesis, concentrating on the definition of its major themes and purposes. Hebrew language not required. [3] REL 6513. The Book of Exodus. [Formerly REL 3123] General exegesis of the Book of Exodus, concentrating on the definition of its major themes and purposes. If necessary, additional time may be allotted for those requiring extra work in Hebrew or in textual criticism. [3] REL 6514. The Exodus in African American Biblical Interpretation. [Formerly REL 3110] This seminar surveys the politics of African American biblical interpretation and the Book of Exodus in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The seminar will rely entirely upon primary source materials. REL 6515. The Book of Deuteronomy. [Formerly REL 3825] An exegesis class on the Book of Deuteronomy, concentrating on defining the book’s major themes and purposes as well as examining the book’s poetry. REL 6516. The Book of Numbers. [Formerly REL 3119] REL 6517. The Book of Joshua. [Formerly REL 3829] An exegesis of the book of Joshua, with special attention paid to literary features, issues of historiography and archaeological evidence, ideological and religious concerns and relation to other texts of the Hebrew Bible, especially the Deuteronomistic History. [3] REL 6518. Book of Job. [Formerly REL 3133] A study of the book of Job, attending to its literary features, religious themes, internal disputes regarding theodicy, and its relation to other texts from the region. [3] REL 6519. Book of Qoheleth. [Formerly REL 3805] Israelite skepticism, with emphasis on the literary form, thematic coherence, and religious viewpoint of Job and Qoheleth, interpreted within the broad spectrum of Israelite wisdom and consideration of Greek influence. [3] REL 6520. Book of Daniel. [Formerly REL 3828] An in-depth analysis of the Book of Daniel, with particular attention to the text’s historical background and literary form. The place of the Book of Daniel within Prophetic and Apocalyptic literature will also be explored. [3] REL 6522. Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible and ANE. [Formerly REL 3135] Explores how various sexual practices (prostitution, homosexuality, heterosexuality, rape, sodomy, incest) are dealt with in the Hebrew Bible and in the larger context of the ANE. [3] REL 6523. The Cultures of Mesopotamia and Anatolia. [Formerly REL 3148] Students will consider the cultural and religious milieus of Mesopotamia and Anatolia before Alexander the Great and their relationship to the Hebrew Bible. [3] REL 6524. Literature of the Ancient Near East. [Formerly REL 3823] Readings in the literature from Egypt, Canaan, and Mesopotamia, with special emphasis on texts relating to the culture, literature, and thought of ancient Israel. [3] REL 6525. Ancient Goddesses. [Formerly REL 3808] This course will examine how ancient cultures (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Ancient Israel, and beyond) conceived of the feminine divine, primarily through a survey of the available literature (myths, hymns, and prayers) and iconographic evidence (statues, plaques, figurines). The roles of specific goddesses, their spheres of influence, and their place in the various pantheons will be taken into account, while also paying attention to cultic practices and religious syncretism across the cultures. REL 6526. Jewish Life in Persian Egypt. [Formerly REL 3824] The Aramaic documents from the island of Elephantine offer a unique portrayal of the life of a Jewish community in fifth-century Egypt B.C.E.. In this seminar, students will learn to read the papyri and ostraca in the original language and script, and explore the historical, linguistic, and cultural implications of the documents in relationship with relevant Biblical material.[3]

vanderbilt university REL 6527. Hellenistic Jewish Literature. [Formerly REL 3827] In the Second Temple period, Israel’s ancient library of sacred texts was becoming the Bible. This period witnessed a proliferation of enormously versatile literary texts with religious themes written in the dominant languages of the time: Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek. Those works that are left out the Hebrew Bible, but became a part of the canonical literature of the early Christian churches, we call here Apocrypha. Pseudepigrapha, conversely, is a vague term for the ancient Jewish national literature that grew around biblical figures and events but was left out of the ancient scriptural traditions. In this course we will examine most of the Apocrypha and a selection of the Pseudepigrapha, in English, and compare them with the literature of a similar genre and period, such as testaments (Testament of Abraham, The Testament of 12 Patriarchs), romances (Joseph and Aseneth), tales of adventure (Books of Tobit, Judith, Esther), letters, apocalyptic literature, historiographies (1-2 Maccabees, Josephus), and philosophical essays (Philo). In these numerous readings of the primary sources, we will also look at the main contemporary methods of interpretation: midrash and allegory. The canonical issues, the scriptural and ecclesiastical authority of the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and their use and function in the confessional and academic setting will receive due attention. REL 6529. Eighth-Century Prophecy. [Formerly REL 3108] A study of the prophetic literature against its ancient Near Eastern background; emphasis placed on the eighth-century B.C.E. prophets and on the contemporary significance of their message. [3] REL 6550. Akkadian I. [Formerly REL 3831] Elements of Akkadian (Assyro-Babylonian) grammar, with reading in selected texts. Consent of the instructor required. [3] REL 6551. Akkadian II. [Formerly REL 3832] Reading in selected historical, mythical, legal, and epistolary texts. Consent of the instructor required. [3] REL 6552. Introduction to Classical Syriac. [Formerly REL 3821] Classical Syriac (also called “literary” Syriac—ktabanaya) is a dialect of Aramaic that flourished for over a millennium in the Middle East and Asia. Today, perhaps more than ten thousand manuscripts written in Classical Syriac survive; many are unique sources for the history of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Reading classical Syriac literature is thus of interest to a variety of scholars including ancient and medieval historians, classicists, scholars of religious studies, biblical scholars, and comparative linguists. In this course students will learn the basic structure of Classical Syriac grammar and learn to read simple texts from the Syriac translations of Christian and Jewish scriptures. Students will learn Syriac using J.F. Coakley’s revision of Robinson’s Paradigms and Exercises in Syriac Grammar, rev. ed. (2013). No specific linguistic prerequisites are required, but students must have previously studied at least one language besides their native language. [3] REL 6571. African American Biblical Hermeneutics. [Formerly REL 3882] Surveys the field of discourse in African American biblical scholarship from its beginnings through the twenty-first century; students will analyze the work of the most prominent hermeneutics; discussions will emphasize the social and ideological currents that have contributed to the development of African American biblical hermeneutics as resistance discourse. [3] REL 6575. Old Testament Theology. [Formerly REL 3107] Traces Old Testament Theology in modern biblical criticism from the late eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. The class will turn to primary sources to engage both the major expressions and major critiques of the enterprise. [3] REL 6580. West Semitic Inscriptions. [Formerly REL 3820] Participants in this course will read from Hebrew, Aramaic, Phoenician, and Moabite texts, and emphasis will be placed upon relevant grammatical analyses. Prior to enrolling in this language course, students must demonstrate a proficient knowledge of Hebrew. [3] REL 6600. The New Testament. [Formerly REL 2511] How the New Testament shows the main characteristics of early Christianity as compared and contrasted with early Judaism and with Hellenistic religions. Religious authority in early Christian communities and the types of faith and ethics found within the New Testament traditions. Not available for Ph.D. credit in biblical studies. [3]

Graduate School / Courses REL 6603. The Gospel of Mark. [Formerly REL 3170] This course addresses various theories concerning Mark’s historical context, narrative art, Christology, depiction of the disciples, political views, and presentations of gender, ethnicity, and social status. Students taking this course will consider the Gospel in its Roman imperial context, economics (e.g., money and trade, rich and poor), social groups (e.g., slaves, military, government officials, religious leaders, patrons and clients, beggars, women and children, families), Christology, and ecclesiology. Discussion will attend both to what the text might have meant in its first-century context and what it might mean for how it has been used by readers today. [3] REL 6604. The Gospel of John. [Formerly REL 3164] This course addresses various theories concerning John’s historical context, narrative art, Christology, depiction of disciples, dualistic language and depictions of those outside the circle of Jesus-believers (e.g., “the world”’ “the Jews”), presentations of gender, ethnicity, and social status; eschatology (futurist, realized), and use/ misuse within Christian teaching and preaching. [3] REL 6605. Readings in Greek: The Gospel of John. [Formerly REL 3183] This upper-level course focuses on the Greek text of the Fourth Gospel. Along with exegetical questions prompted by thesaurus of biblical approaches, attention will be focused on the style, nuances, and intertextual echoes of John’s narrative. The prerequisite for enrolling in the course is successful completion of course work in the Greek language. [3] REL 6607. Acts of the Apostles. [Formerly REL 3347] Exegesis of selected passages from Acts 1-15 with foci on various methodological perspectives. Greek required. [3] REL 6608. Jewish/Christian Relations. [Formerly REL 3510] This course offers a brief history of relations between Christians and Jews and invites participants into critical engagement with present practices in light of that history. [3] REL 6609. Feminist Interpretations of Scripture. [Formerly REL 3169] Examination of the representations of women, religious and ethnic “others,” and sexuality in biblical and contemporary noncanonical (ANE, Pseudepigrapha, Gnosticism) texts, utilizing various approaches (literary, historical, anthropological, ideological, Womanist, Mujerista). [3] REL 6610. The Pauline Interpretation of Christianity. [Formerly REL 3162] Pauline Christianity and its place in the early church, using the letters of Paul, the deutero-Pauline letters, and the portrait of Paul in Acts. Attention to the problems of method. Greek not required. [3] REL 6611. Global Interpretations of Christian Scriptures. [Formerly REL 3845] This course will compare the interpretations of biblical texts by Christians in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania-where at present two-thirds of the readers of the Bible are-with those by Orthodox Christians in Eastern Europe and the Middle East, and by Catholic and Protestant Christians in Western Europe and North America. REL 6612. Semiotics and Biblical Studies. [Formerly REL 3159] Why are several, different, and often opposed interpretations of the same biblical text equally legitimate and plausible? (This is the question raised by Ricoeur in The Conflict of Interpretations, and by Fish in Is There a Text in This Class?, and also raised by the shelves of diverging scholarly commentaries on the same biblical book.) Thus, why do interpreters of the Bible have the moral responsibility of choosing among these legitimate and plausible interpretations one which “does no harm” and to take the risk of choosing an interpretation which will be helpful, liberating, and constructive by challenging systemic evil? Semiotic theories address these questions by providing theories of the way meaning is produced through the interaction of texts, intertexts, contexts, and readers. Most helpful in biblical studies are the semiotic theories of Umberto Eco (A Theory of Semiotics and The Role of the Reader), A.-J. Greimas (Semiotics and Language), who opens the possibility to account for The Religious Dimensions of Biblical Texts), and their applications in biblical studies by Mieke Bal, in Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative; On Meaning-Making: Essays in Semiotics; and her spectacular study of Judges 4 and 5, Murder and Difference: Gender, Genre, and Scholarship on Sisera’s Death; and Loving Yusuf: Conceptual Travels from Present to Past, in which she reads biblical texts together with modern literature, feminist issues, visual art, and other religious texts (in the latter case, the Qur’an). [3]

137 REL 6614. Readings in Greek: The Parables of Jesus. [Formerly REL 3161] Examining the nature of parable as form, the history of the interpretation of parables, the study of parables in the setting of the ministry of Jesus and the theology of the Evangelists, and literary criticism and the interpretation of parables. [3] REL 6616. Greek Readings: The Gospel of Matthew. [Formerly REL 3165] Through analytical approaches such as historical-critical, literary, sociological, and ideological, students will reconstruct Matthew’s audience, both actual and ideal, and explore the topics of Christology, ecclesiology, debates with the synagogue, politics, and artistry of composition. [3] REL 6641. New Testament Studies: Ethos and Locus, Methods and Theories. [Formerly REL 3830] Current methods of New Testament analysis, including textual, source, form, redaction, sociological, semiotic, and literary criticisms. [3] REL 6642. New Testament Studies II: Ideological and Cultural Criticisms. [Formerly REL 3839] This course constitutes the second part of a two-part introduction to New Testament Studies as presently conceived and practiced. It is an advanced course, presupposing previous and substantial work in the field and designed primarily for students in the Graduate Department of Religion. The course is also open to advanced and students in either the M.Div. or the M.T.S. degree program, although with permission of the instructor required. Contemporary biblical criticism may be approached in terms of five interpretive paradigms, each with its own distinctive though complex mode of discourse: historical criticism; literary criticism; sociocultural criticism; ideological criticism; cultural criticism. This second part will examine the role and future of biblical criticism in general as well as the methods and theories at work in the paradigms of ideological and cultural criticism. Its goal is to provide a comprehensive, critical picture of the discipline in terms of differential formations and relations of power as well as of different traditions of reading. The course will encompass three major components. First, a general introduction to the history of the discipline from the 1970s through today, with a focus on the questions raised by ideological and cultural criticisms. Second, sustained analysis of various ideological approaches (feminist and materialist criticisms, ethnic-racial and queer criticisms, postcolonial criticism, disability and ecological criticism) as well as focused consideration of cultural criticism, problematics, trajectories, critiques, interdisciplinary conversations. Finally, a brief view at both the role and the future of biblical criticism.[3] REL 6643. Materialist Biblical Criticism. [Formerly REL 3550] Focuses on the question of political economy and the resultant constructions and relations of social class, an angle of vision closely associated with the liberation criticism of the 1970s and beyond but also with roots in earlier Marxist approaches to the Bible; the course deals with the juncture between economic studies and biblical criticism, both with regard to the texts and contexts of early Christianity and the interpretations/interpreters of such texts and contexts in modernity and postmodernity; course will consider a study of political economy, approaches to the political economy of the Roman Empire, and the trajectory of materialist criticism. [3] REL 6644. Racial-Ethnic Biblical Criticism. [Formerly REL 3344] Students participating in this seminar will analyze the juncture between Early Christian Studies and Racial-Ethnic Studies with a focus on the problems of race and ethnicity in biblical texts and contexts as well as in modern and postmodern interpretations and interpreters. The grounding phenomenon of migration; representations of Self and Others, signification of race and ethnicity, approaches to race and ethnicity in the Roman Empire; approaches to race and ethnicity in early Christian texts and contexts are among the topics students will explore. [3] REL 6645. Latin American Biblical Criticism. [Formerly REL 3345] REL 6700. The Formation of the Christian Tradition. [Formerly REL 2701] The expansion of Christianity, the development of doctrine, relationships with the Roman Empire, development of church institutions, and changing modes of Christian life from the second century into the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the periods and themes that are formative of the classical doctrines and institutional patterns. Major purpose of the course is to establish the background for the division of the Western church and the subsequent development of the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches. [3]

138 REL 6701. The History of Christian Liturgy. [Formerly REL 2706] As an introduction to the origins and development of Christian worship and rituals from 100 to 1600 C.E., the course will encourage students to explore the underlying structures of different worship practices as well as the function of rituals in various times and places. [3] REL 6702. Art and Empire from Constantine to Justinian. [Formerly REL 2713] Participants in this course will engage in an interdisciplinary study of Roman social, political, religious, and art historical developments in the fourth through sixth centuries. [3] REL 6703. Mary, Mary Magdalene, and Eve in Christian Art, Text, and Tradition. [Formerly REL 2707] Christian art historically has depicted the Madonna and her “sisters,” Eve and Mary Magdalene, in diverse ways that largely reflected their distinct but related roles in Christian theology and devotional practice. Recently, fiction writers, art historians, theologians, feminists, and even archaeologists have focused renewed attention on all three figures. This course will consider the many variations and intersections of their stories along with the visual and material culture associated with them. It also will consider contemporary assessments of their place in visual art and Christian tradition, addressing questions about the ways their images have been deployed as archetypes of feminine purity, sensuality, independence, and penitence. [3] REL 6704. Gods, Rulers, and Saints: Portraits in Roman and Christian Art. [Formerly REL 2714] A study of the social, political, and religious function of portraits from the first century through the sixth century C.E., this course considers various problems of representing physical appearance, including the construction of identity, social status, and mediation of presence through image. Other issues that will be addressed include portraits as memorials, as objects of veneration, and as idealized models. The course will conclude with a brief discussion of the ways in which ancient portraits continue to influence or guide the visual construction of likeness. [3] REL 6706. Monasticism in Late Antiquity. [Formerly REL 3175] This course examines the rise of Christian asceticism in Late Antiquity. Students will study the specific historical and geographic contexts of the development of monasticism in Syria, Egypt, and its spread across the Mediterranean and beyond. The course will be primarily focused on interpreting the large body of ascetic literature which developed from the fourth through sixth centuries. Students will read various genres and monastic theologians including the sayings of the Desert Fathers and Mothers, Athanasius’ Life of Anthony, Gerontius’ Life of Melania the Younger, the works of Evagrius Ponticus, Isaac of Nineveh, Philoxenos of Mabbug and others. The course will also examine the legacy of desert spirituality for later Christian traditions and for contemporary theology and monastic practice (such as in the work of Roberta Bondi or Thomas Merton) [3] REL 6708. Christianity in the Reformation Era. [Formerly REL 2703] The setting of the Reformation (c. 1500–1648) and its development. The significant ecclesiastical, theological, and historical issues of the period. Backgrounds and causes; examination of major individuals and ecclesiastical patterns. An understanding and interpretation of the events. Major theological documents and questions of continuing historical interest that have come out of the Reformation. [3] REL 6709. Religion, Culture, Politics in Post Reformation England. [Formerly REL 3978] The course will examine the interaction between religious change and politics in the period after the reformation. The focus will be on the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. Emphasis will be given to questions of “political culture”; the ways in which the peculiar exigencies of the Elizabethan regime, in Collinson’s phrase “the Elizabethan exclusion crisis”, led to various experiments in the ways in which politics was conducted. Central here will be the notion of the monarchical republic of Elizabeth I and the politics of popularity and the various monarchical reactions thereby provoked. The doings of both catholics and puritans will be examined and a wide range of primary sources will be consulted. Various literary texts will also be used. REL 6710. History of Anti-Trinitarian Theology. [Formerly REL 3250] REL 6711. The History of Theodicy in the Christian Traditions. [Formerly REL 3234] The story of Christianity has the notion of God who suffers

vanderbilt university with and in our place at its crux. This course surveys the variegated histories of Christian attitudes toward and responses to evil and suffering: both individually, ecclesially, both in its theology and praxis. Readings will range from Dorothy Day to Irenaeus of Lyons, from Toni Morrison to Shusaku Endo, from Karl Barth to Hannah Arendt. Particular attention will be given to the contemporary issue of human trafficking and global economic disparity and its global impact. REL 6713. Seminar in Late Antiquity. [Formerly REL 2716] This course is a survey of the scholarly literature on the transformation of the Roman world (its state apparatus, society, and culture) from the third through seventh centuries of the current era. We will study the end of the classical world and the origins of Byzantium, the Islamic world, and the medieval West. This class will review historiography on the questions of the fall of Rome and the birth of the heirs to Roman civilization. The course will present key themes for analysis of late Roman society such as wealth and poverty, the crisis of the third century, Roman imperial ideology, gender roles and family structures, the rise of Christianity, the geographic divisions of the Empire, and the last great war of antiquity. Particular attention will be paid to religious practices, communities, and institutions in the later Roman world. Students will gain an overview of scholarly literature on Greek and Roman religious institutions, Jewish, Christian, Manichean, and Muslim communities and a wide range of religious practices. Together, we will traverse recent scholarship concerning a variety of evidence including geography, material evidence, and primary source texts. Students will be encouraged to formulate their own positions with regard to current scholarly debate on the following questions: How did the Roman world change in late antiquity? Why did these changes develop and what alternative trajectories existed? [3] REL 6729. The Historiography of American Religion. [Formerly REL 3251] This course focuses on the major important interpretive accounts of the history of American Religion. The course is designed especially for graduate students who intend to specialize within, or take a doctoral exam on, the field of American religious and church history, key problems and significant monographs in the field. [3] REL 6730. The History of Religion in America. [Formerly REL 2750] The history of the religions in America beginning with colonial religious experiments in the New World. Examines American “church history” as well as the influence of non-Christian religions in American culture. [3] REL 6731. Religion And War in American History. [Formerly REL 3230] An examination of complex interactions between religion and war in American history. Considers the various functions of religion in social and political crises, contrasting theological interpretations of violence, and the religious construction of national identity through warfare. [3] REL 6732. Theology in America, 1600-1850. [Formerly REL 3233] Theology in America from the arrival of the Puritans through the Revolutionary period was a complex mixture of academic doctrines and popular beliefs. The scope of theological ideas extended beyond religious institutions to influence cultural patterns and social issues such as war, slavery, religious persecution, and the nature of citizenship. This intermediate-level seminar examines various theologies in America, including an examination of key theologians (broadly considered) and important themes and traditions, including the Reformed Tradition, Antinomianism, political theologies, revivalism, and Deism. [3] REL 6733. Seminar: American Revivals. [Formerly REL 3853] This course examines selected revivals in American Christianity from the colonial period through the twentieth century. We will focus on the varieties of revival practice, including the ways in which revivals have interacted with views of ministerial authority, doctrine, the body in worship, social reform, and church architecture. Primary and secondary resources will include texts and audio-visual representations of revival experience. REL 6734. American Apocalyptic Thought and Movements. [Formerly REL 3207] This course explores apocalyptic and millennial ideas and movements in North America from the colonial period to the present. The primary focus will be on apocalyptic themes in relation to social and political crises in the history of the United States. Particular attention will be given to apocalyptic images and ideas in popular culture.

Graduate School / Courses REL 6738. Jesus in Modern America. [Formerly REL 3212] The period from 1880 to 2000 featured a high level of American cultural interest in Jesus of Nazareth. More books were produced on Jesus during this period than on any other biblical figure. Through various modes of cultural productionplays, novels, movies, biblical commentaries, theologies, and moral essaysAmericans depicted Jesus to meet their needs and conceptions of who this man was and what he represented for their congregations. Students will examine a wide range of “American Jesuses.” [3] REL 6739. American Religious Intolerance. [Formerly REL 3221] This course studies the art of religious defamation as evidenced by nineteenth and twentieth century exposés and memoires. The following questions guide our study: what are the enduring anxieties that beget and tropes that express religious prejudice; what do they tell us about American society and culture; and how may these anxieties and prejudices be recognized in contemporary culture and ourselves. Memoires and exposés comprise the focus of course readings, while secondary literature provides the context and theoretical frame for our study of intolerance more generally. This term, anti-Catholicism and anti-Mormonism will provide our chief case studies, but the assignment structure and some reading assignments encourage application to other groups. Class discussion will be oriented to identifying the manner in which past and present religious prejudices continually inform one another, both sustaining and imaginatively reshaping meanings to fit instant anxieties and disparate religious groups. At the end of the course, students will better understand the history of religious intolerance in America; recognize the enduring tropes of religious intolerance; be able to critically engage such tropes as applied to different religions; and be more adept in identifying their own prejudices. Grades will be based on contribution to seminar discussions and completion of a research paper. [3] REL 6741. Contemporary Issues in American Religion. [Formerly REL 3210] This course invites students to reflect upon our inheritance from the late twentieth century. We will not march through the years but will consider important themes, key developments, pivotal moments, and still significant writings in order to understand better our contemporary situation. Specifically, we will study how religion has and is responding to recent social crises and cultural developments. Three themes will frame our subject. We will look at the state of organized religion, as well as consider what it means to be “spiritual not religious.” Second, by examining civil rights and wrongs, including but not limited to race, we will attempt to better understand the diverse political strategies employed by religious people. Finally, not just the public, but also the private sphere deserves attention. We will look at religious interests in the sexual revolutions (broadly construed) of the last few decades. This allows us to consider, among other things, the continuing challenge science poses to religious values and worldviews. Certainly, other topical frameworks could be developed and additional sub-topics explored. The reading done for the paper assignments will facilitate your working on topics of particular interest or delving more deeply on ones listed here. Moreover, there will be room on the syllabus for the class to suggest additional themes. A book review, two short papers, and an even shorter class presentation will be required. [3] REL 6744. The Evangelical Protestant Movement in America. [Formerly REL 3227] An examination of evangelical traditions from the colonial period to their present manifestations in twentieth century America, with some attention to the European background. Special attention is devoted to debates concerning the authority and inerrancy of scripture, theology, church-state relations, the role of the Christian in society, education, the relationship between science and religion, the church and racism, the moral character of America, and other areas of cultural cleavage. Cultural conflict or “wars of faith” between conservative black and white Christians studied in terms of their historical significance and political implications. [3] REL 6745. Evangelicalism, Pentecostalism, and the Shape of World Christianity. [Formerly REL 3226] REL 6762. Religions of the African Diaspora. [Formerly REL 2864] This course is a survey of the religious traditions of people of African descent by exploring the historic and phenomenological connections among diverse religious beliefs, values, rituals, institutions, and worldviews throughout the African Diaspora. Using several methodological and theoretical approaches, the course will explore various forms of experiences and practices that provide a deep understanding and appreciation of the sacred meaning of human existence (myth, doctrine, prayers, rituals, institutions, and symbols) drawn

139 from African-derived faith communities dispersed across the Atlantic World such as indigenous African religions, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Vodoun, Santería, alternative religious movements, and humanism amongst others. REL 6763. Religion, Slavery, and the American Civil War. [Formerly REL 3243] This seminar examines slavery in relation to the religious history of the American Civil War. Based on reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources, the seminar will begin by assessing the development of slavery in colonial America and its relation to religious groups through the American Revolution and the early republic. The seminar will examine religious themes in the debates, protests, and revolts over slavery in the nineteenth century. In addition, the seminar will examine broadly the religious history of the Civil War and its aftermath. [3] REL 6764. Slave Thought. [Formerly REL 3852] Students will examine the sources and content of African American slave thought by exploring the themes of God, Jesus Christ, history, the human condition, death and the afterlife, salvation, morality, ethics, Scriptures, and the role of religion in society. Attention will be directed to the sacred world of African American slaves as revealed in narratives, tales, songs, sermons, Works Progress Administration interviews, myths, aphorisms, proverbs, and magical folk beliefs. Students in the M.Div. degree program may apply this course to the requirement in African American, race, and class studies. [3] REL 6766. Black Religion in Context: Harlem. [Formerly REL 2867] This course examines the dynamic issues of racial identity and religious diversity within a specific social context. New York City’s Harlem will serve as a case study to focus our religious imaginations on the issues of race, religion and social transformation in the United States. Special emphasis will be paid to the Black religious tradition in Harlem and how its religious communities are adapting to pressing social issues and other elements of change such as immigration, urbanization, poverty, and globalization. Also critical to this examination are the ways in which the Black Church tradition adapts to different cultural settings and interacts with other world religions as it attends to the religious pluralism of the twenty-first century world. The course is designed as an interdisciplinary study, and a wide range of methodologies and perspectives will be utilized to investigate these issues. [3] REL 6767. Cultural Significations and Black Religion. [Formerly REL 3545] This course focuses on the origins and varieties of religious experience - scriptural interpretations, ritual practices, mythical narratives, symbolic representations, cultural artifacts, vernacular folk traditions, sociopolitical ideologies, and power dynamics—that historically have been subsumed under the heavy-laden concept of “Black religion.” Using the work of pioneering historian of religion Charles H. Long, considerable attention will be paid to the process of signifying as a system of general theorizing about the ways in which human beings communicate, seek, and negotiate meaning and social power in both the sacred and secular spheres. Through an interdisciplinary examination of sources drawn from across the African diaspora, this course will emphasize the study of religion in the modern world as both a mode of orientation as well as a process of meaning-making, but with the description and critical analysis of Black religious phenomena--the complex matrix of sights, sounds, movements, and other sensory stimuli--in contradistinction to the invisibility and invalidation imposed upon subjugated peoples around the world by normative Western discourses. [3] REL 6769. The Religious Thought of Howard Thurman. [Formerly REL 3541] This course will explore the prophetic ministry of Howard Thurman (1900-1981) as a minister, scholar, poet, theologian, pastor, and mystic by focusing on key themes in Thurman’s thought through an interrogation of his intellectual foundations, spiritual formation, his particular vision of justicemaking, mysticism, theological praxis, homiletics, liturgy, and doxology. There will be critical insights into Thurman’s intellectual and spiritual growth as well as offering a window onto the landscape of the defining issues, events, movements, institutions, and individuals that shaped his sacred worldview. REL 6770. Religion and the Civil Rights Movement. [Formerly REL 3236] Students who enroll in this course should note that the seminar carries four semester hours. The seminar will examine the religious ideas and individuals that played pivotal roles in the civil rights movement by exploring the theological foundations of the black freedom struggle, the crucial impact of religion in debates about social change, and the participation of religious institutions and organizations in an effort to achieve racial equality. [4]

140 REL 6771. New Religious Movements. [Formerly REL 3254] The rise and development of new religious movements in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Emphasizes the following themes: utopian, restorationist, and social reform movements in relation to American primitivism and political orders; the role of text and ritual in creating and maintaining religious order and community; and the problematic nature of the sociological categories “sect” and “cult.” [3] REL 6772. Race, Religion, and Protest Music. [Formerly REL 2866] This course examines how music and other related forms of art emerge from a particular social location in order to: help define pressing social issues; galvanize mass social movements; and function as symbols of protest. Using several methodological and theoretical approaches, the course will explore a wide variety of musical genres such as the spirituals, the blues, gospel, jazz, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, folk music, soul music, punk rock, reggae, Afrobeat, and hip hop in order to determine how racial identity and religious themes have articulated themselves within protest music. Various historical and contemporary examples derived from cross-cultural perspectives will be used to illustrate the impact of race and religion on social protest music. REL 6773. Reel Black Faith: Race, Religion, and Film. [Formerly REL 3540] This course is an examination of the religious and spiritual dimensions of films selected from across the African diaspora through from the silent film era to contemporary cinema. The emphasis of this course will focus on race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality, and other aspects of social location juxtaposed with theological concepts, spiritual concerns, religious imagery, and moral values to better understand the interplay of cinematic representation of Black religious experience. [3] REL 6791. The History of the United Methodist Tradition. [Formerly REL 3191] The history of United Methodism from its rise in England in the eighteenth century to the present. Forces that have shaped the movement and its impact on its own culture. Consideration of John Wesley and English Methodism (to 1790). Examination of Methodism on the American scene. [3] REL 6793. Topics in Digital Humanities for Historians and Scholars of Religion. [Formerly REL 3986] The course provides an introduction to the theory and methods of the digital humanities from the disciplinary perspectives of history and religious studies. This course is designed for graduate students of history, religion, historical theology or classics who would like to acquire research skills in the techniques of digital text editing and analysis. Students will learn the fundamentals of digital text editing and the computational analysis of digital corpora. Students will engage with theoretical questions concerning the nature of texts and the challenges of representing the past through new media. By the conclusion of the course, students will have built a working prototype of a digital database specific their research needs. [3] REL 6794. Art Pagans, Christians, Jews. [Formerly REL 2715] Visual art reflecting religious beliefs and practices. Greco-Roman cults, early Christianity, and Rabbinical Judaism. [3] REL 6801. Constructive Christian Theology I. [Formerly REL 2656] In this introduction to the discipline of theology, students will gain practice in the reading of important texts in the field, formulating critical positions, and enhancing theological inquiry and writing skills. The emphasis will be on the constructive development and reformulation of the major interconnected themes of Christian theology considered in relation both to the doctrinal tradition and to challenges of the contemporary context. Themes for the first semester will include the nature and tasks of theology, Scripture and authority, the doctrine of God, Creation and the relation of God to the world, soteriology, and Christology. [3] REL 6802. Constructive Christian Theology II. [Formerly REL 2657] In this introduction to the discipline of theology, students will gain practice in the reading of important texts in the field, formulating critical positions, and enhancing theological inquiry and writing skills. The emphasis will be on the constructive development and reformulation of the major interconnected themes of Christian theology considered in relation both to the doctrinal tradition and to challenges of the contemporary context. Themes for the first semester will include the nature and tasks of theology, Scripture and authority, the doctrine of God, Creation and the relation of God to the world, soteriology, and Christology. [3]

vanderbilt university REL 6803. The Skill and Practice of Theological Conversation. [Formerly REL 2655] This course is an introduction to the skills that inform theological literacy and to the critical thinking that sustains theological reflection. The primary focus will be on introducing students to the habit of theological reflection, and it presupposes very little background knowledge of Christian theology or the Christian theological tradition(s). Students will engage in short, close readings of a wide variety of primary sources, ancient and contemporary, in order to analyze the logic of theological claims, and the varying ways theological discourse addresses its ever-changing situation. Attention will be paid to the function of doctrine in theological discourse, the sources and norms employed in theological formulation, and the theologian’s relationship to philosophical, cultural, and political contexts. REL 6805. From Theology and Worship to Christian Praxis: Liturgy and Ethics. [Formerly REL 3314] This seminar seeks to understand the interrelated roles of sacrament, word, and ethics in the praxis of Christian faith in church and society. Methodologically focused, the course attends to history, major theologians, and current constructive proposals in the areas of early Christian sources, fundamental and political theology, and liturgical and sacramental theology. [3] REL 6807. Suffering, Politics, and Liberation. [Formerly REL 3405] Close reading of biographical and theological texts to explore the practical role religious faith plays in people’s experiences and responses to suffering caused by systemic injustice in societies. Primarily focused on Christianity in North and South America and Europe, along with examples of indigenous American religion and Islam, study includes perspectives of women and men of a variety of races. REL 6808. Eschatology and Apocalypse in Modern/Postmodern Theology. [Formerly REL 3328] The development of eschatological and apocalyptic theology in relation to the modern and postmodern experience of evil, guilt, and death. [3] REL 6810. Theories of Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Disability. [Formerly REL 3909] Recently many subfields of religious studies, including theology, have taken up theories of race, gender, and sexuality generated by scholars in the humanities and social sciences. This course will cover important texts in the theoretical literature with an eye toward their import for constructive work in theology and other subfields. In addition to critical race theory, gender theory, and queer theory, we also will explore the emerging field of disability theory. [3] REL 6820. God in the Western Tradition. [Formerly REL 3923] The major philosophical and theological texts of the Western tradition from Plato to the twentieth century. The changing history of the interpretation of God from Christian neoplatonism to nineteenth- and twentieth-century challenges of classical approaches. [3] REL 6821. Thomas Aquinas. [Formerly REL 3858] Systematic investigation of Aquinas’ major theological and philosophical assertions by considering his conception of the two disciplines and their relationships. All readings will be available in English translations. [3] REL 6822. Theology in the Nineteenth Century. [Formerly REL 3325] Major movements during the nineteenth century, from Schleiermacher to Troeltsch. [3] REL 6823. Kierkegaard the Theologian. [Formerly REL 3346] An advanced exploration of Kierkegaard’s philosophy of Christian belief, with particular attention to his analysis of faith, the relation of ethics and religion, sin and human existence, and his metaphysical and theistic assumptions. Based on close reading and classroom analysis and discussion of selected texts from the pseudonymous authorship. [3] REL 6824. Theology of Karl Barth. [Formerly REL 3333] An introduction to the thought of one of the most important and controversial theologians of the twentieth century. [3] REL 6825. Seminar in Rahner, Schillebeeckx, and Metz. [Formerly REL 3326] This reading-intensive seminar provides the opportunity to study works by three of the most significant Roman Catholic theologians of the second half of the twentieth century. Study of these three authors, then, will access a certain trajectory in systematic-theological content and methods that emerged from the era of the Second Vatican Council. [3]

Graduate School / Courses REL 6840. Seminar in Systematic Theology. [Formerly REL 3908] REL 6841. Process Theology. [Formerly REL 3321] Contributions made to Christian theology by the tradition of process thought, and the questions raised for process thought by the character of Christian theology. [3] REL 6842. Practical Theology. [Formerly REL 3600] This seminar explores the development of practical theology as an academic discipline, focusing primarily on its revitalization in the last half-century, current debates, and future potential. [3] REL 6843. Theology in the United Methodist Tradition. [Formerly REL 3192] A study of theology in the Methodist tradition to the present. There is a concentration on the theology of John Wesley, but attention is given to the major doctrinal foci of Methodism in its various expressions. The student is asked to develop his or her articulation of Wesleyan theology for the contemporary ecclesial situation in relation to several social concerns. REL 6844. Contemporary Theology. [Formerly REL 3327] The major movements in Christian thought from the beginnings of dialectical theology to the present. [3] REL 6845. Feminist Womanist Theology. [Formerly REL 3340] Introduce students to the classic texts and themes of feminist, womanist, and mujerista theologies as well as to current issues and important texts on the relationships among sexuality, gender, and race, the validity of “women’s experiences” as sources for feminist theological reflection, and feminist critiques and reconstructions of traditional theological loci. [3] REL 6846. Queer Theology. [Formerly REL 3348] This course examines emergent queer theology in relationship to the theological and cultural issues (historical and contemporary) that it seeks to address. REL 6847. Theology and Contemporary Continental Philosophy. [Formerly REL 3330] Certain continental philosophers are central to the so-called “return of the religious” in contemporary thought. This course will explore the this development through readings in major figures in the field and in appropriations of and responses to their work by theologians. REL 6850. God, Economy, and Poverty. [Formerly REL 3313] This course will focus on the ways Christian Scripture, tradition, and contemporary theology relate to poverty. Attention will be given to theology’s task of criticizing deformed concepts of God that mask or justify conditions of poverty and theology’s constructive task of articulating alternative ways of viewing the poor and eliminating the conditions of poverty. There also will be focus on ecclesial practices of life with the poor in relation to business, legal, and political solutions in the sphere of public policy. Among issues of the culture of our market society that address the exclusion or inclusion of the poor, these will be considered: lending and debt, property rights, comparative advantage, competition, consumerism, health care delivery, education, and the culture of despair. [3] REL 6851. Visions of the Future. [Formerly REL 3341] Critical and postmodern theories in gender, colonialism, race and sexuality emphasize dystopic possibilities for the future, whereas religious traditions emphasize eutopic eschatologies. Examination of the intersection of theories and imagination on the theological question of the future. [3] REL 6860. Aquinas, Rahner, and Metz. [Formerly REL 3859] The study of one trajectory in twentieth-century Roman Catholic thought beginning with the rise of transcendental Thomism, investigating closely the method and content of Karl Rahner, followed by J. B. Metz’s critique of transcendental-idealism in constructing a political theology of the subject. REL 6862. Ethical Approaches to Preaching. [Formerly REL 3012] This course investigates four ethical approaches to preaching: the social gospel and activist ethics within the preaching of the civil rights movement, the countercultural ethic within post-liberal homiletics, the communicative ethic within conversational and collaborative homiletics, and the ethic or risk and solidarity in liberationist homiletics. Students will preach sermons that make use of these theoretical and theological approaches. [3] REL 6900. Introduction to Homiletics. [Formerly REL 2801] The course is an examination of the theologies and methods of preparing sermons from Biblical texts and an exploration of hermeneutical approaches, oral/ aural skills, rhetorical strategies, narrative and connective logic; students are responsible for developing a working theology of the Word, reviewing

141 major homiletic theories, completing exegetical assignments, skill-building exercises, sermon sketches, and sermon manuscripts; in-class preaching is required. [3] REL 6903. Worship Across Traditions and Cultures. [Formerly REL 3002] Working to expand our familiarity with preaching and worship across denominational and cultural patterns and across faith traditions, this course will study preaching and worship practices and formation that embrace the ever-increasing experience of multiculturalism or pluralism within and between faith communities. [3] REL 6921. Oratory and Rhetoric for Proclamation. [Formerly REL 3007] This course studies the formulaic oratory structures of folk traditions among oral cultures and rhetorical structures of public discourse among classical and contemporary traditions for homiletics and the preaching event. [3] REL 6924. Preaching in the African American Tradition. [Formerly REL 3011] The theology and styles of black preaching. Sermons of the most effective black preachers of today and yesterday. Methodologies for effective outlining, manuscript development, and use of illustrations are discussed. [3] REL 6925. Preaching Theology. [Formerly REL 3032] In-depth exploration of the ways that theology comes to play in sermon preparation and preaching. Particular attention is given to the presence in preaching of theological methods, authorities (scripture, reason, experience, and tradition), theistic worldviews, theodicies, models of church and culture, ideas of atonement, the relationship between religions, and personal and historical eschatologies. Graduate students will be expected to do sermon analyses and/or preach twice for the class. [3] REL 6927. Modern Homiletic Theory. [Formerly REL 3009] Homiletic theory and practice have undergone tremendous changes in the past century. This course traces developments from the deductive and propositional homiletics of the late nineteenth century, through the liberal topical and “project” method of the early twentieth century, new-orthodox and Barthian emphases, inductive homiletics, narrative homiletics, structuralist and phenomenological models, and more recent postmodern construals of homiletic theory. Students will read and analyze sermons using these theories, and opportunity will be given to construct sermons using these methods as well. [3] REL 6928. Popular Music and Religious Identity. [Formerly REL 3005] What religious themes are prevalent in popular music today? How does popular music shape religious identity? How does faith shape popular music? What religious and spiritual experiences shape how music is heard, performed, consumed, or otherwise experienced? How is the music industry shaped by, and a shaper of, religious truth and identity today? These are among the questions this course will seek to address. [3] REL 6940. Homiletic Analysis. [Formerly REL 3010] Students will learn criterion and skills for analyzing, evaluating, and providing feedback on sermons. The course will focus on establishing essential criteria for sermon evaluation, learning methods for offering sermon feedback in small groups, and developing skills for individual sermon supervision. REL 6941. Practical Theology and the Public Church. [Formerly REL 3040] This course studies practical theology topics and methods/methodology for the church’s role in society/public arena, dealing with public theology and a range of social, cultural, economic, and political issues. REL 6942. Liturgy and Preaching. [Formerly REL 3042] An exploration of the historical roots of liturgical preaching, preaching and sacraments, preaching the Church Year and other calendars, lectionary preaching, preaching inclusivity and worship, preaching performance and worship arts, and occasional sermons in liturgical context. REL 6944. Language, Communication, and Practical Theology. [Formerly REL 3043] Most works in the field of practical theology contain normative assumptions about the nature of language and communication. These assumptions inform the analysis of situations, persons, or contexts, and influence the theology shaped in light of those analyses. This course will look especially at the ways in which poetics (theories of myth, symbol, and metaphor), speech act theory, semiotics, rhetoric, narrative theory, communicative action theory, cultural hermeneutics, and ritual theory inform a range of texts in practical theology. Scholars of language and communication under consideration are Suzanne Langer, Kenneth Burke, Claude

142 Lévi-Strauss, James Carey, J. L. Austin, Paul Ricoeur, Catherine Bell, Northrop Frye, Gregory Bateson, Ferdinand de Saussure, Alfred Schutz, Jean Piaget, C. S. Pierce, Ian Barbour, and Victor Turner. Practical theologians under consideration include James Fowler, James Hopewell, Denham Grierson, Robert Shreiter, Alex Garcia-Rivera, Don Browning, Elaine Ramshaw, Herbert Anderson, and Edward Foley, James Loder, Mary Fulkerson, Johannes A. Van der Ven, Gerrit Immink, and Gerben Heitink. REL 7000. Pastoral Theology and Care. [Formerly REL 2550] This course introduces students to basic theories and methods of pastoral care, especially in the ecclesial context. This course assumes that care is mediated through acts of pastoral leadership, liturgy, preaching, and the forming of congregational life and programming as well as through specific individual conversations.Special attention is paid to the person of the pastor as caregiver and leader of a community of faith and care. [3] REL 7002. Pastoral Care and Global Consumerism. [Formerly REL 3098] This course delineates the salient features of late capitalism, often designated by the term neoliberalism, and its profound effects upon global politics and economics, societies, communities, and institutions. It focuses particularly on how contemporary technologies and cultural assumptions extend the influence of free markets into interpersonal relationships and individual selves, as well as into religious congregations, theological reflection, and the practices of pastoral care and counseling. In each instance it asserts that the effects include distorted notions of freedom, identity and tolerance, as well as affective alterations, all of which erode or even corrupt these areas of life and thus contribute to widespread human suffering. Finally, it explores possible practices for congregations and pastoral caregivers that might oppose and alleviate these effects, as well as theories that might guide such practices. REL 7003. Theology and Personality. [Formerly REL 3057] This seminar from the pastoral theology and counseling discipline explores variable topics. REL 7004. Theories of Personality. [Formerly REL 3069] A study of representative theorists within each of the four forces of psychology to clarify alternative understandings of the nature of personality and approaches to the psychological sciences. Attention is given to relationships with pastoral theology and counseling. [3] REL 7005. Methods in Theology and the Social Sciences. [Formerly REL 3757] A study of the relationship of theology and science in general and religion and personality theory specifically. Uses several classic models as illustrative of the ways that persons have attempted to bring these two disciplines and enterprises together. [3] REL 7021. Women, Psychology, and Religion. [Formerly REL 3079] An exploration of the psychological and religious ideas that support a system of advantage based on gender and sexuality, with particular focus on women’s development, self-concept, and altered views of counseling and religious practice. [3] REL 7023. The Body and Theological Knowledge. [Formerly REL 3063] This class will be conducted as a seminar based on shared reading and discussion rather than lecture and will explore the question of how theological knowledge is shaped in and through the body, focusing on exploratory reading in human science research, critical theory, constructive theology, and practical theology. REL 7024. Theology and Health in a Therapeutic Culture. [Formerly REL 3062] Introduces the empirical study of the relationship between health and religion. The ways in which the disciplines of theology, religion, psychology, and medicine inform these studies are examined. [3] REL 7026. Self and Social Context. [Formerly REL 3052] Pastoral theology and practices of care are aided and directed by operative understandings of the self. What is the self? Is it real? Is it universal? How does it come into being? How does it develop, and how does it relate to the divine? These are fundamental questions in pastoral theology. Responding to the insights of feminists, social theorists, and philosophers, contemporary pastoral theologians have been revising their theological anthropologies to include an understanding of the self that takes more seriously its social dimensions. What does attention to the situated self tell us about effective pastoral care, the meaning of healing/salvation, and the nature of God? In this course we will read social scientific, philosophical, and theological accounts of a self formed within its

vanderbilt university social, institutional, and cultural contexts. We will also explore the implications of this theological anthropology for a variety of practices. [3] REL 7037. Shame and Guilt. [Formerly REL 3059] Students enrolled in this seminar will examine the dynamics of shame and guilt in social and personal life from theological, psychological, and pastoral perspectives. [3] REL 7038. Sexuality: Ethics, Theology, and Pastoral Practice. [Formerly REL 3067] A critical investigation of selected readings in the general area of sexuality, intimacy, and relationships as they inform pastoral practice. Uses autobiography and case study methods in conversation with theories in social sciences, ethics, and theology. [3] REL 7039. Gender, Sexuality, and the Family. [Formerly REL 3070] Addresses such issues as divorce, custody, blended families, reproductive issues, infidelity and adultery, unpaid labor in the household, rape, incest, domestic violence, and coming out. The class will focus on the delivery of pastoral care and counseling related to these issues and will also address the utilization of community resources to facilitate further care. The course’s design seeks to equip those who intend to be front-line care providers; an introductory course in pastoral care is a prerequisite unless approval is given by the instructor. [3] REL 7040. Pastoral Theology for Transitions and Crises. [Formerly REL 3072] Examines various pastoral responses to persons facing transitions (e.g., birth, vocational choice, partnering, marriage, aging, and dying) and crises (e.g., illness, bereavement, and interpersonal discord). Close attention paid to the theological and psychological dimensions of these experiences. Current research in coping and religious coping theory to develop strategies for theological reflection and pastoral action. Prerequisite: 7000. [3] REL 7041. Pastoral Care for Persons with Mental Disorders and Addictions. [Formerly REL 3099] In this seminar, students engage in a rigorous examination of the behavioral patterns that characterize addictions and study the effects of the addictive behavior not only on the patient but upon the patient’s family and peers. The course will also explore the different approaches to pastoral care both to the patient and to those who are affected by the patient’s illness. REL 7042. Seminar in Pastoral Care: Death and Dying. [Formerly REL 3071] Addresses the issues of theology and pastoral practice that pertain to ministering to the dying and the bereaved. Participants will have opportunities to consider and to clarify their theological postures regarding theodicy, eschatology, sin and sickness, prayer, suicide, euthanasia, and hope. The course also will examine how ones’ theological commitments translate into authentic acts of care such as accompanying the dying, offering support to the bereaved, and assisting the family in making decisions. REL 7050. Psychology of Ritual and Myth. [Formerly REL 3065] Examination of religious rituals and myths from both Christian and other traditions. Critical review of major psychological theories of ritual and myth and their relevance to an understanding of myth and ritual as religious phenomena. To be offered alternately with 3752. [3] REL 7051. Freudian Theories and Religion. [Formerly REL 3060] An intense reading and discussion of fundamental texts in psychoanalysis and their relationship to Freud’s critique of religion. The basic requirements and texts are introductory; more advanced students can use supplementary texts and approaches. [3] REL 7052. Post-Freudian Theories and Religion. [Formerly REL 3061] An examination of the Object Relations school of contemporary psychoanalysis (M. Klein, D. Winnicott, W. R. D. Fairbairn, Otto Kernberg, Heinz Kohut). Focus on both the clinical and the explanatory theories as they relate to the examination of religious experience and similar self states. [3] REL 7053. Contemporary Psychotherapy and Pastoral Counseling. [Formerly REL 3053] Recent trends in psychotherapy. Theories of personality and personality change, as do strategies for psychotherapy. Students will assess critically the implications of these theories for pastoral counseling. REL 7054. Critical Issues in Psychotherapy. [Formerly REL 3755] Examination of key areas of psychotherapy including patient’s experience of therapy, unconscious thought processes in therapy, interpretation as intervention, transference and the interpretation of transference. [3]

Graduate School / Courses REL 7065. Pastoral Method in Ministry. [Formerly REL 3056] Critical examination of pastoral method in the ministry of care and counseling. Close attention given to the place of the social sciences in pastoral method. Considers issues in the use of quantitative and qualitative research methods. [3] REL 7066. Method and Evaluation. [Formerly REL 3054] The use of the social sciences in the investigation of religious phenomena. The psychological analysis of religion. Representative studies and empirical investigations are sampled. [3] REL 7101. Methods in Ethics. [Formerly REL 3951] A survey of various methods, styles, and contexts under which moral philosophy has been developed and transmitted in Western thought. Topics treated are classical moral philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero), Christian sources (Augustine, Thomas Aquinas), modern philosophical ethics (Spinoza, Kant, Mill, and several twentieth century thinkers). [3] REL 7102. Ethics for Human Development Professionals. [Formerly REL 2813] REL 7120. Modern Christian Political Thought. [Formerly REL 2817] Surveying Christian Political Thought from the late nineteenth century to contemporary debates, we will analyze theo-ethical understandings of the relation of Christianity to political life. Some questions the course will focus on are: Is there a necessary and important relationship between Christianity and democracy? What is the role of the public theo-ethicist in political debates? In what ways do various ecclesial and theological assumptions impact the political engagement of the church? Social gospel, Christian Realist, Anabaptist, Liberation, Catholic Social Thought, Feminist, and Fundamentalist approaches will receive particular attention. A theory-practice option for those who want to study the concurrent U.S. campaign season is available. [3] REL 7121. Religion and Social Movements. [Formerly REL 2815] This course focuses upon the roles of religious organizations, persons, and resources in social-political movements for change. Students will be engaged in the interdisciplinary conversations on the contributions and constraints that religious groups provide for social movements. Among the questions students will investigate are: What makes an activist? In what ways do religions provide resources-materially, ideationally, and culturally for the emergence and maintenance of social movements? In what ways are religious groups transformed by their interaction with the political process? REL 7122. Religion and War in an Age of Terror. [Formerly REL 3411] Looking at both Christian and Islamic political thought, this course will wrestle with questions such as: When, if ever, is it appropriate to go to war? How has the emergence of “terrorism” as a form of war challenged traditional just war and pacifist theories? Are there ways in which religion and violence are inherently connected? How have religion and war been linked historically? In what ways do religious worldviews challenge or complement contemporary efforts at peacemaking? [3] REL 7123. Christian Social Ethics. [Formerly REL 3412] This course is a critique of selected readings from contemporary Christian social ethical perspectives. We will employ historical and ethical analyses of case studies in order to gain some orientation to doing ethical reasoning on current perennial social issues and pursue reading in the literature of the field. The fundamental problems guiding our inquiry will be: (1) the way in which each account interprets morality as the relation between justice and good; (2) the social theoretical assumptions and views that make each of these accounts intelligible and help explain their differences, this will include special attention to the relevant intellectual and social history of each issue and its public advocates; and (3) the theological warrants for how a just society may reside in religious and secular communities of moral discourse. REL 7124. Twentieth-Century North Atlantic Ethics. [Formerly REL 3419] An examination of figures and movements that influenced the discourse on religious ethics in both Europe and North America. Special attention to representatives of History of Religions School (Troltsch, Ott); logical positivism, political theology (Moltmann, Metz, Habermas); neo-orthodox and existential theologies (Brunner, Barth, Buber, Reinhold Niebuhr); as well as ethics influenced by Wittgenstein. [3] REL 7125. American Pragmatism and Empirical Theology. [Formerly REL 3403] Explores the philosophical, theological, and ethical legacies of

143 American philosophers and theologians who have significantly influenced theology and ethics in the United States and American public discourse. Students may encounter the traditions of American pragmatism, American Empirical Theology, Theology of the Social Gospel, American Neo-Orthodoxy, and American Public Theology and figures from William James and R. and H. R. Niebuhr to James M. Gustafson. [3] REL 7126. Political Ethics: The Tradition of Political Liberalism. [Formerly REL 3410] An examination of the political thought of prominent thinkers. [3] REL 7129. Moral Philosophy of Black Popular Culture. [Formerly REL 3959] REL 7130. Ethics and Feminism. [Formerly REL 3467] Ethics and Feminism. Implications of gender theory for understanding the Judeo-Christian moral traditions. Topics include the nature of the moral subject, the social construction of gender, patriarchal consciousness, the abuse of women, black feminism, motherhood, and feminist ecology. [3] REL 7131. Feminist Theological Ethics. [Formerly REL 3415] Using resources from feminist traditions (womanist, mujerista, Asian, white), the course focuses on some major methodological, theoretical, and policy issues in feminist theological ethics. After tracing the historical development of the field of feminist theological/social ethics, we will analyze how feminists choose/use theo-ethical resources, the impact of varying theoretical frameworks on feminist analysis, major policy foci of feminists, and whether/how to stay with a “patriarchal” religious tradition. Readings from Christian, post-Christian, pagan, Islamic feminist. [3] REL 7133. Womanist Literature. [Formerly REL 3428] This seminar examines the Black women’s literary tradition as a repository for doing constructive ethics. Attention will be given to how Black women of various periods, cultures, and literary traditions have brought distinctive imaginative and critical perspectives to bear on “the sacred.” In addition to addressing the complicated presence of religious themes, biblical references, and theological issues in these texts, literary and religious methods of “reading” and “writing” will be employed by comparing constructive and hermeneutical approaches among both literary writers and womanist ethicists. REL 7134. Women’s Bodies, Politics, and Policy Making. [Formerly REL 3414] In this course, students will be active participants in exploring the many dimensions of politics in the United States and abroad concerning how women have organized to subvert the oppression of women’s bodies in an effort to have a greater role in politics and the skills women need to fully participate in politics and policymaking. Students explore how politics and government, morality and religion, church and state affect women’s lives today, and examine the ways that women participate in the social and religious political process in order to influence the course of public policy. Readings and class discussion on the intersection of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality, work/class and ability/aesthetics in policies are central to the theoretical perspectives that provide the foundation of this course. REL 7135. Race, Sexuality, Class, and Inequality. [Formerly REL 3427] This seminar is considers practical applications for religious leaders. REL 7141. The Political Economy of Misery. [Formerly REL 3144] An examination of the ways in which the intersections of various forms of oppression; such as racism, sexism, ageism, heterosexism, and classism; coalesce to form lifestyles of misery that produce social patterns of domination and subordination. [3] REL 7220. Ethics in Healthcare: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives. [Formerly REL 3464] This course examines a broad range of theological and philosophical methods for addressing ethical questions in American health care. Tests will be drawn from Protestant and Catholic Christianity, Jewish thought, contemporary Anglo-American philosophy and the virtue traditions. Issues to be considered will include those at the beginning and ending of life, routine patient care and questions of health policy and social justice. FALL. [3] REL 7221. Healthcare Ethics: Theory and Practice. [Formerly REL 3465] This seminar examines contemporary healthcare ethics in the U.S. and the disciplinary perspectives that inform this field. Attention is given to the political and cultural forces that have shaped the chief ethical problems in healthcare and to the philosophical, religious and social scientific tools

144 used to address them. A major aim of the seminar is to gain critical purchase on these tools, and to assess their uses and limits. We will explore a range of practical issues, probing the ways these concerns shape professional and public life beyond their immediate sphere of occurrence. This seminar serves as a gateway for additional work in the field. [3] REL 7240. Seminar in Sociology of Religion. [Formerly REL 3953] Religion is a constitutive feature of social life, always shaping and being shaped by its particular social context. Indeed, the very content and form of religion itself is always and necessarily formed from the stuff of the socio-cultural world (language, symbols, ritual interactions, resources, organizations, norms, etc). The sociology of religion has focused on this relationship of religion and its broader socio-cultural world, and has developed a particular set of preoccupations: secularization, modernization, myth and meaningmaking, and the role of religion in social ordering, for example. In this course, we hope to examine and experiment with some of the core assumptions of the sociological study of religion. What does it mean to be religious? What is the relationship of religion and culture? Do we live in a secular society? How do we enact religious life? How is religion produced and re-produced? [3] REL 7999. Master’s Thesis Research. [Formerly REL 3690] [0] REL 8000. Theology and Practice Colloquy. [Formerly REL 2001] The colloquy provides a social space for deliberation about the goods of theological education. Driven by student presentations, the colloquy considers especially questions of vocation, teaching, and research. Enrollment is limited to fellows in the Program in Theology and Practice. Fellows are required to enroll in the colloquy in each semester of their first three years of doctoral study. Pass/Fail. [1, awarded at the end of each full year] REL 8001. Theology and Practice Core Seminar. [Formerly REL 2002] Various topics. [3] REL 8002. Theories and Practices in Critical Pedagogy: Identity Politics in Teaching Theology and Religion. [Formerly REL 3602] This doctoral seminar explores critical, liberative and emancipatory pedagogies, and interrogates their applicability for teaching theological education and religious studies. Particular attention will be devoted to critical theories grounded in race, gender, and class analysis, as well as to the promise and problems posed by doing critical pedagogy on the margins of academe and religious life. This seminar will also survey inter/multi/disciplinary pedagogical approaches in order to demonstrate the manner in which subject matter impacts both knowledge production and concrete, everyday life experience. Finally, students will begin working on intellectual design and course development skills in an effort to articulate their own signature pedagogy. REL 8003. Qualitative Research. [Formerly REL 3619] This doctoral seminar introduces qualitative research methods geared to practical theological methodologies. Students will encounter a range of research methods and exercises drawn from various qualitative designs, but often regarded as shared practices among respective disciplines. This course weighs the philosophical and practical bases of said designs and their theories to construct or study research questions. Students will develop skills in conceptualizing and conducting a qualitative research project: determining a research question and research design, accessing a research site, collecting and analyzing data, writing up the findings, and weighing the challenges of theory building. Students will also learn about a range of ethical considerations involved in conducting research. REL 8004. Practicum in the Teaching of Religion. [Formerly REL 3620] Preparation for the teaching of courses in religious or theological studies through discussion of case studies, issues, and problems. Required for all graduate students of religion during the first semester in which they are serving as teaching assistants. Can be repeated. Not open to others except by permission of instructor. [0] REL 8005. Clinical Seminar. [Formerly REL 3760] This two-semester (fall/ spring required) 3-hour credit supervisory course focuses on discussion of readings from a clinical practice orientation (the first hour) and presentation of cases from a context in which students provide care or counseling (the second hour). Requirements include critical engagement with the assigned texts, rigorous clinical discussion, and the submission and presentation of written case reports. Participants must be actively engaged in pastoral ministry or other care-giving roles. Enrollment is limited to six doctoral and

vanderbilt university upper level divinity students. Divinity students are admitted only after interview and confirmation by clinical seminar faculty. [0-3] REL 8006. History of the Study of Religion. [Formerly REL 3525] Since the emergence of the “fetish” in the contact zone of European-African encounter, no other notion in the history of the study of religion has been appropriated by so many secular discourses. Understanding fetishism as delineating a discursive space in which the often misrecognized attempt is made to mediate religious, cultural, ethnic/racial, sexual, gender, class, and/or phenomenological difference(s) by means of material objects (or persons), this course will follow how the term (together with its cool accessories) has traversed from mercantile encounter to rationalist anthropology to philosophy to positivist sociology to political economy to anthropology to sexology to psychoanalysis to aesthetics to postcolonial analysis and iconoclasm. [3] REL 8050. Special Topics in Religion. [Formerly REL 3880] REL 8801. Martin Luther King, Jr. [Formerly REL 2564] King’s role as a religious leader and as an agent of social change, with some attention to the intellectual sources of his thought and social activism. His views concerning the social roles of religion are seen against the background of classical Christian views, late nineteenth-century dissenting traditions, the early twentieth-century American Social Gospel Movement, and the more radical ideas of Malcolm X and Albert B. Cleage, Jr., during the 1960s. Critical evaluations of King are also made in terms of classical Christian views (e.g., Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Wesley). [3] REL 8802. Modern Critics of Religion. [Formerly REL 3311] This seminar examines the relationship between the critique of religion and the understanding of modernity under the aegis of Marx’s famous apothegm: “the criticism of religion is the prerequisite of all criticism.” To that end, it first traces the genealogy of Marx’s remark in the Hegelian tradition’s tie of religion and society as well as explores the notion of critique. Then after analysis of Marx’s own work, in particular his appropriation of religious discourse to undertake social criticism, the seminar considers critiques of religion that appear to belie the optimistic assessment that preceded Marx’s dictum: “For Germany, the criticism of religion has been essentially completed.” The work of the two leading critics of modernity who follow Marx—Freud and Nietzsche—are addressed. [3] REL 8803. Postmodern Theory: In the Wake of the Death of God. [Formerly REL 3351] If modernism is understood to be the age of the subject, the age that begins when self-consciousness says, “I think, therefore I am” (Descartes, 1638), making itself the foundation of its very existence, postmodernity begins when this postulate of the autonomous, self-grounding subject enters into crisis and collapses. Without the individual subject as secure foundation, the presumably stable values of modern tradition since the Renaissance are undermined in all domains from market economies based on the free choices of independent individuals to aesthetic styles of subjective self-expression familiar, for example, in Romantic and Expressionist art. The new sense of a lack of foundations, of no tangible or knowable reality underlying and grounding the flux of appearances in experience, opens thought and praxis in the diverse directions that have come to be characterized as postmodern. Simulacra, inauthenticity, lack of origins or originals, hence proliferating pluralities which nevertheless evince no real distinctions from one another in a consumer society of mass production are some of the typical manifestations of this postmodern milieu. We will undertake to survey important theoretical responses to this predicament particularly from philosophers of religion, primarily those in the continental tradition writing currently. REL 8804. The Nature of Evil. [Formerly REL 3404] Human evil as expressed in the Shoah, religious fundamentalism, and ethnic cleansing. Theological, philosophical, biological, and literary texts. Evil transformed by scientific inquiry since 1600. REL 8805. Jewish Theories of Religion. [Formerly REL 3507] Critical analysis and discussion of modern Jewish constructions of religion: politically, symbolically, ethically, normatively, and aesthetic-mystically. Selected readings from Cohen, Buber, Rosenzweig, Kaplan, and social philosophers such as Simmel and Habermas on the function, nature, and meaning of religion in secular culture.

Graduate School / Courses REL 8807. Mythologies and Epics of South Asia. [Formerly REL 3511] Classical Hindu and Buddhist mythologies of South Asia; Sanskrit Mahabharata and Ramayana epics; regional adaptations of mythical themes in vernacular languages; Buddhist and Islamic narratives of romance and chronicle; interpretive and performative strategies, orality, literacy, and modes of visual representation; political deployment of mythic tropes. [3] REL 8808. Devotional Traditions of South Asia: Hindu, Muslim, Sikh. [Formerly REL 3512] Mythology of Hindu pantheon and worship through devotion or bhakti. Techniques for inculcating devotion through meditation, temple rituals, and pilgrimage. Entry of Islam into South Asia. Shi’I and Sufi practices. Sikh traditions. Role of vernacular languages in creating local traditions. Hindu-Muslim interaction, syncretism, and shared sacred space. Challenges to orthodoxy. [3] REL 8809. Buddhism and the State. [Formerly REL 3514] Models relating Buddhism and the state in ancient and modern Asia. Kingship and spiritual leadership; sacred territory and national identity; legitimation theory and its alternatives; and religious responses to the modern state. Case studies from India, Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Tibet, Mongolia, China, and Japan. [3] REL 8811. Mysticism In Islam. [Formerly REL 3517] A survey of the origins and development of Islamic mysticism, the rise of asceticism, the development of the Sufi orders, the gradual systematization of Sufi teachings, and modern forms of Sufism. The spread of Islamic mysticism was primarily due to the teachings of great thinkers such as Ibn Arabi, Rabi’a, al-Hallaj, Rumi, al-Ghazali, and others. No prior knowledge of Islam is required. [3] REL 8812. The Qur’an and Its Interpreters. [Formerly REL 3518] This course will focus upon the Qur’an and the Islamic tradition of interpretation through a critical examination of the treatment of the biblical prophets, Jesus, and Satan. Interpretations will be drawn from the earliest period to the modern era. Rationalist, dogmatic, Shi’i, and mystical schools of interpretation will be discussed. [3] REL 8813. Foundations in Hindu Traditions: Ritual and Text. [Formerly REL 3519] The course traces the ongoing experiments of ritual processes which sought to resolve or ameliorate the inexorable migratory effect of simple human action (karma). Over the last several thousand years, these experiments have followed four fundamentally different trajectories that provide us with a broad historical frame: the sacrifice/yajina of the Vedic period, meditation/yoga, devotion/bhakit, and tantra/tragressive practices. Students will examine translations of the foundational texts that justify each of these four alternatives, pairing those with the persistnece of material culture, from the sites used for consecrating kings, temple construction and iconography, domestic organization and rites of passage to sacred geography that becomes the object of pilgrimage. At the completion of the class, the student should have the conceptual vocabulary and analytical tools necessary to interpret intelligently any manifextation of the Hindu traditions they may encounter, from the ancient to the contemporary. REL 8814. Asian Conceptions of Wisdom, Liberation, and Enlightenment. [Formerly REL 3520] Philosophical conceptions and practices as found in classical works, including the Bhagavad Gita, the Confucian Analects, the Tao Te Ching, and Buddhist texts that have functioned as religious life-guides in India, China, and Japan for thousands of years. REL 8815. Chinese Religions through Stories. [Formerly REL 3521] Analysis of narratives from various religious traditions and genres within early and medieval China. The role of narrative in Chinese religious, cultural, and political life. Primary texts in English translation. Offered on a graded basis only. [3] REL 8816. Sacred Space in the Tibetan World. [Formerly REL 3523] How is sacred space created, mediated, and reproduced in the greater Tibetan world? To investigate this question, we proceed through loci of increasing scale, from religious icons and bodies to built structures to sacred geographies. In the process, we analyze how sacred space is formed and affirmed through narrative, ritual, cosmology, and interaction with natural environments. We will attend to interactions between Buddhist, Bön, and local religious traditions, as well as to continuities and changes from premodern to modern periods. Our case studies will extend beyond the current political borders of Tibet to include ethnically Tibetan communities in India and Nepal, historically significant sites in China and Bhutan, and the circulation of Tibetan objects and bodies in America and worldwide.

145 REL 8817. The Holocaust: Its Meanings and Implications. [Formerly REL 3524] This course examines the systematic destruction of European Jewry and other groups during World War II, its background, and its aftermath. It addresses the attempts by victims, bystanders, perpetrators, and their descendants-and we are all their descendants-to create meaningful narratives about an event that appears to lack discernible meaning. To that end it focuses upon historical accounts, case studies, memoirs, fiction, and theology and such issues as history, memory, witness, conscience, language, evil, and otherness that they raise. Particular emphasis is upon the many roles of film in both the Third Reich and the postwar world. National Socialism employed films to mobilize support for its rule and to inculcate its racial-eugenic worldview. In the wake of the Holocaust, film has been employed for other purposes: to document, to bear witness, to mitigate or reduce its import, to provide meaning, to unmask attempts to mystify or suppress the past, to explore relationships between those events and contemporary societies, to say the unsayable, to examine the life of the traumatized victim. No prior study is presupposed of these events that have come to be known as the Holocaust. [3] REL 8819. Religion and Film. [Formerly REL 3530] REL 8820. Religious Narrative and the Self. [Formerly REL 3531] This course addresses a number of issues raised by autobiographical narrative in general, and by religious autobiography in particular. These include motivations (personal salvation, testimony or witness, therapy, to mobilize believers, to proselytize); relationships among self, family, God, and religious tradition; relationships among life, death, and afterlife; life before and after conversion; role of memory and narrative; multiple selves (remembered, remembering, writing, and presupposed, as well as the recovered or false); mind and body; oral vs. written; fact vs. truth; privacy vs. publicity; Ego vs. Self vs. non-Self; cultural, ethnic, gender, sexual, and religious differences; genre (confession, diary, memoir, novel, biography); as well as fundamental questions about the nature of autobiography: is it the narrative of how a self endeavors to know itself or, as understood from one contemporary critical perspective, by which a self constructs its own identity or, as understood by another contemporary perspective, how a narrative generates a fictitious self? In addition to the classic exemplars of the genre like Augustine and Rousseau, emphasis will be placed on the autobiographies of those for whom the dominant society has denied a self (in particular, African American and Jewish European,) as well as on the demands that an event like the Holocaust makes on the autobiographical and religious consciousness of those who have as it were survived their own deaths. [3] REL 8822. The Holocaust: Representation and Reflection. [Formerly REL 3537] Explores fundamental questions about the nature of history and representation, the nature of the human and the divine, that the Holocaust raises. [3] REL 8823. Japanese Mythology. [Formerly REL 3542] Antiquity to the present. Classic myths and re-tellings over time. Introduction to theoretical frameworks including comparative and historical. Politics, gender, and performance. [3] REL 8824. Apophatic Mysticism. [Formerly REL 3910] Unsayable or negative, theology from Plato and Neoplatonism through medieval mysticism, Kabbalah and Sufism. Baroque expressions in Silesius Angelus and John of the Cross. Romantic authors and modern and postmodern writers. Chinese Taoism, Advaita Vedanta, and the Buddhism of Nagarjuna. [3] REL 8825. Jewish Animals. [Formerly REL 3961] Throughout the centuries verbal and visual images of animals (pigs, dogs, vermin, rodents, apes, etc.) have been used to debase and bestialize Jews. What then is going on when Jewish writers employ such animal figures in their narratives and poems? After examining the history of such anti-Jewish representations, this course will analyze the animal tales of, among others, Heinrich Heine, Franz Kafka, Gertrude Kolmar (Animal Dreams), H. Leivick (“The Wolf”), Bernard Malamud, Felix Salten (Bambi), Moacir Scliar (The Centaur in the Garden), Curt Siodmak (The Wolf Man), and Art Spiegelman. [3] REL 8900. The Study of Religion. [Formerly REL 3601] Required of entering Ph.D. students in their first semester. Discussion of such topics as the methods, diversities, connections, purposes, and contexts of religious studies. [3]

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REL 8999. Non-candidate Research. [Formerly REL 3790] Research prior to entry into candidacy (completion of qualifying examination) and for special non-degree students. [Variable credit: 0-12]

SLS 7040. Second Language Acquisition Theories and Research. [Formerly SLS 312] (Also listed as French 7040 and German 5311) A review of current sociocultural and cognitive theories and research. [3]

REL 9100. Reading Course in Ethics. [Formerly REL 3976] May be repeated. [1-3]

SLS 8090. Special Topics in Second Language Studies. [Formerly SLS 395] Topics in applied linguistics including second language acquisition, curriculum design, and assessment. [3]

REL 9150. Reading Course in Medical Ethics. [Formerly REL 3977] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9200. Reading Course in Hebrew Bible. [Formerly REL 3974] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9300. Reading Course in Homiletics. [Formerly REL 3972] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9350. Reading Course in Liturgics. [Formerly REL 3973] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9400. Reading Course in American Church History. [Formerly REL 3979] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9415. Reading Course in Reformation History. [Formerly REL 3991] [1-3] REL 9425. Reading Course in Modern European Church History. [Formerly REL 3988] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9450. Reading Course in Early Church History. [Formerly REL 3980] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9475. Reading Course in Historical Theology. [Formerly REL 3981] [1-3] REL 9500. Reading Course in New Testament. [Formerly REL 3975] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9600. Reading Course in Religion, Psychology, and Culture. [Formerly REL 3970] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9650. Reading Course in Pastoral Theology. [Formerly REL 3971] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9675. Readings in Religion/Gender/Sexuality. [Formerly REL 3987] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9700. Reading Course in Systematic Theology. [Formerly REL 3983] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9750. Reading Course in Philosophical Theology. [Formerly REL 3984] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9800. Reading Course in Judaism. [Formerly REL 3982] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9820. Reading Course in History and Critical Theories of Religion. [Formerly REL 3985] May be repeated. [1-3] REL 9999. Ph.D. Dissertation Research. [Formerly REL 3990] May be repeated. [0-12]

Russian RUSS 5231. Jews in Russian Culture: Survival and Identity. (Also listed as RUSS 3231) A course on the history of Jewish contributions to Russian culture, including literature, the visual arts, theatre, and film. Questions of assimilation, the rise of Jewish national consciousness, and interest in Jewish heritage are discussed. No knowledge of Russian required. No credit for students who have earned credit for 3231. [3]

Second Language Studies SLS 6030. Foreign Language Learning and Teaching. [Formerly SLS 310] (Also listed as Spanish 6030, Portuguese 6030, French 6030, German 5310) Principles and practices of teaching a second language with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project. [3]

Sociology SOC 7700. Qualitative Methods Workshop. [Formerly SOC 315] Organization and execution of research in natural settings. Processes of collecting, analyzing, and reporting qualitative social data and documentary evidence. Theoretical and methodological bases of comparative-historical sociology. No credit for students who earned credit for 371 section 1 in fall 2009, spring 2011, fall 2012, or spring 2014. [3] SOC 8329. Survey Seminar on Gender and Sexuality. [Formerly SOC 329] Recent contributions to the field, including micro- and macro-level theories of the development of gender ideology/roles, labor force stratification, gender and social protest, and feminist methodologies. Attention to research on sexual meanings, identities, and behaviors. No credit for students who earned credit for 367 in spring 2013. [3] SOC 8335. Survey Seminar on Deviant Behavior and Social Control. [Formerly SOC 335] Major works on crime, juvenile delinquency, and forms of extralegal deviance. Social control in connection with counteraction of deviance, sociology of law, and manipulation of human behavior. [3] SOC 8339. Survey Seminar on Political Sociology. [Formerly SOC 339] Classical and modern theories about the nature and distribution of power in society and in other human groups. Social bases and implications of major political institutions, the state in particular; and political order and change. [3] SOC 8341. Survey Seminar on Population Studies and Human Ecology. [Formerly SOC 341] Population processes, elements of social organization, and their interaction. Major theories and research pertaining to fertility, mortality, migration, urbanization, urban structure, technology, and the division of labor. [3] SOC 8345. Survey Seminar on Social Stratification. [Formerly SOC 345] Major theories and lines of research pertaining to the origin, nature, and functioning of systems of social inequality. [3] SOC 8347. Survey Seminar on Sociology of Science and Knowledge. [Formerly SOC 347] How ideas and systems of thought are related to the social structure and culture of societies. Institutionalization of scientific and intellectual activity, scientific and intellectual communities or organizations, and social influences on the directions of research by scientists and academicians. [3] SOC 8351. Survey Seminar on Medical Sociology. [Formerly SOC 351] Theoretical paradigms and methodologies for the study of social and cultural factors in the perception, diagnosis, treatment, and distribution of disease. Emphases on medicalization, mental health, medical technology, and roles of patients and medical professionals. No credit for students who earned credit for 363 section 1 in fall 2011 or fall 2013. [3] SOC 8355. Survey Seminar on Sociology of Family. [Formerly SOC 355] Examinations of the family as a social institution. Principles of social organization applied to family relationships. Macro-level analyses of family structure, the effects of families on individuals, and interactions of family systems with other institutions. No credit for students who earned credit for 363 section 1 in fall 2011 or 2013. [3] SOC 8357. Survey Seminar on Sociology of Education. [Formerly SOC 357] Comparative and functional analyses of education in society and education as society. Theories accounting for the form, role, and evolution of educational systems. Intersection of education and other institutions. No credit for students who earned credit for 363 section 1 in fall 2011. [3] SOC 8359. Survey Seminar on International Migration. [Formerly SOC 359] Key current theoretical debates about international migration and intersection with the empirical data and case studies. Emphases on interdisciplinarity and method, and comparative studies. No credit for students who earned credit for 361 section 1 in fall 2011. [3]

Graduate School / Courses

147

SOC 9371. Special-Topic Seminars on Theory. [Formerly SOC 372] Each seminar focuses on a particular theorist, a particular theoretical perspective, or the methodology of theory construction. May be repeated more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

Spanish

SPAN 8130. Seminar: Studies in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature. [Formerly SPAN 361] A broad survey of specific topics such as: textual civil wars; literary constructions of the nation; reconstruction of the narrative genre (1700-1900); eccentricities of Spanish Enlightenment and/or Spanish Romanticism; theatrical spectacles. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

SPAN 5111. Spanish for Graduate Reading. [Formerly SPAN 101g] Survey of grammar and vocabulary, with extensive reading. Available only to graduate students for no credit. [0] SPAN 6010. Literary Analysis and Theory. [Formerly SPAN 301] (Also listed as Portuguese 6010) Methods of literary analysis for the teaching of literature. The systematic application of contemporary theories—structuralist and poststructuralist—in the analysis of poetry and narrative. [3] SPAN 6020. Ibero-Romance Philology. [Formerly SPAN 302] (Also listed as Portuguese 6020) Study of the evolution of the languages and dialects of the Iberian Peninsula. Analysis of selected linguistic developments and readings from medieval texts. [3] SPAN 6030. Foreign Language Learning and Teaching. [Formerly SPAN 310] (Also listed as Portuguese 6030) Principles and practices of teaching a second language with concentration on recent interactive and communicative models of foreign language instruction. Classroom observations, journal writing, development of materials, and a small action research project are expected. Required of all entering teaching assistants. [3] SPAN 6040. Research and Grant Proposal Writing. [Formerly SPAN 303] Designed for Humanities students. Issues of professionalization, career choices, and the job search. Models, guidance, and practice in formulating research projects and writing dissertation and grant proposals. Peer evaluation. [3] SPAN 7000. Survey of Medieval Spanish Literature. [Formerly SPAN 330] Introduction to major works of pre-modern Spanish literature through the fifteenth century. [3] SPAN 7010. Seminar: The Baroque. [Formerly SPAN 344] Readings in Spanish baroque literature and culture, including works by Góngora, Quevedo, Cervantes, María de Zayas, Calderón, and Gracián. [3] SPAN 7050. Introduction to Latin American Colonial Studies. [Formerly SPAN 314] (Also listed as Portuguese 314) Provides a panoramic introduction to the canonical works of the colonial period from “discovery” to “independence,” as well as an overview of the theoretical debates in colonial studies within the Latin American context. Topics include the construction and reshaping of identities and otherness through various stages of Latin American cultural history, the emergence of what has been called the American consciousness during the “New World Baroque,” and the discourses of “independence” and early nation building. [3] SPAN 7060. Seminar: Modernismo. [Formerly SPAN 333] The major literary movement of the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century in the Spanish-speaking world. Major authors, their context, and the fundamental ideological and literary shifts evident in their works. [3] SPAN 7070. Spanish American and Brazilian Literature I. [Formerly SPAN 341] (Also listed as Portuguese 7070) Spanish-American and Brazilian literature from the conquests to the end of the nineteenth century. Authors may include Sor Juana, Matos, Alencar, Assis, and Carrasquilla. [3]

SPAN 8120. Seminar: Studies in Golden Age Drama. [Formerly SPAN 343] The comedia nueva in cultural and critical contexts. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3]

SPAN 8140. Seminar: Modern Spanish Poetry and Poetics. [Formerly SPAN 363] Key moments of Spanish lyric poetry during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Theory and praxis, Romanticism, Avant-Garde, and Post-Modernism. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] SPAN 8150. Seminar: Studies in 20th- and 21st-Century Spanish Literature. [Formerly SPAN 372] Topics vary. May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] SPAN 8200. Seminar: Studies in Colonial Literature. [Formerly SPAN 338] (Also listed as Portuguese 8200) May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] SPAN 8210. Seminar: Hispanic American Essay. [Formerly SPAN 340] (Also listed as Portuguese 8210) May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] SPAN 8220. Seminar: Studies in Spanish American Literature in a Global Context. [Formerly SPAN 373] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] SPAN 8300. Seminar: Studies in Trans-Atlantic Literature and Culture. [Formerly SPAN 375] May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course each semester. [3] SPAN 8400. Seminar: Studies in Inter-American Literature. [Formerly SPAN 374] (Also listed as Portuguese 8400) Comparative approaches to literary texts from such New World culture