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MSU-ILIGAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Andres Bonifacio Avenue, Tibanga 9200 Iligan City, Philippines

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES CATALOGUE

A.Y. 2008-2009

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FOREWORD

In more than three decades of existence of the School of Graduate Studies, a number of changes in the curricular programs had been manifested. From its initial program offering in 1978 (viz., MTT, MLS and MASE), applicants to the School of Graduate Studies can now choose from an array of at least forty (40) programs. An overview of these programs that include a brief introduction, program objectives, admission requirements, policies, curricular offering and scheduling, courses and their description, faculty profile and other details are presented in this Catalogue. It is hoped that through this Catalogue, students will be able to familiarize themselves with the minutiae of the program. A walk-through on the program can readily help them in meeting curricular and other requirements for graduation. This Catalogue is also envisioned at promoting MSU-IIT graduate programs to the world. I believe that this compilation confirms MSU-IIT‘s position as a leading institution at par with other globally renowned academia. We are grateful to the College Coordinators for their time and effort in scrutinizing and submitting the documents that form part of this Catalogue. Likewise, we wish to thank Dr. Ma. Cristina L. Duyaguit, Secretary of the School, and Mr. Jivv Roy B. Manaloto, Office Assistant, for consolidating and arranging all documents in the appropriate format. Above all, we are thankful to the MSU-IIT administration under Chancellor Marcello P. Salazar and Vice Chancellor For Academic Affairs Arnulfo P. Supe for their full support particularly in the publication of this Catalogue.

____________________________ Jerson N. Orejudos XX Dean, School of Graduate Studies

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Content Introduction …………………………………………………………………………….. MSU-IIT Vision Statement …………………………………………………………….. MSU-IIT Mission Statement …………………………………………………………… School of Graduate Studies Mission …….…………………………………………….... School of Graduate Studies Goals …………………………………………………….... Admission Requirements ……………………………………………………………….. Other Requirements …………………………………………………………………….. School Fees ……………………………………………………………………………... Financial Assistance ………………..………………………………………………….. College of Arts and Social Sciences …………………………………………………... Department of English ………………………………………………………….….. Master of Arts in English Language Studies (MAELS) ……………………….…... Objectives ………………………………………………………………...…. Admission Requirements ……….…………………………………..……….. Degree Requirements ………….………………………………………..…… Curriculum ………………….…………………………………………..…… List of Courses by Semester ……………………………………………….... Catalogue of Courses ………….…………………………………………..… Master in English Language Studies (MELS) ………………………………….….. Rationale …………………………………………………………………….. Objectives …………..………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements ……..…………………………………………….. Degree Requirements ………..……………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester ……..…………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …..…………………………………………………… Faculty Profile ……...……………………………………………………….. Department of Filipino ….…………………………………………………………. Master of Arts in Filipino (MA Fil) …….…………………………………………. Introduction ………………………………………………………………….. Admission and Graduation Requirements …….…………………………….. Transfer of Credits ……...…………………………………………………… Residence Requirements …………………………………………………….. List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses ……...………………………………………………… Faculty Profile ……………………………………………………………….. Department of History ….………………………………………………………….. Master in History (MIH) …….…………………………………………………….. Objectives ………...…………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements ……...………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …..…………………………………………………… Faculty Profile ……..……………………………………………………….. Department of Sociology …….……………………………………………………. Master of Arts in Sociology (MA Socio) ….………………………………………. Introduction …………………………………………………………………..

1 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 8 9 14 14 14 15 15 16 18 22 24 24 24 24 25 25 25 27 30 31 31 31 31 31 32 34 36 37 37 37

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Objectives ……………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Master in Sociology (MIS) …..…………………………………………………….. Rationale …………………………………………………………………….. Objectives ………...…………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements ………..………………………………………….. Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… Summary Distribution of Units ………………………………………………………… Mode of Delivery ……………………………………………………………. List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Faculty Profile …...………………………………………………………….. College of Business Administration ………………………………………………….. Master in Business Management (MBM) …………………………………………. Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Specialization Courses …..………………………………………………….. Catalogue of Courses …..…………………………………………………… Foundation Cluster …………………...………………………………… Integrative Cluster ………………………………………………………. Specialization Cluster …………………………………………………... Major in Finance ………………………………………………………... Major in Human Resource Management ……....……………………….. Major in Marketing ……………………………………………………... Major in Production Management ……………………………………… Major in Institutional / Cooperative Management ……………………… Thesis Option …...…………………………………………………………… Non-Thesis Option …...……………………………………………………… Comprehensive Examinations …...………………………………………….. Admission Requirements ……...…………………………………………….. Graduation Requirements …...………………………………………………. Faculty Profile …..…………………………………………………………... College of Education …………………………………………………………………... Department of Physical Education ………………………………………………… Master of Science in Physical Education ……...….……………………………….. Rationale …...………………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… Delivery Mode …...………………………………………………………….. Retention Policies …...………………………………………………………. Proposed Implementation Scheme …..……………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Summary of Courses and Units …...…………………………………………

37 37 38 38 41 51 51 51 52 52 52 53 53 56 65 66 67 67 67 67 69 71 71 73 74 75 75 76 77 78 78 79 79 79 80 81 82 83 83 83 84 85 85 85 85 85 86 87

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Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Faculty Profile ……………………………………………………………….. Department of Science and Mathematics Education …..……………..…………… Master in Science Education (MSciEd) …..………………………………………... Rationale …...………………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… Types of Students …...………………………………………………………. Summary of Units …...………………………………………………………. Program of Study …...……………………………………………………….. List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Major in Biology ……...………………………………………………... Major in Chemistry ……………………………………………………... Major in Physics ………………………………………………………... Major in General Science ……..……………………………………….. Major in Elementary Mathematics ……...……………………………… Major in Secondary Mathematics ………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses ………..……………………………………………… Major in Biology ………………………………………………………... Major in Chemistry ……………………………………………………... Major in Physics ………………………………………………………... Major in General Science ……………...……………………………….. Major in Elementary Mathematics ………...…………………………… Major in Secondary Mathematics ………………………………………. Doctor of Philosophy in Science Education (Chemistry) ….………………………. Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. Mode of Instruction …...…………………………………………………….. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Curriculum …...……………………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Faculty Profile ……………………………………………………………………... College of Engineering …..…………………………………………………………… Department of Civil Engineering ………………………………………………….. Master of Science in Civil Engineering (MSCE) ….………………………………. Introduction ..………………………………………………………………... Objectives ...…………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements ……...………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Department of Mechanical Engineering …………………………………………... Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) ………………………….. Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...………………………………………………..

89 91 93 93 93 93 93 94 94 94 94 97 97 100 102 105 107 109 112 112 114 115 116 118 120 123 123 123 123 123 124 125 130 133 134 135 135 135 135 135 136 137 139 159 159 159 159 159

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Program Requirements …..………………………………………………….. 159 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 160 Catalogue of Courses …..….………………………………………………… 162 Interdisciplinary Programs ……….………………………………………………… 169 Master of Engineering (MOE) …………………………………………………….. 169 Introduction …...……………………………………………………………... 169 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 169 List of Courses by Semester …..……………………………………………. 170 Catalogue of Courses ..……………………………………………………… 171 Foundation Courses …………………………………………………….. 171 Core Courses ……...……………………………………………………. 173 Electrical Engineering Courses ……...…………………………………. 174 Electronics and Communications Engineering ……...…………………. 176 Materials Science and Engineering Courses ……..……………………. 180 Metallurgical Engineering Courses ……..…………………………....... 181 Ceramics Engineering Courses …………………………………………. 182 Mechanical Engineering Courses ………………………………………. 182 Environmental Engineering Courses …………………………………… 186 Doctor of Engineering (DOE) ……...……………………………………………… 189 Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... 189 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 189 Program Requirements …...…………………………………………………. 189 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 190 Catalogue of Courses …..…………………………………………………… 195 Faculty Profile ….………………………………………………………………….. 216 College of Science and Mathematics …………………………………………………. 219 Biological Sciences …..…………………………………………………………….. 220 Master of Biology (MOB) ………………………………………………………… 220 Rationale …...………………………………………………………………... 220 Objectives …..………………………………………………………………. 220 Admission Requirements …………………………………………………….. 220 Degree Requirements ………………………………………………………… 221 Departmental Requirements …………………………………………………. 222 Delivery Mode ……………………………………………………………….. 222 Program of Study …………………………………………………………….. 222 List of Courses by Semester …..……………….……………………………. 223 Master of Science in Biology (MS Bio) ….………………………………………... 225 Introduction …………………………………………………………………... 225 Admission Requirements …………………………………………………….. 225 Departmental Requirements …………………………………………………. 226 Other Requirements ………………………………………………………….. 228 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 228 Master of Science in Environmental Science (MS Envi Sci) ….…………………... 230 Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... 230 Objectives ...…………………………………………………………………. 230 Admission Requirements …………………………………………………….. 231 Course Requirements ………………………………………………………… 231 Other Requirements ………………………………………………………….. 232

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List of Elective Courses ……………………………………………………… 232 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 233 Master of Science in Marine Biology (MS Mar Bio) ….…………………………... 235 Introduction …………………………………………………………………... 235 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 235 Admission Requirements at MSU-IIT ……………………………………….. 235 Degree Requirements ………………………………………………………… 236 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 237 Doctor of Philosophy in Biology (Ph.D. Bio) ….………………………………….. 239 Introduction ……..…………………………………………………………... 239 Objectives ……...……………………………………………………………. 239 Admission Requirements …………………………………………………….. 239 Course Requirements ………………………………………………………… 240 Other Requirements ………………………………………………………….. 242 List of Courses by Semester …..……………………………………………. 243 Catalogue of Courses ..………..…………………………………………………… 246 Faculty Profile .…………………………………………………………………….. 266 Department of Chemistry ….………………………………………………………. 269 Master in Chemistry (MIC) ….…………………………………………………….. 269 Introduction …………..……………………………………………………... 269 Objectives …………...………………………………………………………. 269 Admission Requirements ……..…………………………………………….. 269 Degree Requirements …………...…………………………………………… 270 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 270 Catalogue of Courses …………...…………………………………………… 273 Master of Science in Chemistry (MS Chem.) ……………………………………... 282 Introduction ……………………..…………………………………………... 282 Objectives ……………………...……………………………………………. 282 Admission Requirements ……...…………………………………………….. 282 Degree Requirements ………...……………………………………………… 283 List of Courses by Semester ……………………………...…………………. 283 Catalogue of Courses ……………………………………..………………… 285 Master of Science in Chemistry (MS Chem-Straight Program) ….……………….. 294 Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... 294 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 294 Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. 294 Degree Requirements …..…………………………………………………… 295 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 296 Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… 303 Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry (Ph.D. Chem) ….……………………………... 312 Introduction …...……………………………………………………………... 312 Objectives …..………………………………………………………………. 312 Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. 312 Degree Requirements …..…………………………………………………… 312 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 313 Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… 315 Faculty Profile …….……………………………………………………………….. 324

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Department of Mathematics ………….……………………………………………. Master of Mathematics (MOM) …………………………………………………… Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... Objectives …..………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements ..……………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Master of Science in Mathematics (MS Math) ….…………………………………. Introduction …...……………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Master in Applied Statistics (MAS) ……………………………………………….. Introduction …..……………………………………………………………... Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. Courses Offered …...………………………………………………………… Catalogue of Courses …...…………………………………………………… Master of Science in Statistics (MS Stat) ….………………………………………. Introduction …...……………………………………………………………... Objectives …..………………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. Degree Requirements ……..………………………………………………… List of Courses by Semester ……...…………………………………………. Courses Offered …………………..………………………………………… Catalogue of Courses ……………..………………………………………… Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics (Ph.D. Math) ……………………………… Introduction ……………………………………….………………………... Objectives ………………………………………..…………………………. Admission Requirements ………………………..………………………….. List of Courses by Semester ……………………..…………………………. Catalogue of Courses ……………………………..………………………… Doctor of Mathematics (D. Math) ……………………….……………………….... Introduction ………………………………………..………………………... Objectives ………………………………………..…………………………. Admission Requirements ………………………...………………………….. List of Courses by Semester ….…………………..…………………………. Catalogue of Courses ……...………………………………………………… Faculty Profile …….……………………………………………………………….. Department of Physics …………………………………………………………….. Master of Physics (MOP) …….……………………………………………………. Rationale ……...…………………………………………………………....... Objectives ……...……………………………………………………………. Admission Requirements …...………………………………………………..

326 326 326 326 326 327 327 329 334 334 334 334 334 335 336 346 346 346 346 346 346 347 348 353 353 353 353 353 354 355 356 361 361 361 361 362 364 371 371 371 371 372 374 381 385 385 385 385 385 8

Degree Requirements ……...………………………………………………… 386 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 386 Catalogue of Courses ……...………………………………………………… 388 Master of Science in Physics (MS Phys) …….…………………………………….. 391 Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. 391 List of Courses by Semester …..……………………………………………. 391 Catalogue of Courses …..…………………………………………………… 394 Doctor of Philosophy in Physics (Ph.D. Phys) ….…………………………………. 399 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 399 Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. 399 Course Requirements …..…………………………………………………… 399 Other Requirements ……..………………………………………………….. 400 List of Courses by Semester ……..…………………………………………. 400 Catalogue of Courses ………..……………………………………………… 402 Faculty Profile …….……………………………………………………………….. 405 School of Computer Studies ………………………………………………………….. 407 Master of Science in Computer Application (MSCA)…..…………………………. 408 Introduction ……..…………………………………………………………... 408 Objectives ……..……………………………………………………………. 408 Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. 409 Required Courses …...……………………………………………………….. 409 Degree Requirements ……...………………………………………………… 411 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 411 Specialization Courses ...…………………………………………………….. 412 Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) ….………………………………. 413 Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… 413 List of Courses by Semester …..……………………………………………. 413 Specialization Courses ...…………………………………………………….. 414 Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM) ..………………………… 415 Degree Requirements ……...………………………………………………… 415 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 415 Specialization Courses ..…………………………………………………….. 416 Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT) …….………………………. 417 Degree Requirements …..…………………………………………………… 417 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 417 Specialization Courses ....…………………………………………………….. 418 Master of Computer Applications (MCA) ….……………………………………… 419 Degree Requirements …...…………………………………………………… 419 List of Courses by Semester …..….…………………………………………. 419 Specialization Courses ...…………………………………………………….. 420 Master of Computer Science (MCS) ………………………………………………. 421 Degree Requirements …..…….……………………………………………… 421 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 421 Specialization Courses ..……………………………………………………… 422 Master of Information Management (MIM) .…………………………………….... 423 Degree Requirements ……..………………………………………………… 423 List of Courses by Semester …..……………………………………………. 423 Specialization Courses ...……………………………………………………... 424

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Master of Information Technology (MIT) ….……………………………………. 425 Degree Requirements …..…………………………………………………… 425 List of Courses by Semester …..……………………………………………. 425 Specialization Courses ..……………………………………………………… 426 Catalogue of Courses ……………………………………………………………… 426 Faculty Profile …………………………………………………………………….. 443 Master in Information and Library Science ……………………………………….. 445 Rationale ……...……………………………………………………………... 445 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 446 Admission Requirements …...……………………………………………….. 446 Retention Policies …...………………………………………………………. 446 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 447 Summary of Courses …..……………………………………………………. 449 Catalogue of Courses ..……………………………………………………… 450 Sustainable Development Studies …...……………………………………………….. 457 Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies (DiSDS) …………………………….. 458 Rationale …...……………………………………………………………....... 458 Objectives …...………………………………………………………………. 458 Admission Requirements …..……………………………………………….. 459 Degree Requirements …..…………………………………………………… 460 List of Courses by Semester …...……………………………………………. 462 Ladderized ……………………………………………………………… 462 Lateral Entry to the Doctoral Program …………………………………. 464 Summary of Courses and Units …...………………………………………… 466 Catalogue of Courses …..…………………………………………………… 471 Core Courses ……...……………………………………………………. 471 Cognates (Required Courses) …………………………………………... 473 Sustainable Resource Management (SRM) …………………………….. 474 Sustainable Community Development (SCD) ………………………….. 476 Sustainable Economic Development (SED) ……………………………. 478 Sustainable Rural and Urban Planning (SRUP) ……...………………… 480 Sustainable Environmental Education (SEE) …………………………... 483 Sustainable Environmental Engineering (SEEng‘g) ……...……………. 486 Faculty Profile …..…………………………………………………………... 492 Officers of the MSU System …...……………………………………………………... 497 Officers of the MSU-IIT Administration ……...…………………………………….. 497 Academic Affairs ………………………………………………………………….. 497 Research and Extension ….………………………………………………………… 498 Administration and Finance …..……………………………………………………. 498

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES x

Introduction In 1973, the Department of Technician Teacher Training Program was established. It was later renamed School of Graduate Studies (SGS) in 1977 through BOR Res. No. 1195 s.1977. In 1978, the School offered its pioneering courses, namely, Master in Teaching Technology (MTT), Master in Library Science (MLS) and Master of Arts in Science Education (MASE). It produced its first graduates in MTT in 1981 and MLS in 1982. The year 1995 marked the offering of its first doctoral program - Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics (Ph.D. Math). It produced its first Ph.D. graduate in 1999. Through the years, the School of Graduate Studies grew by and large as it offered new courses and attracted more students in seven (7) Colleges/Schools in the Institute. In 2007, after thirty (30) years of existence, it has produced about six-hundred (600) graduates. It has likewise reached a student population of about six-hundred (600) enrolled in forty-six (46) programs of which eight (8) are doctoral programs, thirty-five (35) are masteral programs and three (3) are certificate/diploma programs as follows: College of Arts and Social Sciences Master of Arts in English Language Studies (MAELS)* Master in English Language Studies (MELS)* Master of Arts in Filipino (MA Fil) Master in History (MIH) Master of Arts in Sociology (MA Socio)* Master in Sociology (MIS)* College of Business Administration Master in Business Management (MBM) Certificate in MBM (CertInMBM) College of Education Master of Science in Physical Education (MSPE) Master of Science Education, Major in Biology, Chemistry, General Science, Mathematics and Physics (MSciEd) Doctor of Philosophy in Science Education, Major in Chemistry (PhDSciEd) College of Engineering Master of Science in Civil Engineering (MSCE)* Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME)* Master of Engineering (MOE)* Doctor of Engineering (DOE)*

College of Science and Mathematics Doctor of Philosophy in Biology (PhDBio)* Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry (PhDChem)* 1

Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics (PhDMath)* Doctor of Philosophy in Physics (PhDPhys)* Doctor of Mathematics (DMath) MS-Ph.D. Chemistry (Straight Program) Master of Science in Biology (MSBio)* Master of Science in Marine Biology (MSMB)* Master of Science in Environmental Science (MSES) Master of Biology (MOB)* Master of Science in Chemistry (MSChem)* Master in Chemistry (MIC)* Master of Science in Mathematics (MSMath)* Master of Mathematics (MOM)* Master of Science in Statistics (MSStat)* Master of Applied Statistics (MAS)* Master of Science in Physics (MSPhys)* Master of Physics (MOP)* Certificate in Physics (CertInPhys) School of Computer Studies Master of Science in Computer Applications (MSCA) Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT)* Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM)* Master in Information and Library Systems (MILS) Master of Computer Science (MCS) Master of Computer Applications (MCA) Master of Information Technology (MIT)* Master of Information Management (MIM) School of Graduate Studies Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies (DiSDS) Master in Sustainable Development Studies (MiSDS) Graduate Diploma in Sustainable Development Studies (GDSDS)

Note: A program with an asterisk is supported by CHED-HEDP-FDP Scholarship.

MSU-IIT Vision Statement A world class institution of higher learning renowned for its excellence in science and technology and for its commitment to the holistic development of the individual and society.

MSU-IIT Mission Statement

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To provide quality education for the industrial and socio-economic development of Mindanao with its diverse cultures through relevant programs in instruction, research, extension and community involvement.

School of Graduate Studies Mission To provide opportunities to qualified individuals for advanced education towards effective leadership and excellence in their profession through carefully organized and strongly supported programs for instruction and research.

School of Graduate Studies Goals In keeping with the Institute‘s thrust of being the Center of Excellence in Science and Technology committed to the development of Southern Philippines, the School of Graduate Studies of MSU-IIT is mandated: 

to provide effective programs which will produce competent human resource for science, engineering and technology, arts and humanities, business management and administration, both in the public and private sectors who will become strong catalysts in the development of the region and the country; and



to produce responsive and innovative researches that can be effectively disseminate and utilized.

Admission Requirements 1.

2.

3.

A bachelor‘s degree, or master‘s degree, from a recognized institution is required for admission to a master‘s program or doctoral program, respectively. For an applicant to a master‘s program, an undergraduate Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.00 or better, and for an applicant to a doctoral program, a GPA of 1.75 or better in the master‘s program; or some evidences of potential ability to pursue a graduate degree, e.g., excellent performance in teaching or research. Evidence of suitable background or its equivalent in the degree sought.

Other Requirements Submit two sets of documents to the program coordinator, each containing the following items: (1) accomplished admission form (including this form), (2) Xerox copy of Transcript of Records, (3) Xerox copy of transfer credentials/honorable dismissal (for non-MSU alumnus), (4) 2‖ x 2‖ picture attached to the application for admission form, and (5) official receipt of the admission fee. If possible, submit also the duly sealed two (2) letters of recommendation from former professors or experts in your field. 3

School Fees Tuition Fee ………………………………….. P600/unit Laboratory Fee ………………………………. P 500/lab Miscellaneous ……………………………….. P660

Financial Assistance 1.

2. 3.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships (A Student with a grade point average of 2.0 or better in his/her undergraduate, or graduate subject can apply. It carries monthly stipend and school fees waiver.) Financial Assistance may be availed of by the graduate students in the form of the CHED Faculty Development Program Scholarship. DOST Scholarship

CCO OLLLLE EG GE EO OFF A AR RTTSS A ANNDD SSO OCCIIA ALL SSCCIIE ENNCCE ESS

List of Programs 4

     

Master of Arts in English Language Studies (MAELS) Master of English Language Studies (MELS) Master of Arts in Filipino (MA Fil) Master in History (MIH) Master of Arts in Sociology (MA Socio) Master in Sociology (MIS)

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DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES The graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Arts in English Language Studies aims to upgrade linguistic and professional competence in the areas of language program management, instructional materials development and research.

Objectives 1. 2.

3.

To develop linguistically and professionally competent teachers of English who can lead in language programs design and management. To expose them to various approaches in teaching language and literature and provide them with the opportunity to choose, modify or adapt those which are relevant to teaching English in a bilingual setting. To provide them with the background needed to pursue research in English language studies and to contribute to the existing body of knowledge in their field.

Admission Requirements Admission to the MA English Language Studies Program requires: 1. Possession of a Bachelor‘s Degree in any of the following:  AB English  BSE English  BS Language Teaching

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Holders of other degrees may be admitted to the program upon completion of at least twelve (12) units in the following language and literature courses:  English 50 Introduction to the Study of Language  English 55 Descriptive Linguistics  English 85 TESL (Theory)  English 150 Survey of World Literature  English 190 Literary Criticism  English 75 The Reading Process Undergraduate grade point average of at least 2.0 or some evidence of potential ability to do graduate work. Submission of undergraduate transcript of records. Application letter and two letters of recommendation from former professors Passing an English Proficiency Test Passing the interview

6

Degree Requirements To qualify for the MA in English Language Studies degree, a student must have: 1. Successfully completed at least 33 units of the course work specified in his/her program of study with a grade point average of 2.00 2. Passed the comprehensive examination 3. Successfully defended his/her thesis before a panel

MA English Language Curriculum A. Core Courses English 200 Introduction to Linguistic Science English 250 Literary Criticism English 290 Methods of Research

B. Major Courses English 202 English 206 English 220 English 228 English English

C. Cognates English English English English English English English English English English English

Structure of English Sociolinguistics Approaches and Trends in Language Education Management of Language Programs in the Philippine Setting 230 The Reading Process and the Teaching of Literature 240 Literary Forms

208 222 224 226 232 234 236 238 242 246 252

Units 3 3 3

9

3 3 3 3 3 3

18

6

6

6

6 39

Language in Culture English for Specific Purposes English for Science and Technology Language Testing and Evaluation Reading in the Content Areas Advanced Composition Writing Communication and Mass Media Studies Technical Report Writing Contemporary Philippine Literature Creative Writing Practical Criticism

D. English 299 (Thesis) Total Number of Units

7

Course Requirements 9 units core courses 6 units cognates 18 units major courses 6 units Thesis Comprehensive examination

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES (MAELS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. English 200 English 250

Course Title

Units

Literary Forms

3

Literary Criticism

3

Cognate Total

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

English 202 Structure of English English 220 Approaches and Trends in Language Education The Reading Process and English 230 the Teaching of Literature Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

3

Prerequisite(s) English 200 3

3 3 3 9

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

English 206 Sociolinguistics Management of Language Programs in the Philippine Setting English 250 Literary Criticism Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

3

English 228

Prerequisite(s) English 200 3

3 3 9

Second Year, First Semester 8

Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

English 290 Methods of Research Cognate

3 6

Total

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

English 299

Thesis

Units

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

6

Prerequisite(s) Passing the Comprehensive Examination to be given at the end of the first semester

CATALOGUE OF COURSES ENGLISH 200

INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC SCIENCE

The course is an introduction to linguistics as an empirical science. It discusses the methods of linguistic investigation, reviews its scope and major subdivisions—synchronic and diachronic—and investigates the relation of language to sociology, psychology and teaching. Credit ENGLISH 202

: 3 units

STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH

The course is a study of the phonology, morphology and syntax of modern American English through various models. It provides the student with a structural knowledge of the language. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENGLISH 206

: 3 units : ENGLISH 200

SOCIOLINGUISTICS

The course is a study of the relationship between language and society and the problems of multilingual and multidialectal societies. It helps provide a background to language policy making and planning. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENGLISH 208

: 3 units : ENGLISH 200

LANGUAGE IN CULTURE 9

This course deals with the interrelationship of language and culture. Some of the topics that will be discussed are cross-cultural understanding acculturation, enculturation, biculturalism world view and possible causes of communication breakdown. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENGLISH 216

: 3 units : ENGLISH 200

ADVANCED ORAL COMMUNICATION

This course equips the students with the basic principles of speech and the skills in speech making and delivery, group discussions, lectures, oral reports, radio and television reviews. Credit ENGLISH 220

: 3 units

APPROACHES AND TRENDS IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

The course is a study of the approaches and trends in the teaching and learning of English in a bilingual setting. Credit ENGLISH 222

: 3 units

ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES

This course is a practical training in the designing and managing of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) programs. It includes developing materials for English for Academic Purposes (EAP), English for Occupational Purposes (EOP) and English for Science and Technology (EST). Credit ENGLISH 224

: 3 units

ENGLISH FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

This course involves materials design and development for teaching English for Science and Technology. Credit ENGLISH 226

: 3 units

LANGUAGE TESTING AND EVALUATION

This course is a training in the construction of instruments for language testing and evaluation purposes. It also includes a review of basic statistical tools necessary for constructing valid and reliable tests. Credit ENGLISH 228

: 3 units

MANAGEMENT OF LANGUAGE PROGRAMS IN THE PHILIPPINE SETTING

10

This course integrates the management principles and practices in the language and literature program design, evaluation and implementation. It uses the case study method for potentially a language program manager or coordinator. It includes curriculum planning, materials designing and evaluation. Credit ENGLISH 230

: 3 units

THE READING PROCESS AND THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE

This course is a study of the nature of the reading process and strategies in the teaching of reading and literature. Credit ENGLISH 232

: 3 units

READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS

This course applies reading strategies to comprehend, analyze, synthesize and evaluate content areas texts (Science, Math, etc.) It also involves developing reading materials for use in the language classroom based on academic texts used in the content areas. Credit ENGLISH 234

: 3 units

ADVANCED COMPOSITION WRITING

The course is a study of the theories and strategies in teaching composition writing. It also gives the graduate student experience in writing particularly in the major types of discourse. Credit ENGLISH 236

: 3 units

COMMUNICATION AND MASS MEDIA STUDIES

The course provides the students with a comprehensive view of the latest communication theories and mass media studies as vital components of a changing society. This course also equips the students with skills in campus journalism and alternative mass media production. Credit ENGLISH 238

: 3 units

TECHNICAL REPORT WRITING

The course covers the mechanics of writing and the production of special reports like progress reports, proposals, and inter-office correspondence. It aims to teach the student how to communicate facts to inform, entertain, enlighten or persuade. ENGLISH 240

LITERARY FORMS 11

This course is an in-depth study of the structure of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and the narrative. It exposes the graduate student to literary writers whose achievements are considered high watermarks in the history of literary writing. Included in the study are the common or different artistic practices of Western and Asian fiction, drama and poetry. Credit ENGLISH 242

: 3 units

CONTEMPORARY PHILIPPINE LITERATURE

This course is a study of written Philippine literature from the 1920‘s to the present. Credit ENGLISH 244

: 3 units

WORLD LITERATURE

The course takes up the great classics of the world like the Bible, Koran, the Mahabharata, the Iliad and the Odyssey, the Aeneid, War and Peace, the Song of Roland and the German Epic. Credit ENGLISH 246

: 3 units

CREATIVE WRITING

This is a workshop-type course which teaches students how to write imaginative or creative literature by actually writing and submitting their works. Credit ENGLISH 250

: 3 units

LITERARY CRITICISM

The course is a survey of literary critical thought in the West beginning with Plato and ending with the contemporary theorists. It is designed to familiarize the student with the different and contrasting viewpoints of what literature is, its source and form. Credit

: 3 units

12

ENGLISH 252

PRACTICAL CRITICISM

This is a course in ―applied criticism‖ dealing with the analysis and evaluation of specific literary works in terms of their structure organization, theme, characterization, language and style. Credit ENGLISH 262

: 3 units

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE-ESL PRACTICUM

This course provides students the opportunity to apply TESL principles in instructional materials development and in the teaching of English in Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced levels. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : ENGLISH 220 or ENGLISH 230

ENGLISH 280-A SPECIAL PROJECT IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE This course equips students with the skills to identify and conduct special projects in the teaching of language and literature relevant to the peculiar needs of their schools. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ENGLISH 290

: 3 units : 6 units of core courses and 12 units of major Courses

METHODS OF RESEARCH

This course is a review of the basic methods of research and an intensive study of the specific methods employed in language and literary research. The student is expected to write and defend a research proposal at the end of the course. Credit ENGLISH 299

: 3 units

THESIS

The thesis must be presented and defended in an oral examination before a thesis panel. Credit

: 6 units

MASTER IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES 13

(Non-Thesis Program) Rationale Globalization and the technology revolution have impacted on our national life in almost unimaginable ways. To cope with their effects, the Philippines has had to reassess and realign its national goals. In education, this realignment is spelled out in its objective of producing globally competitive graduates who possess among other competencies, competence in the language of the global village and in the use of the latest technology. Our facility in English, once our competitive edge over other Asian nations, is slowly being undermined by growing perceptions of its deterioration. The perceived deterioration is attributed to many factors not the least of which is the quality of instruction in all levels of our educational system. Since English is the medium through which practically all knowledge is assessed, it is imperative that the quality of instruction in English be upgraded. The Master in English Language Studies (Non-Thesis Program) is conceived to address the need to upgrade English language instruction in the tertiary level since this level is the training ground for teachers in all fields of study. The MELS (Non-Thesis Program) is designed to upgrade the competence and skills of college English instructors who do not have the inclination or the time to write a thesis, or the required undergraduate degree to teach English but who have been teaching English by force of circumstance, or the financial means to pursue a Master of Arts degree in English. The English Department Faculty of the College of Arts and Social Sciences has the capability and the experience to help upgrade the competence and skills of English instructors in this part of Mindanao. The expertise of its faculty members in language, literature and language teaching is acknowledged in the frequent visitations as resource persons in seminars, conferences and workshops or as consultants in research and publications. By implementing the MELS (Non-Thesis Program) the institute will put to good use the expertise of the English Department Faculty, add to its good name the distinction of being a CHED delivery school in English instruction and help work towards achieving our national objective in education.

Objectives The MELS (Non-Thesis Program) commits to uphold the Institute‘s vision, mission and objectives. Specifically, the program aims to provide graduates with knowledge and skills to enable them to: 1. 2.

upgrade their linguistic and discourse competence in English; apply appropriate approaches in teaching English and literature in a bilingual setting; 14

3.

undertake projects and studies in English language instruction and literature which are responsive to the peculiar needs of their communities.

Admission Requirements Admission to the MA English Language Studies (Non-Thesis Program) requires: 1. Possession of a Bachelor‘s Degree in any of the following:  AB English  BSE English  BS Language Teaching  BEEd English Graduates of other degrees may be admitted to the program upon completion of at least six (6) units in the following undergraduate courses:  English 50 Introduction to the Study of Language  English 55 Descriptive Linguistics  English 85 TESL (Theory)  English 150 Survey of World Literature  English 75 The Reading Process This requirement may be waived if the applicant graduated with honors, or if he or he has been a full-time English teacher for at least two (2) years. 2. Undergraduate transcript of records 3. Application letter 4. Letters from two former professors certifying applicant‘s capability to do graduate work 5. Passing score in the English Proficiency Test

Degree Requirements 1. 2. 3.

Completion of 36 units of the course work with a grade point average of 2.00 Passing the comprehensive examination in two areas: language and literature. Submission of a Special Project

A certificate of proficiency will be awarded upon completion of 21 units of course work.

MASTER IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES (MELS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (Designed for students who will start their studies in summer.) 15

First Year, Summer Course No. English 202 English 216 English 234

Course Title

Units

Structure of English

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

Advanced Oral Communication Advanced Composition Writing Total

3 3 9

First Year, First Semester Course No. English 206 English 220

Course Title

Units

Sociolinguistics

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

Approaches and Trends in Language Education Total

3 6

First Year, Second Semester Course No. English 230 English 240

Course Title

Units

Reading process and the Teaching of Literature

3

Literary Forms

3 Total

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

6

Second Year, Summer Course No. English 236

Course Title Development Communication Cognate Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3 3 6

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk.

Prerequisite(s) 16

Lec Lab English as a Second English 262 Language (ESL Practicum) Cognate

Total English 220 or English 230

3

Total

3 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Special Project in English280A Language and Literature Total

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total

3

Prerequisite(s) 6 units of core courses and 12 units of major courses

3

Master in English Language Studies Curriculum A. Core Courses English 202 Structure of English English 220 Approaches and Trends in Language Education English 280A Special Project in Language and Literature

Units 3 3 3

9

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

21

B. Major Subjects English 206 English 216 English 230 English 234 English 236 English 240 English 262

Sociolinguistics Advanced Oral Communication The Reading Process and the Teaching of Literature Advanced Composition Writing Development Communication Literary Forms English as a Second Language (ESL Practicum)

C. Cognates English 200 English 208 English 222 English 224 English 226 English 228 English 232 English 238 English 242 English 244 English 246

Introduction to Linguistic Science Language in Culture English for Specific Purposes English for Science and Technology Language Testing and Evaluation Management of Language Programs in the Philippine Setting Reading in the Content Areas Technical Report Writing Contemporary Philippine Literature World Literature Creative Writing

6

17

English 250 English 252

Literary Criticism Practical Criticism

CATALOGUE OF COURSES ENGLISH 200 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC SCIENCE The course is an introduction to linguistics as an empirical science. It discusses the methods of linguistic investigation, reviews its scope and major subdivisions—synchronic and diachronic—and investigates the relation of language to sociology, psychology and teaching. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 202 STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH The course is a study of the phonology, morphology and syntax of modern American English through various models. It provides the student with a structural knowledge of the language. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : ENGLISH 200

ENGLISH 206 SOCIOLINGUISTICS The course is a study of the relationship between language and society and the problems of multilingual and multidialectal societies. It helps provide a background to language policy making and planning. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : ENGLISH 200

ENGLISH 208 LANGUAGE IN CULTURE This course deals with the interrelationship of language and culture. Some of the topics that will be discussed are cross-cultural understanding acculturation, enculturation, biculturalism world view and possible causes of communication breakdown. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : ENGLISH 200

ENGLISH 216 ADVANCED ORAL COMMUNICATION This course equips the students with the basic principles of speech and the skills in speech making and delivery, group discussions, lectures, oral reports, radio and television reviews. 18

Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 220 APPROACHES AND TRENDS IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION The course is a study of the approaches and trends in the teaching and learning of English in a bilingual setting. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 222 ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES This course is a practical training in the designing and managing of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) programs. It includes developing materials for English for Academic Purposes (EAP), English for Occupational Purposes (EOP) and English for Science and Technology (EST). Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 226 LANGUAGE TESTING AND EVALUATION This course is a training in the construction of instruments for language testing and evaluation purposes. It also includes a review of basic statistical tools necessary for constructing valid and reliable tests. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 228 MANAGEMENT OF LANGUAGE PROGRAMS IN THE PHILIPPINE SETTING This course integrates the management principles and practices in the language and literature program design, evaluation and implementation. It uses the case study method for potentially a language program manager or coordinator. It includes curriculum planning, materials designing and evaluation. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 230 THE READING PROCESS AND THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE This course is a study of the nature of the reading process and strategies in the teaching of reading and literature. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 232 READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS This course applies reading strategies to comprehend, analyze, synthesize and evaluate content areas texts (Science, Math, etc.) It also involves developing reading materials for use in the language classroom based on academic texts used in the content areas. 19

Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 234 ADVANCED COMPOSITION WRITING The course is a study of the theories and strategies in teaching composition writing. It also gives the graduate student experience in writing particularly in the major types of discourse. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 236 COMMUNICATION AND MASS MEDIA STUDIES The course provides the students with a comprehensive view of the latest communication theories and mass media studies as vital components of a changing society. This course also equips the students with skills in campus journalism and alternative mass media production. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 238 TECHNICAL REPORT WRITING The course covers the mechanics of writing and the production of special reports like progress reports, proposals, and inter-office correspondence. It aims to teach the student how to communicate facts to inform, entertain, enlighten or persuade. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 240 LITERARY FORMS This course is an in-depth study of the structure of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and the narrative. It exposes the graduate student to literary writers whose achievements are considered high watermarks in the history of literary writing. Included in the study are the common or different artistic practices of Western and Asian fiction, drama and poetry. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 242 CONTEMPORARY PHILIPPINE LITERATURE This course is a study of written Philippine literature from the 1920‘s to the present. Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 244 WORLD LITERATURE The course takes up the great classics of the world like the Bible, Koran, the Mahabharata, the Iliad and the Odyssey, the Aeneid, War and Peace, the Song of Roland and the German Epic. 20

Credit

: 3 units

ENGLISH 262 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE-ESL PRACTICUM This course provides students the opportunity to apply TESL principles in instructional materials development and in the teaching of English in Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced levels. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENGLISH 280-A

: 3 units : ENGLISH 220 or ENGLISH 230

SPECIAL PROJECT IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

This course equips students with the skills to identify and conduct special projects in the teaching of language and literature relevant to the peculiar needs of their schools. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : 6 units of core courses and 12 units of major courses

FACULTY PROFILE 1. Alinsangan, Paula K.

MA in English, St. Louis University, 1976 BSE English, St. Louis University, 1967

2. Baguio, Darwisa B.

Ph.D. Language Studies, XU, 2001 MA Communication Arts, XU, 1993 AB English, Notre Dame of Jolo, 1964 Bachelor of Laws, SU, 1968

3. Boniao, Rosie E.

MA Ed. Teaching Communication Arts, XU, 1975 AB English, 1969 BSE English, 1970

4. Cagaanan, Judith S.

MAELS, MSU-IIT, 2000 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1995

5. Caponong, Lorna T.

AB English, DCC, 1977 MEd Reading, UP-Diliman, 1985

6. Dela Cruz, Luvizminda C.

Ph.D. Linguistics, UP-Diliman, 1990 MA English Ed., Ateneo de Davao University, 1978 BSE English, 1967 AB English, 1966

7. Echavez, Nancy Q.

MAELS, MSU-IIT, 2000 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1994

21

8. Englis, Rhodora N.

Ph.D. Language Studies, MSU, 2001 MEd Reading, UP-Diliman, 1979 AB English, MSU, 1973

9. Fajardo, Loreta L.

MA Literature, XU, 2008 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1981

10. Fernandez, Steven Patrick C. Doctor in Fine Arts (Creative Writing), DLSU, 2007 MA Phil Studies, UP-Diliman, 1985 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1976 11. Miguel, Faith O.

Ph.D. Language Teaching, UP-Diliman, 1996 MEd. Teaching English as Second Language, UP, 1988 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1981

12. Molina, Maridette E.

MAELS, MSU-IIT, 2004 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1991

13. Ortega, Christine G.

MA English (Creative Writing), SU, 1979 AB English and American Literature, SU, 1975

14. Parmisana, Venus

MA Teaching English Language, DLSU, 2007 BSED English, St. Michael‘s College, 1992

15. Rodil, Saturnina S.

MAELS, MSU-IIT, 2000 AB History, MSU-IIT, 1982

16. Tan, Anthony L.

Ph.D. British Literature, SU, 1982 MA Creative Writing, SU, 1975 AB English, ADZU, 1968

17. Valbuena, Merle D.

MA TESL, SU, 1979 BSE English, SU, 1969

18. Valdez, Lerry L.

Ph.D. Language Studies, 2001 MED Reading, UP-Diliman, 1985 BSE English, SU, 1967

19. Villabona, Ma. Theresa S.

MA TESL Story Telling, UP-Diliman, 1993 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1982

20. Yu, Rodolfo P.

MA Communication Arts, SMC, 1977 BS Biology, SMC Velez College, 1973

22

23

DEPARTAMENTO NG FILIPINO AT IBANG MGA WIKA MASTER OF ARTS IN FILIPINO The department is one of the six departments of the College of Arts and Social Sciences. One of its functions is to service the language requirements, particularly Filipino and other requested foreign languages, needed by other colleges of the Institute. It is also tasked to implement the two current degree programs: the Bachelor of Arts in Filipino and the Master of Arts in Filipino. It has for its mission to be more responsive to the needs of its clientele and the community it will serve. It has also taken into consideration the central focus of CHED which is towards the scientific transfer of knowledge and its emphasis on research and its application. The degree programs cater to the global needs of the teacher and practitioner of Filipino. The department trains its clientele to have over-all general and balanced knowledge of and skills in Filipino as a language and discipline which they can utilize in their present teaching jobs in the elementary, secondary and tertiary levels of education. The Department has the following for its general objectives: 1) To provide meaningful experiences that will foster among its graduates nationalist and humanist values and equip them with skills to teach and use Filipino in order to constructively contribute to the national development according to their innate capabilities and individual pace; 2) To prepare the graduate to have a comprehensive and in-depth knowledge and skills to teach and use Filipino as a discipline and language through research and scholarly endeavors and in the transfer of other knowledge and skills.

Admission and Graduation Requirements 1.

The student must be a graduate of a bachelor‘s degree in Filipino or its equivalent from a reputable and recognized institution of higher learning. Application must exhibit high quality and integrity of intellect as determined through  Examination of undergraduate credentials  Recommendation of at least two (2) former professors and/or recognized authority in the discipline or area of specialization.  Interview of applicant

2.

He/She must be able to pass a qualifying or admission examination to be administered by the department. Non-holders of a bachelor‘s degree in Filipino may be admitted to the program but are required to take the current undergraduate basic and some major courses in Filipino

3.

24

which are pre-requisites to the courses in the graduate program. Determination of these courses will be done by a panel of graduate faculty to be composed of not less than three (3) members.

Transfer of Credits 1.

Undergraduate units taken from other institutions may be credited for A.B. Filipino provided a student shall satisfy all requirements by the department.

2.

No units in undergraduate courses may be credited to graduate work.

3.

No more than nine (9) graduate units earned from other university may be credited to course work for the program; provided, however, that units earned from equivalent master‘s degree programs in other units of the Mindanao State University System and the University of the Philippines which satisfy the description of the course may be granted to the student upon oral examination by a panel of interrogators in the department. Provided, further, that a student must enroll and pass at least fifteen (15) units of course work in the program.

Residence Requirements 1.

The student shall have been in residence for at least one year immediately prior to the award of the degree.

2.

All requirements for the graduate degree shall be completed in not more than five calendar years including leaves. Special cases, however, may be given an extension of one or more semesters, but in no case shall the extension be longer than two years.

MASTER NG SINING SA FILIPINO, MEDYOR SA WIKA AT LITERATURA Unang Taon, Unang Semestre Kurso Fil 200 Fil 201 Fil 252

Deskripsyon Riserts sa Filipino Pagsasaling wika Gram. & Istruk. ng Fil. Kabuuang Yunit

Yunit 3 3 3 9

Unang Taon, Pangalawang Semestre Kurso

Deskripsyon

Yunit 25

Fil 235 Fil 250 Fil 251 ELEKTIB

Kritisismo sa Panitikan Pagpaplanong Pangwika Baray. & Baryas. ng Fil (Wika) Kabuuang Yunit

3 3 3 3 12

Ikalawang Taon, Unang Semestre Kurso Fil 253 Fil 254 Fil 241 ELEKTIB

Deskripsyon Leksikograpiya Lit. at Kulturang Pop./or Mga Piyesang Pampanitikan (Literatura) Kabuuang Yunit

Yunit 3 3 3 3 12

Ikalawang Taon, Pangalawang Semestre Kurso *Fil 300

Deskripsyon Pagsulat ng Tesis Kabuuang Yunit

Yunit 6 6

*Kakailanganin: Eksaminasyong Komprehensibo

26

CATALOGUE OF COURSES MGA PUNDASYONG KURSO FIL 200

RISERTS SA FILIPINO Pagtalakay sa mga teorya at pamamaraan sa pananaliksik; masusing pag-aaral sa mga bahagi at balangkas ng tesis at papel panriserts. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 201

: 3 yunit : wala

PAGSASALING-WIKA Mga teorya, simulain, paraan at teknik sa pagsasaling-wika, aktwal na pagsasalin ng mga teksto sa idyomatikong ekspresyon, poklor, panitikan, syensya at teknolohiya. Kredit Kakailanganin

: 3 yunit : wala

MGA MEDYOR NA KURSO FIL 235

KRITISISMO SA PANITIKAN Mga teoryang kontemporaryo sa pagsusuri at kritisismong pampanitikan na may aktwal na aplikasyon. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 241

: 3 yunit : wala

MGA PIYESANG PAMPANITIKAN Paghahanda, kuryograpi, at pagdidirek ng mga piyesang pantanghalan gaya ng tulang pambigkasan, balagtasan, sabayang bigkas, madulang pagbasa, at iba pa. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 250

: 3 yunit : wala

PAGPAPLANONG PANGWIKA: TEORYA AT PRAKTIKA Mga teorya ng pagpaplanong pangwika at isinagawang pagpaplanong pangwika sa Pilipinas mula sa panahon ng Kastila hanggang sa kasalukuyan.

FIL 251

Kredit : 3 yunit Kakailanganin : wala MGA BARAYTI AT BARYASYON NG WIKANG FILIPINO Pagtalakay sa mga barayti at baryasyon ng Filipino dahil sa mga poklor na 27

pangkalawakan, pang-espasyo, kultural, o etnolinggwistik. Kredit Kakailanganin FIL 252

: 3 yunit : wala

GRAMATIKA AT ISTRUKTURA NG FILIPINO Intensibong pag-aaral ng gramatika ng wikang Filipino na may pokus sa mga bahagi ng pananalita at istruktura ng wika. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 253

: 3 yunit : wala

LEKSIKOGRAPIYA Intensibong pag-aaral sa leksikograpi na may empasis sa pag-alam sa mga teoryang kasangkot at aktwal na aplikasyon sa Filipino. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 254

: 3 yunit : wala

LITERATURA AT KULTURANG POPULAR Analisis ng kulturang popular kasama ang mga bagong modang esoteriko at kinababaliwang idolatriya at ng mga genre ng literaturang resulta nito. Kredit Kakailanganin

: 3 yunit : wala

MGA KURSONG ELEKTIB FIL 255

WIKA, KULTURA AT LIPUNAN Ang interrelasyon ng wika, kultura at lipunan na nagbubunga sa iba‘t ibang pang-araw-araw na uri at konteksto ng komunikasyon lalo na sa mga patern na berbal at di-berbal. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 256

: 3 yunit : wala

KONTEMPORARYONG PANITIKAN Pag-aaral ng debelopment ng literatura mula 1970 hanggang sa kasalukuyan. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 257

: 3 yunit : wala

MGA PAGDULOG AT TEORYA NG PANITIKAN Analisis ng mga pagdulog at teoryang ginagamit sa literatura. 28

Kredit Kakailanganin FIL 258

: 3 yunit : wala

SIMULAIN AT KALAKARAN SA PAGTUTURO NG WIKA Mga kontemporaryong kalakaran at pagdulog sa pagtuturo ng wika na may pokus sa Filipino. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 259

: 3 yunit : wala

LINGGWISTIKANG APLAYD Mga teorya at prinsipyo sa linggwistikang ginagamit sa pagkatuto ng wika. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 215

: 3 yunit : wala

SOSYOLINGGWISTIKA Panimulang pagtalakay ng mga teorya sa larangan ng sosyolohiya at linggwistika. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 249

: 3 yunit : wala

KASAYSAYANG PAMPANITIKAN NG PILIPINAS Pagbakas ng pag-unlad na historikal ng literaturang Pilipino mula sa simula hanggang sa kasalukuyan. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 239

: 3 yunit : wala

MGA PINAGMULAN AT IMPLUWENSIYA SA PANITIKAN NG PILIPINAS Analisis ng pinagmulan ng mga paktor ng nakaapekto sa panitikan ng Pilipinas at ang lalim ng impluwensiya nito sa mga uri ng panitikang nabuo. Kredit Kakailanganin

FIL 300

: 3 yunit : wala

PAGSULAT NG TESIS Pagsulat at pagpresenta ng tesis sa isang eksaminasyong oral sa harap ng isang komite/panel sa tesis. Kredit Kakailanganin

: 6 yunit : wala

29

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Banawa, Marie Joy D.

Ph.D. Filipino (Language Planning), UP-Diliman, 2005 MA Ed. Communication Arts Filipino, Xavier University, 1995 BSE-Filipino, MSU-Marawi, 1986

2 Dizon, Rosario B.

Ph.D. Language Studies, MSU-Marawi, 2001 MA Filipino, Roosevelt Memorial College, 1983 BSE Pilipino, Rizal Technological University, 1976

3 Gervacio, German V.

MA in Filipino, UP-Diliman, 1999 AB Filipino, MSU-IIT, 1993

4 Hufana, Nerissa L.

Ph.D. Language Studies, MSU-Marawi, 2001 MA Ed. Filipino, WVSU, 1996 BSE Pilipino, Central Philippines University, 1976

5 Magracia, Emma B.

Ph.D. Language Teaching, UP-Diliman, 1997 M.Ed. Language Teaching, UP-Diliman, 1980 MA Adm. & Supervision, BVNS, 1976 BSE WVSU, 1965

6 Mata, Lydia L.

MA Ed. Communication Arts (Filipino), Xavier University, 1990 BSE, Misamis University, 1972

7 Quirante, Jepeth C.

MA Ed. Communication Arts (Filipino), Xavier University, 1997 BSE, Foundation University-Dumaguete City, 1968

8 Revelo, Corazon A.

MA Filipino, MSU-Marawi, 1996 BSE, University of San Carlos-Cebu City, 1965

9 Sandoval, Mary Ann S. MA Ed. Communication Arts (Filipino), Xavier University, 2000 AB Filipino, MSU-IIT, 1997 10 Santos, Angelina L.

Ph.D. Language Studies, MSU-Marawi, 2001 M.Ed. Language Teaching. UP-Diliman, 1981 BSE English, Pasig Catholic College, 1972

11 Ijan, Melba B.

MA Filipino, MSU-IIT, 1999 AB Filipino, MSU-IIT, 2005

30

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY MASTER IN HISTORY (NON-THESIS OPTION) Objectives The Master in history non-thesis program has the following objectives: 1. 2.

to develop graduate students‘ potential in analyzing social issues through an understanding of historical facts and information. to deepen graduate students‘ understanding of history as a means to analyzing current social, political, economic and cultural issues.

Admission Requirements 1.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Have a Bachelor‘s degree in any of the following fields: a. History b. Political Science c. Sociology d. Social Studies Official transcript of records of Bachelor‘s degree or its equivalent Recommendation from two (2) former professors and/or recognized authorities in History and other Social Science Curriculum Vitae Personal Interview

Degree Requirements Core Courses Required Courses Cognate Special Project

12 units 18 units 3 units 3 units

TOTAL 36 units

31

MASTER IN HISTORY (MIH) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Hist 204 Hist 205

Course Title

Units

Strategies in the Teaching of History Issues on Contemporary Asian History Total

3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 6

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Issues on Contemporary European History Issues on Contemporary Latin Hist 207 American History Total Hist 206

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 6

First Year, Summer Course No. Hist 201 Hist 202

Historiography World Geography

3 3

Hist 203

Philosophy of History

3 9

Course Title

Units

Total

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Hist 211

Course Title Issues on the Ethno-History of the Indigenous Communities in the Philippines Special Project Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 6

32

Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

Comprehensive Examination

Second Year, Summer Course No. Hist 208 Hist 209 Hist 210

Course Title Issues on Contemporary Middle Eastern History Issues on Contemporary Sub-Saharan History Issues on Contemporary North American History Total

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 9

Core Courses/ Required Courses Hist 201 Hist 202 Hist 203 Hist 204

Historiography World Geography Philosophy of History Strategies on the Teaching of History

Specialized Courses Hist 205 Hist 206 Hist 207 Hist 208 Hist 209 Hist 210

18 units

Issues on Contemporary Asian History Issues on Contemporary European History Issues on Contemporary Latin American History Issues on Contemporary Middle Eastern History Issues on Contemporary Sub-Saharan History Issues on Contemporary North American History

Cognate Hist 211

12 units

3 units

Hist 212

Issues on Ethno-History of the Indigenous Cultural Communities in the Philippines Issues on Contemporary Philippine History

Hist 298

Special Project

3 units

33

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CORE COURSES (12 units) HIST 201

HISTORIOGRAPHY Historiography, its basic principles at work, trends and schools in historiography especially in the 20th century, ethno-history, oral and local history and some specific problems of historiography in the Philippine Setting. Credit

HIST 202

: 3 units WORLD GEOGRAPHY

Geographical distribution of mineral and other natural resources and their impact on the international economic order, geopolitical and the global environment. Credit HIST 203

: 3 units PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY

Introduction to the basic concepts, principles, methods and objectives in history as viewed by various philosophers from Herodotus to the present. Credit HIST 204

: 3 units

STRATEGIES IN THE TEACHING OF HISTORY A seminar workshop on the strategies in the teaching of history in which the participants are expected to conduct demonstration teaching. Credit

: 3 units

SPECIALIZED COURSES (18 units) HIST 205

ISSUES ON CONTEMPORARY ASIAN HISTORY Covers Asia and Southeast Asia, and the issues selected shall be affecting political trends, economic cooperation and trade, development energy resources, regional security, peace and development, inter-college exposures, gender issues, environmental degradation and restoration. Credit

: 3 units

34

HIST 206

ISSUES ON CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN HISTORY Covers Western and Eastern Europe, and the issues selected issues like those affecting political stability, situation of indigenous peoples, economic cooperation and trade within the geographical zone, trade with the world, development of alternative energy sources regional peace and development, gender issues, environmental degradation, etc. Credit

HIST 208

: 3 units ISSUES ON CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY

Covers the Middle Eastern countries, including those above the Saharan Africa. Some problems that may be selected are political, Pan Arab. The continued presence of the US as a world superpower, security, oil reserves and oil politics, economic cooperation and Arab-Israel peace process etc. Credit HIST 209

: 3 units ISSUES ON CONTEMORARY SUB-SAHARAN HISTORY

Covers region of the Sub-Saharan Africa. The issues that may be selected are political stability vs. tribalism, regional security, economic cooperation and trade, development of alternative sources of energy, peace and development, gender issues, environmental care. Credit HIST 210

: 3 units ISSUES ON CONTEMPORARY NORTH AMERICAN HISTORY

Covers the region of North American and Canada. The issues selected shall be those affecting domestic affairs and international commitments, minority groups, economic and peace arrangements with other countries, the continued role of the US as a world leader. Credit

: 3 units

COGNATES (3 units) HIST 211

ISSUES ON THE ETHNO-HISTORY OF THE INDIGENOUS CULTURAL COMMUNITIES IN THE PHILIPPINES

Involves in-depth explorations and discussion on the ethno-history and the cultures of the different indigenous cultural communities in the Philippines, including the Muslim Filipinos of Mindanao and the Sulu Archipelago, and the evaluation of their significance in the totality of the Filipino nation. Credit HIST 212

: 3 units

ISSUES ON CONTEMPORARY PHILIPPINE HISTORY

35

Focuses on the vital issues affecting the Filipino Society, including the impact of colonialism. Credit

: 3 units

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Baena, Melecia G.

MA Social Studies, UP-Diliman, 1993 AB History, Saint Paul College, 1971

2 Calsado, Quirico M.

MA Islamic Studies, UP-Diliman AB History, MSU-IIT

3 Clar, Nora A.

MAT Social Studies, UP-Diliman, 1982 AB History, Maryknoll College, 1974

4 Danao, Carolina M.

MA Asian Studies, UP-Diliman, 1984 AB Political Science, MSU-Marawi, 1965

5 Derogongan, Rahane M.

MA Peace & Development Studies, MSU-Marawi, 1999 AB History, MSU-Marawi, 1991

6 Enderes, Leonor B.

MA Asian Studies, UP, 1998 AB History, MSU-IIT, 1986

7 Flores, Lorna E.

Ph.D. Peace & Development Studies, Notre Dame Univ., Cotabato, 2000 M.Ed., UP-Diliman, 1991 AB History, Xavier university, 1970

8 Hernando, Edwin Peter S.

MA Peace & Development Studies, XU, 1999 AB History and AB Political Science, MSU-IIT, 1984

9 Kamlian, Jamail A.

Ph.D. Philippine Studies, UP-Diliman, 1991 MA Asian Studies, UP-Diliman, 1982 AB Political Science, Ateneo de Zamboanga, 1975

10 Macansantos, Rosello C.

MA Asian Studies, UP-Diliman, 1979 AB Political Science, MSU-Marawi, 1966

11 Regalado, Monolita O.

MA Philippine Studies, UP-Diliman, 1993 AB Sociology, MSU-Marawi, 1981

12 Salgado, Geoffrey G.

MA History, San Carlos University, 1979 AB History,University of San Carlos, 1970

13 Tangian, Ma. Cecilia B.

MA History, Xavier University, 2001 AB History, MSU-IIT, 1990

14 Teanco, Phyllis Marie S.

MA History, MSU-Marawi, 2003 AB Political Science, MSU-IIT, 1991

36

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY

Sociology is the scientific study of social relationships and individual and collective human action insofar as these are influenced by social forces. It consists of a body of related generalizations about human behavior and society guided by concepts and theories arrived at through scientific investigation. The Master of Arts in Sociology offers training in three (3) areas of concentration leading to various lines or professional work. Specifically, the program offers courses leading to a Masteral degree in Industrial and Urban Sociology, Population Studies, and Social Problems. To be considered proficient in the field of Sociology, the student must finish a total of 36 Masteral units which includes 6 units of thesis writing. The 36 units are distributed as follows: 15 units of courses related to Research Methodology, and 3 units of Design and Analysis and Statistics course. Fifteen units (15) are to be taken from other areas of concentration, and 6 units of thesis writing.

Objectives 1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

To make MSU-IIT more responsive to the needs and problems of industrializing and urbanizing Southern Philippines by establishing a strong social science support at the graduate level. To strengthen the Institute‘s leadership in the field of service and educational development in the region by spearheading an academic area of concentration in Urban and Industrial Sociology, Population Studies and Social Problems. To develop fully educated individuals not only imbued with the skill of critical thinking in the analysis of social issues but also grounded on the human dimensions of values, ethics, traditions and customs. To cater to the career advancement needs of teachers, leaders, employees, professionals and other social science practitioners in the region. To enrich systematic information based on the dynamics of sociocultural, economic, technological changes in the Southern Philippines through sociological research studies.

Admission Requirements 1.

An incoming MA Sociology student must be a holder of a Bachelor‘s degree in Sociology or its equivalent from any recognized institution of higher learning. Applications must exhibit high quality and integrity of intellect as determined through a) examination of undergraduate credentials, b) recommendations from two (2) former professors and/or recognized authority 37

in the discipline or area of specialization, c) character references and d) interview of the application, or any other appropriate means. 2.

Non holders of a bachelor‘s degree in Sociology or its equivalent may be admitted to the program, but are required to take the following 15 units of undergraduate courses: Sociology 11 (or its equivalent) ---------------------------Social Statistics ----------------------------------------------Sociological Theories ----------------------------------------

3 units 3 units 3 units

Research Methods ------------------------------------------Any 1 major courses in Sociology -------------------------

3 units 3 units ---------Total Number of units ------------------------------------------- 15 units

Degree Requirements To qualify for the MA Sociology degree, a student must have: 1. Completed at least thirty (30) units of academic course work in addition to six (6) units of required thesis writing with a grade point average of at least 2.00. 2. Passed the comprehensive examination given. 3. Successfully defended his/her thesis before the graduate school panel.

MASTER OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY (MA SOCIO) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER)

First Year, First Semester Course No. Socio 270 Socio 288 Major

Course Title

Units

Sociological Theories Advanced Statistics Any three-unit course of the chosen area of concentration Total

3 3

Lec 3 3

3

3

9

9

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

First Year, Second Semester 38

Course No. Socio 271 Socio 280 Major

Course Title

Units

Theory Construction Research Methods I Any three-unit course of the chosen area of concentration Total

3 3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 Socio 270 3 Socio 288

3

3

9

9

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Socio 281 Major

Major

Cognate

Course Title

Units

Research Methods II Any three-unit course of the chosen area of concentration Any three-unit course of the chosen area of concentration Any three-unit course of the other areas of concentration Total

3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 Socio 280

3

3

3

3

3

3

12

12

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Socio

299

Course Title

Units

Masteral Thesis

6

Total

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total All core courses and other required courses and Written Comprehensive Examination

6

*Required Core Courses **May be taken from Anthropology, Communications, Community Development, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, History, Social Work, and/or on other areas of concentration in Sociology

SUMMARY OF COURSES 39

UNITS 15 units

I. CORE CURRICULUM Socio 270 Socio 271 Socio 280 Socio 281 Socio 288

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

II. AREAS OF CONCENTRATION A. Major

15 units 12 units

1.

Industrial and Urban Sociology (Any four of the following courses) Socio 215, 216, 226, 237, 239, 244, 246, 255, 260, 261, 272

2.

Population Studies (Any four of the following courses) Socio 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 274

3.

Social Problems (Any four of the following courses) Socio 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 226, 236, 251, 273

B. Cognate

3 units

May be taken from Anthropology, Communications, Community Development, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, History, Social Work, and/or on other areas of concentration in Sociology. III. THESIS WRITING

6 units

Socio 299

6 units

Total number of units

36 units

CATALOGUE OF COURSES SOCIO 200

PRESEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY 40

An advanced introductory course which provides a deep review of the field, its methods, and scope of inquiry as a formal discipline. Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 201

: 3 units : none

HISTORY OF SOCIOLOGY A study on the theoretical and methodological foundations of modern sociology and the growth of this discipline from ―lore‖ to ―science‖. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

INSTITUTIONS SOCIO 210

FAMILY AND KINSHIP Family types and kinship relations and their impact on larger social structures are taken up in this course, including a cross-cultural analysis of families in various societies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 211

: 3 units : none

SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION A scientific study of religion as a social fact, and as an institution which controls, modifies and validates human action. Major religious groups will be investigated to discern their universal and specific functions, and how the established beliefs embodied in them affect the economic, political and psychic orientation of people. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 212

: 3 units : none

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY Ethical issues and social aspects of health, illness, and disease as well as relations between healers and the sick in various cultures are the subject matter for study in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 213

: 3 units : none

POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY A course on the analysis of philosophical and empirical works on power and authority and the political institutions which give them meaning. 41

Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 214

: 3 units : none

SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION The sociocultural foundations of education and its effects on individuals and societies will be explored here to be able to appreciate differences in learning, educational achievement and value system. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 215

: 3 units : none

ECONOMY AND SOCIETY An analysis of economic life in pre-industrial and urbanizing societies, and an application of analytic models to account for activities relating to production and distribution of goods and services are the major subject areas in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

CHANGE AND DEVIANCY SOCIO 220

SOCIAL CHANGE This course focuses on the theories of social change and empirical studies of determinants and consequences of change. Experiences of underdeveloped and developed societies like Japan, the U.S. and many countries in Europe will be carefully examined. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 221

: 3 units : none

DEVIANT BEHAVIOR A study on the review and analysis of abnormal behaviors, including other forms of deviancy which are not necessarily pathological, and social controls used by society to enforce conformity to norms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 222

: 3 units : none

CRIMINOLOGY AND PENOLOGY A study on the correlates and typology of crime and its victims, and the mechanisms of legal sanctions to reduce the tide of criminality and antisocial acts. 42

Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 223

: 3 units : none

SOCIAL PROBLEMS Breakdown of social relations and disturbance of the social order are the concerns of this course. Corollary to this causes and consequences of major social problems will be explored and analyzed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 224

: 3 units : none

SOCIOLOGY OF REVOLUTIONS This course will determine why men rebel, what changes in the society do they expect, and what means do they employ to reach their goals in a revolutionary way. Cases of rebellions in several types of societies will be likewise studied. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 225

: 3 units : none

COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR A study of the theories regarding origins, internal process, dynamics and developments of short term and spontaneous group behavior in relatively unstructured social situations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 226

: 3 units : none

SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT A course that deals with the causes and consequences of modernization and economic development. The patterns of change or reactions to it are also examined in changing and developing societies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 227

: 3 units : none

FUTURISTICS A study on the anticipation and forecast of what life might become in the future based on game theory, stimulation, and other models using quantitative and qualitative methods. 43

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : None

STRUCTURE AND PROCESS SOCIO 235

SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Studies the critical and empirical basis of social stratification, the social means of mobility as well as some consequence of stratification on human behavior and outlook. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 236

: 3 units : none

RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS This course is addressed to investigating the effects and policy implications of social contracts when the people‘s diverse racial and ethnic origins meet in a common locale. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 237

: 3 units : none

URBAN SOCIOLOGY This course deals with comparative studies of urban communities; nature and consequences of urbanization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 238

: 3 units : none

RURAL SOCIOLOGY An analysis of village life and the world view as well as the microscopic view of the dominant social institutions in peasant societies and the changes that impinge on them. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 239

: 3 units : none

INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY A course that studies on the psychosocial effects of industrialization vis-àvis man-work, man-man, and man-time relations. Social relations among workers affecting productivity and management and employee relations are the major topics covered in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

44

POPULATION AND ECOLOGY SOCIO 240

DEMOGRAPHY An introductory course on the analysis of population structure and dynamics and their implications to the quality of life and human survival on earth. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 241

: 3 units : none

DEMOGRAPHIC METHODS A course focusing on the methods and techniques of estimating vital population processes and the statistical tools used in making demographic data analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 242

: 3 units : none

POPULATION DYNAMICS Answers to the question of how a population changes are sought in this course by examining migration, natality, and mortality as revealed by studies the world over. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

45

SOCIO 243

FAMILY PLANNING AND FERTILITY CONTROL This course deals with the analysis of the conceptual models used to explain fertility behavior and the problems of family planning programs in various cultures. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 244

: 3 units : none

DEMOGRAPHY OF MANPOWER AND LABOR A study of the composition, characteristics, participation, distribution and changes in the labor force and the factors that bring about such changes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 245

: 3 units : none

HUMAN ECOLOGY This course gives focus on human‘s adaptation to various environmental and socio-cultural settings, and his patterned responses to changes in these settings as a result of technological advancement, urbanization, and colonization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 246

: 3 units : none

SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION A course that concentrates on the investigation of various types of contaminants found in an industrial setting and the risks they impose on the health and life span of human beings. Organized reactions to and policies on pollution are likewise covered in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY SOCIO 250

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY This course deals with the theory and research on the effect of social structures on an individual‘s behavior as well as the influence of personality on group behavior. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

46

SOCIO 251

SMALL GROUP PROCESSES A course that studies the dynamics of attitude change in small groups and the patterns of interaction their members develop according to the contours of small group norms. These patterns may be contrary to ideal or established ways. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 252

: 3 units : none

CULTURE AND PERSONALITY A course that focuses on the analysis of the interplay between culture as a group phenomenon and personality as an individual attribute in different societies, with emphasis on the formation of recurrent traits, values, and peculiar ways of coping with varied situations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 253

: 3 units : none

SEMINAR ON POPULAR CULTURE A study of the resurgence of esoteric and novel fashions, crazes, and fads expressed in music and dance, art, and the relatively recent lores of society. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 254

: 3 units : none

ATTITUDES A study of the nature, formation, changes and measurement of attitudes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 255

: 3 units : none

MOTIVATIONS This course probes into the psychic forces of mankind which emerges over behavior, the types and ranges of motivations in industrial and urbanizing societies, as well as the approaches to measurement of motives. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

47

WORK AND OCCUPATION SOCIO 260

SOCIOLOGY OF OCCUPATION A course that analyzes the meaning of attitudes to work and occupations, as well as the historical and ideological underpinnings of vocational behavior, occupation prestige, and occupational choice. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 261

: 3 units : none

ENTREPRENEURSHIP An examination of the environmental and social-psychological factors in the rise of entrepreneurship and the acquisition of entrepreneurial personality. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

THEORY SOCIO 270

SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES This course surveys and analyzes past and contemporary theories as revealed in the works of prominent sociologists and their conceptions of a model man or society. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 271

: 3 units : none

THEORY CONSTRUCTION This course focuses on the mechanics of conceptualizing, developing, and testing research problems which are stated in theoretical terms. Model building and construction of scales, and linking theory and data under a deductive or inductive system are also included in its coverage. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 273

: 3 units : none

PERSONALITY THEORIES A course that concentrates on the major schools of thought explaining personality differences and principles of behavior modification. Works of Lewin, Skinner, Dolgar, From, McC lelland and others will be analyzed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

48

SOCIO 274

POPULATION THEORIES Theories of population from Malthus to the leading contemporary demographers will be evaluated in this course with special attention to the debate on the relation between population, economics and related issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

METHODS SOCIO 280

RESEARCH METHODS I An introductory course on the scientific approach in conducting social research, zeroing in on the theoretical aspects of problem definition, hypothesis testing, development of suitable indicators, and the techniques of data collection and data reduction.

SOCIO 281*

Credit : 3 units Prerequisite(s) : none RESEARCH METHODS II Research proposal writing and practicum Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 282

: 3 units : none

SURVEY METHODOLOGIES AND DESIGN A course that familiarizes the student to the types of data collection using non-reactive methods and other appropriate techniques of community analysis under uncontrolled conditions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 283

: 3 units : none

FIELD METHODS An in-depth approach in conducting field investigations and application of research framework utilizing references other than the scientist‘s point of view is what this course tackles. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 284

: 3 units : none

EVALUATION RESEARCH

49

The principles of assessing impacts of social and development projects through the use of social science research methods are the major focus of this course Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 285

: 3 units : none

ETHNOMETHODOLOGY Non-mathematical models of social research and the ways of developing and applying them to right kinds of data are the contents of this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 286

: 3 units : none

QUANTITATIVE SOCIOLOGY A programmable introduction to the procedures and techniques of data analysis using computers and programmable calculators. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 287

: 3 units : none

DATA PROCESSING A study on the basic concepts of statistics and probability with emphasis on the analysis of social science data using statistical tools and techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 288*

: 3 units : none

ADVANCED STATISTICS A course concentrating on the principles of statistical tests and inferences using parametric and non-parametric statistics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

SOCIAL REPORT SOCIO 290

DIRECTED READINGS/RESEARCH (3-6 UNITS) Under the close supervision of a faculty, students conduct an independent research on topics of special interest to them to clarify certain issues or prepare themselves for the writing of a research proposal. This course may be repeated for credits. Credit

: 3 units 50

Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 299

: none

MASTER‘S THESIS (6 UNITS) Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units : All core and other required courses.

*Required core courses

51

MASTER IN SOCIOLOGY Rationale In this era of globalization when boundaries between and among systems of cultures, economies, and governance are rapidly breaking down, competition for survival and development among nations, institutions, groups, and individuals has likewise become much stiffer. As an academic institution which has been mandated to develop not only technicians who can serve the manpower needs of an industrializing Southern Philippines, but also fully educated graduates imbued with social visions and consciousness; MSUIligan Institute of Technology must respond more effectively to the need for improving the quality of education for academicians and practitioners in various fields. Of the existing social science programs at MSU-IIT, it is Sociology that is believed to be the most appropriate to respond to the challenge of providing the necessary competencies for one to gain competitive advantage along this field particularly in the regions of Mindanao, Sulu, and Palawan. Sociology is the social science that tries to systematically understand the problems that change in culture, governance, economy, or physical environment can bring to people and society. Various problems of change can be meaningfully understood and thus appropriately attended to with the help of sociological perspectives and methods of inquiry which are multidisciplinary. It is against this backdrop that MSU-IIT has embarked on a masteral program in Sociology, which produced its first batch of graduates in 1993-1994. In response to the call of the Commission on Higher Education to fast track faculty upgrading to improve the quality of higher education, a non-thesis masteral program in Sociology has been developed as a branch-out of the thesis program. This institute is equipped with the necessary human skills and competencies to sustain a non-thesis program on selected areas of sociology. There are at least six faculty members with Ph.D. and M.A. degrees who could be tapped for the program. This faculty force could be strengthened by at least eight competent faculty from the main MSU campus. This Institute is therefore deemed highly competent to provide the service, which the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) needs to successfully achieve its goal of upgrading the capability of tertiary level faculty.

Objectives The objectives of the program are: 1.

2.

3.

To make MSU-IIT more responsive to the needs for sustainable development of the Southern Philippines by establishing a strong social science support at the graduate level through a non-thesis masteral degree program in Sociology. To strengthen the Institute‘s leadership in the field of service and educational development in the region by spearheading an academic area of concentration in Urban and Industrial Sociology, Population Studies and Social Problems. To develop fully educated individuals not only imbued with the skill of critical thinking in the analysis of social issues but also grounded on the human dimensions of values, ethics, traditions, and customs. 52

4.

5.

To fast track MSU-IIT capability to cater to the career and advancement needs of teachers, leaders, employees, professionals and other social science practitioners in the region. To enrich systematic information based on the dynamics of sociocultural, economic, technological changes in the Southern Philippines through sociological studies.

Admission Requirements 1. 2.

3.

Holders of a bachelor‘s degree in Sociology or its equivalent from recognized institution of higher learning may be admitted to the program. Non-holders of bachelor‘s degree in Sociology or its equivalent may be admitted to the program but are required to take the following 15 units of undergraduate courses: Sociology 1 (or its equivalent) 3 units Social Statistics 3 units Sociological Theories 3 units Research Methods 3 units Any major course in Sociology 3 units 15 units Applicants must exhibit high quality and integrity of intellect as determined through: a) examination of undergraduate credentials, b) recommendations of two (2) former professors and/or recognized authority in the discipline or area of specialization, c) character reference and d) interview of applicants, or any other appropriate means.

Degree Requirements To qualify for the Master in Sociology degree, a student must have satisfied the following requirements: 1. Completed at least thirty three (33) units of academic course work in addition to three (3) units of required special problem writing with a Grade Point Average of 2.00. 2. Passed the comprehensive examination given. 3. Successfully defended his/her special problem before the graduate school panel.

Summary Distribution of Units To be proficient in the field of Sociology, the student must earn a total of 36 masteral units distributed as follows: 1. Fifteen (15) units of core courses, 6 units related to Sociological Theory, 6 units related to Research Methodology, and 3 units of Design and Analysis and Statistics course. 2. Twelve (12) units of the chosen concentration area. 53

3. 4.

Six (6) units from other areas of concentration. Three (3) units of special problem writing.

Mode of Delivery 1. 2.

Summer classes will be held in MSU-IIT campus. Regular Semester-classes may be conducted in any of these two options: a. Weekends – Saturdays and Sundays b. Compressed type – one week or two during the first part or second part of the semester.

MASTER IN SOCIOLOGY (MIS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, Summer Hours/Week Course Course Title Units Prerequisite(s) No. Lec Lab Total Socio 270 Sociological Theories 3 3 Socio 288 Advanced Statistics 3 3 Any three-unit of the chosen Major 3 3 area of concentration Total 9 9

First Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. Socio 271 Theory Construction Socio 280 Research Methods I

Units

Total

3 3 6

Hours/Week Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 Socio 270 3 Socio 288 6

First Year, Second Semester Hours/Week Course Course Title Units Prerequisite(s) No. Lec Lab Total Socio 281 Research Methods II 3 3 Socio 280 Any three-unit of the chosen Major 3 3 area of concentration Total 6 6

Second Year, Summer Course

Course Title

Units

Hours/Week

Prerequisite(s) 54

No.

Lec Lab Total Any three-unit of the chosen area of concentration Any three-unit of the chosen area of concentration Total

Major Major

3

3

6

6

9

9

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Cognate Cognate

Course Title

Units

Any three-unit course from other areas of concentration Any three-unit course from other areas of concentration Total

Hours/Week Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3

3

3

3

6

6

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Socio 298

Course Title

Units

Special Problem

Total GRAND TOTAL

-

3

Hours/Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s) All core courses and other required courses and Written Comprehensive Examination

3

36 UNITS

A. Core Courses Sociology 270* Sociology 271* Sociology 280* Sociology 281* Sociology 288*

15 units Sociological Theories Theory Construction Research Methods I Research Methods II Advanced Statistics

B. Concentration Areas

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

18 units

Industrial and Urban Sociology 55

Sociology 215 Sociology 237 Sociology 239 Sociology 244 Sociology 255 Sociology 216 Sociology 261 Sociology 260 Sociology 246

Economy and Society Urban Sociology Industrial Sociology Demography of Manpower and Labor Motivations Mass Communications Entrepreneurship Sociology of Occupation Seminar in Industrial Pollution

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

Population Studies Sociology 240 Sociology 241 Sociology 242 Sociology 243 Sociology 244 Sociology 245 Sociology 246

Demography Demographic Methods Population Dynamics Family Planning and Fertility Control Demography of Manpower and Labor Human Ecology Seminar in Industrial Pollution

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

Social Change Deviant Behavior Criminology and Penology Social Problems Sociology of Revolutions Collective Behavior Race and Ethnic Relations Sociology of Development Small Group Processes

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 unit

Social Problems Sociology 220 Sociology 221 Sociology 222 Sociology 223 Sociology 224 Sociology 225 Sociology 236 Sociology 226 Sociology 251

C. Special Problem Writing Socio 298

Special Problem

Total Number of Units:

3 units 3 units 36 units

* Required Core Courses

CATALOGUE OF COURSES SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES SOCIO 270

SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES

56

This course surveys and analyzes past and contemporary theories as revealed in the works of prominent sociologists and their conceptions of a model man or society. Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 271

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

THEORY CONSTRUCTION This course focuses on the mechanics of conceptualizing, developing, and testing research problems that are stated in theoretical terms. Model building and construction of scales, and linking theory and data under a deductive or inductive system are also included in this coverage. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 272

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Socio 270

ORGANIZATIONAL THEORIES This is a graduate course that focuses on the sociological and multidisciplinary anyalysis of organizational structures and the dynamics of social relationships in formal and informal organization. Using a diversity of paradigms and methods, it mainly deals with formal and informal structures of control, decision making, management, task allocation, innovation, technological and organizational change in relation to environment, among others. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 273

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

PERSONALITY THEORY A course that concentrates on the major schools of thought explaining personality differences and principles of behavior modification. Works of Lewin, Skinner, Dolgar, From, McClelland and others will be analyzed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 274

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

POPULATION THEORY Theories of population from Malthus to the leading contemporary demographers will be evaluated in this course with special attention to the debate on the relation between population, economics, and related issues.

57

Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 201

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

PRESEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY An advanced introductory course which provides a deep review of the field, its methods, and scope of inquiry as a formal discipline. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 202

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

HISTORY OF SOCIOLOGY A study on the theoretical and methodological foundations of modern sociology and the growth of this discipline from ―lore‖ to ―science‖. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY SOCIO280

RESEARCH METHODS I An introductory course on the scientific approach in conducting social research, zeroing in on the theoretical aspects of problem definition, hypothesis testing, development of suitable indicators, and the techniques of data collection and data reduction. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 281

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Sociology 288

RESEARCH METHODS II Research proposal writing and practicum. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Socio 280

58

SOCIO 282

SURVEY METHODOLOGIES AND DESIGN A course that familiarizes the student to the types of data collection using non-reactive methods and other appropriate techniques of community analysis under uncontrolled conditions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 283

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

FIELD METHODS An in-depth approach in conducting field investigations and application of research frame work utilizing references other than the scientist‘s point of view is what this course tackles. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 284

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

EVALUATION RESEARCH The principles of assessing impacts of social and development projects through the use of social science research methods are the major focus of this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS SOCIO 288

ADVANCED STATISTICS A course concentrating on the principle of statistical tests and inferences using parametric and non-parametric statistics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 287

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DATA PROCESSING A study on the basic concepts of statistics and probability with emphasis on the analysis social science data using statistical tools and techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 285

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ETHNOMETHODOLOGY Mathematical models of social research and the ways of developing and applying them to right kinds of data are the contents of this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

59

SOCIO 290

DIRECTED READINGS/RESEARCH Under the close supervision of a faculty, students conduct an independent research on topics of special interest to them to clarify certain issues or prepare themselves for the writing of a research proposal. This course may be repeated for credits. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CONCENTRATION AREAS INDUSTRIAL AND URBAN SOCIOLOGY SOCIO 215

ECONOMY AND SOCIETY An analysis of economic life in pre-industrial and urbanizing societies, and an application of analytic models to account for activities relating to production and distribution of goods and services are the major subject areas in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 237

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

URBAN SOCIOLOGY This course deals with comparative studies of urban communities; nature and consequences of urbanization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 239

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY A course that studies on the psychosocial effects of industrialization visà-vis man-work, man-man, and man-time relations. Social relations among workers affecting productivity and management and employee relations are the major topics covered in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

60

SOCIO 244

DEMOGRAPHY OF MANPOWER AND LABOR A study of the composition, characteristics, participation, distribution and changes in the labor force and the factors that bring about such changes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

MOTIVATIONS This course probes into the psychic forces of mankind which emergize over behavior, the types and ranges of motivations in industrial and urbanizing societies, as well as the approaches to measurement of motives. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 216

MASS COMMUNICATIONS Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 261

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ENTREPRENEURSHIP An examination of the environmental and social-psychological factors in the rise of entrepreneurship and the acquisition of entrepreneurial personality. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 260

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SOCIOLOGY OF OCCUPATIONS A course that analyzes the meaning of attitudes to work and occupations, as well as the historical and ideological underpinnings of vocational behavior, occupation prestige, and occupational choice. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 226

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT A course that deals with the causes and consequences of modernization and economic development. The patterns of change or reactions to it are also examined in changing and developing societies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units ( 3 hrs lec) : none

61

POPULATION STUDIES SOCIO 240

DEMOGRAPHY An introductory course on the analysis of population structure and dynamics and their implications to the quality of life and human survival on earth. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 241

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DEMOGRAPHIC METHODS A course focusing on the methods and techniques of estimating vital population processes and the statistical tools used in making demographic data analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 242

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

POPULATION DYNAMICS Answers to the questions of how population changes are sought in this course by examining migration, natality, and mortality as revealed by studies the world over. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 243

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

FAMILY PLANNING AND FAMILY CONTROL This course deals with the analysis of the conceptual models used to explain fertility behavior and the problems of family planning programs in various cultures. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 244

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DEMOGRAPHY OF MANPOWER AND LABOR A study of the composition, characteristics, participation, distribution and changes in the labor force and the factors that bring about such changes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec) : none

62

SOCIO 245

HUMAN ECOLOGY This course gives focus on human‘s adaptation to various environmental and socio-cultural settings, and his patterned responses to changes in these settings as a result of technological advancement, urbanization, and colonization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 246

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION A course that concentrates on the investigation of various types of contaminants found in an industrial setting and the risks they impose on the health and life span of human beings. Organized reactions to and policies on pollution are likewise covered in this course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SOCIAL PROBLEMS SOCIO 220

SOCIAL CHANGE This course focuses on the theories of social change and empirical studies of determinants and consequences of change. Experiences of underdeveloped and developed societies like Japan, the U.S., and many countries in Europe will be carefully examined. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 221

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)) : none

DEVIANT BEHAVIOR A study on the review and analysis of abnormal behaviors, including other forms of deviancy which are not necessarily pathological, and social controls used by society to enforce conformity to norms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 222

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CRIMINOLOGY AND PENOLOGY A study on the correlates and typology of crime and its victims, and the mechanisms of legal sanctions to reduce the tide of criminality and antisocial acts. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : none

63

SOCIO 223

SOCIAL PROBLEMS Breakdown of social relations and disturbance of the social order are the concerns of this course. Corollary to this, causes and consequences of major social problems will be explored and analyzed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 224

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SOCIOLOGY OF REVOLUTIONS This course will determine why men rebel, what changes in the society do they expect, and what means do they employ to reach their goals in a revolutionary way. Cases of rebellions in several types of societies will be likewise studied. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 225

: 3 units(3 hrs lec) : none

COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR A study of the theories regarding origins, internal process, dynamics and developments of short term and spontaneous group behavior in relatively unstructured social situations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 226

: 3 Units (3 hrs lec) : none

SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT A course that deals with the causes and consequences of modernization and economic development. The patterns of change or reactions to it are also examined in changing and developing societies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 236

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS This course is addressed to investigating the effects and policy implications of social contracts when then people‘s diverse racial and ethnic origins meet in a common locale. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SOCIO 251

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SMALL GROUP PROCESSES A course that studies the dynamics of attitude change in small groups and the patterns of interaction and their members develop according to the

64

contours of small group norms. These patterns may be contrary to ideal or established ways. Credit Prerequisite(s) SOCIO 298

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SPECIAL PROBLEM A course focusing on any social issue that is related to one‘s chosen concentration area, which requires a student to do an independent systematic work under the guidance of a panel of experts constituting one adviser and one panel member. Among the social issues that one may work on include gender and development, environment, peace and conflict, socio-cultural context of medical practice, and religion. A special problem may be a project proposal or concept paper, project evaluation, or any form of a research work. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : All core and other required courses. Compre Exam

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Nimfa L. Bracamonte

Ph.D. Sociology, UP-Diliman, 1996 MA Sociology, Xavier University, 1981 AB Political Science, MSU-Marawi, 1971

2 Luz C. Sevidal Castro

Ph.D. Philippine Studies, Socio-Anthro, UP-Diliman, 1997 MA Asian Studies, U.P. Diliman, 1975 AB Asian Studies, MSU-Marawi, 1967

3 Myrma Jean A. Mendoza

Ph.D. Sociology, Up-Diliman, 2005 MA Sociology, MSU-IIT, 1992 AB Sociology, MSU-Marawi, 1978

4 Sulpecia L. Ponce

Ph.D. Sociology, XU-Cagayan de Oro City, 2005 MA Sociology, MSU-IIT, 1993 AB Sociology, MSU-IIT, 1982

5 Liwayway S. Viloria

Ph.D. Philippine Studies, UP-Diliman, 2002 MA Philippine Studies, U.P. Diliman, 1986 BS Community Development, MSU-Marawi, 1974

CCO OLLlle eg ge eo off b buussiinne essss a addm miinniissttr ra attiio onn

65

List of Program

 Master in Business Management (MBM) Specialization Areas: a) b) c) d) e)

Finance Human Resource Management Marketing Production Management Institutional Management/Coop Management

 Certificate in MBM (CertInMBM)

MASTER IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Introduction

66

The Master in Business Management Program is a 42-unit graduate course intended to train bachelors‘ degree holders (regardless of the field of study) in new business management approaches to prepare them for executive, managerial or supervisory positions in business and industry, as well as in the government and the cooperative sectors. The program will also hone its graduates‘ entrepreneurial skills by equipping them with tools which they can use to organize and manage their own businesses. Moreover, MBM graduates will have an intensive preparation required to handle business education and research. Objectives The Master in Business Management Program aims primarily to produce competent human resources needed in the management of private and public sector organizations and cooperatives and in the development of new enterprises. Specifically, the program aims to: a.

prepare the students for positions in middle and higher management in the private and public sectors and cooperatives;

b. equip the students with expertise in the planning and development of new enterprises; and c. prepare the students to handle business instruction, research and extension services.

MASTER OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (MBM) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. BA 201n

Organizational Theory

3

BA 202n

Managerial Accounting

3

BA 203

Managerial Economics

3

BA 204

Operations Research

3

Course Title

Units

Total

12

Hours/ Week Prerequisites Lec Lab Total 3 None Pre-MBM Acctg. 3 Course* Pre-MBM 3 economic course* Pre-MBM Quanti 3 Anal. course* 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No. BA 205

Course Title Financial Management

Units 3

Hours/ Week Prerequisites Lec Lab Total 3 BA 202, 203 67

BA 206 BA 207 BA 298

Marketing Management Production and Operations Management

3

3

3

3

Business Research**

3

3

12

12

Total

BA 203 BA 204 Functional courses completed

Second Year, First Semester Course No. BA 291 BA 292 BA 297/299n BA_____

Course Title

Units

Hours/ Week Prerequisites Lec Lab Total 3 Foundation courses

Business Policy MIS & Expert Systems in Business Management Case Writing/Thesis Writing***

3

Specialization Course

3

3

12

8

Total

3

2

3

3

3

1

Foundation courses

Consultation only

Functional courses Graduating/BA 298 Relevant foundation courses

1

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. BA 299n BA _____

Course Title

Units

Thesis Writing Specialization Course or Elective Total

3

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total Consultation only

3

3

6

3

Prerequisites Relevant foundation courses

*For students deficient in this area **May not be taken by those with two years supervisory positions prior to admission to MBM except when taking the Thesis Option. They shall, however, enroll in an additional specialization course. ***BA 299 is for students under the Thesis Option. BA 297 is for those under the NonThesis Option and without a supervisory position for at least two years prior to admission to the MBM; they shall enroll in an additional specialization course as BA 297 is only a 3unit course (those in the thesis option has to enroll in 6 units of BA 299 - Thesis Writing). Those with supervisory positions for at least two years prior to admission to MBM may not take BA 297 but shall enroll in (a) two additional specialization courses, or (b) in an additional specialization course and in an additional elective. Relevant foundation courses as prerequisites to specialization courses vary with each major field:

68

Specialization Courses Major in Finance Prerequisite: BA 205 Financial Management BA 231n BA 232n BA 233n

Investment Management Management Of Financial Institutions International Finance

3 3 3

Major in Production and Operations Management Prerequisite: BA 207Production and Operations Management BA 241 BA 242 BA 243

Materials Management Total Quality Management Advanced Operations Research

3 3 3

Major in Human Resource Management Prerequisite: BA 201 Organization Theory BA BA BA BA

221n 222n 223n 224n

Wage and Salary Administration Organization Development Staffing , Training and Career Development Laws on Labor - Management Relations

3 3 3 3

Major in Marketing Prerequisite: BA 206 Marketing Management BA 251n BA 252n BA 253n

Entrepreneurial Marketing Sales Management International Marketing

3 3 3

Major in Institutional Management /Cooperative Management Prerequisite: Tool Courses BA 241 BA 261 BA 262

Materials Management Policy Problems in the Management of Non-Profit Organizations Special Topics

3 3 3

Units FOUNDATION CLUSTER Tool Courses* ………………………..……………………...

12 69

BA BA BA BA

201n 202n 203 204

Organization Theory ………………………….. Managerial. Accounting ………………………. Managerial Economics ……………………..… Operations Research ……………………….….

3 3 3 3

Functional Courses ……..……….………………………….. BA 206 BA 205 BA 207

Marketing Management ………………….…… Financial Management …………………..……. Production & Operations Management ……….

9 3 3 3

INTEGRATIVE CLUSTER …………………………………… BA 291 BA 292

Business Policy …………………………….…. Management Information System & Experts Systems In Business …………..

6 3 3

SPECIALIZATION CLUSTER ……………………….……… A. Thesis Option BA ___ BA ___ BA 298 BA 299n

15

Specialization Course …………………. Specialization Course …………………. Business Research ……………………. Thesis Writing ………………………....

3 3 3 6

B. Non-Thesis Option BA ___ Specialization Course ………………… BA ___ Specialization Course …………………. BA 298 Business Research …………………….. BA 297 Management Case Writing …………… BA ___ Elective ……………………………..…

3 3 3 3 3

TOTAL UNITS *Requires pre-MBM Courses in: - Accounting - Economics - Quantitative Tools in Business - Management Communications, Technical Writing and Case Analysis

42**

** Students with appropriate undergraduate preparation may forego some courses or have an effective maximum of 36 to 39 units, to wit:

MBM students whose undergraduate degrees are in Accounting, Economics, Marketing, and Management may forego the MBM course offerings corresponding to their respective field of specialization (Managerial Accounting and Control, Managerial Economics, Marketing Management, or Organization Theory) provided their GPA in their major subjects is 2.0 or better. Organization Theory may not be taken even by nonManagement majors provided that their GPA in all their Management courses is 2.0 or better. 70

Two integrative cases shall, however, be required of students for every course not taken. The case analyses shall be presented in oral and written form, and shall be rated only as Pass or Fail. The integrative cases shall be determined by the course professor and rated by him/her. Moreover, students foregoing some courses shall not be exempted from taking the comprehensive exams in these courses.

CATALOGUE OF COURSES FOUNDATION CLUSTER TOOL COURSES BA 201

ORGANIZATION THEORY The course is basically a critical review of conceptual literature on organizations and organizational life. It deals primarily with the fundamentals of management and organization theory, organizational behavior of individuals and groups and its dimensions, dynamics and processes, and of organizational change, development and intervention. A careful blend of theory and practice, particularly in the local and Asian setting, is also ensured for the course to come to life. The class is required to organize an enhancement seminar in Organization Theory. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : None

71

BA 202

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING The course covers financial and management accounting within the framework of accounting conventions, principles, measurements and procedures for internal control, for use by management and for preparing public reports. It also covers managerial cost accounting and responsibility accounting, cost-volume-profit analysis, introduction to management systems, relevant standard, ful l and variable costing theory, financial and

capital budgeting. An enhancement seminar shall be organized by the class. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 203

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : Pre- MBM course in Accounting for students deficient in accounting background

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS This course deals with the concepts and principles in Economics which have been developed as effective analytical tools for management decision-making. It draws upon widely-accepted economic principles applicable to sound profit management and policy formulations in the areas of pricing, costs and finance in the micro and macro levels. An enhancement seminar shall be organized by the class. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 204

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : Pre-MBM course in Economics for students deficient in Economics Background

OPERATIONS RESEARCH This course covers concepts and methods of operations research as applied to problems in business and industry. It intends to make the students conversant with the scientific bases of the decision-making process in operations research. The topics include decision models as developed in the fields of marketing, economics, statistics and math, as well as other models under the frame work of certainty, risk, and uncertainty. The class shall come up with an enhancement seminar. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : Pre- MBM course in Quantitative Analysis for students with deficient background in the course

FUNCTIONAL COURSES BA 205

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT The course deals with short-range and long-range financial planning risks and rates of return, bond and stock valuations and the management of the working 72

capital and long-term financial position of a business. An enhancement seminar shall be organized by the class. Credit Prerequisite(s) BA 206

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 202, BA 203

MARKETING MANAGEMENT The course deals with the marketing function of a business enterprise. it reviews the nature and dynamics of demand, and presents problems confronting management in adapting to demand conditions. Its emphasis is on the 4Ps: the management of the existing products; the development of pricing strategies for new and existing products; the types of distribution patterns; and the promotional programs employed to obtain sales and profits under a variety of operating conditions. An enhancement seminar shall be organized by the class. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 207

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 203

PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT The course covers the scope and responsibilities of the production/operations function with emphasis on the planning, organizing and assembling of resources in a production or service enterprise; and on directing and controlling production operations. The topics include plant lay-out, time-andmotion study, synthetic time standard analysis of manufacturing processes, quality control, impact of automation, and purchasing techniques in response to change in market demand. Plant visits and case analysis enhance the course. The class shall come up with an enhancement seminar. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 204

INTEGRATIVE CLUSTER BA 291

BUSINESS POLICY This is an integrative course that deals with the study of policy issues and the development of strategy for the organization. The course explores the important relationship between the structural characteristics of an industry (e.g., market share, entry barriers, product market segmentation) and the performance (e.g., profitability, growth) of firms competing in the industry. Emphasis is placed on the application of theoretical concepts and models to policy formulation. Includes plant visits. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 292

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : Foundation courses

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND EXPERT SYSTEMS IN BUSINESS 73

The course covers the role of the information system in governing the behavior of an organization. Topics include planning and control system, the role of analytical and simulation models in decision-making, the economics of information, the implementation of an integrated system and latest techniques in managing information. Examples of MIS will be studied and their analysis and design will be discussed through cases and projects. Students also learn how

experts systems work and how they can be applied in business. Students shall come up with a project using an experts systems shell. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (2 units lect., I unit lab.) : Foundation courses

SPECIALIZATION CLUSTER COMMON SPECIALIZATION COURSES BA 298

BUSINESS RESEARCH (For the thesis and non-thesis options) This course deals with the principles and methods of research in the behavioral sciences which are applicable to business problems. The emphasis will be on the major steps in the design and conduct of research from problem identification and conceptualization to data gathering, analysis and preparation of the research report. Each student shall be required to submit a research proposal. This shall serve as the thesis proposal of the student in the thesis option and he/she shall be made to defend the same before a panel of faculty members. Since the class shall consist of students with different fields of specialization it shall comprise only a maximum of six (6) students to ensure optimum effectiveness in the handling of the course. This is because it is expected that the students‘ output shall be as varied as their field of specialization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 297

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : Foundation courses

MANAGEMENT CASE WRITING (For the non-thesis option only) This is a case writing course and is the terminal course for the non-thesis option and is equivalent to and comparable with Thesis Writing. This course work is designed to test the student‘s ability to pinpoint problem areas in business operations that are actually obtaining or obtained in an organization and to test his/her skills in tackling them through recommendations for their solutions. This objective will be achieved by requiring the students (in groups or by individual) to investigate operations in any problem areas, therein, to write a case out of the problem situation/s uncovered by the investigation, to develop and propose solution as well as decision models, and present and defend the same before a panel composed of faculty members handling specialized courses in the three (3) areas of specialization. The case thus written should highlight 74

problems relating to the student‘s area of specialization. Written and oral presentations of the case will be required of every student or of a group of students. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 299N

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : Completion of functional courses

THESIS WRITING (For the thesis option only) The student writes a thesis that is relevant to his/her field of specialization. The output has to undergo oral examination. The continuous registration rule shall apply. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units (Consultations) : BA 298/Graduating

MBM MAJOR IN FINANCE BA 231N

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT Deals with investment analysis. The concentration is on the factors influencing the value of securities and the implications for portfolio management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 232N

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 205

MANAGEMENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Deals with problems and policies in the effective management of the resources of financial institutions, including bank lending and institutional investments. The course will also cover a study of the character and structure of the money and capital markets, and of the functions of the investment banking firms as financial intermediaries. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 233N

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 205

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE Financing foreign trades, international capital movements, balance of payments and the foreign exchange, and international monetary theory and policy. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 205

MBM MAJOR IN HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

75

BA 221

WAGE AND SALARY ADMINISTRATION The course deals with compensation and wage theories; job design, analysis and evaluation; wage structure and design; benefits and incentives; labormanagement relations; wage and salary problems; and Philippine labor laws on salaries, wages, benefits and incentives. Presentation and analysis of cases form

part of the course. The students shall be required to submit a wage and salary structure and design towards the end of the term. Credit Prerequisite(s) BA 222

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 201

ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT The course deals with the planned, systematic, and long-range efforts to change the organization toward greater effectiveness making use of applied behavioral science principles and practices. The intervention strategies focus on the organization‘s culture and its human and social processes, with emphasis on ―intact work teams‖ rather than on individual managers. The course shall be enhanced by case analyses and structured learning experiences. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 223

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 201

STAFFING, TRAINING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT The course deals with the theory and practice of bringing new people into the organization and making them valuable addition to the work force. It also deals with the principles and techniques to ensure a fit between the people and the organization over time, thereby reducing turnover, improving the quality of work life, and improving on-the-job performance. The case method supplements lectures and discussions. The students, working by teams, shall be required to submit a training needs analysis and program toward the end of the term. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 201

76

BA 224

LAWS ON LABOR-MANAGEMENT RELATIONS The course presents the laws on labor-management relations in the Philippines, including the avenues for compromise, cooperation, and collaboration between labor and capital. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 201

MBM MAJOR IN MARKETING BA 251N

ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING The course deals with the entrepreneurial aspects of marketing. As such, entrepreneurial theories and methods are highlighted.

Credit : 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) Prerequisite(s) : BA 206 BA 252N SALES MANAGEMENT Deals with the administration of the sales function and the role of salespersons in a consumer-oriented economy in which marketing functions as a logisticsupport and message transmittal system. Credit Prerequisite(s) BA 253N

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 206

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING The course focuses on marketing management theories, techniques, and strategies necessary to incorporate marketing concepts into the framework of the world market from a managerial point of view. The necessity of understanding the impact of a country, culture, and environment of a marketing program is emphasized as well as the problems of competing in diverse markets. Different levels of marketing involvement, from exporting to multinational marketing, are considered. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 206

MBM MAJOR IN PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT BA 241

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT The course is a study of procurement procedures, inventory control, storage and warehouse management through the use of case problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 242

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 207

TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT 77

The course is intended to share management experiences and expertise on total quality management (TQM) implementation. Comprehensive case studies on TQM in selected industries shall also be done Credit Prerequisite(s) BA 243

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 207

ADVANCED OPERATIONS RESEARCH The course deals with advanced operations research techniques used in firms. This includes computer simulation of alternative production processes for managerial decision-making. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lec) : BA 207

MBM MAJOR IN INSTITUTIONAL/ COOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT BA 261

POLICY PROBLEMS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS The course deals with the definition of policy and strategy issues for non-profit organizations with focus on cooperatives, hospitals and health care presented through book excerpts, journal articles and cases. Private sector policy issues and policy implications of the relative absence of market discipline in the nonprofit sector are discussed. The emphasis is on managerial and human judgment factors, with the focus of analysis often on the organization leaders. A team composed of three or four students each is required to conduct an investigation of policy and management issues in a non-profit enterprise of their choice, produce a written report and make a class presentation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BA 262

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lecture) : BA 201, 202, 203, 204

SPECIAL TOPICS Seminars on special problems of developing and implementing organization strategy in the non-profit sector focusing on cooperatives, hospitals, and health care. Students will be required to submit a research output on a chosen special problem. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lecture) : BA 201, 202, 203, 204

78

BA 241

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT This is also a specialization course in MBM major in Production Management.This is a study of procurement procedures, inventory control, storage and warehouse management through the use of case problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 Units (3 hrs. lecture) : BA 207

Note: The specialization courses in one major field in the MBM Program may be taken as electives by students majoring in another field.

Thesis Option A student who chooses the thesis option shall enroll in six (6) units of BA 299 Thesis Writing. The continuous registration rule for Thesis Writing shall apply.

Non-Thesis Option A student who has had no supervisory designation of at least two (2) years prior to admission in the MBM who chooses the non-thesis option shall enroll in BA 298 (Business Research, 3 units) and BA 927 (Management Case Writing, 3 units). And in one additional specialization course (3 units). A student who has had at least two (2) years of supervisory designation at the time of his/her admission to the Program and who chooses the non-thesis option shall enroll in an additional 3-unit specialization course in lieu of BA 297 - Management Case Writing and in another additional 3-unit elective in lieu of BA 298 - Business Research.

Comprehensive Examinations A student in the non-thesis option is required to take and pass the comprehensive exams in the following areas. Area I Area II Area III Area IV Area V

Accounting Finance/Economics Organizational Theory Production & Operations Management Marketing

79

Admission Requirements 1.

A bachelor‘s degree regardless of the field of study,from recognized institutions of higher learning.

2.

An undergraduate weighted average of at least 2.0 or some evidence of potential to do graduate work.These qualifications shall be determined through the submission of the following: a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

3.

Official transcript of records Duly accomplished application for admission Recommendation from a former professor Recommendation from a current supervisor An interview with the MBM Program Committee Satisfactory score in the MBM Program‘s admission test Satisfactory score in the English – Proficiency Test

Passing in pre-admission requirements for those applicants who may be found deficient in the appropriate basic tools where such tools are required prior to enrolling in certain core courses.

Graduation Requirements Regular MBM 1. The student must have earned a minimum weighted average grade of 2.0 in all core courses and 1.75 in all specialized courses. 2. He/She must have successfully presented his / her written Management Case Study (non-thesis option). 3. He/She must have successfully defended his/her master‘s thesis if he/she follows the thesis program. 4. He/She must satisfactorily pass the comprehensive examinations with a grade of 1.75 in his/her field of specialization and 2.0 in the other subjects if he/she follows the non – thesis program

CERTIFICATE COURSES LEADING TO THE MBM DEGREE 1. 2. 3. 4.

The student must have completed all four certificate courses, each with a weighted average of 2.00. He/She must have completed also integrative courses, including a course in Business Research, with a weighted average of 2.00. He/She must have successfully defended his/her master‘s thesis if he/she follows the thesis program. He/She must satisfactorily pass the comprehensive examinations with a grade of 2.0 if he/she follows the non – thesis program.

FACULTY PROFILE 80

1. Bokingo, Julita W.

MBA, MSU- Marawi City, 1977 BSBA (Marketing), MSU Marawi, 1974

2. Gamolo, Nerio D.

MA (Economics), University of the Philippines BSBA (Economics), Mindanao State University

3. Manulat, Rhede Nelson

MBA, UST-Manila, 1990 BSBA (Marketing), MSU- Marawi City, 1979

4. Narido, Milagros R. CPA

MBA, UP-Diliman, 1981 BSBA (Accounting), MSU-IIT, Cum Laude, 1981

5. Orejana, Anne J.

Doctor in Management, University of San Jose Recoletos, Cebu City, 1997 MA (Economics), Ateneo de Manila University Loyola Heights, Quezon City, 1984 BSC (Economics), Far Eastern University, Manila, 1972

6. Resureccion, Pamela F.

MBM (Human Resource Management), MSU-IIT, 2001 BSBA (Marketing), MSU-IIT, 1995

7. Roxas, Alita T.

Doctor in Management, University of San Jose Recoletos, Cebu City, 1997 MA (Economics) Ateneo de Manila University Loyola Heights, Quezon City 1989 BSBA (Economics), MSU-IIT, 1982, Magna Cum Laude

8. Teves, Rizalia Y.

MA (Economics), University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1994 AB (Economics), University of San Carlos, Cebu City, 1983, Cum Laude

CCO OLLlle eg ge eo off e edduucca attiio onn 81

List of Programs  Master of Science in Physical Education  Master of Science Education a) b) c) d) e) f)

Major in Biology Major in Chemistry Major in Physics Major in General Science Major in Elementary Mathematics Major in Secondary Mathematics

 Doctor of Philosophy in Science Education Major in Chemistry

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 82

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION Rationale Cognizant of the need to help upgrade and eventually standardize the teaching of Physical Education in the MINSUPALA region and in view of the MSU-System‘s role in developing and producing competent teachers who are prolific in instruction, research and extension, the Department of Physical Education (DPE) of the College of Education Department (CED) of MSU-IIT herein strongly proposes, after thorough studies, preparations and negotiations with the MSU-CSPEAR of the main campus, to adopt the Master of Science in Physical Education (MSPE) effective June 2004-2005.

The offering of MSPE program in MSU-IIT campus zeroes in on the pedagogical needs of Physical Education teachers in Mindanao. Particularly, it purports to: 1) Usher in cultural peace and development through programs that promote integration and understanding among the tri-people in Mindanao namely; the indigenous People (IP‘s), the lumads and the christians, 2) Alleviate poverty through sponsorship of highly organized institutional sports competitions promoting lucrative business opportunities on the part of the people and minimized expenditures on the part of the teachers who are pursuing master‘s degree in Physical Education offered in far places such as Cebu or Manila other than MSU-main campus, 3) Provide better educational integration and cultural understanding, content and approaches to enhance the field of Physical Education as a science that promotes sound-mind-and-sound-body-principle among the entire populace, and 4) Bring the special population and the handicaps, special children/ learners, etc. to the normal population, enabling them to become productive members of the society through ameliorative and remedial programs especially designed for People With Disabilities (PWD). The Department of Physical Education (DPE) is now capable of carrying on its mandate after a number of years of planning and preparations. It has very competent and committed roster of faculty members. To date, it has three (3) Ph.D. candidates, eleven (11) MSPE and MAPE/MAT-PE holders, and two (2) MSPE candidates. To complement its faculty force, it will tap the services of (5) Ph.D. holders of the Department of Professional Education. It has adequate equipment and facilities for instruction, research and extension and has sufficient library holdings for both graduate and undergraduate students. Having been granted Level II by the AACUP accreditors and having scheduled for Level III first visit, the DPE is therefore highly qualified to adopt the Master of Science in Physical Education (MSPE) Program in the MSU-IIT campus.

This program is a long overdue answer to the 1995 CED and DPE conducted researches on the needs and the teaching competencies of Physical Education teachers, which revealed the need to offer MSPE to upgrade their teaching competencies 83

in sport, physical education, recreation and dance. This was followed-up in a survey which was conducted in compliance with the requirement of the University Curriculum Committee. Subsequently, the findings suggested a magnanimous demand for offering the MSPE program in MSU-IIT.

In the regional scene, the dynamic programs of the Department of Physical Education (DPE) (i.e., the yearly Dance-Seminar Workshop for Teachers (DSWFT), along with the other extension activities sponsored by the department) are still in demand by DepEd teachers coming from Zamboanga del Norte, Zamboanga del Sur, Misamis Oriental, Misamis Occidental, Lanao del Norte, Lanao del Sur, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur, Butuan City, and even Cebu (particularly Daan Bantayan). This demand has been unprecedented making the program dynamic and mobile in the past five (5) years. In the local scene, firstly, its faculty has been known to cater to the needs of the special population in Iligan City. In cooperation with the Iligan City Government and Rotary International, the DPE is tasked to provide programs to the People With Disabilities (PWD) for holistic development (an ideal avenue for which MSPE graduates can develop skills in research and extension); and secondly, there is an ongoing negotiations in the signing of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Tubod Lanao del Norte Government for MSU-IIT to use Tubod‘s state-of-the-art sports facilities as venue of the DPE‘s extension activities. All these manifest the people‘s trust and confidence in the DPE as a potent agent of human development and as an active catalyst for change in MINSUPALA. If implemented, the program will also prepare the graduate students‘ competencies in designing curricula in the three (3) levels of education for the indigenous people, Lumads and the Christians in Mindanao, overriding the greater role of bringing peace and development through its cultural and economic development activities and orientations.

Finally, in the global front, graduate teachers will be better prepared to select, train and develop, through competitive sports activities, regional, national and even international athletes to compete in the International Olympic Games (IOC), thereby bringing glory to this country.

Objectives The program aims to produce graduates with advanced training in Physical Education capable of: 1. Managing the three (3) levels of cognition in Physical Education (P.E) stressing quality instruction through the implementation of a welldesigned curriculum fashioned for to the tri-people in Mindanao. 2. Undertaking independent research in Physical Education (P.E) for publication in professional journals. 3. Performing extension activities to promote social and cultural integration.

84

4.

Training athletes to compete in the local, regional, national and even international sports competitions.

Admission Requirements The applicant must: a. Have a bachelor‘s degree in any of the following: (a) BPE, (b) BSPE, (c) BSE-PEHM, (d) BEED-MAPE, (e) PDPE, (f) BSE-PE b. Have official transcript of records of Bachelor‘s degree or its equivalent with a GPA of 2.0 or better c. Pass the Graduate Schools ‗s admission examination d. Have recommendation from two (2) former professors e. Submit his/her curriculum vitae f. Pass the personal interview

Degree Requirements The student must: a. Complete a total of 39 units of approved coursework (includes 6 units of graduate thesis); b. Pass the comprehensive examination in all required courses (exam must be taken after completion of all required courses); and c. Successfully defend his/her thesis.

Delivery Mode a. b. c. d.

Full-time student during regular semester (9-12 units load); summer (9 units) Week-end classes Web-based technology Lecture venue may be on – or off – campus.

Retention Policies The students‘ academic standing is evaluated at the end of each semester. To stay in the program, a student must have a GPA of 1.75 or better.

Proposed Implementation Scheme 1.

The MSPE Curriculum shall be implemented at the MSU-IIT campus starting the school year 2004-2005.

2.

Consortium with the MSU-CSPEAR is part of the implementation plan.

3.

Tie-ups with LGUs, NGOs, POs and other organizations for extension 85

activities shall be secured. 4.

Linkages with the international community in sports, PE, Recreation and Dance shall be explored.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (MS PE) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. SPEAR 201 SPEAR 202 SPEAR 203 SPEAR 204

Course Title Historical & Philosophical Background of PE Biomechanics in PE and Sports Curriculum Development in SPEAR Current Trends in SPEAR Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

2

2

2

None

5

5

5

None

3

3

3

None

2 12

2 12

2 12

None

First Year, Second Semester Course No. SPEAR 205 SPEAR 206 SPEAR 211 Non-SPEAR

Course Title

Units

Inferential Statistics Advance Methods of Research and Evaluation in SPEAR Advance Management of SPEAR Elective Total

3

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total 3 3

Prerequisite(s) None

3

3

3

None

2

2

2

None

2 10

2 10

2 10

None

Second Year, First Semester 86

Course No. SPEAR 212 SPEAR 213 SPEAR 223 SPEAR 290 Non-SPEAR

Course Title

Units

Physical Fitness & Sports Skills Testing Physio- Psycho. in SPEAR Recreation for Special Groups Seminar in SPEAR Elective Total

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

2

2

2

None

2

2

2

None

2

2

2

None

1 2 9

1 2 9

1 2 9

None None

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Non-SPEAR

Course Title

Units

Elective Thesis Total

GRAND TOTAL

2 6 8

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 2 2 None 6 6 8 8

39 units Summary Of Courses And Units

Particulars

*Present (Units)

**Proposed (Units)

2

2

5

5

3

3

SPEAR 204

Historical and Philosophical Background of P. E. Biomechanics in P. E. and Sports Curriculum Development in SPEAR Current Trends in SPEAR

2

2

SPEAR 205

Inferential Statistics

3

3

SPEAR 206

Advance Methods of Research and Evaluation in SPEAR

3

3

Total

18

18

SPEAR 211 Advance Management of SPEAR

2

2

I. Foundation and Core Courses SPEAR 201 SPEAR 202 SPEAR 203

II. SPEAR Electives

87

SPEAR 212 Physical Fitness and Sports Skills Testing SPEAR 213 Physio – Psycho. In SPEAR

2

2

2

2

SPEAR 223 Recreation for Special Groups SPEAR 290 Seminar in SPEAR

2 1

2 1

9

9

6

6

6

6

6

6

39

39

12

12

10

10

First Semester

9

9

Second Semester

8

8

39

39

Total III. Non – SPEAR Electives Total IV. THESIS SPEAR 300 GRAND TOTAL V. Comprehensive Examination VI. Units Per Semester First Year First Semester Second Semester Second Year

GRAND TOTAL * CSPEAR, MSU, MARAWI

** CEd, P.E., MSU-IIT

CATALOGUE OF COURSES SPEAR 201

HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL BACKGROUND OF P.E. The course deals with the discussion of the principles and historical background of physical education. It aims at encouraging the graduate students to develop personal philosophies of physical education as a profession. Credit

SPEAR 202

: 2 units

BIOMECHANICS IN P.E. AND SPORTS 88

This course deals with the analyses of a variety of sports activities in terms of application of fundamental principles of biomechanics and kinesiology in relation to teaching, coaching, and research. Credit SPEAR 203

: 5 units

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN SPEAR This course deals with providing the graduate students with technical know-how in planning the contents of physical education, taking into consideration the strategies, values, historical foundations and development of PE curriculum for the pre-school, elementary, secondary and tertiary levels. Credit

SPEAR 204

: 3 units

CURRENT TRENDS IN SPEAR It deals with the essential issues of PE curriculum development and implementation. It provides the teachers awareness of the latest trends and discoveries in Sports, PE, Health, and Recreation to improve teaching competencies. Credit

SPEAR 205

: 2 units

INFERENTIAL STATISTICS This course aims at providing the graduate students with knowledge about the statistical tools needed in research and decision-making. The graduate students are expected to acquire competence in both descriptive and inferential statistics. Credit

SPEAR 206

: 3 units

ADVANCE METHODS OF RESEARCH & EVALUATION IN SPEAR This course introduces prospective physical education teachers to the complex nature of the principles and methods of research. It also deals with the knowledge of and skills in doing research proposals. Credit

SPEAR 211

: 3 units

ADVANCE MANAGEMENT OF SPEAR This course deals with the administrative dimensions in sports, physical education and recreation, including intramural programs. The graduate

89

students are taught the tenets of management processes using the cognitive approaches of learning objectives. Credit SPEAR 212

: 2 units

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND SPORTS SKILLS TESTING This course provides graduate students with the holistic approach to fitness as health and skill related. This also aims at providing the students with technical and alternative resources, which blends traditional practices with modern science. Credit

SPEAR 213.

: 2 units

PHYSIO- PSYCHO. IN SPEAR This course deals with the concepts of psychology and physiology in relation to coaching learning situation. It includes areas and facets of sports psychology, personality, behavioral theories in sports, arousal and sports behavior, anxiety and performance, aggression and sports audience effects, physiological factors affecting performance, and coaching. Credit

SPEAR 223

: 2 units

RECREATION FOR SPECIAL GROUPS The course deals with the study of recreation activities designed to meet the needs and interest of the handicapped and develop their motor skills and abilities so that they may live a healthful and productive life. Credit

SPEAR 290

: 2 units

SEMINAR IN SPEAR This course deals with discussions and critiques of the various aspects of physical education, sports, recreation and dance. Lecturers and speakers shall be invited to talk on their views about current trends and researches in physical education, sports, recreation and dance, which may help students formulate problems for their graduate thesis. Credit

SPEAR 300

: 1 unit

GRADUATE THESIS Being the stage in the graduate program this course deals with research work, exploratory study, or extensive survey on a specific topic as a graduate thesis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units : Passing the comprehensive examination 90

FACULTY PROFILE 1. Alcuizar, Rebecca M.

MS Physical Education, MSU-Marawi, 1994 Professional Diploma in PE, MSU-IIT, 1988 BS Business Administration, St. Peter‘s College, 1982

2. Arugay, Eduardo B.

MA Educational Management, Ortañez University, 1981 Certificate in PE, National College of PE, 1978 BSE Filipino

3. Baldonado, Joselito E.

MS Physical Education, MSU-Marawi, 1999 Bachelor of Physical education, MSU-IIT, 1984

4. Banawa, Edward L.

MS Physical education, MSU-Marawi, 1994 Professional Diploma in PE, MSU-IIT, 1986 BS Forestry, MSU

5. Biong, Corazon T.

MS Physical Education, MSU-Marawi, 1991 Bachelor of Physical Education, MSU-Marawi, 1983

6. Bucad, Jonathan M.

Master of Physical Education, Cebu Normal University, 1997 BSE-Physical Education, University of San Carlos, 1977

7. Bucad, Marzania M.

MS Physical Education, UP-Diliman, 1993 BSE-Physical Education, University of San Carlos, 1994

8. Enezario, Paz A.

MAT- Physical Education, University of the East, 1985 BSE- Physical Education, Central Philippine University, 1970

9. Enriquez, Cynthia Ll.

MAT- Physical Education, Philippine Normal University, 1997 Bachelor of Physical Education, MSU-IIT, 1991 Professional Diploma in Physical Education, MSU-IIT, 1988

10. Ferraris, Ramon C.

MS Physical Education, UP-Diliman, 1998 Bachelor of Physical Education, MSU-IIT, 1984

11. Iglupas, Nenita V.

MA Physical Education, Centro Escolar University, 1985 BSE- Physical Education, Centro Escolar University, 1965

12. Martil, Josephine F.

MAT Physical Education, Philippine Normal University 91

BSE- Physical Education, University of San Carlos 13. Miguel, Cesar

MS Physical Education, MSU-Marawi, 1995 BSE- Physical Education, Silliman University, 1987

14. Reyes, Arlene V.

MS Physical Education, UP-Diliman, 1984 BSE- Physical Education, University of the East, 1971

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION MASTER OF SCIENCE EDUCATION Rationale Appraisal of the MASE & MAME Programs as an integral part of its improvement was conducted by a group of faculty members from the different concerned colleges. A summary of the findings and synthesized suggestions have been considered to institute desired changes for an effective operation of the on-going program for dynamism 92

and vision for excellence in science and technology. Moreover, these envisioned changes cater to the present and future needs of the learner and society. Thus, the new program is MASTER OF SCIENCE EDUCATION (MSciEd)

Objectives The Master of Science Education program of the department of Science and Mathematics Education aims to upgrade teachers in the areas, namely; instruction, research and extension. Specifically, it is to: 1. enhance competence of science and mathematics teachers in content and pedagogy and make their training relevant to the needs of the community; 2. develop in them understanding of the relatedness of the sciences and their application to daily living; and, 3. enhance their leadership qualities and capabilities in Science and Mathematics education research.

Academic Requirements 1. Possession of: BEEd major in Science or Mathematics / BSEd major in Sciences – Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics BS Science related degrees with at least 18 units of education subjects and 18 units of the undergraduate Science and Math courses in the major applied for, 2. Transcript of Records 3. A grade point average of 2.0 or its equivalent in the undergraduate Science and Math courses. 4. Complete application form of the MSU-IIT Graduate School 5. Two (2) letters of recommendation from former undergraduate faculty attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for graduate studies.

Degree Requirements To qualify for the Master of Science Education, a student must have: 1.

successfully completed at least 36 units of the course work specified in the program of study of the chosen option or specialization with a grade point average of 2.0 or better.

2.

passed the comprehensive examination.

3.

successfully defended the thesis and submitted the bound copies. 93

Types of Students  

Full-time student has semestral load of 9 to 12 units Part-time students has semestral load of less than 6 to 9 units

Classes are held on Friday 5:00 – 9:00 PM and on Saturdays (To accommodate working students and those commuting from neighboring areas.)

Summary of Units A. Education Courses - 9 units B. Research - 6 units C. Major Courses - 21 units TOTAL

36 units

Program of Study A. EducationCourses: Educ 206 Educ Sci. Ed 205

Methods of Research and Statistics Foundations of Education Curriculum Development in Science and Mathematics

Units 3 3 3 9

(Above courses are common to MSci. Ed. – Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Elem. Math and Sec. Math) Sci Ed 209B Science Teaching Strategies & Techniques (for General Science and in lieu of Sci Ed 205)

B. Specialization Courses Major in Biology Bio 211 Bio 221 Bio 241 Bio 251 Sci Ed 213 Bio Ed 300

Units Advanced Systematics Advanced Ecology Advanced Physiology Advanced Genetics Special Topics in Biology Thesis

Electives: Bio Ed 213

3 3 3 3 3 6

(6 units) Multimedia Technology

3 94

Sci. Ed 228 Chem 204 Bio Ed 290

Environmental Education Advanced Biochemistry Seminar in Biology Ed Required number of units

2 3 1 --------27

Major in Chemistry

Units

Chem 201 Chem. 202 Chem 203 Chem 205 Chem 207 Chem 289 Chem Ed 253 Chem Ed 290 Chem Ed 300

2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 6 --------27

Analytical Chemistry Instrumental Method Organic Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry Physical Chemistry Environmental Chemistry Sec. School Chemistry Seminar in Chemistry Education Thesis Required number of units

Major in Physics Phys 201 Phys 202 Phys 203 Phys 204 Phy Ed 251 Phy Ed 253 Phy Ed 257 Sci Ed 228 Phy Ed 290 Phy Ed 300

Units Classical Mechanics Classical Electromagnetism Thermodynamics & The Kinetic Theory Modern Physics I Selected Topics in Mathematical Physics Secondary School Physics Selected Topics in Physics Environmental Education Seminar in Physics Ed. Thesis

3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 6

Elective Phys 205

Modern Physics II Required number of units

Major in General Science Sci. Ed. 220 Sci. Ed. 230 Sci. Ed 240 Sci. Ed. 250 Sci. Ed. 260

Selected Topics for Mathematics Teacher Conceptual Physics Conceptual Chemistry Earth and Space Science Concepts in Biology and Ecology

3 -------31

Units 2 4 4 4 4

95

Sci. Ed. 264 Sci. Ed. 300

Anatomy, Physiology & Herbal Medicine Thesis

3

Required number of units

Major in Elementary Mathematics Math Ed 230 Math Ed 231 Math Ed 232 Math Ed 233 Math Ed 290 Sci Ed 228 Math Ed 300

Units

Fundamental Concepts of Elementary Math Geometry Algebra Trigonometry Seminar in Math Education Environmental Ed. Thesis

Electives: Math 206 Math 201 Math Ed 238 Math 275 Math Ed 240 Math Ed 241

Theory of Numbers Set Theory Intermediate Statistics Graph Theory Computer Education Basic Analysis

Major in Secondary Mathematics

Math Ed 235 Math 201N Math Ed 241 Math Ed 290 Sci Ed 228 Math Ed 300

Selected Topics in Algebra & Trigonometry Selected Topics in Geometry Logic and Set Theory Basic Analysis I Seminar in Math Ed. Environmental Education Thesis

Electives: Math 206 Math 201 Math Ed 238

3 3 3 3 1 2 6

(6 units)

Required number of units

Math Ed 234N

6 -------27

3 3 3 3 3 3 -------27

Units 3 3 3 3 1 2 6

(6 units) Theory of Numbers Set Theory Intermediate Statistics

3 3 3 96

Math 275 Math 221.1 Math 225.1 Math Ed 240

Graph Theory Fundamental of Linear Algebra Fundamental of Abstract Algebra Computer Education Required number of units

3 3 3 3 -------27

MAJOR IN BIOLOGY (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (For Full Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/202/203 Bio 221 Bio 241 Bio Ed 213 or Sci Ed 213

Units 3 3 3 3

Total

12

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 1 6 9 or 8 9 or 12 12

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

SciEd 205 Bio 211 Bio 251 Sci Ed 228 Total

Units 3 3 3 2 11

Lec 3 2 2 9

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 3 3 3 3 2 6 11

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Chem 204 Educ 206 Bio Ed 290 Total

Units 3 3 1 7

Lec 3 3 1 7

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 1 0 7

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Bio Ed 300

Course Title

Units 6

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6

Prerequisite(s)

97

Total

6

6

(For Part Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/202/203 Bio 221 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 2 5

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 3 3 3 6

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 205 Bio 211 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 2 5

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 3 3 3 6

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Bio 241 Educ 206 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 2 3 5

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 3 3 0 3 3 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Chem 204 Bio Ed 213 Or Sci Ed 213 Total

Units 3 3 3 6

Lec 3 2 1 5 or 4

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 3 3 6 3 or 6 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Bio 251 Sci Ed 228 Bio Ed 290 Total

Units 3 2 1 6

Lec 2 2 1 5

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 3 3 0 2 0 1 3 6

Prerequisite(s)

98

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Lec

Prerequisite(s)

Comprehensive Examination Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Bio Ed 300

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6 6

Lec

6 6

Total

Prerequisite(s)

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Bio Ed 300

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 3 3

Lec

3 3

Total

Prerequisite(s)

MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (For Full Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Educ 201/202/203 Chem 201 Chem 202 Chem Ed 253 Total

3 2 3 3 11

Lec 3 2 2 2 9

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 2 3 3 3 3 6 11

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci. Ed 205 Chem 203 Chem 205 Chem. 289 Total

Units 3 3 3 3 12

Lec 3 3 3 3 12

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 12

Prerequisite(s)

99

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 206 Chem 207 Chem Ed 290 Total

Units 3 3 1 7

Lec 3 3 1 7

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 1 0 7

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Chem Ed 300

Lec

6 6

Total

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6 6

Prerequisite(s)

(For Part Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/202/203 Chem 202 Total

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3

3

0

3

3 6

2 5

3 3

3 6

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci. Ed 205 Chem 203 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

First Year, Summer Course No. Chem 205 Chem Ed 206

Course Title

Units 3 3

Lec 3 3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 100

Total

6

6

0

6

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Chem 207 Chem Ed 253 Total

Units

Lec 3 2 5

3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 3 3 3 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Chem 201 Chem. Ed 290 Chem 289 Total

Units

Lec 2 1 3 6

2 1 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 6

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Comprehensive Examination Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Chem Ed 300 Total

Units

Lec

6 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 6 6

MAJOR IN PHYSICS (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (For Full Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No. Educ 201/202/203 Phy Ed 253

Course Title

Units 3 3

Lec 3 2

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 3 3 101

Phys 204 Phy Ed 251

3 3 12

Total

3 3 11

0 0 3

3 3 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Sci Ed 205 Phys 201 Phys 202 Sci Ed 228

3 3 3 2 11

Total

Lec 3 3 3 2 11

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 2 0 11

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Educ 206 Phys 203 Phy Ed 290 Phy Ed 257 Phys 205

Course Title

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 (3) 0 3 8 or (11) 0 11

Units

3 3 1 1 (3) Total 8 or (11)

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Phy Ed 300 Total

Units

Lec

6 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 6 6

(For Part Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No. Educ 201/ 202/203

Course Title

Units 3

Lec 3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0

3 102

Phys 204 Total

3 6

3 6

0 0

3 6

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 205 Phys 202 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

103

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Educ 206 Phys 201 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Phys Ed 253 Phys Ed 251 Phys Ed 257 Total

Units 3 3 1 7

Lec 2 3 1 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 3 3 0 3 0 1 3 7

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 228 Phys Ed 290 Phys 203 Total

Units 2 1 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 2 0 2 1 0 1 3 0 3 6 0 6

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Comprehensive Examination Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

PhyEd 300 Total

Units 6 6

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 6 6

MAJOR IN GENERAL SCIENCE 104

(LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (For Full Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

SciEd 220 SciEd 230 SciEd 260

Lec 2 3 3 8

2 4 4 10

Total

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 2 3 4 3 4 6 10

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Educ 201/202/203 Sci Ed 240 Sci Ed 250 Total

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3

3

0

3

4 4 11

3 3 9

3 3 6

4 4 11

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Educ 206 Sci Ed 209B Sci Ed 264 Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Comprehensive Examination Total

105

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Sci Ed 300

6 6

Total

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 6 6

(For Part Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/202/203 Sci Ed 230 Total

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

3

3

0

3

4 7

3 6

3 3

4 7

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 240 Educ 206 Total

Units 4 3 7

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 3 4 0 3 3 7

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

SciEd 260 Total

Units 3 3

Lec 3 3

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

SciEd 250 Scied 209B Total

Units 4 3 7

Lec 3 3

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 3 4 0 3 7

Prerequisite(s)

106

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 220 Sci Ed 264 Total

Units 2 3 5

Lec 2 3 5

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 2 0 3 0 5

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Comprehensive Examination Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 300 Total

Units

Lec

6 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6 6

Prerequisite(s)

MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (For Full Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/202/203 Sci Ed 205 Math Ed 230 Math Ed 231 Total

Units 3

Lec 3

3 3 3 12

3 3 3 12

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 0 0 0

Prerequisite(s)

3 3 3 12

107

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Educ 206

3

Lec 3

Math Ed 232 Math Ed 290 Sci Ed 228

3 1 2 9

3 1 2 9

Total

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 0 0 0

Prerequisite(s)

3 1 2 9

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Math Ed 233

3

Lec 3

Elective I Elective II

3 3 9

3 3 9

Total

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 0 0

Prerequisite(s)

3 3 9

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 300 Total

Units

Lec

6 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6 6

Prerequisite(s)

(For Part Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/ 202/203 Math Ed 230 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 206 Math Ed 231 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

108

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 232 Total

Units 3 3

Lec 3

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 3

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 233 Elective I Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 228 Math Ed 290 Elective II Total

Units 2 1 3 6

Lec 2 1 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Comprehensive Examination Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 300 Total

Units 6 6

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6 6

Prerequisite(s)

109

MAJOR IN SECONDARY MATHEMATICS (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) (For Full Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/202/203 Sci Ed 205 Math Ed 234 Elective I Total

Units 3 3 3 3 12

Lec 3 3 3 3 12

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 12

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Educ 206 Math Ed 235 Math Ed 290 Sci Ed 228

3 3 1 2 9

Total

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 1 0 1 2 0 2 9 0 9

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Math 201 Math 241 Elective II Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Comprehensive Examination Total

110

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 300 Total

Units

Lec

6 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6 6

Prerequisite(s)

(For Part Time Students) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Educ 201/ 202/203 Math Ed 234 Total

Units 3

Lec 3

3 6

3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 0

Prerequisite(s)

3 6

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 205 Elective I Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Educ 206 Elective II Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 235 Math 201 Total

Units 3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

111

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Sci Ed 228 Math Ed 290 Math Ed 241 Total

Units 2 1 3 6

Lec 2 1 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Comprehensive Examination Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Math Ed 300

Units

Lec

6 Total

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 6

6

Prerequisite(s)

6

CATALOGUE OF COURSES EDUCATION COURSES EDUC 206

METHODS OF RESEARCH AND STATISTICS

Research process, research design, statistics and computer applications. Students are required to submit research proposal at the end of the course. Credit EDUC. ___

: 3 units

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION

A credit of 3 units is given to any of the following foundation courses: Educ 201 - Philo. Foundations of Education Educ. 202 - Psycho. Foundations of Education Educ. 203 - Socio-Antrho. Foundations of Education SCI.ED 205

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENCE AND MATH

A study of the changing concepts of the curriculum with advance point determinants, composition and curriculum development with planning, 112

designing and evaluation stressed. The role of administrators and teachers for curriculum improvement included. Credit

: 3 units ( 3 hours lecture/week)

SPECIALIZATION COURSES MAJOR IN BIOLOGY BIO 211

ADVANCED SYSTEMATICS Principles and methods of classification and nomenclature in various living forms. Credit

BIO 221

: 3 units (2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab/week) ADVANCED ECOLOGY

Principles and concepts underlying ecosystem structure and function in natural environments. Credit BIO 241

: 3 units (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory/week) ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY

Recent developments in general physiology including biosynthetic and metabolic pathways pertaining to both plants and animals. Credit BIO 251

: 3 units (2 units lecture and 1 unit laboratory/week) ADVANCED GENETICS

Biochemical and molecular basis of heredity, biotechnology. Credit BIO ED 213

: 3 units (2 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory/week) MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY

Computer Aided instructional technology development Credit BIO ED 290

: 3 units (2 hours lecture/week, 3 hours laboratory/week) SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION

Special seminar topics related to Biology Education. Credit BIO ED 300

: 1 unit1 hour /week seminar session THESIS 113

A research study to be conducted by the master‘sstudent related to Science Education/Biology Teaching. Credit

: 6 units

CHEM 204 (CHEM 145)

ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY

Latest developments in Biochemistry are discussed. Topics include metabolism, nucleic acid, enzymology, biokenetics, and other trends. Credit : 3 units; 3 hours lecture Prerequisite(s) : Chem 45 SCIED 213

SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

Recent biological and ecological breakthrough applied to Biology Education Credit SCI.ED. 228

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

Rationale of Environmental education, curriculum development, teaching strategies, designing projects and then demonstrating them. Reports, classroom experiences, and other devices provide feedback on the implementation of the strategies. Credit : 2 units (2 hours lecture/week) Prerequisite(s) : Educational Psychology and methods of Teaching.

MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY CHEM 201

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Topics of current interest will be discussed, specifically new methods of qualitative & quantitative analysis. The content of this course shall be taken from current analytical chemistry periodicals. CHEM. 202

INSTRUMENTAL METHODS

Fundamentals of Chemical Instrumentation, theory and application of electroanalytical spectroscopic and other relevant instrumental methods. Prerequisite(s) CHEM 203

: Chem 28

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Major reactions in organic synthesis: stereochemistry, mechanism, and applications in industry, environment, biosynthesis of natural products and medicine.

114

CHEM 205

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Principles in bonding and structure of inorganic compounds, transition metal complexes, ligand field theory, molecular orbital theory and inorganic reactions. Prerequisite(s) CHEM 207

: Chem 16

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

This course discusses the law of thermodynamics and their applications to chemical systems. Topics include: Gases: First, second and third Laws of Thermodynamics, Thermochemistry, Phase Transformation, Solutions, Chemical Equilibrium, and Electrochemistry. Prerequisite(s) CHEM 289

: Math 61, Physics 11 and Chem 28

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

The course deals with the nature of air and water pollution; pollutants and their effects on the physical, chemical, & biological processes and interrelationships between man and his environment. It also includes pollution monitoring, control and abatement. CHEM ED 253 SECONDARY SCHOOL CHEMISTRY A critical discussion of the approaches by which the fundamentals of chemistry can best be introduced. The course covers the content of the general chemistry used in secondary schools. Credit

: 3 units

CHEM ED 290 SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY EDUCATION Special seminar topics related to Chemistry Education. Credit

: 1 unit (1 hour/week seminar session)

CHEM ED 300 THESIS A research study to be conducted by the masteral student related to Science Education/Chemistry teaching.

115

MAJOR IN PHYSICS PHYS 201

CLASSICAL MECHANICS

A calculus treatment of classical mechanics covering introductory vector analysis, forces, potential energy, gravitation, central forces and planetary motion and dynamics of rigid bodies. Credit PHYS 202

: 3 units (3 hours lecture). CLASSICAL ELECTROMAGNETISM

A calculus treatment of classical electromagnetism using vector analysis and partial differential equations. Topics include the concepts of electrostatics, electric fields and potentials, dielectrics, Laplace‘s equation, magnetic materials, ampere‘s Law, Faraday‘s Law of Induction and Maxwell‘s equation. Credit PHYS 203

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) THERMODYNAMICS, KINETIC THEORY AND OPTICS

A calculus treatment of the concepts of heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, Maxwellian molecular velocity, distribution, entropy, waves, geometrical and physical optics, lenses and optical instruments. Credit PHYS 204

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) MODERN PHYSICS I

An introduction to the concepts of Modern Physics. Topics include special relativity, Lorenz transformation, photo-electric effect, early atomic theories, Planck‘s radiation law, Rutherford‘s atom, de Broglie hypothesis, Bohr atom and

wave properties of matter. Credit PHYSICS 205

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) MODERN PHYSICS II

Continuation of Physics 204. Topics include Schroedinger Theory and its application to atomic and molecular physics, material science, nuclear physics and elementary particles. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture)

116

PHY ED 251

SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS

This is a special course which tackles topics related to mathematics applied to physics, breakthrough/recent development on vector analysis, different equations and other related topics. PHY ED 253

SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICS

Include Differential Equation Units and analytical Physics and Geometry. This course addresses problems in Physics Teaching in High school like misconceptions, etc. it includes lectures textbooks used by selected schools with emphasis in problem solving. Credit PHY ED 257

: 3 units (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory/week) SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICS

This course includes designing of teaching emits at the high school level on the basic concepts such as laser, plasma, microelectronics, semactivity, photovoltaics and other topics not concerned in regular high school physics subject. It also includes community-based physics activities and teaching units. Credit PHY ED 300

: 1 unit (1 hour/week seminar session) THESIS

A research study to be conducted by the master‘s student related to Science Education/Physics education.

MAJOR IN GENERAL SCIENCE SCI.ED. 220

SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENCE TEACHERS

Measurements, conversion factors, variables, relationships between variables,

scaling, construction of graphs, and interpretation of graphs. Credit SCI.ED. 230

: 2 units CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS

Basic ideas and concepts in Physics which includes mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound and light, and electricity and magnetism. Credit SCI.ED. 240

: 4 units (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory/week) CONCEPTUAL CHEMISTRY 117

Basic concepts in chemistry including the fundamentals of inorganic and organic chemistry. Credit SCI.ED. 250

: 4 units (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory) EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE

Physical geography, geology, hydrology, meteorology, and astronomy. Credit SCI.ED. 260

: 4 units (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory) CONCEPTS IN BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

Chemistry of life, cell physiology, classification of organisms, and basic genetics. Ecological concepts include interactions in the biosphere, functions of trophic levels in an ecosystem, and structures of biotic communities. Credit SCI.ED. 264

: 4 units (3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory) ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND HERBAL MEDICINE

Structures and function of plants and animals with emphasis on human anatomy and physiology, their disorders and diseases. This also includes identification of medicinal plants and their specific medicinal applications. Credit SCI.ED. 300

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) MASTER‘S THESIS

Independent study on science education. Credit

: 6 units

MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS MATH 201

SET THEORY

Most known mathematics can be expressed in terms of sets and language of logic and sets is utilized in every mathematical discipline. It is important that a teacher of mathematics should have a fair background of its theories. The course content includes the use of the axiomatic system, language of the set theory, Truth of sentence, algebra of sets, Boolean algebra relations, order relations, equivalence relations, inverse relations, cardinal numbers, arithmetic of cardinal numbers, axioms of set theory. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) 118

MATH 206

THEORY OF NUMBERS

Elementary topics in number theory which include divisibility and division algorithm, prime numbers and composite numbers, unique factorization theorem, greatest common divisor and least common multiple, modular arithmetic. Credit MATH 275

: 3 units; 3 hours lecture/week GRAPH THEORY

This includes the graphs of paths, trees, cycles, complete graphs, planar graphs, bipartite graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, eulerian graphs, and the platonic solids. Colorability, chromatic polynomial and chromic number of graphs. Credit MATHED 230

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS

This course offers a systematic analysis of arithmetic and a presentation of intuitive algebra and geometry. The topics included are symbols and numerals, place value and bases, rational numbers, decimals, irrational numbers, real numbers, sets and variables, solution sets for equations, two variables and graphs, fundamental principles of counting, permutation, combination, general principles of geometry, similar triangles and trigonometry. Credit

: 3 units; 3 hours lecture/week

MATH ED 231 GEOMETRY Selected mathematics topics in plane and solid Geometry. It covers the following topics: Lines, plane, angles and triangles, geometric inequalities, perpendicular and parallel lines and planes. It includes also polygonal regions and their areas, circles and spheres and solids and their volumes. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 232 ALGEBRA Selected topics in Algebra. It covers the real number system, polynomials, product and factoring, the linear and quadratic functions, the complex number system. It also includes equation of the second degree in two variables, system of equations, polynomial equations, and sequence and series and mathematical induction. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 233 TRIGONOMETRY

119

It deals with the comprehensive treatment on the analytical and computational aspects of plane and spherical trigonometric functions. It covers also inverse functions, and relationships among functions and their inverses. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 238 INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS This course includes counting principles, probability laws, probability distribution, sampling from normal distribution, simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, analysis of variance, Kruskalwallis Anova, correlation analysis. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 240 COMPUTER EDUCATION The study of computer programming language called BASIC. It deals with background information about computer center. It focuses on the ideas and techniques of structured and modular programming, program readability and program documentation. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 241 BASIC ANALYSIS I This course includes topics on function, limits of functions, continuity of functions, derivatives and its applications, and integration. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 290 SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION Current trends in Mathematics teaching, readings on journals on Mathematics education and from other reports on recent innovations on updating curricula in Mathematics. Credit

: 1 unit (1 unit lecture/week)

MATH ED 300 THESIS The masteral thesis must be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge involving Mathematics education before a panel of instructors appointed by the dean of SGS. Credit

: 6 units (conference to be arranged with adviser)

MAJOR IN SECONDARY MATHEMATICS SCI.ED. 228

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 120

Rationale of Environmental education, curriculum development, teaching strategies, designing projects and then demonstrating them. Reports, classroom experiences, and other devices provide feedback on the implementation of the strategies. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 201

: 2 units (2 hours lecture/week) : Educational Psychology and Methods of Teaching.

SET THEORY

Most known mathematics can be expressed in terms of sets and language of logic and sets is utilized in every mathematical discipline. It is important that a teacher of mathematics should have a fair background of its theories. The course content includes the use of the axiomatic system, language of the set theory, ―Truth, of sentence, algebra of sets, Boolean algebra relations, order relations, equivalence relations, inverse relations, cardinal numbers, arithmetic of cardinal numbers, axioms of set theory. Credit MATH 221.1

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) FUNDAMENTAL OF LINEAR ALGEBRA I

This course deals with vector spaces, bases subspaces, linear transformations, matrices, system of linear equations, determinants, adjoint, Hamilton-Gayley theorem, Jordan normal form, linear functions, Hermite normal form. Credit MATH 225.1

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) FUNDAMENTAL OF ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I

This course includes topics such as equivalence relations, functions and other relations from the standpoint of algebra of sets, elementary theory of graphs, rings and polynomial rings, ordered rings based on the study of rings of integers, and including the fundamental homomorphisms theorems, field of quotients of integral domains. Credit MATH 275

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) GRAPH THEORY

This includes the graphs of paths, trees, cycles, complete graphs, planar graphs, bipartite graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, eulerian graphs, and the platonic solids. Colorability, chromatic polynomial and chromic number of graphs. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 234 SELECTED TOPICS IN ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY This course deals with topics in Algebra, linear algebra and trigonometry. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week) 121

MATH ED 235 SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOMETRY This course deals with selected topics in plane and solid geometry and nonEuclidean geometry. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 238 INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS This course includes counting principles, probability laws, probability distribution, sampling from normal distribution, simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, analysis of variance, Kruskalwallis Anova, correlation analysis. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 240 COMPUTER EDUCATION The study of computer programming language called BASIC. It deals with background information about computer center. It focuses on the ideas and techniques of structured and modular programming, program readability and program documentation. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 241 BASIC ANALYSIS I This course includes topics on function, limits of functions, continuity of functions, derivatives and its applications, and integration. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

MATH ED 242 BASIC ANALYSIS II This is the second course in analysis for students in the secondary mathematics education. It includes topics on application of definite integral (area of a region, volume of a region and work), differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration and sequences.

122

MATH ED 243 INTRODUCTORY COMBINATORICS Pigeonhole principle, basic counting principle, permutations, combinations, binomial coefficients, multinomial theorem, the inclusion-exclusion, principle, recurrence relations, generating functions. Credit

: 3 units (3 hours lecture/week)

This course requires the student to conduct actual teaching to the different secondary/elementary/schools as decided by both teacher/instructor and student with the application to the different methods of strategies and contents in Mathematics. MATH ED 290 SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION Current trends in Mathematics teaching, readings on journals on Mathematics education and from other reports on recent innovations on updating curricula in Mathematics. Credit

: 1 unit (1 unit lecture/week)

MATH ED 300 THESIS The masteral thesis must be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge involving Mathematics education before a panel of instructors appointed by the dean of SGS. Credit

: 6 units (conference to be arranged with adviser)

123

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (CHEMISTRY)

Introduction The Doctor of Philosophy Science Education (Chemistry) program is designed primarily for teacher educators, policy makers, researchers, and other educational personnel involved in science and mathematics education. The program aims to upgrade the capabilities of Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs). Graduates of this program are expected to play active roles in promoting and improving science education. They could become administrators of science departments, supervisors of science in school systems, supervisors of science laboratories, directors of research, professors of science and science education courses. The area of specialization is Chemistry. Other specializations like Biology, Physics and Mathematics are still on process of curriculum development for implementation.

Objectives The program seeks to: 

 

Provide highly competent and academically prepared teachers of science in the tertiary and secondary levels, administrators of science departments, supervisors in science laboratories and teachers of science education as well as science courses. Contribute in the production of the critical mass of science educators as projected by the DOST. Develop graduates with capabilities of doing problem-based and discipline (science) based researches.

Mode of Instruction Delivery of instructions will include on and off-campus through on-line learning employing information and communication technology (ICT). It may also be done by establishing collaborative activities with the community and stakeholders by conducting conventions, congress, seminars, fora and the likes.

Admission Requirements 1. For a doctoral degree, an earned MS/MA/MAT/MST/MSc major in one of the sciences 2. A grade point average of 1.75 or above in the graduate major or minor field of study 3. Pass the Admission Test for Doctoral Program in Education (ATDPE) 4. Pass the interview by the department chair.

124

PROGRAM CURRICULUM A. Basic Courses Sci Ed 300 Sci Ed 302 Sci Ed 303 Sci Ed 304

(12 units) Psych. & Philosophical Theories of Science Ed. Adv. Educational Stat. Adv. Designs and Data Analysis Seminar in Curriculum and And Design and Instruction in Science Education

B. Major Courses Chem 311 Chem 320 Chem 330 Chem 350

Seminar in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Seminar in Advanced Analytical Chemistry Seminar in Advanced Organic Chemistry Seminar in Physical Chemistry

Cognates (any two of the ff. courses)

Sci Ed 304 Sci Ed 306 Sci Ed 307 Sci Ed 308 Chem 212 Chem 215 Chem 221 Chem 241 Chem 251 Chem 252 Chem 253 Chem 255

3 3 3

(27 units)

Chem (200 level) Sci Ed 309 Independent Study I Sci Ed Independent Study I

Sci Ed 303

3

Current Trends and Research in Chemistry Advanced Educational Management Advanced Measurement and Evaluation Special Problems in Chemical Education Computer Aided Chemistry Instruction Physical Organic Chem. Physical Organic Chem. Spectroscopic Methods of Analysis Molecular Biochemistry Chem‘l. Thermodynamics I Chem‘l Thermodynamics II Chemical Kinetics Quantum Chemistry

3 3 3 3

3 3

(6 units) 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

125

C. Comprehensive Examination All Ph.D students must take and pass a comprehensive examination at the end of their course work, prior to commencing their dissertation work.

D. Dissertation

(12 units)

Summary Of Units Basic Courses ……………………………………..…… Major Courses ……………………………………..…… Cognates …………………………………………..…… Dissertation ………………………………………..…… Total

12 27 6 12 57

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN SCIENCE EDUCATION (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Sci Ed 301

Units

Seminar in Curriculum and Design and Instruction in Science Education

3

3

0

3

3 3

3 3

0 0

3 3

3

3

0

3

12

12

0

12

Major 1 Major 2 Cognate 1

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Course Title

(Cognate related to the specialization ) Total

Lec

Prerequisite(s)

Sci Ed 300

First Year, Second Semester Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Course No.

Course Title

Units

Sci Ed 302

Advanced Educational Statistics

3

3

0

3

3 3 3

3 3 3

0 0 0

3 3 3

12

12

0

12

Major 3 Major 4 Cognate 2 Total

Lec

Prerequisite(s) None

126

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Major 5 Major 6 Total

3 3

Lec 3 3

6

6

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0

Prerequisite(s)

6

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Sci Ed 303

Sci Ed 300 Sci Ed 309 Major 7

Course Title Advanced Design and Data Analysis Psychological and Philosophical Theories of Science Education Independent Study I Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3

3

0

3

Sci Ed 302

3

3

0

3

None

3 3

3 3

0 0

3 3

12

12

0

12

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Sci Ed 310

Course Title

Units

Independent Study II Preparation for Comprehensive Exam.

3

Total

3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 Sci Ed 309

3

0

3

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title Comprehensive Examination Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 127

Sci Ed 400

Dissertation Total

GRAND TOTAL

12

12

0

12

12

12

0

12

57 units

(Part-time Student) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Sci Ed 301

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

Course Title

Units

Seminar in Curriculum and Design and Instruction in Science Education

3

3

0

3

3 6

3 6

0 0

3 6

Major 1 Total

Sci Ed 300

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Major 2 Cognate 1

Units 3

(Cognate related to the specialization ) Total

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3

3

3

0

3

6

6

0

6

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Sci Ed 302

Course Title

Units

Advanced Educational Statistics

3

Major 3 Total

3 6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total None 3 0 3 3 6

0 0

3 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Major 4

Course Title

Units 3

Lec 3

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total 0 3

Prerequisite(s)

128

Cognate 2 Total

3 6

3 6

0 0

3 6

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Major 5 Major 6

Units 3 3

Total

6

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 6

0

6

Third Year, First Semester Course No. Sci Ed 303 Sci Ed 300

Course Title

Units

Advanced Design and Data Analysis Psychological and Philosophical Theories of Science Education Total

Lec

Hrs./Wk. Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

3

0

3

Sci Ed 302

3

3

0

3

None

6

6

0

6

Third Year, Second Semester Course No. Sci Ed 309 Major 7

Course Title Independent Study I Total

Units 3 3 6

Hrs./Wk. Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 6 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

Fourth Year, First Semester Course No. Sci Ed 310

Course Title

Units

Independent Study II Preparation for Comprehensive Exam.

3

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 Sci Ed 309

129

Total

3

3

0

3

Fourth Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title Comprehensive Examination Total

Units

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Fifth Year, First Semester Course No. Sci Ed 400

Course Title Dissertation Total

GRAND TOTAL

Units 12 12

Hrs./Wk. Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 12 0 12 12 0 12

57 units

CATALOGUE OF COURSES SCI. ED. 300

PSYCHOLOGICAL / PHILOSOPHICAL THEORIES OF SCIENCE EDUCATION

The course deals with the discussion of the psychological and philosophical foundations of science and mathematics education through historical background to encourage and appreciate among the graduate students the development of personal philosophies of science and mathematics education as a profession. 130

Credit Prerequisite(s) SCI ED. 302

: 3 units : none

ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS

This course deals with advanced statistical analyses applied to education. Credit Prerequisite(s) SCI ED. 303

: 3 units : none

ADVANCED DESIGNS AND DATA ANALYSIS

This course deals with qualitative and quantitative research designs with computer applications. Credit Prerequisite(s) SCI ED. 301

: 3 units : none

SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM AND DESIGN AND INSTRUCTION IN SCIENCE EDUCATION

This course consists of two parts: introduction to Curriculum Development and Curriculum Development process in Science and mathematics . Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : none

CHEM 300 LEVEL CHEM 311

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Issues, Trends and Current researches in the field of Inorganic Chemistry and oral presentation and discussion of student‘s research output related to Inorganic Chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 320

: 3 units (3 hours lecture per week) : Completion of 9 units in the Master‘s program

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Issues, Trends and Current researches in the field of Analytical Chemistry and oral presentation and discussion of student‘s research output related to Analytical Chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 330

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Completion of 9 units in the Master‘s program

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 131

Issues, Trends and Current researches in the field of Organic Chemistry and oral presentation and discussion of student‘s research output related to Organic Chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 350

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Completion of 9 units in the Master‘s program

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

Issues, Trends and Current researches in the field of Physical Chemistry and oral presentation and discussion of student‘s research output related to Physical Chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) SCI ED 308

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Completion of 9 units in the Master‘s program

SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CHEMICAL EDUCATION

Recent breakthrough in Chemistry applied to Education. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 212

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Consent of the Graduate Committee. Course prepares the student in the selection of dissertation topics.

PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Applications of physical chemistry in the study of structure, reactivity and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 235

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Physical Chemistry

PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

Concepts on stereochemistry and their applications to the study of configuration, conformation, reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 221

SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS OF ANALYSIS APPLICATION OF NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY

Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 241

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Physical Organic Chemistry I

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Physical Organic Chemistry I

MOLECULAR BIOCHEMISTRY

132

Behavior of biologically active substances and mechanisms of enzymic reactions in terms of electronic theory Credit CHEM 251

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS I

Thermodynamics Theory, applications to chemical and other related systems, introduction to irreversible thermodynamics Credit CHEM 252

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS II

Ensemble and Thermodynamics, non-interacting systems, interacting systems, quantum statistics. Credit CHEM 253

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) CHEMICAL KINETICS

Reaction rates and mechanics. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 255

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week) : Chem 250

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY AND APPROXIMATIONS METHODS; NON-INTERACTING PARTICLES; THE CHEMICAL APPLICATION OF GROUP THEORY.

Credits

: 3 units (3hours lecture per week)

FACULTY PROFILE 1. Alensub, Sonia M.

Ph.D. Educational Psychology, UP-Diliman, 1994 M.Ed. Educational Technology, UP-Diliman, 1979 AB Political Science, MSU-Marawi, 1968

2. Antonio, Thelma A.

Ph.D. Sci. Education -Chemistry, DLSU-Manila, 1987 MAT Chemistry, UP-Diliman, 1975 BS Nutrition, CEU-Manila, 1984

3. Barquilla, Manuel B.

Ph.D. Biology Education, UP-Diliman, 2003 MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT MA Science Education Biology, MSU-IIT, 1994 133

BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1987 4. Buan, Amelia T.

MA Mathematics Education, MSU-IIT, 1997 BSE Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1992

5. Dapusala, Inocencia

Ph.D. in Environmental Science, UP-Diliman, 1986 MAT General Science, UP-Diliman, 1972 BSE General Science, MSU-Marawi, 1967

6. Hairulla, Monera S.

MS Biology, UP-Diliman, 2002. BSE Biology, MSU-IIT, 1988

7. Lahoylahoy, Myrna E.

Ph.D. Science Education Mathematics, UP-Open Univ., 2003 MAT Mathematics, UP, 1982 BS Mathematics, University of San Carlos, 1973

8. Lim, Cora

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, ADMU, 2006 MA in Social and Community Psychology, ADMU, 1992 AB Psychology, MSU-Marawi, 1981

9. Magsayo, Joy R.

MSciEd Biology, MSU-IIT, 2006 BSE Biology, MSU-IIT, 1996

10. Sedurifa, Esmar N.

MASE Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1985 BS Chemistry, South Western University, 1976

11. Semorlan, Antonieto S.

MAT Physics, UP, 1971 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1966

12. Sombilon, Virginia A.

MAT Mathematics, UP, 1979 BS Education, Divine Word College of Tagbilaran, 1973

13. Silor, Adelfa F.

EdD Educational Management, Cebu Normal University, 2004 MAED Educational Management, Cebu Normal University, 1994 AB English, MSU-IIT, 1987

CCO OLLlle eg ge eo off e enng giinne ee er riinng g

List of Programs

134

   

Master of Science in Civil Engineering (MSCE) Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) Master of Engineering (MOE) Doctor of Engineering (DOE)

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING Introduction Civil engineering covers such diverse areas of concern as design of structural systems, water resource planning, treatment and ultimate disposal of noxious solid and liquid wastes, design of building systems for rural and urban dwellers in the commercial 135

and industrial sectors, development of transportation systems, construction methods and management, and implementation and management of public work projects designed to improve the environment without due prejudice to the health, safety and welfare of the public. The formation of new communities, cities and industries especially in Mindanao, the recent demands of the population for higher level of safety of the built environment calls for civil engineers with higher level of scientific and technical know-how. Undergraduate programs in civil engineering alone are not sufficient to meet the requirements necessary to produce high-level manpower resources for scientific and technological advancement and to satisfy the research and development demands of an industrialized country.

Objectives The MSCE program is offered with the following objectives: 1.

to provide high-level manpower resources in the field of civil engineering needed by industries and agencies in both the private and public sectors; and

2.

to develop the competence of Filipino scientists and engineers in the field of civil engineering through promotion and support of technical researches and related scientific activities.

Admission Requirements Admission to the program is contingent upon the policies and guidelines of the Graduate School. In addition, all applicants must meet the following requirements: 1. The student must have an undergraduate engineering degree from a recognized institution. In the event that the degree is in a field other than civil engineering, the student may be required to complete a set of prerequisite undergraduate courses before graduate degree credits may be accrued. 2. The student must have an undergraduate weighted average grade of at least 2.0 or equivalent, or must be able to show some evidence of potential ability to pursue a graduate degree, e.g., excellent performance in teaching or research, or experience in the industry or private sector as evidenced by a strong recommendation from his immediate superior or former mentors.

Degree Requirements The degree may be earned through a thesis or coursework option. The minimum course requirements for each option are as follows:

136

Thesis Option Core Courses Foundation Courses Electives Thesis

Total

Coursework Option 15 units 6 3 6 ------------

Core Courses Foundation Courses Electives Special Project Comprehensive Exam

30 units

Total

24 units 9 9 3 ------------45 units

Core courses are identified by CE prefixes. They may be taken from any of the five areas of discipline, namely, Engineering Construction and Management, Structural Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Transportation Engineering and Water Resources Engineering. The offering of such courses is based on the availability of faculty members vis-à-vis the number of students meeting the five-enrollee-per-class requirement. Core courses taken beyond the minimum requirement may be credited as electives. Foundation courses are identified by ES prefixes. These courses provide the students necessary background to tackle the core courses. ES 201 is a required foundation course and must be passed within the first year. Electives are courses that may be taken, in consultation with the adviser, from any of the foundation courses of the MOE or MSCE program, or from any discipline-related courses of the MOE program. Likewise, core courses of MSCE program beyond the 15unit or 24-unit minimum requirement for the thesis or coursework option, respectively, may also be credited as electives. Special Project is a course in which the student conducts a practice-oriented study culminating to the presentation of a project report. Comprehensive exam is a written exam given to students undergoing the coursework option. This is aimed at determining the students' ability to integrate and apply knowledge that they have acquired in their program of study.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (MSCE) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER, THESIS OPTION) First Year, First Semester Course No. ES 201

Course Title Advanced Engineering Mathematics I Foundation Course Core Course

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

3

3

0

3

3 3

3 3

0 0

3 3

Prerequisite(s)

137

Core Course Total

3 12

3 12

0 0

3 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Core Course Core Course Core Course Elective Total

3 3 3 3 12

Lec 3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 12

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No. CE 299

Course Title

Units

Thesis

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

6

Total

6

Second Year, Second Semester

Course No. CE 299

Course Title

Units

(Thesis Continuation) Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

-

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (MSCE) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER, COURSEWORK OPTION) First Year, First Semester Course No. ES 201

Course Title

Units

Advanced Engineering Mathematics I Foundation Course Core Course Core Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

3

3

0

3

3 3 3 12

3 3 3 12

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 12

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 138

Foundation Course Core Course Core Course Elective Total

3 3 3 3 12

3 3 3 3 12

0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Core Course Core Course Elective Special Project

CE 298

Total

3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 12 0 12

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Core Course Core Course Elective Comprehensive Exam Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3

9

0

9

CATALOGUE OF COURSES FOUNDATION COURSES ES 201

Advanced ENGINEERING Mathematics I Vector spaces; linear independence; matrices; rank and inverse of a matrix; decomposition theorems; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; unitary and similarity transformations of matrices; initial and boundary value problems; power series solutions; applications to engineering problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 202

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 81 (Math Methods of Engineering I) or equivalent

Advanced ENGINEERING Mathematics II Boundary value problems of differential equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; singular boundary conditions, orthogonal expansions, separation of variables in partial differential equations, spherical harmonics. 139

Credit Prerequisite(s) ES 205

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 81 (Math Methods of Engineering I) or equivalent

NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS Error analysis; solution of non-linear equations; direct and iterative methods of solving linear systems; approximations of functions; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations; computer machine problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 210

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 81 (Math Methods of Engineering I) or equivalent

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN ENGINEERING PLANNING AND DESIGN Basic probability and statistics with application and examples in engineering systems; elementary probability theory; random variables and their distribution; random processes; statistical inference; curve fitting and prediction; correlation and application to quality assurance reliability life testing. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 211

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 85 (Probability and Statistics in Engineering) or equivalent

REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Review of the fundamentals of statistics and probability; review of regression analysis: linear and multiple regression analysis of variance; design of experiments; completely randomized design; randomized complete blocks; Latin square multiclassification; factorial, incomplete blocks and fractional replications; confounding, general mixed factorials; optimum design. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 215

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 210 (Probability and Statistical Concepts in Engineering Planning and Design) or equivalent

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Elements of Computer Programming; Structured Computer Programming in FORTRAN or C, or any structured programming language. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 216

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CSc11 (Computer Programming) or Consent of Instructor

OPERATIONS RESEARCH Operations research methods; linear programming, transportation problem; assignment problem; integer programming; review of probabilities; network 140

analysis, PERT-CPM, dynamic programming; game theory, Markov chains; nonlinear programming. Credit Prerequisite(s) ES 218

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ENERGY MANAGEMENT Energy resources, conversions, uses; energy conservation methods in the home, in transportation, in industrial and commercial sectors; fuel substitution; factors in the design of low-energy consumption buildings; economics of energy; technological, economic, societal and environmental factors. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 219

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT Pollution control laws; regulations and standards; types, sources and harmful effects of pollution, solid and liquid waste disposal and management; air pollution control. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CORE COURSES CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT COURSES CE 200

PRINCIPLES OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT History of construction management; nature of the construction industry; planning theory; organization theory; staffing, leading and communication theory; control theory; organization structure and communication in construction; planning, estimating, monitoring, evaluation and control in construction; constructibility improvement; quality management in construction; selection of consultants; contractors, vendors, etc.; contemporary construction management perspective; emerging issues in construction project management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 201

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND ECONOMIC DECISION ANALYSIS IN CONSTRUCTION Basic economic concepts; types and organization of cost estimates; comparison of alternatives; replacement; depreciation and depletion; tax considerations; quantity take-offs; manual and computer methods; contract cost estimates based on CSI subdivisions; cost adjustments with or without indices; interest calculations; effect 141

of inflation; cash flow forecasting and budgetary control; project cost control; construction cost accounting; financing business units and projects; decision making under risk and uncertainty; economic decision models. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 202

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CIVIL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS PLANNING, DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT METHODOLOGY Principles of organization; scheduling, planning, design and development methodologies applied to Civil Engineering systems and projects; planning strategies and application of detailed analysis and procedure of project planning and design from needs analysis; problem definition; generation of alternatives; evaluation and selection of alternatives; detailed design, construction and operational considerations; project evaluation considering technical, economic, financial, community and environmental impact; students generally work on a single project for the entire term in consultation with their instructor. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 203

: 3 units (1 hr lec) : Consent of Instructor

CIVIL ENGINEERING FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS Theory and practice of feasibility studies for proposed Civil Engineering projects and other related areas of interest. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 204

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : Consent of Instructor

CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY ANALYSIS Productivity in construction; factors affecting construction productivity; productivity measurement; productivity improvement during design and construction. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 205

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CIVIL ENGINEERING LAWS, CONTRACTS AND ETHICS General principles of law; overview of the preparation and presentation of construction project bids and proposals; project award process, bid packages, quantity take-offs, estimating, scheduling, and project presentation; students' participation in a realistic bidding exercise; ethical, social, political, legal and ecological issues of the engineering profession; construction statutes; engineer's view of contracts for design and construction; construction contracts and their procurement; elements and importance of contracts, obligations, frauds, proposals, 142

bonds, specifications, performance and termination; construction claims prevention and management; disputes and their resolution; construction insurance; preparation and administration of complete specifications and contract documents for an engineering project; Civil Engineering code of ethics; legislation and policy affecting labor-management relationships in construction; invention and patents. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 206

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

INTERNATIONAL ISSUES IN CONSTRUCTION History of world construction; the future of world construction; cultural influences in construction management; cross-cultural management in construction; international joint ventures; international contracting; global human resources management; privately financed public infrastructure projects and technology transfer; hybrid management in construction; the construction industries in the Asia-Pacific region Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 207

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS FOR CONSTRUCTION Theories of composites; law of mixtures; properties of composites; ferrocement technology; applications of ferrocement; fiber-reinforced c oncrete; cement replacement materials; high-strength concrete; bamboo; paving blocks; prefabricated elements. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 208

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION History of construction procurement; importance and nature of procurement; procurement procedure; value engineering application; equipment procurement; materials procurement; procurement of labor; procurement of outlet works. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 209

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

OPERATIONS RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING Applications to Civil Engineering systems planning, design and operation of operations research methods such as linear programming, integer programming, network analysis, dynamic programming, game theory and non-linear programming; Civil Engineering applications of decision theory, stochastic techniques, and operations research; probabilistic decision theory; queueing

143

theory; inventory theory; reliability theory; scheduling theory; heuristics and systems simulation. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 210

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING Problems of the construction industry; contract administration, men, machines and methods in Civil Engineering construction; applications of mathematical methods and management tools to project and construction management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 211

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION FIELD TECHNIQUES Advanced techniques for construction of bridges, high-rise office buildings, and structures in adverse environments; production and handling of high-strength concrete; erection of complex structural steel structures; placement of high-

performance concrete under water and slurries; field repair of damaged structures; introduction of alternative techniques and their limitations; students' performance using selected techniques and evaluation of their performance. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 212

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR CONSTRUCTION Introduction to information technology for construction; analysis and design of information systems; implementation, development and selection of systems; application packages for construction operations; artificial intelligence and expert systems; automation in construction and robotics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 213

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : none

CONSTRUCTION OF HARBOR, COASTAL AND OCEAN STRUCTURES Construction methods and equipment for construction of cofferdams, caissons, wharves, marine terminal, outfall sewers, power plant intakes and discharges, submarine oil and gas pipelines, dredging, offshore platforms, sub sea and deep ocean facilities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

144

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING COURSES CE 220

ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS Theory and applications of modern structural analysis; structural modeling concepts; static and kinematic requirements; matrix formulations; vector transformations; stiffness and flexibility methods of matrix analysis; direct stiffness method; virtual work energy theorems; numerical solution methods; practical analysis of large frame structures using commercial software; plastic analysis of frames; P-delta effects. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 221

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 152 (Structural Theory II) or equivalent

COMPUTER METHODS OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AND DESIGN Review of numerical methods and solution techniques appropriate to complex structural problems; condensation and substructure techniques; comprehensive presentation of structural analysis in matrix language using force, displacement and direct stiffness methods, considering effects of applied forces, support settlement, and temperature changes; application of matrix methods to complex structures such as trusses, frames, multistory buildings with emphasis on numerical solutions by efficient computer implementations; database abstraction methods for engineering systems; database models and systems; computer graphics; engineer-computer interfaces; introduction to finite element method. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 222

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 220(Advanced Structural Analysis), or ES 205 (Numerical Methods for Engineers) or consent of Instructor

NON-LINEAR STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS Theory, modeling and computations for analysis of structures with material and geometric non-linearities; sources of non-linearity; modeling of inelastic materials and members; P-delta and large deformation theory; analysis of stability; practical applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 223

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 220 (Advanced Structural Analysis) or consent of Instructor

FINITE ELEMENT METHODS IN ENGINEERING Theory for approximate analysis of deformation and stress in solids; finite element formulation for frame, plane stress and plane strain, axisymmetric, torsion and three-dimensional elastic problems; the isoparametric formulation and implementation; finite element modeling of structural systems; plate and shell elements; problems other than structural mechanics. 145

Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 224

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 220 (Advanced Structural Analysis), or CE 221 (Computer Methods of Structural Analysis and Design), or CE 228 (Introduction to Solid Mechanics) or consent of Instructor

BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD Introduction to boundary element method; mathematical background, theories and numerical methods; two-dimensional, three-dimensional and axisymmetric potential and elastostatic problems; use of a BEM computer program in structural analysis. thermoelasticity, multi-domain and fracture mechanics problems; BE formulation in non-linear problems with emphasis on elastoplasticity; coupling BE and FE, centrifugal loading, infinite elements and time-dependent problems; use of a BEM computer program in structural analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 225

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS General theory of free, forced, and transient vibrations; foundation excitation; vibration transmission, isolation, and measurement; systems with single and multiple degrees of freedom; eigenvalue problems; mode superposition technique; vibration of continuous systems; generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equations; method of influence coefficients; matrix formulation and solution; estimation of maximum response by response spectrum analysis; evaluation of earthquake induced deformations and forces in structures by linear response history analysis; effects of inelastic behavior. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 226

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 220 (Advanced Structural Analysis), or ES 205 (Numerical Methods for Engineers) or consent of Instructor

PLATE AND SHELL STRUCTURES Theory and design of plates and shells; bending and stretching of plates; circular plates; rectangular plates; plates on elastic foundation; large deflections; stability; anisotropy; numerical and classical methods. General properties of stress systems in shells; surface theory; deformation; shells of revolution; cylindrical shells; hyperbolic and elliptic paraboloids; displacements; boundary conditions; stability. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 227

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 205 (Numerical Methods for Engineers) or consent of Instructor

STRUCTURAL STABILITY

146

Simple column buckling for various conditions; basic considerations for elastic and inelastic equilibrium; determination of buckling strength of columns with variable cross-section; elastic stability of framed structures. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 228

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

INTRODUCTION TO SOLID MECHANICS Cartesian tensors; stress and strain tensors; equilibrium; rigid body displacements; constitutive laws; anisotropic, orthotropic, and isotropic elastic solids; natural boundary conditions; compatibility conditions; Maxwell-Betti structural theorem; governing equations in cylindrical coordinates; two main approaches to boundary valued problems; isotropic elastic planes; isotropic elastic half-spaces; bending of thin plates; brief introduction to nonlinear mechanics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 229

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

THEORY OF ELASTICITY AND PLASTICITY Analysis of stress; stress boundary conditions; rigid body displacements; isotropic materials; anisotropic materials; torsion; membrane analogy for torsion problem; Airy's stress function; special problems. Mathematical theory of plasticity; plastic stress-strain laws; yield functions and associated flow rules; applications to problems in flexure and torsion; plane plastic flow. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 230

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 201 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics I) or consent of instructor

MATERIAL PROPERTIES FOR DESIGN Series of current readings on the properties of engineering materials, e.g., steel, high-strength lightweight alloys, plastics, composites and ceramics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 231

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING Uses and application of models; laws of similitude, dimensional analysis; scale factors; parametric studies; error and uncertainty in experiment; measurement of strains; electrical resistance strain gauges; rosette analysis; photoelasticity; acoustic emission method; instrumentation for load tests and measurement of settlement in buildings. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 232

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : none

EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING 147

Characteristics of strong earthquakes; determination of location and size of earthquake; earthquake magnitude and intensity; frequency of occurrence of earthquakes; engineering implications of geological phenomena (e.g., earthquake mechanisms, faulting and fault slippage); effects of local geology on earthquake ground motion; response spectra; seismic risk; soil liquefaction. Design of structures to resist earthquakes; ductility; base isolation; development of design criteria for elastic and inelastic structural response; seismic performance of various structural systems; prediction for nonlinear seismic behavior; basis for code design procedures; structural design and detailing for earthquake resistance. Evaluation of seismic vulnerability of existing structures and rehabilitation of seismic deficiencies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 233

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 220 (Advanced Structural Analysis), or CE 225 (Structural Dynamics) or consent of instructor

PLANNING AND OPTIMIZATION OF STRUCTURES Structural design processes; analyses leading to the choice of load-resisting systems; geometric patterns and selection of materials for optimum design of structural elements; mathematical programming in optimization of structural systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 234

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN Advanced topics in reinforced concrete construction, including inelastic flexural behavior; limit state design method; application of plastic analysis to reinforced concrete frames; behavior in shear and torsion; yield-line analysis of slabs; behavior under cyclic and reversed loading. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 235

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 162 (Design of Concrete Structures II) or equivalent

PRESTRESSED CONCRETE STRUCTURES Behavior and design of prestressed concrete structures under bending moment, shear , torsion and axial load effects ; materials; simple and composite sections; continuous members; slabs; columns; frames; arches; tanks; column buckling; two- and three-way prestressing and balanced-load techniques; time-dependent effects and deflections; allowable stress and ultimate strength methods of analysis and design. Applications to design and construction of bridges and buildings. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 162 (Design of Concrete Structures II) or equivalent

148

CE 236

PLASTIC DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES Basic concepts of limit analysis; plastic hinge formation; development and analysis of collapse mechanisms; inelastic behavior of metal structural frameworks; strength and stability under combined loadings; deflections; incremental collapse and shakedown under repeated loading; application of plastic design to high-rise braced and unbraced steel frames; introduction to optimum design. Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD). Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units ( 3 hrs lec) : CE 163 (Design of Steel Structures) or equivalent

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING COURSES CE 240

MECHANICS OF SOILS Stress and strain concepts and stress distribution in soil; theories of strength, permeability, consolidation, seepage, lateral earth pressures and bearing capacity; settlement and stability analyses of soil foundation; slope stability; subsoil exploration and soil sampling. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 241

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 112 (Soil Mechanics) or equivalent

TESTING AND INSTRUMENTATION IN SOIL ENGINEERING Laboratory and field measurements of soil properties; measurements of in-situ soil characteristics; introduction to geotechnical field instrumentations; results evaluations and applications to geotechnical engineering analysis; development in testing and instrumentation methods and equipment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 242

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : CE 112 (Soil Mechanics) or equivalent

FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING Description and evaluation of rocks; causes and criteria for recognition of geologic structures ; physical and mechanical properties of rock masses; rock slope stability; geological and geophysical exploration for structures in rocks. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 243

: 4 units (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : Geol 40 (Engineering Geology) or equivalent

ROCK MECHANICS 149

Engineering properties of rocks and their measurements; stresses and strain and its application to fracture and deformation in rocks; analysis of rock mass deformation; seepage; stability of rock slopes, tunnels, underground openings, and foundations on weak and fractured rocks; applications of mechanics and geology to the planning, design and construction of engineering structures. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 244

: 4 units (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : Geol 40 (Engineering Geology) or equivalent

EARTH STRUCTURES Soil stabilization by compaction and using admixtures for use in embankment, dams, highway and airfields, and lined waste repositories; in-situ ground improvement; analysis, design and construction of earth and rock fill dams, levees, embankments and other earth structures. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 245

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 112 (Soil Mechanics) or equivalent

FOUNDATION ENGINEERING Subsoil investigation; soil/rock-structure interactions; sheeting and bracing for groundwater control; analysis, design and construction aspects of structural foundation systems for shallow and deep foundations and earth retaining structures; case studies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 246

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 112 (Soil Mechanics) or equivalent

SOIL STABILIZATION Methods and techniques in ground improvement; materials for ground improvement and their behaviors; ground improvement for foundation and earth structure stability; Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 247

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of instructor

SOIL ENGINEERING DESIGN Application of soil mechanics principles and theories to the analysis and design for settlement, bearing capacity, slope stability, seepage and earth pressures problems; natural soil deposits properties; subsoil exploration. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 248

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils) or consent of instructor

GROUNDWATER IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

150

Principles of groundwater flow, including steady and transient flow through porous media, analysis of seepage; saturated and partially saturated flow; free surface analysis; numerical method of analysis; permeability in-situ earth materials. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils) or ES 205 (Numerical Methods for Engineers) or consent of Instructor

151

CE 249

FOUNDATION ANALYSIS AND DESIGN Foundation engineering fundamentals and theories related to analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations, retaining structures; embankment, excavation and slope stability; subsoil exploration and in-situ shear strength evaluation of soil for stability analysis and design. Integrated design project on major topics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 250

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils) or consent of instructor

SOIL DYNAMICS Principles of dynamics; lumped system; elastic half-space theory; dynamic characteristics soil; wave phenomena in soil materials; analysis and design of foundation and earth structures for dynamic loads; foundation design problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 251

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soil) or consent of instructor

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Application of computer solutions to the analysis and design problems in geotechnical engineering. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 252

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils) or ES 71 (Computer Programming) or consent of instructor

STATISTICAL METHODS IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Examination of the nature of particular media and their description and characterization; comparison of the deterministic and probabilistic approaches to the action and reaction of structures off, on, or in soil when subjected to loadings; uncertainty considerations in material parameters and their effects on designs; stability assessment in terms of reliability as well as customary factors of safety. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 253

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils), or CE 241 (Testing and Instrumentation in Soil Engineering), or ES 85 (Probability & Statistics in Engineering) or consent of instructor

CRITICAL STATE SOIL MECHANICS Introduction to critical state approach in soil mechanics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils) or consent of instructor

152

CE 254

SOIL AND ROCK ENGINEERING PROBLEMS Application of boundary value solutions to problems in soil and rock mechanics; numerical methods of solutions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 205 (Numerical Methods for Engineers), or CE 229 (Theory of Elasticity and Plasticity) or consent of Instructor

GEOTECHNICAL ASPECTS OF EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING Overview of earthquake engineering; role of civil engineer in planning and design for earthquakes; influence of soil conditions on site response; seismic site response analysis; seismic hazard analysis; methods of analysis for seismic loads; dynamic soil property evaluation and modeling; liquefaction and its consequences; seismic analysis for earth pressure, slope stability and deformation; seismic code provision and practices; seismic soil-structure interaction; seismic analysis of earth dams, embankments and waste containment facilities; seismic performance of pile foundations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 256

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 250 (Soil Dynamics ) or consent of instructor

EARTH AND ROCKFILL DAM Design requirements of earth and rockfill dam; analysis and design for stability and seepage; construction methods and techniques; compaction control; soil sampling and testing; foundation preparation; and field instrumentation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 257

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 240 (Mechanics of Soils) or consent of instructor

RETAINING STRUCTURES Analysis and design of retaining structures; sheet pile structures, single wall cofferdams, and cellular cofferdams; recent innovations of fluid trench walls and reinforced soil. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 258

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 247 (Soil Engineering Design) or consent of instructor

SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

153

A critical and in-depth examination of topics selected mutually by students and instructor from among the topics not covered in other geotechnical courses. Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec) Prerequisite(s) : Consent of Instructor CE 259 APPLIED SOIL MECHANICS Soil and foundation engineering case histories, including analysis of failures and recommendations for their correction; engineering report. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 245 (Foundation Engineering), or CE 248 (Groundwater in Geotechnical Engineering) or consent of instructor

TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING COURSES CE 260

TRANSPORTATION ECONOMICS AND POLICY Engineering economics; cost-benefit; public economics and the role of the public sector; spectrum of transportation policies; economic impact of transportation improvement; evaluation of transport project; environmental policies, impact statements and assessment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 261

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

GEOMETRIC DESIGN OF HIGHWAYS AND STREETS Location and design of major features and various classes of highways with emphasis on advanced theories and latest practices related to highway alignment, cross-sections, intersections, interchanges, and arterial routes in urban areas. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 262

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 122 (Transportation Engineering) or equivalent

TRAFFIC ENGINEERING I Human, vehicular, and traffic characteristics and their use in the planning and functional design of highway and terminal facilities; traffic studies, methods of analysis and evaluation; highway capacity, traffic control measures and devices; functions of the traffic engineer. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 263

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : CE 122 (Transportation Engineering) or equivalent & ES 210 (Probability and Statistical Concepts in Engineering Planning and Design)

TRAFFIC ENGINEERING II

154

Traffic flow variables and their relationships; deterministic flow models; stochastic modeling of traffic processes; traffic simulation models. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 264

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 262 (Traffic Engineering I)

THEORY OF TRAFFIC FLOW Study and evaluation of various qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the complex phenomenon of traffic flow. The conceptual and mathematical models considered are statistical relationships, car following analogy, queueing theory, traffic network analyses, computing machine simulation studies, mathematical experiments, and distribution-function theories. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 265

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 263 (Traffic Engineering II) or consent of instructor

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING I Elements and features of transportation systems; technology and operating characteristics of existing transportation systems; transportation planning process; survey methods in transportation; transportation demand modeling; transportation network analysis; GIS in transport planning Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 266

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 122(Transportation Engineering) or equivalent, or ES 210 (Probability and Statistical Concepts in Engineering Planning and Design) or Consent of Instructor

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING II Public transportation planning, surveys and operations; transportation system management; transportation and environmental planning; traffic safety management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 267

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 265 (Transportation Planning I)

PAVEMENT DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS Properties of paving components; testing of paving materials; design of flexible and rigid pavements; pavement evaluation; maintenance and rehabilitation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 268

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : CE 112 (Soil Mechanics) or equivalent, or CE 262 (Traffic Engineering I) or consent of instructor

AIRPORT DESIGN AND PLANNING

155

Airport requirements, design and planning, site selection, air traffic controls and geometric design of runways, taxi ways, terminal facilities, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 269

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 261 (Geometric Design of Highways and Streets) or consent of instructor

AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION Air photo interpretation and application to engineering surveys for city planning, highways, airports, and transportation in general, with emphasis on interpretation of landforms and their influence on location studies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 270

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : Consent of Instructor

FREIGHT DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS Design, development, management, and control systems and subsystems to effectively distribute goods from producer to user. Deals with logistic models, characteristics of freight transportation modes, freight handling techniques, transport service quality and economics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 271

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

PUBLIC MASS TRANSPORTATION Public mass transportation system technology, design, operation, and planning including vehicle characteristics, bus transit, light rail and rail rapid transit, schedules and networks, capacity, paratransit. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 272

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 262 (Traffic Engineering I) or consent of instructor

SOIL ENGINEERING FOR TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

156

WATER RESOURCES COURSES CE 280

HYDRAULIC DESIGN Hydraulic structures; gravity structures; reinforced-concrete structures; earth structures; forces acting on hydraulic structures; economic considerations; open channel. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 281

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CE 101 (Hydrology) or equivalent

HYDRAULIC MEASUREMENTS Principles of design and operation of instruments for the measurement of pressure, velocity, discharge and related fluid flow characteristics.

Credit : 2 units (1 hr lec, 3 hrs lab) Prerequisite(s) : ES 65 (Mechanics of Fluids) or equivalent CE 282 SOIL EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION Erosion control structures; sediment transport; stable channel design; desilting and diversion structures. Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 283

: 2 units (2 hrs lec) : ES 65 (Mechanics of Fluids) or equivalent

WATER DISTRIBUTION AND WATER TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN Design of the components of different types of water treatment plants; preparation of a plan of a treatment and distribution system using previously designed components. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 284

: 3 units (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab) : CE 101 (Hydrology) or equivalent

ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC PROJECTS Detailed analysis or design of a complex hydraulic structure or a water resources' project emphasizing interrelationships of various components with applications of fluid mechanics and/or hydrology. Students generally work on a single project for the entire term, on frequent consultations with their instructor. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 285

: 3 units (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab) : CE 101 (Hydrology) or equivalent

FREE-SURFACE FLOW Open-channel flow; the hydraulic jump; backwater curves and surges in canals and docks; river control; flood routing; reservoir operation. 157

Credit Prerequisite(s) CE 286

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 65 (Mechanics of Fluids) or equivalent

COASTAL ENGINEERING Engineering applications of the theory of small and finite amplitude water waves; diffraction, reflection, refraction; wind-generated waves and wave prediction procedure; tides and their interaction with the coast line; effect of waves on coastal structures such as breakwaters and pile-supported structures; coastal processes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 287

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

APPLIED HYDROLOGY Basic hydrologic principles; hydrograph analysis; hydrologic techniques applicable to problems in water power, water supply, irrigation and flood control. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 288

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 65 (Mechanics of Fluids) or equivalent

GROUND WATER DEVELOPMENT Groundwater movement, storage and exploration; basic principles of ground water flow and aquifer testing; well design, construction, production tests and maintenance; ground water recharge and run off; development and management of aquifers. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 289

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING Concepts in water resources planning; water inventories, use and control; water conservation measures and legislation; single-purpose and multipurpose project planning; economic and financial analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units ( 3 hrs lec) : CE 101 (Hydrology) or equivalent

158

OTHER COURSES CE 295

SPECIAL TOPICS I This is a specialized course not found in any of the above core courses. Topics vary depending on the availability of a Professor. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 296

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SPECIAL TOPICS II This is a specialized course not found in any of the above core courses. Topics vary depending on the availability of a Professor. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 295

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SPECIAL TOPICS III This is a specialized course not found in any of the above core courses. Topics vary depending on the availability of a Professor. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 298

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SPECIAL PROJECT The student will complete a typical Civil Engineering project design culminating in a professional practice-oriented project. Suitable projects may be undertaken in response to the needs of the community. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CE 299

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

MASTERAL THESIS Credit

: 6 units

159

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Introduction There are over 22 schools in Mindanao that offer Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and majority of their faculty members do not have an MSME degree. With MSU-IIT near their home institutions and offering the MSME program, these faculty members can be motivated to pursue graduate studies, thus improving the quality of education of the mechanical engineers in Mindanao. This will also affirm MSU-IIT‘s role as Mindanao‘s center of excellence in science and technology.

Objectives The MSME program is offered with the following objectives: 1. to provided training and education necessary for research and development; 2. to stimulate research and development in the field of mechanical engineering, and 3. to contribute to the manpower needs of the Philippines in the 21st century.

Admission Requirements An applicant must have a bachelor‘s degree in Mechanical Engineering or allied fields from MSU-IIT or from any accredited university or tertiary institution acceptable to the Admission Committee. The applicant must possess a high degree or aptitude to pursue research. The applicant must also comply with the general admission requirements of the MSU-IIT Graduate School. In addition, the department admission committee may require the applicant to undergo an examination or other related requirements.

Program Requirements Upon admission to the program, a comprehensive plan of study will be designed by the candidate in consultation with his/her adviser. The plan of study must satisfy the program requirements of a minimum of 30 units including thesis with a credit of six units for the Thesis Option and a minimum of 36 units of course works for the Non-Thesis Option. These units are allocated below: Thesis Option Applied Mathematics Major Subjects Electives Thesis

Total

Non-Thesis Option 6 units 15 3 6 -----30 units

Applied Mathematics Major Subjects Electives Special Project Comprehensive Exam

6 units 15 12 3 -----36 units

160

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MSME) ) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER, THESIS OPTION) First Year, First Semester Course No. ES 202

Course Title

Units

Advanced Engineering Mathematics I Foundation Course Core Course Core Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

3

3

0

3

3 3 3 12

3 3 3 12

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 12

Prerequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Core Course Core Course Core Course Elective Total

3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 12 0 12

Second Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. ME 300 Thesis

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

6

Total

6

Second Year, Second Semester Course Course Title No. ME 300 (Thesis Continuation)

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

-

161

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MSME) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER, COURSEWORK OPTION) First Year, First Semester Course No. ES 202

Course Title

Units

Advanced Engineering Mathematics I Foundation Course Core Course Core Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3

3

0

3

3 3 3 12

3 3 3 12

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Foundation Course Core Course Core Course Elective Total

3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 12 0 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

ME 299

Course Title

Units

Core Course Core Course Elective Special Project Total

3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 3 0 3 12 0 12

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Core Course Core Course Elective Comprehensive Exam Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0

9

162

CATALOGUE OF COURSES ES 201

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I Vector spaces; linear independence; matrices; rank and inverse of a matrix decomposition theorems; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; unitary and similarity transformations on matrices, initial and boundary value problems, power series solutions; application to engineering problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 202

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS II Boundary value problems of differential equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; singular boundary condition, orthogonal expansions, separation of variables in partial differential equations, spherical harmonics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 203

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS III Applications of vector analysis, curvilinear coordinates, and conformal matting to the solutions of engineering problems. Complex variables. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 205

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Error analysis; solution of non-linear equations; direct and iterative methods of solving linear systems, approximations of functions, numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations; computer machine problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 252

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

GAS DYNAMICS Fundamentals of gas dynamics. Steady one-dimensional flow. Shock regions. Introduction to propulsion systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

163

ME 253

COMBUSTION Physical and chemical aspects or basic combustion phenomena. Classification of flames. Measurement of laminar flame speeds. Factors influencing burning velocity. Theory of flame propagation. Flammability, chemical aspects, chemical equilibrium, chain reactions. Calculation and measurement of flame temperature. Diffusion flames. Fuels - atomization and evaporation of liquid fuels. Theories of ignition, stability, and combustion efficiency. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 254

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

THERMAL ENGINEERING Characteristics of gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. Local materials. Efficient burning of fuels in furnaces, kilns, gas producers, engine and other heat engine. Performance calculations. Treatment of fuel to improve its suitability for a given heat equipment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED HEAT CONDUCTION Steady and transient heat conduction. Stationary and moving sources. Numerical and graphical methods. Porous systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 256

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) or consent of Instructor

ADVANCED HEAT CONVECTION Mechanism of fluid flow, energy relationship of flowing fluid. Convection heat transfer. Momentum, heat and mass transfer analogies. Boiling and condensing heat transfer. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 257

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 or with consent of Instructor

ADVANCED HEAT RADIATION Radiation heat transfer. Shape factors in an absorbing and non-absorbing media. Thermal radiation from gasses and flames. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 258

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 or with consent of Instructor

TWO-PHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER

164

Nature of multiphase flow. An intensive study of flow patterns in multicomponent flows and the application of these principles to pipe design. Modeling of two-phase flow in vertical, horizontal and inclined pipes. Two-phase flow in adiabatic pipes and heated pipes. Correlation of pressure changes and heat transfer in pipes. The prediction of gaseous and liquid diffusion coefficients. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 259

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) and ME 256 (Advanced Heat Convection)

THERMAL SCIENCE APPLICATIONS IN POWER ENGINEERING Power system thermodynamics. Power Plant cycles; processes; and components, combustion equipment, heat exchangers, turbines, and pumps. Water supply and treatment systems. Air circulating and heating systems. Operation, efficiency and energy balance calculations of power stations. Economics and management of power production. Environmental impacts of thermal plants. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 260

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED DYNAMICS Generalized coordinates, classification of dynamic systems with finite degrees of freedom. Lagrange equations for rheonomic, non-holoromic systems. Ignorable coordinates, small oscillations about steady solutions, and introduction to stability. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 261

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

CONTINUUM MECHANICS Introduction to Cartesian tensor. Basic principles of continuum mechanics; concepts of deformation, motion, stress, and strain; conservation of mass, balance of momenta, continuum thermodynamics, and constitutive equations. Illustrative applications in elasticity, fluid dynamics, and viscoelasticity. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 262

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED STRESS ANALYSIS Studies of stresses and strains in three-dimensional problems. Failure theories and yield criteria. Stress function approach to two-dimensional problems. Bending of nonhomogeneous asymmetric curved beams. Torsion of bars with noncircular cross sections. Energy methods. Elastic stability. Introduction to plates. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

165

ME 263

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS After the concepts of finite elements methods are presented, formulation for different engineering problems and their applications are studied. Topics include variational methods. The finite element concept, and applications in stress analysis, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 264

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED KINEMATICS Geometry of constrained plain motion with application to linkage design. Type and number synthesis, size synthesis, path curvature, inflection circle, cubic of stationary curvature. Finite displacements, three-and four-separated positions. Graphical analytical, and computer techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 265

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS The principles of computer graphics and interactive graphical methods for problem solving. Emphasis is placed on development and use of graphical tools for various display devices. Topics include pen plotting, storage tube, three dimensions color, modeling of geometry, and hidden surface representation of systems, controllability and observability, stability, probability and random signals, correlation, autocorrelation, and spectral density. Modeling technique and design of controllers using digital and analog controllers. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 266

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) and (Vector Analysis and Complex Variables)

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS Application of finite difference methods, finite elements methods, and the method of characteristics for the numerical solutions of fluid dynamics problems. Incompressible viscous flows: vorticity transport equation, stream function equation, and boundary conditions. Compressible flows: treatment of shocks, implicit and explicit artificial viscosity techniques, and boundary conditions. Computational grids: graphical methods for problem solving. Emphasis is placed on development and use of graphical tools for various display devices. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 267

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II)

MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS Linear vibration

analysis

of multi-degree-of-freedom systems.

Torsional 166

vibrations in gears and shaft systems. Finite elements analysis of machine members dynamics. Introduction to experimental vibration analysis using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. Typical sources of vibration in machines. Experimental modal analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 268

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) or consent of Instructor

ANALYSIS OF PLATES AND SHELLS Bending of rectangular and circular plates under normal loading; thermal stresses in plates. Stresses in thick and thin shells; bending and thermal stresses at joints. Design of pressure vessels. Credit

ME 271

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS

Mathematical development of thermodynamic functions, irreversible processes Thermodynamic relations, equilibrium, real gases, applications to heat engines. Credit Prerequisite(s) ME 272

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS A comparative study of conventional and alternative energy conversion systems including economic and environmental concerns. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 274

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED ENERGY RESOURCES ENGINEERING Application of new methods and concepts to the development of present and future energy sources. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

167

ME 276

SOLAR ENERGY Study of solar energy conversion. Solar space-and-water heating and cooling systems including economic considerations.

Credit : Prerequisite(s) : Consent of Instructor ME 278 ENERGY SYSTEMS DESIGN Design of energy systems by synthetic and/or experimental procedures. Technical and economic feasibility to be established. Credit Prerequisite(s) ME 281

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED REFRIGERATION Advanced study of refrigeration processes and cycles including design problems and special applications. Low temperature systems, liquefaction of gases, thermoelectric cooling and absorption systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 282

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED AIR CONDITIONING AND VENTILATION Advanced studies covering principles and applications of cooling, heating and air moving systems. Design and selection of air conditioning equipment, piping and duct systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 283

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

REFRIGERATION AND AIR PROCESSING AND STORAGE

CONDITIONING

FOR

FOOD

Food freezing and food storage theories and methods. Applications of refrigeration and air conditioning in agricultural and dairy products processing and storage. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 290

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ME 161 (Refrigeration Engineering) and ME 162 (Air-Conditioning Engineering)

THEORY AND DESIGN OF CONTROL SYSTEMS Elements of feedback theory as basis for analyzing and designing automatic control systems. State space representation of systems, controllability and observability, stability, probability and random signals, correlation, autocorrelation, and spectral density. Modeling technique and design of controllers using digital and analog controllers. 168

Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 298

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) and ES 203 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics III)

SPECIAL TOPICS Investigation of special topics dictated by student and faculty interests. Maybe repeated up to a total of six units. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 299

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SPECIAL PROJECT A project on mechanical engineering involving individual effort and formal written report. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 300

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

THESIS Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units : Consent of Instructor

169

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS MASTER OF ENGINEERING Introduction The Master of Engineering Program was offered in June, 1995 under the flagship of the DOST-ESEP I project to upgrade the engineering education in the Philippines. It was conceived by the consortium of DOST-ESEP network schools in the Visayas and Mindanao. These schools are Central Philippine University for Western Visayas, University of San Carlos for Central and Eastern Visayas, MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology for Northern Mindanao, and Ateneo de Davao and University of Mindanao for Southern Mindanao. Since its founding, the program has helped increase the number of engineering faculty members with advanced degrees. A number of graduates have been conferred the degree with specialization in such fields as Ceramics Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Communications Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Material Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Metallurgical Engineering.

Objectives The MOE program is offered with the following objectives: 1.

to upgrade engineering education in the Visayas and Mindanao by making the program accessible to faculty members of engineering schools; and

2.

to provide engineering practitioners advanced tools to cope with the increasing sophistication of processes and system in industries.

MASTER OF ENGINEERING (MOE) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) 170

First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Advanced Engineering Mathematics I Probability and Statistical ES 210 Concepts in Engineering Planning and Design ES 201

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

3

0

3

ES 81

3

3

0

3

ES 85

ES 215 Computer Programming

3

2

3

5

ES 218 Energy Management

3 12

3 11

0 3

3 14

Total

ES 81 None

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ES 205 ES 216 ES 217 ES 219

Course Title Numerical Methods for Engineers Operations Research Research and Development Environmental Engineering and Management Total

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

3

0

3

ES 81

3 3

3 3

0 0

3 3

None ES 81

3

3

0

3

None

12

12

0

12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ES 202 ES 211

Course Title Advanced Engineering Mathematics II Experimental Analysis and Design (Discipline Related Course) (Discipline Related Course) Total

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

3

0

3

ES 201

3

3

0

3

ES 210

3 3 12

3 3 12

0 0 0

3 3 12

Second Year, Second Semester 171

Course No.

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Course Title

Units

ES 220

Management Information Systems

3

3

0

3

None

ES 221

Special Project

3

3

0

3

All Foundation and General Courses

3

3

0

3

3

3

0

3

12

12

0

12

(Discipline Related Course) (Discipline Related Course) Total

Lec

Prerequisite(s)

CATALOGUE OF COURSES FOUNDATION COURSES ES 201

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I Vector spaces, linear independence, matrices, rank and inverse of a matrix, decomposition theorems, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, unitary and similarity transformations on matrices, initial and boundary value problems, power series solutions. Applications to engineering problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 205

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 81 (Mathematical Methods in Engineering I) or equivalent

NUMERICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS Error analysis, solution of nonlinear equations, direct and iterative methods of solving linear systems, approximations of functions, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. With computer machine problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 210

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 81 (Math Methods in Engineering I) or equivalent

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN ENGINEERING PLANNING AND DESIGN 172

Basic probability and statistics with application and examples in engineering systems, elementary probability theory, random variables and their distributions, random processes, statistical inferences, curve fitting and prediction, correlation and application to quality assurance reliability life testing. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 211

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 85 (Probability and Statistics in Engineering) or equivalent

EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS & DESIGN Review of the fundamentals of statistics and probability. Review of regression analysis: linear and multiple regression analysis of variance. Design of experiments: completely randomized design, randomized complete blocks. Latin square multiclassification, factorial, incomplete blocks and fractional replications, confounding, general mixed factorials, optimum design. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 215

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 210 (Probability and Statistical Concepts in Engineering Planning and Design) or equivalent

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Elements of computer programming, structured computer programming in FORTRAN or C, or any structured programming language. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 216

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 81 (Mathematical Methods in Engineering I) or consent of the instructor

OPERATIONS RESEARCH Operations research methods. Linear programming, transportation problem, assignment problem, integer programming. Review of probabilities, network analysis, PERT-CPM, dynamic programming, game theory, MARKOV chains, nonlinear programming. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

173

ES 217

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Elements and fundamentals of research and development, writing of project proposals.

Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec) Prerequisite(s) : ES 81 (Mathematical Methods in Engineering I) ES 218 ENERGY MANAGEMENT Energy resources, conversions, uses. Energy conservation methods in the home, in transportation, in industrial and commercial sectors. Interfuel substitution; Factors in the design of low –energy consumption buildings. Economics of energy. Technological, economic, societal and environmental factors. Credit Prerequisite(s) ES 219

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING & MANAGEMENT Pollution control laws; regulations and standards; types‘ sources and harmful effects of pollution, solid and liquid waste disposal and management, air pollution control Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CORE COURSES ES 202

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS II Boundary value problems of differential equations. Sturm-Liouville theory, singular boundary conditions, orthogonal expansions, separation of variables in partial differential equations, spherical harmonics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ES 220

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 201 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics I) or equivalent

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS The course covers the role of information system in governing the behavior of an organization. Topics include planning and control system, the role of analytical and simulation models in decision-making, the economics of information, and the implementation of an integrated system. Examples of some types of information system will be studied and their analysis and design will be discussed through cases and projects. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

174

ES 221

SPECIAL PROJECT Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : All foundation courses & general courses

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COURSES EE 212

LINEAR SYSTEMS THEORY Functions of matrices. State-space descriptions, canonical realizations, observability and controllability. Linear state-variable feedback, quadratic regulator theory. Asymptotic observers, direct transfer function design procedures. Synthesis of multivariable transfer functions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 213

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of the instructor

LINEAR NETWORK SYNTHESIS Positive real lemma. Bounded real lemma. Impedance matrix synthesis. Scattering matrix synthesis. Transfer function matrix synthesis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 235

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 212 (Linear Systems Theory)

NONLINEAR SYSTEMS Methods of analysis and synthesis. Describing functions. Second method of Lyapunov. Popov and the circle criteria Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 245

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 131 (Control Systems Theory)

ADVANCED THEORY OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES Generalized machine theory. Analysis of rotating machines during steady-state, transient and dynamic conditions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 250

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 42 (Electromechanical Energy Conversion)

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Photovoltaic generators. Thermionic converters. generators. Fuel cells. Recent developments. Credit Prerequisite(s)

Magnetohydrodynamic

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 151 (Introduction to Power Systems) 175

EE 251

FAULT STUDIES Symmetrical components. Sequence impedances of transmission lines, synchronous machines and transformers. Unbalanced and simultaneous faults. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 252

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 151 or equivalent

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN POWER SYSTEMS Network matrices. Mathematical models. Computer solution for load flow and fault studies. Sparsity techniques. Recent developments. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 254

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 151 or equivalent

SURGE PROTECTION IN POWER SYSTEMS Electrical surges including traveling waves due to lightning and switching. Principles of lightning protection. Insulation coordination. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 256

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 102 (Probability for Electrical Engineers)

PROTECTIVE RELAYING Fundamental principles. Protective devices. Relay systems. Relay coordination. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 290

SEMINAR Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 353

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 251 (Fault Studies)

: 1 unit per semester; maximum of 3 units : none

POWER SYSTEM RELIABILITY Basic concepts. Measures and models. Reliability of generation, transmission, distribution and composite systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

176

EE 357

POWER SYSTEM STABILITY Power system stability criteria. Steady-state, transient and dynamic stability. Swing equation. Computer solutions. Multi-machines. Recent developments

Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec) Prerequisite(s) : Consent of Instructor EE 358 POWER SYSTEM ECONOMICS Economics of energy generation and operation. Optimization methods. Mixedgeneration dispatch. Optimal load flow. Recent developments. Credit Prerequisite(s) EE 359

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

POWER SYSTEM OPERATION & CONTROLS Synchronous machines and their control systems. Excitation and speed governing systems. Prime movers. Load-frequency control. System voltage control. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EE 258

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EE 245 (Advanced Theory of Electrical Machines)

LOAD FLOW STUDIES

ELECTRONICS AND COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING COURSES ECE 205

DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING Analysis of discrete signals and systems. Applications to digital filtering, active filters, digital communication and encoding. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 304

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION TO THE DESIGN OF DIGITAL COMPUTERS The hardware organization of computer systems including the following topics: Instruction set selection, arithmetic/logic unit design, hard wired and microprogrammed control schemes, memory organization. I/O interface design. The course will involve computer simulation of digital systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 201

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING An introductory treatment of digital signal processing algorithms and implementation using high speed digital signal processors. Detailed discussions of

177

sampling, architecture, addressing modes and instruction set of digital signal processors, discrete Fourier transform and digital filtering. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 251

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

SEMICONDUCTOR POWER ELECTRONICS Introduction to power semiconductor devices, characteristics and ratings. Analysis and design of circuits with power semiconductors and associated devices are emphasized. Topics include power rectification, inversion, AC-to-DC power control, firing circuits and microcomputer control of power circuits. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 227

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION. TO COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS ANALYSIS Applications of the principles of signal analysis of amplitude phase, and frequency modulator systems. Behavior of receivers in the presence of noise. Pulse code modulation and multiplex systems. Emphasis on applications of theory to communication system design. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 277

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DIGITAL COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS Algorithmic and computational aspects of electronic circuit analysis. Both linear and nonlinear. Numerical methods such as Newton-Raphson and various integration formulas. Sparse matrices and implicit integration techniques. Worst case and tolerance analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 281

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DESIGN OF ANALOG AND DIGITAL FILTERS Approximation of filter transfer characteristics, scaling, and transformations in digital filter design. Active filter design using OP-Amps; Sensitivity calculations and minimization; Computer-aided methods. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

178

ECE 285

INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING Analysis, design, and fabrication of silicon, thin-film and thick-film integrated circuits. Consideration of circuit design, layout and fabrication techniques for integrated circuits. Circuit simulation studies are aided with SPICE II software system. Integrated operational amplifiers and logic gates (T2L, I2L, MOS, and CNOS) are treated. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 305

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION. TO COMPILERS AND TRANSLATION ENGINEERING The design and construction of compilers and other translators. Topics include compilation goals, organization of a translator, grammars and languages, symbol tables, lexical analysis, syntax analysis (parsing), error handling, intermediate and final code generation, assemblies, interpreters, and an introduction to optimization/parallelization. Emphasis is on engineering, from scratch, a compiler or interpreter for a small programming language – typically a C or Pascal subset. Projects involve the implementation (and documentation) of such a system using a C on ECN Unix. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 307

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

OPERATING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING The design and construction of modern operating systems. Basic process concepts in multiprogrammed computer systems including concurrency, scheduling, resource sharing, synchronization, deadlock, mutual exclusion and protection. The engineering of operating systems involving detailed examination and modification of an existing operating system, Unix. Presentation of analytic modeling and performance evaluation techniques. Case studies of existing operating systems. A substantial part of the course will involve projects centered on modification of Unix. The projects will support concepts of OS design and construction including primary and secondary storage management, file systems, I/O subsystems, CPU scheduling, and disk scheduling. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR SYSTEMS AND CONTROL Introduction to various methods of obtaining the extremum of a nondynamic or dynamic system and their uses in control system design. Linear programming, various search methods, nonlinear programming, and dynamic programming are presented for discrete-time as well as continuous-time systems. Various real-life applications are discussed, and appropriate case studies are investigated Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) 179

Prerequisite(s) ECE 257

: none

INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS Applications of phase plane methods and classification of singular points. Iteration and perturbation techniques jump resonance. Limit cycles. Relaxation oscillations. Introduction to Liapunov and asymptotic stability. Control area staff. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 263

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN CONTROL THEORY Theoretical methods in optimal control theory. Topics include the calculus of variations and the Pontryagin minimum principle with applications to minimum energy problems. Geometric methods will be applied to the solution of minimum time problems. Computational methods, singular problems, observer theory, and sufficient conditions of existence of solutions are also discussed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 282

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS Introduction to digital communication systems and spread spectrum communications. Topics include analog message digitization, signal space representation of digital signals, binary and M-ary signals, comparison of digital communication systems in terms of signal energy and signal band width requirements. The principal types of spread spectrum systems are analyzed and compared. Application of spread spectrum to multiple access systems and to secure communication system is discussed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 231

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION TO NEURAL NETWORKS An introduction to basic concepts in the design, analysis and application for computational neural networks. Topics include highly parallel fine grain architectural model such as the Boltzman machine, Rosenblatt‘s perception, Hopfield‘s neutral nets, Back propagation, and their associated learning algorithms. Proposed architectures and related simulation techniques are discussed. Applications to signal/image processing and recognition optimization, and controls are examined. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 285

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

180

Introduction to digital image processing techniques for enhancement, compression, restoration, reconstruction, and analysis, 2-D signals and systems; sampling and scanning; random fields; discrete cosine transform; discrete Karhunen-Loeve transform; grayscale transformations; linear, ranked order, and morphological filters; human vision, printing, and display of images, entropybased compression; vector quantization; block truncation coding; transform coding; predictive coding; image degradation models; Wiener filter; constrained deconvolution, computed tomography; edge detection; shape representation; and segmentation. Credit Prerequisite(s) ECE 267

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL CIRCUITS Analysis and design of special amplifiers, pulse circuits, operational circuits, DC amplifiers, and transducers used in instrumentation, control, and computation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ECE 308

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE An introduction to the problems involved in designing and analyzing current machine architectures. Included are stack, SIMD, and MIMD machines, and the use of overlap, pipeline, parallel, and associative processing. Advanced I/O systems and memory organizations are examined. Evaluation methods for the performance of computer systems to enable the architect to determine the relation between a computer design and the design goals are explored. Some programming experience is assumed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING COURSES MSE 242

HIGH TEMPERATURE ALLOYS

Theory of alloying and relationship among temperature, structure, and mechanical properties in nickel, cobalt, and iron base alloys are presented. Effects of thermomechanical processing are shown. Analysis of microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray microprobe are discussed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

MSE 241

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CORROSION

181

Rate-controlling steps in electrode processes, nature, structure, and mechanical properties in nickel; activation, ohmic, and concentration polarization; passivation; potentio-static studies and alloy design; application to engineering systems. Credit Prerequisite(s) MSE 210

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN SOLIDS

Energetics and kinetics of phase change in metals and alloys. Nucleation and growth models, with special emphasis on role of crystal defects. Selected topics in multicomponent diffusion. Credit Prerequisite(s) MSE 261

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

POLYMER SCIENCE

Fundamental relationships between chemical structure and physical properties of high polymers. Polymerization reactions and processes. Molecular weight, viscous flow and mechanical properties of polymers. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING COURSES MetE 222

ADVANCED MINERAL DRESSING

Special topics in flotation and comminution theory, mineral physics, thermal description, rise of radioactive tracers and ion exchange resins. Credit Prerequisite(s) MetE 234

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ADVANCED PRODUCTION OF IRON AND STEEL

Technology of steel making; blast furnace operation; converter operation, open hearths process, direct reduction process, Correx process and other processes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

182

MetE 240

WELDING METALLURGY

Welding processes, thermal aspects of welding. Metallurgical evaluation of the microstructure resulting from welding; Phase transformation during welding; Selection of filler metals, Stresses; Stress relief and annealing; Preheating and post heating, difficulties and defects; welding ferrous and non-ferrous alloys; welding tests. Credit Prerequisite(s) MetE 241

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ADVANCED PHYSICAL METALLURGY

Electron theory of metals, the nature of solid solutions, intermetallic compound, solid state transformations mechanism of plastic deformation, creep, fatigue, rupture of metals. Credit Prerequisite(s)

MetE 253

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

FUELS AND COMBUSTION

Properties of different fuel materials; combustion processes; flame propagation phenomena; application of the concepts of heat transfer and combustion to the design of commercial and industrial furnaces; and estimation of energy requirements of different metallurgical processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MetE 281

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

DISLOCATION THEORY

Foundations of dislocation theory, dislocation movements, forces, interactions, role of dislocations in strengthening mechanism in solids. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CERAMICS ENGINEERING COURSES CerE 201

X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

X-ray methods for the characterization of crystal structure and determination of chemical composition. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none 183

CerE 210

REFRACTORIES AND FURNACES

Classification of refractories and their application to industries, study of the physical and chemical properties of refractories, and of pertinent phase equilibrium systems, manufacture, refractory utilization practices; industrial furnaces. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSES ME 252

GAS DYNAMICS Fundamentals of gas dynamics. Steady one-dimensional flow. Shock regions. Introduction to propulsion systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 253

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

COMBUSTION Physical and chemical aspects of basic combustion phenomena. Classification of flames. Measurement of laminar flame speeds. Factors influencing burning velocity. Theory of flame propagation. Flammability, chemical aspects, chemical equilibrium, chain reactions. Calculation and measurement of flame temperature. Diffusion flames. Fuels-atomization and evaporation of liquid fuels. Theories of ignition, stability, and combustion efficiency. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 254

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

THERMAL ENGINEERING Characteristics of gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. Local materials. Efficient burning of fuels in furnaces, kilns, gas producers, engine and other heat engine. Performance calculations. Treatment of fuel to improve its suitability for a given heat equipment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ADVANCED HEAT CONDUCTION Steady and transient heat conduction. Stationary and moving sources. Numerical and graphical methods. Porous systems.

184

Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 256

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Math II) or consent of Instructor

ADVANCED HEAT CONVECTION Mechanism of fluid flow, energy relationship of flowing fluid. Convection heat transfer. Momentum, heat and mass transfer analogies. Boiling and condensing heat transfer. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 257

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) or consent of Instructor

ADVANCED HEAT RADIATION Radiation heat transfer. Shape factors in an absorbing and non-absorbing media. Thermal radiation from gases and flames. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 258

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) or consent of Instructor

TWO-PHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER Nature of multiphase flow. An intensive study of flow patterns in multicomponent flows and the application of these principles to pipe design. Modeling of two-phase flow in vertical, horizontal and inclined pipes. Two-phase flow in adiabatic pipes and heated pipes. Correlation of pressure changes and heat transfer in pipes. The prediction of gaseous and liquid diffusion coefficients. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 259

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) and ME 256 (Advanced Heat Convection)

THERMAL SCIENCE APPLICATION IN POWER ENGINEERING Power system thermodynamics. Power plant cycles; processes; and components, combustion equipment, heat exchangers, turbines, and pumps. Water supply and treatment systems. Air circulating and heating systems. Operation, efficiency and energy balance calculations of power stations. Economics and management of power production. Environmental impacts of thermal plants. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 260

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ADVANCED DYNAMICS

185

Generalized coordinates, classification of dynamical systems with finite degrees of freedom. Lagrange equations for rheonomic, non-holoromic systems. Ignorable coordinates, small oscillations about steady solutions, and introduction to stability. Credit Prerequisite(s) ME 261

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

CONTINUUM MECHANICS I Introduction to Cartesian tensor. Basic principles of continuum mechanics; concepts of deformation, motion, stress, and strain; conservation of mass, balance of momenta, continuum thermodynamics, and constitutive equations. Illustrative applications in elasticity, fluid dynamics, and viscoelasticity. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 262

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ADVANCED STRESS ANALYSIS Studies of stresses and strains in three-dimensional problems. Failure theories and yield criteria. Stress function approach to two-dimensional problems. Bending of non-homogeneous asymmetric curved beams. Torsion of bars with non-circular cross sections. Energy methods. Elastic stability. Introduction to plates.

Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec) Prerequisite(s) : none ME 263 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS After the concepts of finite elements methods are presented, formulation for different engineering problems and their applications are studied. Topics include variational methods. The finite element concept, and applications in stress analysis, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Credit Prerequisite(s) ME 264

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

ADVANCED KINEMATICS Geometry of constrained plain motion with application to linkage design. Type and number synthesis, size synthesis. Path curvature, inflection circle, cubic of stationary curvature. Finite displacements, three-and-four-separated positions. Graphical, analytical, and computer techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

186

ME 265

INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS The principles of computer graphics and interactive graphical methods for problem solving. Emphasis is placed on development and use of graphical tools for various display devices. Topics include pen plotting, storage tube, three dimensions color, modeling of geometry, and hidden surface representation of systems, controllability and observability, stability, probability and random signals, correlation, autocorrelation, and spectral density. Modeling technique and design of controllers using digital and analog controllers. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 266

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 & Vector Analysis and Complex Variables

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS Application of finite difference methods, finite element methods, and the method of characteristics for the numerical solutions of fluid dynamics problems. Incompressible viscous flows: vorticity transport equation, stream function equation, and boundary conditions. Compressible flows: treatment of shocks, implicit and explicit artificial viscosity techniques, and boundary conditions. Computational grids. Graphical methods for problem solving. Emphasis is placed on development and use of graphical tools for various display devices. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 267

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) or consent of Instructor

MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS Linear vibration analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Torsional vibrations in gears and shaft systems. Finite elements analysis of machine members dynamics. Introduction to experimental vibration analysis using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. Typical sources of vibration in machines. Experimental modal analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ME 268

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 202 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics II) or consent of Instructor

ANALYSIS OF PLATES AND SHELLS Bending of rectangular and circular plates under normal loading; thermal stresses in plates. Stresses in thick and thin shells; bending and thermal stresses at joints. Design of pressure vessels. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

187

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING COURSES EnE 203

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING BIOLOGY Freshwater biology; self-purification of streams; effect of thermal pollution; roles of organisms in trickling filtration and activated sludge; enzyme stabilization of organic matter. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 210

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY I Examination and analysis of water and sewage as related to their treatment Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 215

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : Chem 16 (General Chemistry II)

ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYSIS A field and laboratory course designed to acquaint students with basic techniques needed to measure an analyze various biotic and abiotic environmental parameters in estuarine and shallow habitats. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 216

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : Consent of Instructor

ECOSYSTEM ANALYSIS Formulation and simulation of compartment models of marine and terrestrial ecosystems with complex nutrient cycling, food chains and energy flow; analog and digital simulation techniques; ecosystem stability and sensitivity, organization, structure and diversity of an ecosystem. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 217

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Framework and methodology of environmental impact assessment; prediction and assessment of impacts on the physical and biological environment, assessment of environmental resources in terms of their potential for utilization and corresponding impact to human activities Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 221

: 4 units (3 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : Consent of Instructor

WASTEWATER DISPOSAL AND TREATMENT

188

Wastewater characteristics; stream pollution load; sewerage systems; physical and other waste water treatment methods. Credit Prerequisite(s) EnE 231

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 219

WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT Methods and economics of water quality control; river and estuary models for water. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE232

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Composition and quantity of solid wastes generated by residential, commercial and industrial establishments, disposal methods and management Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 233

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Consent of Instructor

ECOSYSTEM MODELING AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Concepts in systems ecology and ecological modeling with emphasis on the use of models and computer simulations in examining environmental interactions; predicting environmental impact and facilitating the process of environmental planning. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 234

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : ES 201 or Consent of Instructo

AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT Nature, sources, effects and control of air pollutants, sampling and analysis; monitoring meteorology. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE241

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN Theory of biological treatment processes and design of treatment plants. Credit Prerequisite(s)

EnE 242

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EnE 203 (Environmental Engineering Biology)

CHEMICAL TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN Theory of chemical treatment processes and design of treatment plants. 189

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : EnE 203 (Environmental Engineering Biology)

190

DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING PROGRAM Introduction Training of professionals for degrees beyond the Master‘s degree level in engineering is of utmost importance for the growth and development of the country. In the Visayas and Mindanao regions, there is very minimal opportunity to pursue such advanced degrees. The College of Engineering of MSU-IIT, based on the minimum standards set by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), is capable of offering the Doctor of Engineering Program in the following areas: 1) Mechanical Engineering, 2) Civil Engineering, and 3) Materials Science and Engineering.

Objectives The objectives of the Doctor of Engineering Program are as follows: 1.

2. 3.

to develop engineering professionals with the ability to perform independent research and be able to apply engineering fundamentals to the solution of complex technical problems; to produce engineering graduates who have the knowledge and technical competence at the advanced level; and to provide education at the highest level of the engineering profession with emphasis on solving technical problems to benefit humankind.

Program Requirements Admission to the program is given to applicants who hold a Master‘s degree in engineering with a GPA of 2.00 or better from a graduate engineering program recognized by CHED. Each applicant is required to submit a more or less 300-word essay dealing with the applicant‘s motivation for seeking admission to the program. All candidates for the Doctor of Engineering degree must complete the required program of study of at least 9 units-mathematics, 3 units-management, 3 units-economics, 3 units- environmental science, 18 units of discipline related courses and 12 units equivalent dissertation. All students must satisfy the following requirements before they are allowed to start enrolling for the 12 units equivalent dissertation: 1) Completion of the required 36 units of coursework with a GPA of 2.00 or better; 2) Passing the qualifying examination as prescribed by the Doctoral Advisory Committee (DAC); and 3) Satisfactory presentation/defense of the dissertation proposal before the DAC. Upon completion of the dissertation, the student must apply for the dissertation examination to the Dissertation Examination Panel (DEP). Students are recommended for the degree when the following requirements are satisfied: 1) All academic requirements have been fully satisfied. 191

2) Presentation of at least one technical paper related to the dissertation in a national or international conference and/or seminar during his/her studies. 3) The DEP has evaluated the doctoral dissertation as acceptable. 4) The suggestions/recommendations of the DEP have been fully addressed as evaluated by DAC. All requirements for the program must be completed within a period of seven consecutive years from the date of admission.

DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING (DOE) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Mathematics Economics Env. Science Total

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

3 3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Mathematics Management Disc. Related Total

Lec

Hours/ Week Lab Total

Prerequisites

3 3 3 9

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Mathematics Disc. Related Disc. Related Total

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

3 3 3 9

192

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Disc. Related Disc. Related Disc. Related Total

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

3 3 3 9

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Dissertation Total

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

12 12

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

Dissertation (Continuation) Total

Fourth Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

Dissertation (Continuation) Total

Fourth Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hours/ Week Lec Lab Total

Prerequisites

Dissertation (Continuation) Total

193

LIST OF COURSES CORE COURSES (minimum18 units) Course No.

Course Title

Units

Mathematics (minimum 9 units) ES 301 ES 302 ES 303 ES 304 ES 305

Engineering Vector and Tensor Analysis Advanced Engineering Analysis Variational Methods in Engineering Analysis of Non-linear Systems Applied Engineering Analysis

3 3 3 3 3

Management (minimum 3units) ES 311 ES 312 ES 313 ES 315

Engineering Management Management of Technical Organization Program and Project Management Advanced Topics in Management

3 3 3 3

Economics (minimum 3 units) ES 321 ES 322 ES 323

Economic Evaluation of Industrial Projects Survey of Finance and Engineering Economics Economic Analysis in Engineering Planning

3 3 3

Environmental Science (minimum 3 units) ES 331 ES 333 ES 334 ES 335

Industrial Waste Treatment Air Pollution Control Engineering Design Physical and Chemical Principles of Environmental Engineering Environmental Issues in Manufacturing and Product Use

3 3 3 3

DISCIPLINE RELATED COURSES (minimum 18 units) Course No.

Course Title

Units

Mechanical Engineering (minimum 18 units) ME 311 ME 313 ME 314 ME 315 ME 321

Linear and Non-linear Control Systems Digital Control Systems Advanced Control of Mechanical Systems Advanced Control System Design and Implementation Introduction to Mechatronics

3 3 3 3 3 194

ME 322 ME 323 ME 328 ME 331 ME 332 ME 333 ME 334 ME 335 ME 338 ME 341 ME 342 ME 343 ME 344 ME 345 ME 346 ME 347 ME 348 ME 349 ME 351 ME 352 ME 353 ME 355 ME 356 ME 357 ME 361 ME 363 ME 365 ME 366 ME 372 ME 374 ME 383 ME 392 ME 398 ME 400

Machine Vision Robotics Special Topics in Automation and Mechatronics Dynamics of Mechanical Systems Vibration of Mechanical Systems Vibration of Continuous Systems Principles of Continuum Mechanics Mechanics of Contact Rotordynamics Computational Fluid Mechanics Lubrication Viscous Flow Wave Propagation in Solids Acoustics Advanced Gas Dynamics Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Gases Advanced Internal Combustion Engines Advanced Topics in Combustion Transport Phenomena in Multiphase Flow Heat Transfer with Phase Change Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Advanced Conduction Heat Transfer Advanced Convection Heat Transfer Advanced Radiation Heat Transfer Energy and Variational Methods in Elasticity and Plasticity Advanced Finite Element Analysis Fracture Mechanics Fatigue of Materials and Structures Energy Conversion Solar Thermal Technologies Computer Aided Design and Optimization Graduate Seminar and Technical Communication Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering Doctoral Dissertation

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Civil Engineering (minimum 18 units) CE 300 CE 301 CE 302 CE 303 CE 304 CE 320 CE 321 CE 322 CE 323 CE 324 CE 341

Construction Best Practices Constructibility and Modularization Construction Inspection and Quality Control Process Construction Monitors and Emerging Trends in Construction Management of International Projects Value Engineering for the Construction Industry Advanced Mechanics of Materials Advanced Mechanics of Steel Structures Stress Analysis Advanced Analysis of Engineering Systems Repair and Strengthening of Structures Advanced Soil Mechanics

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 195

CE 342 CE 343 CE 344 CE 345 CE 346 CE 347 CE 348 CE 349 CE 350 CE 351 CE 360 CE 361 CE 362 CE 363 CE 364 CE 365 CE 370 CE 371 CE 372 CE 373 CE 374 CE 375 CE 376 CE 381 CE 382 CE 383 CE 384 CE 398 CE 400

Advanced Soil Testing Advanced Soil Dynamics Advanced Foundation Engineering Slope Stability Analysis and Design Ground Improvement Techniques Geosynthetics Engineering Computer Aided Design in Geotechnical Engineering Advanced Geotechnical Site investigation Deep Foundations and Anchors Advanced Analysis in Geotechnical Engineering Advances in Transportation Demand Analysis Urban Transportation Planning Engineering System Evaluation and Decision Making Contemporary Transportation Issues Transportation Systems Operations and Control Intermodal Transportation Systems Environmental Impact Assessment of Engineering Projects Housing, Planning and Sustainability Sustainability Design and Construction Low Impact Development System Sustainable Transport Planning and Design Biomimicry in Design Sustainable Technologies Water Resources Development Statistical Hydrology River Hydraulics Dam Engineering and Hydropower Special Topics Doctoral Dissertation

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Materials Science and Engineering (minimum 18 units) MSE 301 MSE 311 MSE 312 MSE 313 MSE 314 MSE 315 MSE 316 MSE 317 MSE 318 MSE 319 MSE 325 MSE 331 MSE 333 MSE 341 MSE 343 MSE 345 MSE 351

Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering Transmitted Light Microscopy Mineragraphy Crystallography Vacuum Technologies and Thin Film Deposition Electronic and Magnetic Measurements Ceramics Processing and Characterization Scanning Electron Microscopy Metallography Thermal Analysis X-ray Crystallography and Spectrography Thermodynamics of Materials Kinetics Physics of Solids Epitaxial Growth Semiconductor Specialization Mechanical Properties of Solids

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 196

MSE 353 MSE 355 MSE 356 MSE 366 MSE 367 MSE 368 MSE 371 MSE 381 MSE 382 MSE 383 MSE 386 MSE 387 MSE 400

Heat Treatment of Ferrous and Special Alloys Metal Casting Ceramic Materials Polymer Materials Surface Science Degradation of Materials Physics of Liquid Crystals Dislocation Theory Composite Materials Semiconductor Materials and Processes Powder Technology Crystal Growth Doctoral Dissertation

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CORE COURSES MATHEMATICS ES 301

ENGINEERING VECTOR AND TENSOR ANALYSIS Discussion on the related topics of vector analysis, matrix algebra, and threedimensional tensor analysis. Areas covered include curvilinear coordinates; differential and integral operations; transformation properties of tensors; invariance, eigenvalues and eigenvectors; isotropy. Engineering applications. Credit

ES 302

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS

Topics include complex variables; generalized functions and integral transforms; variational calculus and applications; approximate methods of engineering analysis including asymptotic expansions and regular and singular perturbation methods. Credit ES 303

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) VARIATIONAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING

Calculus of variations, Hamilton's principle and Lagrange's equations, SturmLiouville problems, approximation techniques. Credit ES 304

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ANALYSIS OF NON-LINEAR SYSTEMS

Analysis of nonlinear systems using analytical and numerical techniques. 197

Credit ES 305

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) APPLIED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS

Methods of optimization for engineering systems; classical optimization, Taylor‘s theorem, Lagrange Multipliers, and Kuhn-Tucker theorem; direct methods, Newton and quasi-Newton methods, penalty and Barrier methods, linear and nonlinear programming. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

MANAGEMENT ES 311

ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Studies of current methods for the effective control of projects in the private and public sectors are presented. Included are the analyses of qualitative and quantitative factors that affect the successful completion of projects. Emphasis is on the development of project criteria, analysis of project networks, and the effects of time, financial, and organizational changes on projects. Credit

ES 312

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) MANAGEMENT OF TECHNICAL ORGANIZATION

The practice of management as applied within technical organizations. Includes history of the tradition and current effective practices, research findings, and case studies, with objectives of enhanced understanding of external and internal factors influencing organizational performance and leadership requirements. Credit ES 313

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Problems in managing projects; project management as planning, organizing, directing, and monitoring; project and corporate organizations; duties and responsibilities; the project plan; schedule, cost, earned-value and situation analysis; leadership; team building; conflict management; meetings, presentations, and proposals Credit ES 315

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT

Readings and discussion of classical and recent literature concerning the philosophy and practice of management in technical organizations, including the impacts of changing technology, globalization, and insights from the social sciences. 198

Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

ECONOMICS ES 321

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS Advanced study in the time-value of money, project costing, evaluation of industrial projects, and economic decision models for investments in manufacturing and industrial projects. Topics include, but are not limited to, activity-based costing, venture capital, concepts and impact of risk, and corporate financial evaluation. Credit

ES 322

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) SURVEY OF FINANCE AND ENGINEERING ECONOMICS

Survey of materials relevant to financial decision making for engineering activity. Includes traditional engineering economy topics; fundamentals of accounting; and financial planning, budgeting, and estimating applicable to the management of technical organizations Credit ES 323

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ECONOMIC ANALYSIS IN ENGINEERING PLANNING

Case studies in engineering economic analysis, capital budgeting, benefit-cost analysis, and other cost-related methodologies relevant to engineering managers. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

199

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ES 331

INDUSTRIAL WASTE TREATMENT Study of sources of industrial wastewater and their treatability by physical, chemical, and biological processes; problems and solutions involved in combining municipal and industrial waste treatment; and treatment of wastewater from selected industries. Credit

ES 333

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) AIR POLLUTION CONTROL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Design of air-pollutant-control systems for mobile and stationary sources of pollutants. Credit ES 334

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Theory and application of physical and chemical processes for water treatment and related environmental control systems Credit ES 335

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN MANUFACTURING AND PRODUCT USE

Explores environmental and economic aspects of different materials used in products throughout the product life cycle. Introduces concepts of industrial ecology, life cycle analysis, and sustainable development. Students work in teams to analyze case studies of specific products fabricated. These case studies compare cost, energy, and resources used and emissions generated through production, use, and disposal stages of the product life cycle. Debates issues in legislation (extended product responsibility, recycling mandates, and ecolabeling) and in disposal strategies (landfill, incineration, reuse, and recycling). Discusses difficulties associated with environmental impact assessments and the development of decision analysis tools to weigh the tradeoffs Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

200

DISCIPLINE RELATED COURSES MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ME 311

LINEAR AND NON-LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS Theory and applications of linear systems, state space, stability, feedback controls, observers, LQR, LQG, Kalman Filters. Analysis of nonlinear systems, geometric control, variable structure control, adaptive control, optimal control, applications. Credit

ME 313

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

Comprehensive treatment of the representation, analysis, and design of discretetime systems. Techniques include Z- and W- transforms, direct method, control design, and digital tracking. Credit ME 314

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED CONTROL OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

Design and analysis of multivariable systems using state-variable techniques; introduction to system modeling, observability, controllability, stability, Z transforms, and controller design. Credit ME 315

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION

Analysis, synthesis and implementation techniques of continuous-time and realtime control systems using classical and state-space methods. Credit ME 321

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) INTRODUCTION TO MECHATRONICS

Modeling and control of actuators and electro-mechanical systems. Performance and application of microprocessors and analog electronics to modern mechatronic systems. Credit ME 322

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) MACHINE VISION

Design of algorithms for vision systems for manufacturing, farming, construction, and the service industries. Image processing, optics, illumination, feature representation. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

201

ME 323

ROBOTICS Analysis and design of robotic systems including arms and vehicles. Kinematics and dynamics. Algorithms for describing, planning, commanding and controlling motion force. Credit

ME 328

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) SPECIAL TOPICS IN AUTOMATION AND MECHATRONICS

Special topic offerings of current interest in automation and mechatronics not included in regular courses. Credit ME 331

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) DYNAMICS OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

Motion analysis and dynamics modeling of systems of particles and rigid bodies in three-dimensional motion. Credit ME 332

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) VIBRATION OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

Introduction to modeling and oscillatory response analysis for discrete and continuous mechanical and structural systems. Credit ME 333

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) VIBRATION OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS

Equations of motion and oscillatory response of dynamic systems modeled as continuous media. Credit ME 334

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) PRINCIPLES OF CONTINUUM MECHANICS

Introductory treatment of the fundamental, unifying concepts of the mechanics of continua. Credit ME 335

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) MECHANICS OF CONTACT

Mechanics of surface contact, with emphasis on tribological interactions as in rolling element bearings, slider bearings, mechanical seals, and materials processing. Credit ME 338

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ROTORDYNAMICS 202

Introduction to a collection of phenomena and related analysis techniques associated with the dynamics of rotating machinery, e.g., turbines, compressors, pumps, power transmission shafting, and others. Development of adequate computationally oriented component and system models for the analysis of rotors. Credit ME 341

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) COMPUTATIONAL FLUID MECHANICS

Numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations in complex geometries, including theory, implementation and applications. Credit ME 342

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) LUBRICATION

Analytical and numerical investigation of full film compressible and incompressible hydrodynamic lubrication problems for steady and unsteady conditions. Hydrodynamic lubrication, self-excited instability of hydrodynamic bearings, design optimization. Hydrostatic lubrication with design optimization. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication, calculation of Hertzian contact stresses, and deformation in rolling contact bearings. Credit

ME 343

:

3 units (3 hrs lec)

VISCOUS FLOW Derivation and exact solutions of Navier-Stokes equations governing incompressible, laminar viscous flow; applications include non-steady flow, low Reynolds numbers flows, parallel flows, and laminar boundary layer; classification of fluid behavior, rheometry, and viscoelastic and time-dependent properties. Credit

ME 344

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) WAVE PROPAGATION IN SOLIDS

Wave motion in solids, wave equations, analytical and numerical solutions, ultrasonic NDE. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

203

ME 345

ACOUSTICS Elements of theoretical acoustics: plane and spherical acoustic waves; transmission and absorption of acoustic waves; theory of resonators and filters; application of theory to noise problems in mechanical and air-moving equipment. Credit

ME 346

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED GAS DYNAMICS

Generalized one-, two-, and three-dimensional compressible flows, normal shocks, oblique shocks, flow with friction and heat transfer, method of characteristics, real gas effects. Credit ME 347

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS OF GASES

Thermodynamics of nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures. Introductory quantum theory, statistical thermodynamics and gas kinetic theory. Credit ME 348

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

Advanced studies in spark ignition and diesel engines, cycle analysis and modeling, thermochemical analysis, combustion and emission, knock phenomena, mixture requirements and performance. Credit ME 349

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMBUSTION

Turbulent combustion, combustion instability and control, solid propellants and explosives, chemical kinetics, pollutant formation and destruction, computational methods for reacting flows. Credit ME 351

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN MULTIPHASE FLOW

Gas-liquid, two-phase flow patterns; basic and empirical models; conservation equations and closure relations; pool and convective boiling; aerosol transport; condensation. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

204

ME 352

HEAT TRANSFER WITH PHASE CHANGE Heat transfer in phase change; nucleate and film-boiling mechanisms; pool and forced-convection boiling; two-phase flow, flow regimes, and transitions; application to cryogenics and nuclear reactors. Credit

ME 353

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) COMPUTATIONAL FLUID FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER

Application of advanced numerical methods to current problems in the fluid flow and heat-transfer areas; internal and external incompressible and compressible flows; numerical methods for inviscid flow equations; multi-grid procedure; computer applications. Topics include integral methods for boundary layers and their coupling to potential flow solutions, the use of coordinate transformations and body-oriented coordinate systems, and the application of superposition techniques in convective heat transfer problems. Credit ME 355

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED CONDUCTION HEAT TRANSFER

Heat transfer by conduction in steady, transient, and periodic states in solids for one-, two-, and three-dimensional problems; applications of various analytical and numerical methods. Credit ME 356

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER

Convective processes involving heat, momentum, and mass transfer, and their applications. Laminar and turbulent convection heat transfer; internal and external flows. Credit ME 357

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ADVANCED RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER

Physics of the thermal radiation process; surface properties; exchange factors and networks for heat transfer between surfaces; characteristics of emission and absorption of flames, gases, and the atmosphere; solar radiation. Credit ME361

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ENERGY AND VARIATIONAL METHODS IN ELASTICITY AND PLASTICITY

Applications in energy and variational methods in engineering mechanics to elastic, plastic and dynamical behavior of deformable media. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

205

ME 363

ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS Study of two- and three-dimensional continua; application of finite-element methods to mechanical engineering analysis and design problems. Credit

ME 365

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) FRACTURE MECHANICS

Advanced study of failure of structural materials under load, mechanics of fracture, and microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the fracture of engineering materials. Nonlinear fracture mechanics including elastic-plastic, time-dependent fracture, advanced test methods, J-integral theory, and extensions. Credit ME 366

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) FATIGUE OF MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

Mechanical and microstructural aspects of nucleation and growth of cracks under cyclic loading conditions, notch effects, cumulative damage, multiaxial loading and fatigue crack propagation. Credit ME 372

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) ENERGY CONVERSION

Nuclear, solar, and chemical energy-conversion techniques. Thermodynamics of power cycles and systems; thermoelectric devices; thermionic generators; MHD systems; fuel cells; photovoltaic cells. Credit ME 374

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) SOLAR THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES

Solar radiation fundamentals. Measurement/processing needed to predict solar irradiance dependence on time, location and orientation. Characteristics of components in solar thermal systems. Collectors, heat exchangers, thermal storage. System performance, low temperature applications. Credit ME 383

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION

Optimum design problem formulation, optimum design concepts, numerical methods for unconstrained and constrained optimum designs; 3-D graphics techniques, non-traditional computing techniques such as artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic, which provide a different approach in engineering design and analysis. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec)

206

ME 392

GRADUATE SEMINAR AND TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION Attend and/or deliver seminar on recent developments. Workshop on presenting a seminar and technical paper writing. Credit

ME 398

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) SELECTED TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Topics of current interest to the mechanical engineering profession. Credit ME 400

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Credit

: 12 units

CIVIL ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT CE 300

CONSTRUCTION BEST PRACTICES Management of innovation in project-based firms and the production of the built environment; development of knowledge structure for categorization of research findings to identify best practices; knowledge sharing and implementation of practices; benefits to construction and client organizations; also covers sustainable design/construction, green building practices, environmental assessment, alternative construction materials and recycling of materials, vis-à-vis, environmental regulations. Credit

CE 301

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) CONSTRUCTIBILITY AND MODULARIZATION

Principles and methods of project constructibility enhancement; principles and applications of modularization and preassembly; planning for startup of industrial, residential and other facilities. Credit CE 302

: 3 units (3hrs.lec.) CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCESSES

Current codes and procedures in sampling; engineering standards; testing procedures and guidelines; data analysis using computer modeling and analysis. Credit CE 303

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) CONSTRUCTION MONITORS AND EMERGING TRENDS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS 207

New government policies and initiatives; information on research, statistics, export promotions, etc., for the construction industry; construction materials and methods development; international law; cultural and demographic differences as applied to construction processes; case studies with emphasis on the international aspect of the construction industry. Credit CE 304

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) VALUE ENGINEERING FOR THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

Theories and concepts; function and FAST Diagrams; project implementation; VE management processes and job plan; project enhancement; case studies. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.)

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING C E 320

ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS Study of stress and strain in two and three dimensions; theories of failure; stress concentrations; unsymmetrical bending; curved beams; beams on elastic foundations; column theories; torsion; thick-wall cylinders. Credit

C E 321

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) ADVANCED MECHANICS OF STEEL STRUCTURES

Advanced structural mechanics applicable to steel structures; includes inelastic behavior, plastic analysis, plate buckling, column and frame stability, torsion of open and closed sections, composite construction, connections, welding, bracing design and recent developments in steel design codes; application of fracture mechanics to fracture-safe design of metal structures; material behavior and analysis of components containing cracks. Credit CE 322

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) STRESS ANALYSIS

Selected topics from elasticity, plasticity, elastic stability, plates and shells; theory and application of photoelasticity, strain gages and nondestructive testing methods. Credit CE 323

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) ADVANCED ANALYSIS OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS

Development of engineering systems requiring advanced analytical solutions; solutions to equations arising from engineering problems selected from the following topics: groundwater flow, beams and plates, electrical potential, heat 208

transfer, structural dynamics, structural stability, solute transport problems, diffusion problems, etc. Credit CE 324

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) REPAIR AND STRENGTHENING OF STRUCTURES

Evaluation of condition, strength, serviceability and ductility of existing structures; criteria for rehabilitation; retrofit techniques for change in function, loading and seismic forces. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.)

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING CE 341

ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS Compaction and soil improvement; seepage, drainage, and flow nets; stress distribution; effective stresses; consolidation and settlement; shear strength and deformation behavior; soil stress-strain models and critical state theories. Credit

CE 342

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) ADVANCED SOIL TESTING

Interpretation of field and laboratory data; behavior of soils; familiarization with field-testing equipment and field monitoring devices; experimental testing procedures and advanced soil testing equipment for research practice; design and construction of some laboratory devices, development of skills in data reduction and evaluation of the test results. Credit CE 343

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) ADVANCED SOIL DYNAMICS

Theory of vibration; stress wave propagation in soils; dynamic stress, deformation and strength characteristics of soils; dynamic bearing capacity and earth pressure problems; machine foundations; liquefaction of soils. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

209

CE 344

ADVANCED FOUNDATION ENGINEERING Design criteria; stability analysis based on plastic theorem; earth pressure related on foundation engineering; types of shallow foundations; bearing capacity of soils; settlement of foundations; type of pile foundations; bearing capacity of pile foundation. Credit

CE 345

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

Slope failure mechanisms; recognition of slope instability using field methods, geomorphology and aerial photographs; stability analysis methods; slope design; slope-failure mitigation. Credit CE 346

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) GROUND IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES

Surface compaction; deep compaction; preloading; vertical drains; vacuum drainage; granular piles; micropiles; lime stabilization; cement stabilization; chemical stabilization; grouting. Credit CE 347

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) GEOSYNTHETICS ENGINEERING

Types and functions of geosynthetics, geotextiles, geogrids, geomembranes, geonets and geosynthetic clay liners; soil reinforcement; mechanically stabilized earth (reinforced earth); geosynthetics in roads and pavement; erosion control applications; landfills and impoundments; geosynthetics in ports and harbor. Credit CE 348

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

Soil engineering problems; methods of analysis; analytical versus numerical methods; soil modeling and soil models; finite element method in geotechnical engineering; commercial softwares for geotechnical engineering application. Class assignments cover practical problem solving using available software. Credit CE 349

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) ADVANCED GEOTECHNICAL SITE INVESTIGATION

Principles and techniques of site investigation; soil profiling; identification and classification of soils; principles of operation of vane shear, cone penetrometer, plate loading and pressuremeter tests; load tests on piles; dynamic measurements on piles; field practice in soil profiling and field test methods; geophysical methods; pressuremeter test. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

210

CE 350

DEEP FOUNDATIONS AND ANCHORS The influence of geology and soil profile on the selection and performance of piled foundations; application of wave equation theory to the prediction of pile behavior; integrity testing of pile settlements; prediction of anchor load capacity and load-deflection characteristics; anchor construction and testing procedures. Credit

CE 351

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) ADVANCED ANALYSES IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

Development and application of linear and nonlinear finite element procedures for the solution of geotechnical engineering problems related to embankments, excavations, soil-structure interaction, etc. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING CE 360

ADVANCES IN TRANSPORTATION DEMAND ANALYSIS Developments in the econometric and behavioral aspects of demand analysis and forecasting; supply-demand integration; dynamic models; applications to passenger and freight transportation and other infrastructure services. Credit

CE 361

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

Interrelationship of transportation and the urban environment; methodologies for planning multimodal transportation systems and developing feasible alternatives. Credit CE 362

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) ENGINEERING SYSTEM EVALUATION AND DECISION MAKING

Advanced methods for selection of transportation and other infrastructure systems in the presence of multiple criteria, multiple decision makers and uncertainty. Credit CE 363

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) CONTEMPORARY TRANSPORTATION ISSUES

Consideration, analysis and evaluation of recent transportation-related innovations and developments. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

211

CE 364

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS OPERATIONS AND CONTROL Concepts and advanced methods for the design of control strategies for transportation systems operations, including highway traffic systems (signalized street networks and freeways), transit systems and private carrier operations, including airlines. Credit

CE 365

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

Strategic planning of intermodal freight transportation systems (infrastructure and rolling stock); freight logistics, intermodal technology and terminal operations; intermodal freight transportation policy, planning and operational systems and programs. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.)

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CE 370

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF ENGINEERING PROJECTS Study and evaluation of the impacts of large scale engineering projects on the quality of the environment with emphasis on the assessment of physical and community impacts; noise pollution, air pollution, cultural impacts and socioeconomic impacts. Environmental laws, environmental regulations, economic forces in the design of large civil engineering projects. Impact statement preparation Credit

CE 371

:

3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs lab.)

HOUSING, PLANNING AND SUSTAINABILITY Housing is an important element in the study and planning of the built environment. This course discusses the theoretical and practical aspects of housing, making special reference to their relationships with urban planning and sustainable development; housing system concepts; the political economy of housing policies; land use planning and housing affordability; principles of residential planning; housing policy analyses; housing market analyses, and the application of the sustainable development perspective to housing analyses. Credit

CE 372

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Cradle to cradle analysis of new products, processes and policies to avoid undue environmental harm and achieve extended product responsibility. Approaches and methods for life assessment and for green design of typical products and procedures. Process-based analysis model, input-output and hybrid approaches for 212

life assessment. Use of software programs in process analysis. A life cycle assessment project is required. Sustainable designs, green buildings and materials and cradle to cradle designs. Survey the principles of environmentally sensitive design and planning. Credit CE 373

:

3 units (3 hrs. lec.)

LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM Sustainable flood drainage and control using low impact development technology system. Credit

CE 374

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT PLANNING AND DESIGN

Concepts critical to understanding transport in broadest sense, but in addition to, attach human, user and spatial perspective to transport matters. Sustainable planning and design of transport systems, environmentally friendly designs. Alternative energy sources for transport. Credit CE 375

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) BIOMIMICRY IN DESIGN

Design imitating nature, nature as model, nature as mentor, the natural step process of design. Credit CE 376

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGIES

Technological applications considering economic development that enhances sustainability and protect the natural resources quantities and qualities. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING C E 381

WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT Students function as members of a consulting panel and prepare reports on major water resources development problems. Political, financial, and social aspects of water resources development, as well as scientific and technical details, are considered. Credit

C E 382

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) STATISTICAL HYDROLOGY 213

Application of statistical techniques to hydrologic data, including distributions, hypothesis testing, linear models, non-parametrics, time-series and stochastic models. Credit CE 383

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) RIVER HYDRAULICS

Fluvial system characteristics and problems; open channel fluid mechanics; channel conveyance and flow resistance; friction; bed forms and alluvial roughness; composite roughness; compound sections; initiation of sediment movement; scour; scour protection; sediment transport theory and models; nonuniform flow analysis; water and sediment routing; river morphology; regime theory; stability; river response to development; river control; environmental aspects. Credit CE 384

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) DAM ENGINEERING AND HYDROPOWER

Dams, reservoirs and other hydraulic structures; integrated planning and environmental principles; design and analysis; construction and foundation treatment; operation and maintenance; dam safety and project funding; hydraulic structures in focus are as follows: dams and man-made reservoirs, barrages, cofferdams and weirs, rivers and large reservoir offtakes, river structures and rivetments, coastal structures and breakwaters; hydropower systems; regional hydropower potential: planning, design and analysis, construction, operation and maintenance, rehabilitation, operational models; hydropower schemes to be considered include : large hydropower schemes, small pumping storage and tidal hydro schemes. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

CE 398

SPECIAL TOPIC

CE 400

DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Credit

: 12 units

214

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING MSE 301

FUNDAMENTALS OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Materials classification, properties, and applications; principles of processing; raw materials for the industry. Credit MSE 311

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) TRANSMITTED LIGHT MICROSCOPY

Use of transmitted light microscopy in surface examinations of materials. Credit MSE 312

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) MINERAGRAPHY

Study of the different structures of various minerals. Credit MSE 313

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

Determination of crystal structures using x-ray diffractions. Credit MSE 314

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) VACUUM TECHNOLOGIES AND THIN FILM DEPOSITION

Different techniques on depositing one type of materials over another type. Credit MSE 315

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) ELECTRONIC AND MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS

Electronic and magnetic properties of materials are measured. Credit MSE 316

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) CERAMICS PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION

Different techniques of fabricating ―high-tech‖ ceramic materials. Credit MSE 317

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Use of scanning electron microscope in surface examinations of materials. Credit

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.)

215

MSE 318

METALLOGRAPHY

Different techniques of sample preparations, examinations of metals and the likes using metallographic microscope. Credit MSE 319

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) THERMAL ANALYSIS

Use of thermo-gravimetric and thermo-mechanical analysis for the study of materials. Credit MSE 325

: 1 unit (3 hrs. lab.) X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND SPECTROGRAPHY

X-ray methods for the characterization of crystal structures and determination of chemical composition. Credit MSE 331

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

Theory of thermodynamics; applications to phase equilibria. Credit MSE 333

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) KINETICS

Reaction rates, mechanisms, transport phenomena of materials. Credit MSE 341

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) PHYSICS OF SOLIDS

Band theory of solids and lattice vibrations; electrical, magnetic, and optical properties. Credit MSE 343

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) EPITAXIAL GROWTH

Processing and preparation of semi conducting materials and related compounds, microstructures, and devices with emphasis on the principles of epitaxial growth; in-situ analytical methods for the evaluation of growth fronts. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec)

216

MSE 345

SEMICONDUCTOR SPECIALIZATION

Advanced methods of evaluating semiconductor materials, microstructures and devices including electronic analysis, spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and surface analysis. Credit MSE 351

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLIDS

Mechanisms of deformation and fracture mechanics; failure of materials and strengthening mechanisms; plastic deformation. Credit MSE 353

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) HEAT TREATMENT OF FERROUS AND SPECIAL ALLOYS

Types of ferrous alloys, inter relationships among compositions, microstructure, service requirements and mechanical properties of ferrous alloys; industrial heat treatment practices; special alloys. Credit MSE 355

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) METAL CASTING

Metallurgy of cast metals, unit foundry operations, sand testing and control, melting and casting practices; manufacture of special cast metals and alloys. Credit MSE 356

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) CERAMIC MATERIALS

Structure and properties; synthesis and processing of ceramics; high technology and engineering applications. Credit MSE 366

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) POLYMER MATERIALS

Structure and properties; synthesis of polymers; processing and conversion to plastics; applications and performance of polymers. Credit MSE 367

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) SURFACE SCIENCE

Surfaces and interfaces, thermodynamics and electrical aspects of surface and interfaces; adsorption; catalysis; colloidal systems; applications to processing and manufacturing. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.)

217

MSE 368

DEGRADATION OF MATERIALS

Degradation and effects of the environment on metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. Credit MSE 371

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) PHYSICS OF LIQUID CRYSTALS

Study of anisotropic fluids; main types and properties; long and short order in nematics; principles of the main field (Majer-Saupe) and the continuum theories; static and dynamic properties of nematics, cholestics, and smectics; applications of liquid crystals. Credit MSE 381

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) DISLOCATION THEORY

Foundations of dislocation theory, dislocation movements, forces, interactions; role of dislocations in strengthening mechanisms of solids. Credit MSE 382

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) COMPOSITE MATERIALS

Basic mechanics and materials science of important modern composite materials; structures and properties of fibers, matrices and final composites. Credit MSE 383

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS AND PROCESSES

Substrate material preparation; physics of semiconductors; device fabrication technologies; packaging and encapsulation. Credit MSE 386

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) POWDER TECHNOLOGY

Problems associated with forming powders into shapes; powder characterization; processes of sintering and vitrification; operations of grinding, finishing and coating. Credit MSE 387

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec.) CRYSTAL GROWTH

Application of thermodynamics and phase diagrams to crystal growth; segregation; nucleation; techniques and choice of method for a specific material. Credit MSE 400 Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec) DOCTORAL DISSERTATION : 12 units 218

FACULTY PROFILE CE Department 1 Ancog, Geronides P.

Master of Engineering. (Structural Eng‘g & Construction), Asian Institute of Technology 1978 BSCE, Cebu Institute of Technology, 1973

2 Empig, Vicente E.

Master of Engineering (Geotechnical), AIT, 1981 BSCE, MSU, 1973

3 Milano, Alan E.

Master of Engineering (Structural), CIT, 1983 BSCE, CIT, 1980

4 Mostrales, Daniel S.

Master of Engineering (Water Resource Dev.), AIT, 1982 BSCE, MSU, 1974

5 Orejudos, Jerson N.

Ph.D. (Design & Construction Tech.) Niigata Univ., Japan, 1995 Master of Engineering (CE), Niigata Univ., Japan, 1991 Master of Engineering (Construction Mgt.) AIT, Thailand, 1987 BSCE, MSU-Marawi, 1983, Magna Cum Laude

6 Trinidad, Ariston G.

Master of Engineering (Structural Eng‘g & Const.) AIT,1987 BSCE, MSU, 1977, Cum Laude

7 Trinidad, Metodia M.

Master of Engineering (Transportation Engineering) AIT,1987 BSCE, MSU, 1982, Cum Laude

CerE / ChE / MetE Department 1 Balacuit, Rosalinda C. MSMetE, UP, 1990 MAT Chemistry, UP, 1977 BS Che, MSU-Marawi, 1967 2 Bernardo, Ivyleen C.

MOE (Material Science), MSU-IIT, 2006 BS CerE, MSU-IIT, 1998

3 Espenido, Mercurio I.

MOE (Metallurgical Eng‘g), UP, 1983 MBA, UP, 1983 BS MetE, UP, 1978

4 Ibarra, Ephraim E.

MS CerE, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, 1990 BS MetE, MSU-IIT, 1981, Cum Laude

219

5 Ignacio, Ma. Teresa T.

MS MetE, UP, 1983 BS MetE, UP, 1977

6 Jarligo, Ma. Ophelia D.

MS Mat. Science and Engineering, UP, 2000 BS CerE, MSU-IIT, 1995, Cum Laude

7 Menchavez, Ruben L.

Doctor of Engineering (Material Science and Engineering), Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, 2008 MOE (Ceramics), MSU-IIT, 2002 BS CerE, MSU-IIT, 1996

EECE Department 1 Estoperez, Noel R.

Doctor of Engineering (Electronic and Info. Engineering), Tokyo University of Agriculture and Tech., Japan, 2007 Master of Engineering, MSU-IIT, 2000 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1990 BSEE, MSU-Marawi, 1989

2 Gomez, Randy B.

MSES, University of South Wales, Australia, 2001 BSECE, MSU-IIT, 1998

3 Lambino, Mercedenia A.

MSECE (Neural Networks), DLSU, 1994 BSECE, University of the East, 1982

4 Porquis, Lope Ben C.

MS in Computer Application, MSU-IIT, 2007 BSECE, MSU-IIT, 2001

5 Teatro, Angiline L.

M. Engineering, MSU-IIT, 2001 BSECE, MSU-IIT, 1992

Mechanical Engineering 1 Alagao, Feliciano B

Ph.D. in ME, Royal Melbourne Inst. of Technology Univ., Australia, 1996 Master of Mechanical Engineering, UP Diliman, 1983 BSME, MSU, 1978, Cum Laude

2 Allen, Deuel H.

MS Mechanical Engineering, UP Diliman, 1983 BSME, MSU, 1975

3 Congreso, Jose, Jr. R.

MSME, MSU-IIT, 2005 BSME, MSU, 1997

4 Donasco, Edgar Allan A

MSME, UP-Diliman, 2001 BSME, MSU, 1990, 7th Placer ME Board Exam

220

5 Lagumbay, Randy S.

Ph.D. in Mechanical Eng‘g, University of Colorado, USA, 2007 MS Computational Fluid dynamics, Univversity of South Wales, Australia, 2000 BS in Mechanical Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1997, Cum Laude

6 Maglasang, Jonathan C.

Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics Engineering, Kyushu University, Japan, 2007 MS in Engineering (Aeronautics and Astronautics Engineering), Kyushu University, 2004 BS in Mechanical Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1994

7 Resabal, Vannie Joy T.

MOE (Material Science and Engineering), MSU-IIT, 2006 BS Metallurgical Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1999

8 Uy, Rolando S.

MS (Resource Management & Engineering Science), Australian National University, Canberra, Australia MS in Forestry, UP-Los Baños, 1980 BS in Forestry, UP-Los Baños, 1971

9 Villanueva, Eliseo P.

Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, 1999 MS in Nuclear Engineering, UP-Diliman, 1984 BS in Mechanical Engineering, MSU-Marawi, 1976

221

CCO OLLlle eg ge eo off sscciie enncce ea anndd m ma atth he em ma attiiccss

List of Programs                  

Master of Biology Master of Science in Biology Master of Science in Environmental Science Master of Science in Marine Biology Doctor of Philosophy in Biology Master in Chemistry Master of Science in Chemistry Master of Science in Chemistry (Straight Program) Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry Master of Mathematics Master of Science in Mathematics Master in Applied Statistics Master of Science in Statistics Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Doctor of Mathematics Master of Physics Master of Science in Physics Doctor of Philosophy in Physics

222

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MASTER OF BIOLOGY Rationale The Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology, recognizing the great need to improve the quality of education attuned to the manpower requirements of the MINSUPALA Region and also at the national and global levels, proposed this non-thesis Master of Biology (MOB) curriculum. Such is a branched-out curriculum of the existing program which envisioned to be a strong catalyst in the development of biological education, research and extension, thus providing for the manpower needs of the region and enabling the future generation to address problems of biological significance such as pollution, abuse of natural resources, increased demand for food sources, disease prevention and control in man, livestock or agricultural crops.

Objectives The branching out from the existing Master of Science in Biology program to the degree of Master of Biology seeks to attain the following objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4.

to develop graduates who will become competent teachers in tertiary biology education ; to produce graduates who will be knowledgeable in many areas of biology; to produce graduates whose teaching skills and strategies are attuned to their institution‘s needs; and to produce highly-trained biology faculty members who will contribute to the betterment of student learning and greater productivity of graduates in the labor market.

Admission Requirements 1. 2.

A baccalaureate degree in Biology or any of the allied fields from a recognized institution, and/or currently teaching biology course in the tertiary level. Have a background (formal or non-formal) in each of the following areas of study: a. b. c. d. e.

3. 4.

Taxonomy Genetics Ecology Physiology Developmental Biology

f. General Biology g. Cell Biology h. Organic Chemistry i. Inorganic Chemistry j. Biochemistry

Be a full-time faculty member and currently teaching in a public or private college or university included in the list of sending institutions. Does not have a master‘s degree. 223

5.

6.

7. 8.

Have a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better in major courses taken or show evidence of capabilities necessary for completion of the program, e,g, good or better teaching performance and/or trainings or workshops attended. Have no pending criminal/administrative charges or conviction for violation for violation of any Philippine law. Certification must be obtained from appropriate agencies. A letter of endorsement from the head of the sending institution. Two (2) letters of recommendation from former instructors in undergraduate major biology courses attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for graduate studies in biology.

Degree Requirements To qualify for the Master of Biology degree, a student must successfully complete a minimum of 37 units of course work specified in his program of study with a grade point average of 2.0 or better. A. Core Courses (22 units) Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio

211 221 241 251 261 281 291 296

Advanced Systematics Advanced Ecology Advanced Physiology Advanced Genetics Advanced Developmental Biology Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology Special Problem Seminar in Biology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 1 unit

B. Major Courses (15 units) Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bot Bot

223 224 230 248 249 250 252 253 255 256 257 262 267 287 288 289 215 227

Terrestrial Ecology Freshwater Ecology Problems in Environmental Biology Radiation Biology Biology of Symbiosis Radiation Ecology Advanced Cytogenetics Molecular Genetics Genetics of Evolution Population Genetics Genetics of Eukaryotes Cell Differentiation in Embryonic Systems Evolutionary Biology Advanced Theoretical Biology Critique in Evolution Philippine Biology Aquatic Botany Phytogeography

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 224

Bot Bot Bot Bot Bot MB MCB MCB MCB Zoo Zoo Zoo Zoo Zoo Zoo

232 233 241 242 262 221 221 241 251 220 227 243 244 263 271

Morphology of Higher Vascular Plants Morphology of Thallophytes Advanced Plant Physiology Plant and Water Relations Plant Growth and Development Advanced Marine Ecology Microbial Ecology Microbial Physiology Microbial Genetics Ornithology Zoogeography Comparative Endocrinology of Vertebrates Physiology of Reproduction Experimental Embryology Comparative Histology of Vertebrates

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

293 294

Biometry Bioethics

3 units 1 unit

C. Cognates Bio Bio

Departmental Requirements Courses in the program can be classified into seven areas, namely: Taxonomy, Developmental Biology, Physiology, Genetics, Ecology, Cell Biology and General Biology.

Delivery Mode During summer terms, the student is in campus as a full-time student while during the regular semesters, there will be two modes of delivery, namely: 1.

2.

Weekend lectures that may start on Friday evening up to Sunday and may be scheduled at least once a month either in the venue where more students originate or at MSU-IIT: On-line learning mode: Interactive type through the internet – question and answer between the faculty and the students and among the students themselves.

Program of Study This two-year Master of Biology program starts in summer. The student undertakes full-time schooling during summer carrying a 9-unit load. During three regular semesters, the student carries a 6-unit load, but on the last semester, the student carries a 7unit load which includes the presentation of a special problem report in a seminar.

225

MASTER OF BIOLOGY (MOB) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER)

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology Bio 251 Advanced Genetics Bio 241 Advanced Physiology Total Bio 281

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

2

3

5

Bio 181 or its eq.

3 3 9

2 2 6

3 3 9

5 5 15

Bio106 or its eq. Bio 109 or its eq.

First Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. Bio Advanced Systematics 211 Bio Advanced Ecology 221

Units

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

2

3

5

Bio 105 or its eq.

3

2

3

5

Bio 107 or its eq.

6

4

6

10

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Bio 261

Course Title

Units

Advanced Developmental Biology

Major 1 Total

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

3

2

3

5

3 6

2 4

3 6

5 10

Prerequisite(s) Bio 120 or its eq.

Second Year, Summer 226

Course Course Title No. Major 2 Bio 291 Special Problem Major 3

Units 3 3 3 9

Total

Lec 2 1 2 5

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 3 5 6 7 3 5 12 17

Prerequisite(s) All Core Courses

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Major 4 Major 5 Bio 296

Course Title

Seminar in Biology Total

Units 3 3 1 7

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total 2 3 5 2 3 5 1 0 1 5 6 11

Prerequisite(s)

227

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY Introduction The program leading to the degree of M.S. in Biology was instituted at the Iligan Institute of Technology of the Mindanao State University in 1995. It aims to: -

provide Mindanao, Sulu, and Palawan (MINSUPALA) regions a graduate program in the highest level envisioned to be a strong catalyst in the development of biological education, research and extension services;

-

provide the manpower needs of the region in general and the Cagayan-IliganCorridor (CIC) area in particular to address problems of biological significance such as abuse of natural resources, pollution, increased demand for food resources, and disease prevention and control in man, livestock and agricultural crops;

-

produce highly trained biologists with strong biotechnological foundations who will help bring the Philippines to a Newly Industrialized Country (NIC) status by increasing productivity and making the quality of biotechnologically processed goods competitive in the world market.

Admission Requirements Applicants for admission to the program must fulfill the following requirements: 1.

Hold a baccalaureate degree in Biology or in any of the allied fields from a recognized institution.

2.

Have a background in each of the following areas of study: a) Taxonomy f) Inorganic Chemistry b) Morphology g) Organic Chemistry c) Ecology h) Biochemistry d) Physiology i) Statistics e) Genetics

3.

Have a grade point average of 2.0 or better in major courses taken or show some evidence of capabilities necessary for completion of the program, e.g. excellent teaching performance, published or unpublished researches, and/or trainings and workshops attended.

4.

Two (2) letters of recommendation from former instructors in undergraduate major biology courses attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for graduate studies in biology.

228

Probationary admission may be given to baccalaureate degree holders in the allied fields provided that: a)

they take prescribed undergraduate courses in which they are deficient within the first three semesters in the program; b) while in the program they obtain a grade point average of 2.0 or better in the graduate courses and a grade point average of 2.5 or better in the prescribed undergraduate courses; c) they carry a full load of 10-12 units per semester in the program; and d) comply with the 2.5 grade point average for their undergraduate degree and submit two letters of recommendation from former instructors of their undergraduate major courses.

Departmental Requirements Courses in the program can be classified into seven areas namely: Taxonomy, Morphology, Developmental Biology, Physiology, Genetics, Ecology and General Biology. 1 A minimum of 37 units of graduate courses shall be required. These courses should include the following: a. Core Courses (10 units) Bio Bio Bio Bio

281 298 211 296

Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology Advamced Research Methodology Advanced Systematics Seminar in Biology

3 units 3 units 3 units 1 unit

b. Major Courses (21 units of major courses apportioned in at least three areas, in any three of the seven areas including General Biology; or eighteen (18) units of major courses apportioned similarly plus three (3) units of a graduate course in biochemistry, marine biology, fisheries, agriculture, statistics or computer science, preferably one that is directly related to the student‘s thesis.

TAXONOMY Bot Zoo

211 211

Advanced Plant Systematics Advanced Animal Systematics

3 units 3 units

MORPHOLOGY Bot Bot Zoo

232 233 271

Morphology of Higher Vascular Plants Morphology of Thallophytes Comparative Histology of Vertebrates

3 units 3 units 3 units

229

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Bio Bot Zoo

262 262 263

Cell Differentiation in Embryonic Systems Plant Growth and Development Experimental Embryology

3 units 3 units 3 units

PHYSIOLOGY Bio Bot Bot MCB Zoo Zoo Zoo

248 241 242 241 243 244 247

Radiation Biology Advanced Plant Physiology Plant and Water Relations Microbial Physiology Comparative Endocrinology of Vertebrates Physiology of Reproduction Physiology of Insects

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

GENETICS Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio MCB

252 253 255 256 257 251

Advanced Cytogenetics Molecular Genetics Genetics of Evolution Population Genetics Genetics of Eukaryotes Microbial Genetics

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

ECOLOGY Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bot Bot MB MCB Zoo

223 224 230 249 250 215 227 221 221 227

Terrestrial Ecology Freshwater Ecology Problems in Environmental Biology Biology of Symbiosis Radiation Ecology Aquatic Botany Phytogeography Advanced Marine Ecology Microbial Ecology Zoogeography

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

GENERAL BIOLOGY Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Zoo

287 288 289 293 294 295 220

Advanced Theoretical Biology Critique in Evolution Philippine Biology Biometry Bioethics Individual Studies Ornithology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

230

c. Master‘s Thesis (6 units) Bio

300

Master‘s Thesis

6 units

2.

A grade of 2.0 or better in a graduate or undergraduate course that is included in the student‘s approved program of study shall be given credit.

3.

Comprehensive Examination – The comprehensive examination will cover all graduate courses taken by the student.

Other Requirements To be able to complete the program and obtain the Master of Science in Biology degree the student must comply with all the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies relating to academic credits retention, residence requirement, time limit for completion of the program, comprehensive examination, thesis, and the policy on disqualification from the program.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (M.S. BIO.) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, Summer Course No. Bio 281 Bio 298 Major

Course Title

Units

Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology Advanced Research Methodology Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

2

3

5

Cell Biology

3

2

3

5

Biostatistics

3 9

2 6

3 9

5 15

First Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. Bio Advanced Systematics 211 Major

Units

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

3

2

3

5

3 6

2 4

3 6

5 10

Prerequisite(s) Systematics

First Year, Second Semester

231

Course No. Major Major

Course Title

Units

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Major Major Major Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 9

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Bio 300 Bio 296

Course Title

Units

Master‘s Thesis Seminar in Biology Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 1 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Bio 300

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Master‘s Thesis

Total

232

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Introduction Environmental degradation is a glaring feature in the biosphere in the Twenty first Century, and must be addressed seriously before the worst effects would be felt particularly by human beings. Being the premier school in southern Philippines mandated to contribute to the development of MINSUPALA, the Mindanao State University through its Iligan Institute of Technology Campus must take heed to the demands of the time. It is but imperative for the MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology to meet this demand primarily because the campus is situated in a city where several industries and a growing human population are exerting strong pressures on the environment. The concern of MSU-IIT, however, is not limited to its local environment but to the entire region of Mindanao, Sulu and Palawan because irrational and unsustainable use of the environment is getting more prevalent in these regions. These realities have given impetus to MSU-IIT to develop a graduate program (masteral level) that proactively caters to problems related with the environment. Guided by MSU-IIT‘s mandate of instruction, research and extension, the program is envisioned to contribute to solving multi-faceted environmental problems. With options to major in either Environmental Research, Environmental Education, or Environmental Planning and Management, the M.S. in Environmental Science is so timely because several environment-related government agencies, e.g. the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Department of Health, and the Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and some higher education institutions, are gearing up towards high levels of efficiency and competence in their personnel. The M.S. in Environmental Science is expected to provide an advanced and cutting-edge training to this clientele. At present, MSU at Naawan and the College of Forestry of MSU Marawi are implementing an undergraduate program in Environmental Science. Graduates from this program may proceed to enroll in the M.S. in Environmental Science, particularly those who are keen at getting an advanced level of training in environmental science. Long term sustainability of this graduate program is ensured by the fact that there is an existing strength and commitment in several faculty members from participating departments within MSU-IIT and the MSU System.

Objectives The M.S. in Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary program. It aims to: 1.

Provide an advanced formal manpower training for instruction and research capabilities in the various areas of environmental education, research, and planning and management, and

2.

Fill up the need for highly trained personnel in the government, private industries and academic sectors in the MINSUPALA Region.

Admission Requirements 233

1.

B.S. degree from a recognized higher education institution, with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 (or its equivalent) or better, plus the following requirements for each program specialization: a. Environmental Education i. At least 12 units of natural sciences in the baccalaureate degree; ii. Background in Educational Psychology, Methods in Teaching, General Botany, General Zoology, and General Chemistry. b. Environmental Research i. A baccalaureate degree in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, etc.). c. Environmental Planning and Management i. A baccalaureate degree in engineering or in the natural sciences.

2. Two letters of recommendation from former professors/immediate supervisor attesting to the student‘s capacity for advanced studies; and 3. Satisfaction of the School of Graduate Studies‘/institute‘s admission requirements.

Course Requirements A minimum of 39 graduate units (32 course work, 1 seminar and 6 thesis) are required. A. Core Courses (17 units) EnSc EnSc EnSc EnSc EnSc Stat

201 202 203 206 298 233

Principles of Environmental Science Environmental Laws and Policies Resource Management and Conservation Environmental Impact Assessment Research Methodology Biostatistics

3 units 1 unit 3 units 4 units 3 units 3 units

B. Major Courses ( 15 units) Specialization: Environmental Education (Nine units of the following required courses plus 6 units of free electives) Bio 221 EnSc 220 EnSc 236

Advanced Ecology Environmental Geology Environmental Education

3 units 3 units 3 units

Specialization: Environmental Research

234

(Nine units of the following required courses plus 6 units of free electives. Qualified students who would be focusing on either Chemistry or Biology are required to enroll in elective courses relevant to their focus discipline.) EnSc 240 EnSc 248 Chem 281

Environmental Physiology and Toxicology Environmental Evaluation and Monitoring Advanced Environmental Chemistry

3 units 3 units 3 units

Specialization: Environmental Planning and Management (Nine units of the following required courses plus 6 units of free electives) EnSc 260 EnSc 264 EnSc 268

Man and His Environment Environmental Planning and Management Environmental Management Through Community Development

3 units 3 units 3 units

C. Graduate Seminar (1 unit) EnSc 296

Graduate Seminar

1 unit

D. Master‘s Thesis (6 units) EnSc 299

Master‘s Thesis

6 units

Other Requirements 1. 2. 3. 4.

Maintenance of a weighted average of 2.0 or better while in the program. Passing the comprehensive exam after the completion of all academic courses. Completion and oral defense of a thesis. Submission of 6 bound copies of the approved thesis.

List of Elective Courses EnSc 226 EnSc 230 EnSc 244 EnSc 252 EnSc 254 EnSc 256 EnSc 280 EnSc 284 Bio 223 Bio 224 Chem 281 MB 221

Elementary Geography Climatology Analytical Techniques in Environmental Science Pollution Prevention Principles of Waste Management Wastewater Treatment Resource Use and Development Forest and Watershed Management Terrestrial Ecology Freshwater Ecology Advanced Environmental Chemistry Advanced Marine Ecology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 235

Ocea 201

Fundamentals of Biological, Chemical and Physical Oceanography

3 units

[Courses offered under the Master of Engineering (major Environmental Engineering), M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemistry, M.S. and Ph.D. in Biology may be taken as electives.]

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (M.S. Envi. Sci.) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER)

First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Principles of Environmental Science Environmental Laws and EnSc 202 Policies EnSc 201

EnSc 298 Research Methodology Stat 233

Biostatistics Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3

2

3

5

1

1

0

1

3

3

0

3

3 10

3 9

0 3

3 12

Undergaduate Biostatistics

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

EnSc 203

Resource Management and Conservation

3

Elective 1 Elective 2 Elective 3 Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3

0

3

3 3 3 12

First Year, Summer Course No. EnSc 206

Course Title

Units

Environmental Impact Assessment Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

4

2

6

8

4

2

6

8

Second Year, First Semester 236

Course Course Title No. Elective 4 Elective 5 EnSc 296 Graduate Seminar

Units

Total

3 3 1 7

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

1

0

1

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

(Comprehensive Examination) (Thesis Proposal Defense) Total

Third Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. EnSc 299 Master‘s Thesis

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 Total

6

Third Year, Second Semester Course Course Title No. EnSc 299 Master‘s Thesis (Thesis Defense)

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Total

237

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARINE BIOLOGY

Introduction The Master of Science in Biology is a consortium program of the Federation of Institutions for Marine and Freshwater Sciences.

Objectives 1.

To establish an independent center for the development of instruction, research and extension program in Marine Sciences in the Visayas and Mindanao.

2.

To upgrade manpower and facilities of member institutions enabling them to offer a graduate program at the masteral level and ultimately to aptly provide them with the capabilities to develop an internationally recognized institution offering a Ph. D. degree program.

3.

To promote an atmosphere of cooperation and coordination among member institutions concerned with the development of marine science.

4.

To provide a channel to share and exchange physical and human resources in areas of common interests in marine science among member institutions.

Admission Requirements at MSU-IIT Admission on a regular status to the M.S. in Marine Biology program requires: 1. Possession of a B.S. Marine Biology degree, or a baccalaureate degree in Biology, Zoology, Botany, Fisheries and related fields with completion of the following courses: Oceanology Marine Plants/Algae Marine Invertebrates Marine Vertebrates

4 units 4 units 4 units 4 units

2. A grade point average of 2.5 (or its equivalent) or better in the undergraduate degree. 3. Two letters of recommendation from former instructors in undergraduate major (marine biology) courses attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for graduate studies in marine biology. Probationary admission may be given to baccalaureate degree holders in Biology, Botany, Zoology, Fisheries and other related fields provided that: 238

a. They take the four courses under no. 1 above within their first 3 semesters in the program; b. While in the program, they obtain a grade point average of 2.0 or better in the graduate courses and a grade point average of 2.5 or better in the required undergraduate courses; c. They carry a full load of 10-12 units per semester in the program; and d. Comply with the 2.5 grade point average for their undergraduate degree and submit two (2) letters of recommendation from former instructors of their undergraduate major courses.

Degree Requirements To qualify for the M.S. in Marine Biology degree, a student must: a. Successfully complete a minimum of 37 units of course work specified in his program of study with a grade point average of 2.0 or better. b. Successfully defend orally a thesis proposal and a thesis before a panel. c. Present his thesis in a seminar. A. Core Courses (15 units) Bio Ocea Ocea Ocea Stat

298 211 221 231 233

Advanced Research Methodology Biological Oceanography Physical Oceanography Chemical Oceanography Biostatistics

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

B. Cognate Courses (minimum of 6 units) Bio Bio Bio Bio MB MB

201 213 251 261 212 217

Microtechnique Advanced Parasitology Advanced Genetics Developmental Biology Advanced Invertebrate Zoology Ichthyology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

C. Major Courses (minimum of 9 units) Bio MB MB MB MB MB MB MB MB

211 203 214 221 226 228 229 240 241A

Advanced Systematics Marine Microbiology Marine Planktonology Advanced Marine Ecology Marine Ecosystems Marine Productivity Marine Pollution Marine Toxicology Morphology and Physiology of Marine Animals

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 239

MB MB MB MB MB

241B 292 293 294 298

Morphology and Physiology of Marine Plants Marine Resource Management Mariculture Fisheries Biology Marine Methodology

3 units 3 units 3 unitd 3 units 3 units

D. Other Required Courses (7 units) MB MB

296 300

Seminar in Marine Biology Masteral Thesis

1 unit 6 units

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARINE BIOLOGY (M.S. Mar. Bio.) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER)

First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Advanced Research Methodology Ocea 211 Biological Oceanography Stat 233 Biostatistics MB 296 Seminar in Marine Biology Total Bio 298

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3

3

0

3

3 3 1 10

2 3 1 9

3 0 0 3

5 3 1 12

First Year, Second Semester Course Course Title Units No. Ocea 221 Physical Oceanography 3 Ocea 231 Chemical Oceanography 3 Elective 1 3 Elective 2 3 Total 12

Lec 2 2

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 3 5 3 5

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Elective 3* Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 240

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Cognate1 Cognate2 Elective 4

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Lec

3 3 3 9

Total

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

(Comprehensive Exam)** MB 300

(Thesis Proposal Defense)** Masteral Thesis Total

6 6

Second Year, Summer Course No. MB 300

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Masteral Thesis Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No. MB 300

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

Masteral Thesis Total

241

Third Year, Second Semester Course No. MB 300

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Masteral Thesis (Thesis Defense)**

* May be taken in the first semester of the second year ** May be enrolled/conducted either in the first or second semester/summer term

242

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN BIOLOGY Introduction The Mindanao State University has long been recognized as the premier university in the Southern Philippines. The various curricula offered by its seven autonomous campuses sufficiently provide an answer to the varied manpower needs of the MindanaoSulu-Palawan (MINSUPALA) Region. MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, in particular, has been identified as a center of excellence in various disciplines of science and technology. As such, it is expected to continuously provide training and development of manpower resources in the region through its undergraduate and graduate programs. Recently, the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) through the Mindanao Advanced Education Project (MAEP) identified MSU-IIT as a graduate center for several disciplines in the area of the sciences including biology. Geared towards substantial improvement in the manpower capability in the college/graduate levels in various institutions in Mindanao, MAEP provides financial assistance and scholarships to some faculty members from these institutions to pursue advanced degrees, either M.S. or Ph.D. At present, MSU-IIT in consortium with MSU-Marawi, is offering the M.S. Biology program. Considering the strong faculty profile, adequate laboratory and library facilities of the Department of Biological Sciences in both campuses, it is deemed appropriate that the university through the MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology (MSU-IIT) will offer the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Biology with options in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Genetics and Environmental Biology. In doing so, the Mindanao State University can answer the demand for advanced training in teaching and research capabilities in the region.

Objectives Envisioned to develop the manpower resources in the MINSUPALA Region, the Ph.D. (Biology) program shall: 1. 2.

provide advanced formal training for instruction and research capabilities in the area of the biological sciences, and fill the need for highly trained biologists in the government, private industries and academic sectors in the region.

Admission Requirements Admission to the Ph.D. (Biology) Program shall require: 1. a B.S. degree in biological science or allied fields from a recognized institution of higher learning with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better (for the MS-Ph.D. direct program). 243

2. a M.S. degree in biological science or allied fields from a recognized institution of higher learning with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better in the M.S. degree (for the regular program). 3. three (3) letters of recommendation from former professors/immediate supervisor attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for advance studies. 4. satisfaction of the School of Graduate Studies‘/institute‘s admission requirements. Probationary, conditional or special admission may be granted to applicants with deficiencies (viz., GPA lower than 2.0, lack prerequisites, etc.) as may be determined by the Ph.D. Biology Program Committee.

Course Requirements A minimum of 60 units (48 course work and 12 dissertation) shall be required for students entering the program with a B.S. degree and 39 units (27 course work and 12 dissertation) for students entering with a M.S. degree. A. Core Courses (21 units) (Must be taken by students entering the program with a B.S. degree. Students entering with a M.S. degree who have taken any of these courses or their equivalents can have them validated. Request for validation must not exceed 9 units for those who obtained their M.S. degree from outside the MSUS). Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio

211 221 241 251 261 267 281

Advanced Systematics Advanced Ecology Advanced Physiology Advanced Genetics Advanced Developmental Biology Evolutionary Biology Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

B. Specialty Electives (24 units from any of the fields of specialization: Environmental Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology and Microbiology.) 1. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio

213 222 223 224 225 226 229 230 240 245 255 268

Advanced Parasitology Community Ecology Terrestrial Ecology Freshwater Ecology Population Ecology Ecological Methods Pollution Biology Problems in Environmental Biology Environmental Toxicology Biology of Reproduction Genetics of Evolution Ethology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 244

Bio Bio Bot Bot Bot EnSc MB MCB MCB Zoo Zoo

290 291 211 227 241 206 221 221 241 211 227

Special Topics Special Problem Advanced Plant Systematics Phytogeography Physiology of Plants Environmental Impact Assessment Advanced Marine Ecology Microbial Ecology Microbial Physiology Advanced Animal Systematics Zoogeography

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 4 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

Advanced Cytogenetics Molecular Genetics Developmental Genetics Genetics of Evolution Population Genetics Genetics of Eukaryotes Radiation Genetics Special Topics Special Problem

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

2. GENETICS Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio Bio

252 253 254 255 256 257 258 290 291

3. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Bio 246 Bio 253 Bio 264 Bio 283 Bio 284 Bio 285 Bio 290 Bio 291 Chem 240 Chem 242 Chem 243 Chem 244

Molecular Biology of Reproduction Molecular Genetics Molecular Basis of Growth Regulation Molecular Biology of Fermentation Molecular Biology of the Immune System Recombinant DNA Technology Special Topics Special Problem Structure and Function of Biomolecules Lipids, Proteins and Carbohydrates Enzymes Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

4. MICROBIOLOGY MB MCB MCB MCB MCB MCB MCB MCB

203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210

Marine Microbiology Industrial Microbiology Food Microbiology Determinative Bacteriology Microbial Toxins Microbiological Techniques Virology Epidemiology

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 245

MCB MCB MCB MCB MCB

221 241 251 290 291

Microbial Ecology Microbial Physiology Microbial Genetics Special Topics Special Problem

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units

C. Graduate Seminar (3 units from three (3) one-unit seminar courses. Bio

296

Seminar in Biology

1 unit

D. Doctoral Dissertation (12 units) Bio

400

Doctoral Dissertation

12 units

Other Requirements 1. After completion of all the core courses with a GPA of 2.0 or better, by a student entering the program with a B.S. degree, or after validating the core courses or their equivalents for students entering with a M.S. degree, the student takes a qualifying (written) examination which will be the basis for evaluating his/her ability to pursue doctoral studies. A committee of at least three members to be formed by the Ph.D. Biology Program Committee shall prepare and administer the examination. 2. After passiong all the specialty courses (based on the program of study) with a weighted average grade of 2.0 or better, the student takes an oral specialty examination which will be given by his advisory/guidance committee. A dissertation proposal is a requirement for the specialty examination. 3. Final Examination (Oral defense of the dissertation before the advisory committee. 4.

In the event a student entering the program fails in the qualifying (written) examination twice, the Ph.D. Biology Program Committee may recommend that the student take at least nine units of specialty courses and conduct a thesis leading to a M.S. degree or the student be dismissed from the program.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY BIOLOGY (Ph.D. Bio.) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER)

First Year, First Semester 246

Course No.

Course Title

Units

Bio 221

Advanced Ecology

3

Bio 241

Advanced Physiology

3

Bio 251

Advanced Genetics

3

Bio 261

Advanced Developmental Biology

3 Total

12

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total General 2 3 5 Ecology General 2 3 5 Physiology General 2 3 5 Genetics Developmental 2 3 5 Biology 8 12 20

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Bio 267 Elective 1 Elective 2 Elective 3 Bio 296

Course Title

Units

Evolutionary Biology Specialty Specialty Specialty Seminar in Biology Total

3 3 3 3 1 13

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total 0 3 Core Courses Core Courses Core Courses Core Courses 1 0 1

Lec 3

First Year, Summer Course No. Elective 4 Elective 5 Bio 296

Course Title

Units

Specialty Specialty Seminar in Biology Total

3 3 1 7

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total Core Courses Core Courses 1 0 1

Lec

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Elective 6

Course Title Specialty

Units 3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total Core Courses 247

Elective 7 Elective 8 Bio 296

Specialty Specialty Seminar in Biology (Dissertation Proposal Defense)

3 3 1

Total

Core Courses Core Courses 1

0

1

10

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Bio 400

Course Title

Units

(Comprehensive Examination) Doctoral Dissertation (Dissertation Proposal Defense)

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total Core Courses

12

Total

12

Second Year, Summer Course No. Bio 400

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Doctoral Dissertation Total

Third Year, First Semester Course No. Bio 400

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Doctoral Dissertation Total

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

(Doctoral Dissertation 248

Defense) Total

CATALOGUE OF COURSES

BIO 201

MICROTECHNIQUE Fundamentals of microtechnique and principles of microscopy; preparing and mounting of cells, tissues, organs & whole organisms for microscopic study. Credit

BIO 211

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) ADVANCED SYSTEMATICS

Principles and methods of classification and phylogeny of living forms. Credit Prerequisite(s) BIO 213

: 3 units : Bio 105 (Systematics) or its equivalent.

ADVANCED PARASITOLOGY Biology of parasites of marine organisms with emphasis on their taxonomic status and relationships: their morphology, physiology, ecology, host parasite relationships, manner of infestation, control and cure. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 221

: 3 units : Bio 160 (Parasitology) or its equivalent

ADVANCED ECOLOGY Advanced principles of ecosystems: structure and function. It covers major ecosystems in terrestrial and marine environments. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 222

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

COMMUNITY ECOLOGY Principles on dynamics of communities, structure and function and interaction of component species and biodiversity. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

249

BIO 223

TERRESTRIAL ECOLOGY Composition and dynamics of terrestrial communities/ ecosystems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 224

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Composition and dynamics of freshwater communities/ ecosystems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 225

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

POPULATION ECOLOGY Principles on dynamics of population; causes of rise and fall in numbers of population; regulation and management of population. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 226

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

ADVANCED METHODS IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH Analytical tools and research approach in the study of populations, communities and ecosystem. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 227

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

PHYTOGEOGRAPHY Ecology and distribution of plant .populations on earth. Credit

Prerequisite(s)

BIO 229

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology). Bio 105 (Systematics) recommended or their equivalents.

POLLUTION BIOLOGY Discussions on types and causes of pollution in the environment. Methods on bioremediation and pollution control and prevention will be included. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 230

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology) or its equivalent.

PROBLEMS IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY Defining some environmental problems brought up as a result of human activity. Discussion of possible abatement and control. 250

Credit Prerequisite(s) BIO 240

: 3 units. : Consent of instructor.

ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY Discussions on synthesis of toxins. Includes discussions on the principles of toxicology among organisms especially animals. Identification of common environmental toxins, their mechanisms of toxication and possible cure and prevention. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 241

: 3 units. : Bio 109 (General Physiology) and Chem 45 (Elementary Biochemistry) or their equivalents.

ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY Recent trends and concepts in physiology with emphasis on the universal physiological principles applied to all organisms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 245

: 3 units : Bio 109 (General Physiology) or its equivalent.

BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION Life cycle and reproductive process in organisms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 246

: 3 units : Bio 157 (Comp. Anatomy and Phylogeny of Vertebrates) and Bio 109 (General Physiology)

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION The molecular basis of fertilization, development and differentiation of living organisms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 248

: 3 units : Bio 120 (Developmental Biology) or its equivalent.

RADIATION BIOLOGY Effects of ionizing radiation on the different biological systems Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 249

: 3 units : Biology 109 (Gen. Physiology) or its equivalent

BIOLOGY OF SYMBIOSIS The different symbiotic relationships among living organisms Credit

: 3 units 251

Prerequisite(s)

BIO 250

: Biology 107 (Gen. Ecology) or its equivalent

RADIATION ECOLOGY Effects of ionizing radiations on the environment Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 251

: 3 units : Biology 107 (Gen. Ecology) or is equivalent

ADVANCED GENETICS Biochemical and molecular basis of heredity and biotechnology. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 252

: 3 units : Bio 106 (General Genetics) or its equivalent.

ADVANCED CYTOGENETICS Advances in the study of chromosomes and their structure, behavior and their function. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 253

: 3 units : Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics)

MOLECULAR GENETICS Molecular mechanisms of inheritance, mutation and related processes. Topics on recombinant DNA will be discussed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics) and Chem 45 (Elem.Biochemistry)

252

BIO 254

DEVELOPMENTAL GENETICS Genetic principles as applied to the development of organisms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 255

: 3 units : Bio 120 (Developmental Biology) and Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics) or their equivalents.

GENETICS OF EVOLUTION Role of genetic factors in evolution and speciation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 256

: 3 units : Bio 106 (General Genetics) or its equivalent: Bio 110 (Evolution) recommended.

POPULATION GENETICS Principles governing the behavior of genes in populations Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 257

: 3 units : Biology 106 (Gen. Genetics) or its equivalent

GENETICS OF EUKARYOTES Advances in the identification, characterization and manipulation of genes in eukaryotic systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 258

: 3 units : Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics) or its equivalent.

RADIATION GENETICS Change in genetic structure, manifestation and function when genes/chromosomes are exposed to various ionizations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 261

: 3 units : Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics) or its equivalent.

ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Recent concepts differentiation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

on

the regulation

of

fertilization,

development

and

: 3 units : Bio 120 (Developmental Biology) or its equivalent.

253

BIO 262

CELL DIFFERENTIATION IN EMBRYONIC SYSTEMS Current concepts on embryonic development Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 264

: 3 units : Biology 120 (Development Biology) or its equivalent

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF GROWTH REGULATION Discussions on the molecular/cellular bases of growth and differentiation regulations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 267

: 3 units : Bio 109 (Gen. Physiology) or its equivalent.

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY Major and general concepts of evolution of organisms. Discussions on different theories of evolution both micro- and macro- evolution. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 268

: 3 units : Consent of instructor.

ETHOLOGY Natural history of behavior, genetics and learning on the shaping of behavior, physiological and adaptive value of behavior, mechanisms of response to environment and the adaptiveness of the behavioral response. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 281

: 3 units. : Consent of instructor.

ADVANCED CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Recent advances in cell and molecular biology including neurobiology and techniques in molecular biology and genetic engineering. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 283

: 3 units : Bio 108 (Cell Biology) or its equivalent.

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF FERMENTATION The physiology, biochemistry and genetics of fermentation and the production of secondary metabolites and substances of economic importance. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Consent of instructor.

254

BIO 284

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM Molecular determinants of antigenicity and immunogenecity. Discussions on the biochemistry of adjuvants and the structure and function of antibodies will be included. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 285

: 3 units : Consent of instructor.

RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY Molecular biology techniques and genetic engineering protocols in recombinant DNA. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 287

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) and Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics) or their equivalents.

ADVANCED THEORETICAL BIOLOGY Recent advances in theories and principles applicable in bioinformatics, evolutionary and epidemiological genomics and proteomics, and ecological modeling and simulation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 288

: 3 units (3 hrs lec/week) : Cell and Molecular Biology or its equivalent or consent of the instructor

CRITIQUE IN EVOLUTION The different theories on evolution Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 289

: 3 units : Biology 157 (Comp. Ana. & Phylogeny of Vertebrates) Biology 107 (Gen. Ecology) and Biology 106 (Gen. Genetics) or their equivalents

PHILIPPINE BIOLOGY Philippine flora and fauna Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) and Biology 102 (Fundamentals of Animal Biology) or their equivalents

255

BIO 290

SPECIAL TOPICS Thorough discussion on assigned topics in a particular field of specialization (To be enrolled under the student‘s adviser) Credit

BIO 291

: 3 units SPECIAL PROBLEM

Assigned experimental or laboratory work on any special topic related to one‘s field of specialization. Reporting and discussions of results. (To be enrolled under the student‘s adviser) Credit BIO 293

: 3 units BIOMETRY

Mathematical skills and the processes of statistical analysis necessary in the collection and interpretation of experimental data Credit Prerequisite(s) BIO 294

: 3 units : Stat 33 (Biostatistics) or its equivalent

BIOETHICS Critical analysis of issues arising from science, technology, belief structures, rights of an individual and society, and their interrelationships. Topics focus on the ethics of recombinant DNA research, eugenics, germinal choice, in vitro fertilization, abortion, transexualization and euthanasia. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 295

: 1 unit : Consent of Instructor

INDIVIDUAL STUDIES An independent research project in a specific area of study under the guidance of an appropriate faculty. Credit Prerequisite(s)

BIO 296

: 1-6 units depending on the student and academic adviser : None

SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY Oral presentation and discussion of current researches in biology Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit : None

256

BIO 298

ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Principles and methods in biological research including statistical analysis Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Stat 33 (Biostatistics) or its equivalent

MASTER‘S THESIS

BIO 300

A formal, detailed report on the research conducted based on an approved thesis proposal. The research must be an original contribution to the area of specialization. Credit BIO 400

: 6 units DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Formal, detailed report on the research conducted based on approved thesis proposal. The research must be an original contribution on the area of specialization. Credit BOT 215

: 12 units (to be enrolled four times. 3 units/semester) AQUATIC BOTANY

Identification, classification and biology of aquatic plants, including the algae, in both fresh and marine waters Credit Prerequisite(s)

BOT 232

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) or its equivalent

MORPHOLOGY OF HIGHER VASCULAR PLANTS

Anatomy and histology of higher vascular plants Credit Prerequisite(s)

BOT 233

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) or its equivalent

MORPHOLOGY OF THALLOPHYTES

Anatomy and histology of thallophytes Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) or its equivalent

257

BOT 241

ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

Recent developments in the field of photosynthesis, photorespiration, respiration, biosynthesis, hormones, transport and other physiological activities of plants Credit Prerequisite(s)

BOT 242

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) or its equivalent

PLANT AND WATER RELATIONS

Mechanisms of and factors affecting water utilization in plants Credit Prerequisite(s)

BOT 262

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) or its equivalent

PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Patterns and regulation of plant growth and development Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 240

: 3 units : Biology 103 (Fundamentals of Plant Biology) or its equivalent

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF BIOMOLECULES

Structure and function of biochemical systems: their regulation, biosynthesis and coordinated metabolic pathways. Recent literature in molecular biology. Credit CHEM 242

: 3 units LIPIDS, PROTEINS, AND CARBOHYDRATES

Advances in lipid, protein and carbohydrate chemistry. Extraction and separation methods in lipid, protein and carbohydrate analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 243

: 3 units : Chem 240

ENZYMES

Enzyme structure and function: allosterism. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of enzyme reactions. Coenzyme functions and structures. Biochemical mechanisms and their regulation. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 244

: 3 units : Chem 240.

NUCLEOTIDES AND NUCLEIC ACIDS 258

The replication of living organisms, mutations, repair mechanisms. Recent development in biochemistry of nucleoside and nucleic acids. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 281

: 3 units : Chem 240.

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Deals with the nature of air, land and water pollution: pollutants and their effects on the physical, chemical and biological processes and interrelationships between man and his environment: includes pollution monitoring, pollution control and abatement. Credit ENSC 201

: 3 units lecture PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Materials and geologic processes and nature of the lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Biosphere, principles and interactions associated with land, air and water environments and environmental health. Credit

ENSC 202

: 3 units (2 units lec, 1 unit lab)

ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS AND POLICIES

Environmental laws and policies in research and development in support of environmental management, planning and community advocacy. Institutional framework / organizations involved with environmental issues. Credit ENSC 203

: 1 unit lecture RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION

Natural resources focus on Philippine resources, issues and problems of natural resource management and conservation. Credit ENSC 206

: 3 units lecture ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Framework and methodology for environmental impact assessment and monitoring, prediction and assessment of impacts on the physical and biological environment, assessment of environmental resources in terms of their potential for utilization and corresponding impact to human activities. Credit ENSC 220

: 4 units lec 2 / lab 2 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

259

Geological materials and processes related to their influences on man‘s physical environment. Effect of landscape modification and geological hazards such as earthquakes and landslides. Properties of minerals rocks sediments and soils, and geological aspect of waste disposal and water resources. Occasional field trips. Credit ENSC 226

: 3 units ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY

Models of the earth, map reading, determination of locations, spatial distributions of coastal and marine resources, transportation and human settlements. Credit ENSC 230

: 3 units METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY

Elements of weather and climate, their measurements, acquisitions, processing, and application of climatological data; classification of world and Philippine climates. Credit ENSC 236

: 3 units (2 units lec, 1 unit lab) ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

Rationale of environmental education, and sustainable development, curriculum development, teaching strategies, designing projects and then demonstrating them. Reports, classroom experience, and other devices provide feedback on the implementation of the strategies. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENSC 240

: 3 units : Educational Psychology and Methods of Teaching.

ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

Physical and chemical environment as it affects the physiology and population dynamics of organisms including humans. Stability and maintenance of biochemical cycles. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENSC 244

: 3 units : Gen. Biology or Gen. Zoology

ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Analytical procedures applicable to research in environmental science. Credit ENSC 252

: 2 units lab POLLUTION PREVENTION

Past and future industrial development in relation to environmental issues and trends. Economically sustainable industrial development and clean production 260

practices and their practical applications in developed and developing countries. Techniques that promote prevention of pollution. Credit ENSC 254

: 3 units (2 units lec, 1 unit lab) PRINCIPLES OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

Solid waste problems in the municipal, industrial, and agricultural areas. Interrelationships with other environmental problems and socio-economic aspects. Quality and quantity variations of solid waste treatment and management systems; recycling and resource control. Credit ENSC 256

: 3 units (2 units lec, 1 unit fieldwork) WASTEWATER TREATMENT

Chemical, physical and biological factors affecting development of water supplies: water quality: municipal and industrial water treatment processes consisting of removal of particulate matter, softening, disinfection, corrosion control, aeration, and taste and odor removal. Credit ENSC 260

: 3 units (2 units lec, 1 unit lab) MAN AND HIS ENVIRONMENT

Political, economic, psychological, sociological and anthropological aspects in the design and management of human environments. Credit ENSC 264

: 3 units lecture. ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

National, regional and local efforts to plan for the allocation and use of environmental resources with emphasis on land use. Technical, economic and institutional considerations that influence plan development, preparation and implementation. Credit ENSC 268

: 3 units lecture ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT THROUGH COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Local community / government approaches to community environmental management; training and technological aspects of environmental management at the community level; effective communications to build partnerships for sustainable community development; waste recovery and recycling. Credit ENSC 280

: 3 units lecture. RESOURCE USE AND DEVELOPMENT 261

Effects of resource use and development on the environment, on social, technical and economic problems. Credit ENSC 284

: 3 units lecture. FOREST AND WATERSHED MANAGEMENT

Principle of multiple use, classification and distribution of forests, management in relation to forest products; regulation, conservation practices and treatment of aggregate resources of a drainage basin for the production of water and the control of erosion, stream flow and flood. Credit ENSC 296

: 3 units lecture GRADUATE SEMINAR

Oral presentation and discussion on the current researches in environmental science. Credit

ENSC 298

: 1 unit

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Methods of research including statistics with focus on environmental studies. Course requirement- Research Proposal. Credit Prerequisite(s) ENSC 299

: 3 units : Biostatistics

MASTER‘S THESIS

Formal, detailed report on a research conducted based on an approved thesis proposal. Credit MB 203

: 6 units MARINE MICROBIOLOGY

Marine microorganisms with emphasis on their role in the degradation and recycling of nutrients in the marine ecosystem and biotechnological applications of some important forms. Credit MB 212

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY

Systematics of marine invertebrates; their relationship, life cycle, external and internal anatomy. Credit

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) 262

MB 214

MARINE PLANKTONOLOGY Biology of marine aquaculture, their importance in the economy of the sea with emphasis on their role in the food chain; sampling methodology, and preparation for biomass and productivity estimates. Credit

MB 217

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) ICHTHYOLOGY

Biology of fishes on classification, anatomy, life cycle, physiology and ecology; conservation and economic importance. Credit MB 221

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) ADVANCED MARINE ECOLOGY

Composition and dynamics of marine ecosystems. Credit : 3 units Prerequisite(s) : Bio 107 (General Ecology) MB 226 MARINE ECOSYSTEMS Structure and function of marine ecosystems. Credit MB 228

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) MARINE PRODUCTIVITY

Principles of primary productivity with emphasis on photosynthesis, chemosynthesis, respiration, growth, biomass, chlorophyll; methods of measurement. Credit

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk)

263

MB 229

MARINE POLLUTION Types of marine pollutants; their sources, distribution and movement; measurements of the level of pollution and methods of control. Credit

MB 240

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) MARINE TOXICOLOGY

Venomous and toxic marine organisms; chemical analysis of toxins, their physiological effects, and pharmacologic importance. Credit MB 241A

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ANIMALS

Structure and function relationships of marine animals with emphasis on nutrition, respiration, osmoregulation, and excretion. Credit MB 241B

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE PLANTS

Structure and function relationships of marine plants with emphasis on nutrition, respiration, osmoregulation, and excretion. Credit MB 292

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) MARINE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Principles of marine resource conservation, rational utilization, protection and management of the marine environment; conservation laws. Credit MB 293

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec/seminar/ & 3 hrs. field observations MARICULTURE

Principles of aquaculture and their application to the culture of economically important marine organisms; prevention and control of their pests, diseases and parasites; economic feasibility analysis of mariculture ventures. Credit MB 294

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) FISHERIES BIOLOGY

Biology, population dynamics and stock assessment of the living resources of the sea and man‘s interaction with them. Credit MB 296

: 3 units (2 hrs. lec.; 3 hrs. lab/wk) SEMINAR IN MARINE BIOLOGY 264

Oral presentation and discussion of current researches in biology. Credit MB 298

: 1 unit (1 hr./wk seminar session) MARINE METHODOLOGY

Methods and techniques in marine biological research or in oceanographic work. Credit MB 300

: 3 units (3 hrs. lec/wk) MASTERAL THESIS

A research study or project to be conducted by the masteral student. Credit MCB 201

: 6 units INDUSTRIAL MICROBIOLOGY

Thorough discussions on the industrial applications of microorganisms. Major classes of products and processes and microorganisms used in industrial processes will be discussed. Credit Prerequisite(s) MCB 203

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent

MARINE MICROBIOLOGY

Marine microorganisms with emphasis on their role in the degradation and recycling of nutrients in the marine ecosystem. Discussions on the biotechnological applications of some important forms will be included. Credit MCB 205

: 3 units FOOD MICROBIOLOGY

Discusses the normal flora of foods, their significance, and the manner in which foods may be protected from microbial contamination and microbial spoilage. Food products manufactured by microbial fermentation, the role of foods in the transmission of diseases and food poisoning will be discussed. Credit Prerequisite(s) MCB 206

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent.

DETERMINATIVE BACTERIOLOGY

Thorough discussions on the criteria for classification and identification of bacteria. Specific groups of bacteria will be isolated and identified. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent. 265

MCB 207

MICROBIAL TOXINS

Thorough discussions on the physical, chemical, and biological properties of bacterial and fungal toxins. Credit Prerequisite(s) MCB 208

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent.

MICROBIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES

Discussions on standard techniques used in industrial quality control, safety monitoring and in microbiological research laboratories. Credit Prerequisite(s) MCB 209

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent.

VIROLOGY

Basic characteristics of viruses: structures, chemical composition, reproduction and ways in which viruses are classified into taxonomic groups. Also discusses the ability of viruses to cause disease and methods used to study viruses in the laboratory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MCB 210

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent.

EPIDEMIOLOGY

Thorough discussions on occurrence and distribution of microbial diseases, control and quantitative procedures. Credit Prerequisite(s) MCB 221

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) or its equivalent.

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY

Interrelationship between microorganisms and the biotic and abiotic components of their environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Bio 127 (General Microbiology) or its equivalent.

266

MCB 241

MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY

Metabolic activities and other factors affecting the growth of microorganisms. Credit Prerequisite(s)

MCB 251

: 3 units : Bio127 (General Microbiology) and Chem 45 (Elementary Biochemistry) or their equivalents

MICROBIAL GENETICS

Principles of heredity in microbial systems and their application in microbiology and molecular biology. Credit Prerequisite(s)

OCEA 201

: 3 units : Bio 127 (Gen. Microbiology) and Bio 106 (Gen. Genetics) or their equivalents.

FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Physical dynamics and chemical processes of the oceans and instrumentations related to analysis. Biological systems in the sea in relation to the physical and chemical dynamics. Credit OCEA 211

: 3 units (2 units lec, 1 unit fieldwork) BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Biological systems and processes in the sea; the structure of marine ecosystems and biological flow of energy and matter under various natural and man-made factors; major emphasis on systems ecology, synecology, population ecology, and physiological ecology. Credit OCEA 221

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Comparative descriptions and physical dynamics of oceans; theories of energy transmissions and the resultant motions such as currents, waves, and tides; instrumentation in oceanographic investigations. Credit OCEA 231

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Comparative constituents of seawater and the various analytical techniques used to determine their concentrations; emphasis on salinity, major and minor elements, macro- and micronutrients, dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic substances; equilibrium processes which qualitatively and quantitatively affect them. 267

Credit STAT 233

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) BIOSTATISTICS

Application of statistical methods in biological problems. Credit ZOO 211

: 3 units (3 hrs lec/wk) ADVANCED ANIMAL SYSTEMATICS

Principles and methods of classification and nomenclature in animals. Credit Prerequisite(s) ZOO 220

: 3 units : Bio 105 (Systematics)

ORNITHOLOGY

Taxonomy and distribution of birds Credit Prerequisite(s)

ZOO 227

: 3 units : Biology 157 (Comp. Ana. & Phylogeny of Vertebrates) and Biology 107 (Gen. Ecology) or their equivalents

ZOOGEOGRAPHY

Ecology and distribution of animal populations on earth. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ZOO 243

: 3 units : Bio 107 (General Ecology); Bio 105 (Systematics) recommended or their equivalents.

COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY OF VERTEBRATES

Hormonal and parahormonal mechanisms with emphasis on the comparative endocrinology of vertebrates Credit Prerequisite(s) ZOO 244

: 3 units : Biology 109 (General Physiology) or its equivalent

PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION

Reproductive processes and relation of hormones Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Biology 109 (General Physiology) or its equivalent

268

ZOO 247

PHYSIOLOGY OF INSECTS

Functions of the different structures of various insect groups Credit Prerequisite(s) ZOO 263

: 3 units : Biology 109 (General Physiology) or its equivalent

EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOLOGY

Experimental studies of differentiation and organization in embryonic systems Credit Prerequisite(s) ZOO 271

: 3 units : Biology 120 (Developmental Biology) or its equivalent

COMPARATIVE HISTOLOGY OF VERTEBRATES

Structure and function of tissues of vertebrates Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Biology 102 (Fundamentals of Animal Biology) or its equivalent

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Amorado, Faith B.

M.S. Biology, University of San Carlos, 1991 B.S. Med. Tech., Silliman University, 1972

2 Amparado, Ruben F.

Ph.D. Applied Biological Sciences (Envi. Tech.), University of Ghent, Belgium, 1996 M.S. Envi. Sanitation, University of Ghent, Belgium, 1991 B.S. Forestry, MSU-Marawi, 1982

3 Anies, Olive S.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 B.S. Nursing, Liceo de Cagayan, 1992 B.S. Biology, MSU Marawi, 1987

4 Aranico, Edgardo C.

M. S. Forestry, UP-Los Baños, 1981 B.S. Forestry, UP-Los Baños, 1973

5 Demayo, Cesar G.

Ph.D. Entomology, UPLB, 1998 M.S./Ph.D. Genetics, UPLB, 1985/1990 B.S. Biology, MSU Marawi

6 Deocampo, Annielyn H.

M.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT 1999 B.S. Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1993

7 Dimalen, Marilou D.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2005 269

B.S. Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1976 8 Eya, Anna Arlene A.

M.S. Applied Statistics, MSU-IIT, 2007 M.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 B.S. Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1984

9 Garcia, Maricis Gay P.

M.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 B.S. Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1993, Magna Cum Laude

10 Jimenez, Buenaflor D.

M.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 1996 M.S. Aquaculture (CAR), UP Visayas, 1982 B.S. Premed, Southwestern University, 1974 B.S. Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1975

11 Lacuna, Dorothy G.

Ph.D. Biological Oceanography, Hiroshima Univ., Japan, 2001 M.S. Biology, UP-Diliman, 1993 B.S. Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1986

12 Lahoylahoy, Lucilyn D.

M.S. Microbiology, UP-Los Baños, 2003 B.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 1999

13 Metillo, Ephrime B.

Ph.D. Aquatic Zoology, University of Tasmania, Australia, 1995 Graduate Diploma of Science, University of Tasmania, 1992 M.S. Zoology B.S. Zoology, MSU, 1988, Magna Cum Laude

14 Nuñeza, Olga M.

Ph.D. (Animal Physiology), UPLB, 1992 M.S. Zoology, UPLB, 1978 B.S. Biology, MSU, 1978

15 Oclarit, Jose M.

Ph.D. Applied Biochemistry, Hiroshima University, 1994 M.S. Biology (Physiology), UP, 1987 B.S. Zoology, MSU, 1979

16 Orbita, Ma. Luisa W.

Ph.D. Marine Biology, Hokkaido University, Japan, 2006 M.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 1998 B.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 1993

17 Ortega, Eduardo P.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2007 B.S. Biology, Silliman University, 1969 B.S. PreMed, Silliman University, 1967

18 Responte, Jose Angelo A.

M.S. Marine Biology, MSU-IIT 270

B.S. Marine Bio/BS Zoology/BS Biology, MSUMarawi, 1985 19 Rivero, Henry I.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2004 B.S. Biology, PNU-Manila, 1990

20 Solon, Christine Cherry E.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 B.S. Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1988

21 Tabaranza, Alicia E.

M.S. Biology, UP-Los Baños, 1987 B.S. Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1975

22 Teves, Franco G.

Ph.D. Microbiology/Molecular Genetics, UP-Los Baños/Universidad de León, Spain, 2001 M.S. Food Microbiology, UPLB, 1987 B.S. Med. Tech., Silliman University, 1980, Magna Cum Laude

23 Tobias, Ermelinda G.

Ph.D. Zoology, UP Diliman, 1995 M.S. Zoology, UP Diliman, 1982 B.S. Biology, MSU Marawi, 1974, Cum Laude

24 Torres, Mark Anthony J.

Ph.D. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2008 M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2007 B.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 1992 Magna Cum Laude

25 Valdez, Sasha Anne L.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2003 B.S. Medical Technology, Silliman University, 1995

26 Villanueva, Josefa D.

M.S. Botany, UP Diliman, 1986 B.S. Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1974

27 Warguez, Dennis A.

M.S. Biology, MSU-IIT, 2001 B.S. Biology / BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1995

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY MASTER IN CHEMISTRY 271

Introduction To improve the knowledge and competence in teaching and research in the various areas of specialization in chemistry e.g. Analytical, Biochemistry, Environmental Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry starting with the tertiary level faculty, the Faculty Development Program of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) envisions to upgrade the number of master‘s degree holders in the country, from 30% to 70%, most especially in the MINSUPALA Region

Objectives The branching out from the existing Master of Science in Chemistry program to the degree of Master in Chemistry seeks to attain the following objectives: 1.

Provide a degree program with a non-thesis mode, on a full time basis during summer terms and part time basis, through distance learning and scheduled lecture/contact hours, during regular semesters;

2.

Provide Mindanao, Sulu and Palawan (MINSUPALA) region a graduate program for tertiary faculty members currently teaching chemistry an advanced training in chemistry but not necessarily requiring intensive laboratory skills.

3.

Yield highly trained graduates who are competent for a teaching career in a science based schools/universities; and

4.

Upgrade the competence of chemistry teachers both in content and methodology.

Admission Requirements 1.

B.S. in Chemistry (B.S. Chem) degree or other undergraduate degree provided that the following minimum requirements is satisfied: Course General Chemistry (lec/lab) Analytical Chemistry (lec/lab) Biochemistry Inorganic Chemistry Organic Chemistry (lec/lab) Physical Chemistry (lec/lab)

2. 3. 4.

Units 10 10 3 3 10 10

Be a full-time faculty member and currently teaching in a public or private college or university included in the list of sending institutions. Have no master‘s degree. Have a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or its equivalent in undergraduate courses in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics.

272

5.

6. 7.

Have no pending criminal/administrative charges or convicted for violation of any Philippine Law. Certification must be obtained from appropriate agencies. Letter of endorsement from the head of the sending institution. Two (2) letters of recommendation from former undergraduate instructors in major chemistry courses attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for graduate studies.

Degree Requirements 1.

Courses: Must have successfully completed at least 35 units of the course work (including 3 units of Special Project) specified in his/her program of study.

2.

GPA: A student enrolled in the Master in Chemistry Program must obtain an overall Grade Point Average (GPA) Grade of 2.0 or better after each semester for all courses taken. A student who fails to satisfy this requirement may be put on probation in the following semester upon recommendation of the Chemistry Graduate Committee. Failure to maintain the required GPA after the probation period of one semester shall automatically disqualify the student from the program.

3.

Comprehensive Examination: Must have passed a comprehensive examination in her/his chosen area of specialization.

4.

Presentation: The student must have successfully presented his/her Master‘s Project in public.

List of Courses by Semester This two-year program of Master in Chemistry usually starts in summer. The student undertakes a full time schooling during summer, carrying a 9-unit load. During 2 regular semesters, the student carries a 6-unit load, but on the second semester of year 1 and 2, the student carries a 4 unit load which includes the comprehensive examination and presentation of the special project in a seminar, respectively.

MASTER IN CHEMISTRY (MIC) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, Summer

273

Course No. Chem 220/ 220N Chem 230 Chem 250

Course Title

Units

Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis Organic Reactions and Mechanisms Inorganic Structures and Reaction Mechanisms Total

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

9

9

0

9

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

First Year, First Semester Course No. Chem 240 Chem 270/ 272/ 275 Chem 291

Course Title

Units

Structure and Function of Biomolecules Chemical Thermodynamics/ Chemical Kinetics/Quantum Chemistry Seminar I Total

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

3

3

0

3

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

1

1

0

1

9 units core courses

None

7

7

0

7

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Elective on the Cognate field of 1 specialization

3

3

0

3

Elective on the Cognate field of 2 specialization

3

3

0

3

6

6

0

6

Total

Prerequisite(s) 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval

Corequisite(s) None

None

Second Year, Summer Course Course Title No. Chem Instrumental

Units 2

Hrs/Wk PreLec Lab Total requisite(s) 0 6 8 Chem 220 or

Corequisite(s) None 274

221.2

Methods of Analysis

Cognate Elective on the 3 field of specialization

3

3

0

3

5

3

6

11

Written Comprehensive Exam on the field of specialization Total

CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval 14 units Core courses, GPA of 2.00 with No INC grades

None

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Elective on the Cognate field of 4 specialization

3

3

0

3

Elective on the Cognate field of 5 specialization

1

1

0

1

4

4

0

4

Total

Prerequisite(s) 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘ approval

Corequisite(s) None

None

Second Year, Second Semester Hrs/Wk Course PreCoCourse Title Units No. requisite(s) Lec Lab Total requisite(s) Chem Master‘s Project 1 1 0 1 None Chem 397 293 Seminar Chem Passed the Master‘s Project 3 0 9 9 None 297 Compre Exam Total 4 1 9 9

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CHEM 220/220N SPECTROCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS Spectroscopic methods, theory, structure elucidation and analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Chemistry Graduate Committee‘s (CGC‘s) Approval 275

CHEM 221.2

INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Laboratory work in instrumental methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 230

: 2 units ( 6 hrs lab) : Chem 220 (Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis) or CGC‘s Approval

ORGANIC REACTIONS AND MECHANISMS

Study of structure including stereochemistry, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 250

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

INORGANIC STRUCTURES AND REACTION MECHANISMS

Structural concepts and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds and transition metal ions. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 270

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Theory and applications of classical thermodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 272

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMICAL KINETICS

Principles of kinetics, transport processes, reaction kinetics, theories of reaction rates. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

276

CHEM 275

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY

Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 291

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

SEMINAR I

A seminar presentation of a research paper from current library scientific journals in any area of specialization. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 293

: 1 unit (1hr lec) : 9 units of core courses

MASTER‘S PROJECT SEMINAR

Presentation of the Master‘s Project in a seminar. Credit Corequisite(s) CHEM 297

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : Chem 397 (Master‘s Project)

MASTER‘S PROJECT

A scientific investigation of a research problem that may involved experimentation and doable in one-semester. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (9 hrs lab) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMISTRY COGNATES ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 321

ELECTROANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Theory and analytical applications of electrochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 322

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Principles and applications of chromatographic methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

277

CHEM 323

RADIOCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Theory and analytical application of radiochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 329

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in analytical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-BIOCHEMISTRY CHEM 331

CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS

Advances in the chemistry and biosynthesis, isolation techniques, and structure elucidation of natural products. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 332

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

POLYMER CHEMISTRY

Reactions, reaction mechanisms and synthesis of polymers. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 333

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

PHOTOCHEMISTRY

Theory of photochemistry and photoreactions. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 334

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ORGANIC MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

Study of organic compounds that are used as drugs or medicinal agents, their activity, applications, limitations, stability, forms and uses. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 335

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ORGANOMETALLICS

Reaction mechanisms of organometallic compounds and their role in 278

homogeneous catalysis and biochemical processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 339

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in organic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 340

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF BIOMOLECULES

Structure and function of biochemical systems, their regulation, biosynthesis and coordinated metabolic pathways. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 342

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

LIPIDS, PROTEINS, AND CARBOHYDRATES

Advances in lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates chemistry. Extraction and separation methods in lipids, proteins and carbohydrate analyses. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 343

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ENZYMES

Enzyme structure and function; allosterism. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of enzyme reactions. Coenzymes, functions and structure. Biochemical reaction mechanisms and their regulation. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 344

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEIC ACIDS

The replication of living organisms mutation. Repair mechanisms. Recent development in the biochemistry of nucleosides and nucleic acids. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 349

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in biochemistry. 279

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY CHEM 351

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of complexes formulated by a central atom or ion surrounded by a set of other atoms, ions, or small molecules. Symmetry groups and molecular symmetry are the main concern of this study. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 352

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

MACROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY

The study of characteristically interesting and unusual macrocyclic ligand systems. Areas of study include the structures and properties of macrocyclic compounds; synthesis; polyether crown and related systems; host-guest chemistry, kinetics; thermodynamics and electrochemical aspects of a range of macrocyclic system. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 353

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

SUPRAMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of intermolecular bond that is concerned with the structure and function of entities formed by the association of two or more molecular or ionic species. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 354

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

BIOINORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Explores the variety of function of metal ions in specific steps that they play in biology. This study includes areas on ion pumps and transport proteins and the biochemical catalysts, metalloenzymes. Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec) Prerequisite(s) : None CHEM 355 SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY The current enthusiasm for ―material chemistry‖ has greatly increased the synthesis and study of new inorganic solids. The study covers areas on basic concept of prototypical solid structures, lattice enthalpies, ionic and covalent bonding, intercalation compounds, crystal structures, electronic band structures, xray and neutron diffraction structures. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) 280

Prerequisite(s) CHEM 359

: None

CURRENT TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in inorganic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 371

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.)

Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 373

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY

Semi-empirical method, molecular mechanics, ab-initio methods, density functional theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 375

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

MOLECULAR DYNAMICS** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.)

MD simulations of small systems, equilibrium and dynamical properties, timedependent phenomena. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

281

CHEM 376

CHEMICAL APPLICATION OF GROUP THEORY

Symmetry, matrix representation of groups, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules, molecular vibrations, molecular orbitals. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 377

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Ensembles, partition functions, application to thermodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 379

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in physical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

ALLIED CHEMISTRY CHEM 381

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Advanced study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fate of chemical species in water, soil, and air environments, and the effects of technology thereon. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 382

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

AQUATIC CHEMISTRY

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of natural waters. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 383

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of the air environment. Gaseous inorganic and organic pollutants and their reactions. Photochemical smog chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

282

CHEM 384

FATE OF POLLUTANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

Advanced treatment of the study of the fate of pollutants in air, water, and soil/sediment environments. Literature readings. Modeling. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 385

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL

Standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s) CHEM 385.2

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None : Chem 485.2 (Principles of Water Quality Control Laboratory)

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORY

Laboratory experiments covering standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s) CHEM 386

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None : Chem 485 (Principles of Water Quality Control)

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS

Sampling methods, extraction methods, method validation techniques, advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air, water, soil and sediment environments. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 387.2

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB I

Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in water and wastewater environments. Liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-solid extraction, closedloop stripping, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None

283

CHEM 388.2

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB II

Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air and soil/sediment environments. Supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasonic extraction, microwave extraction, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 389

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in environmental chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY

284

Introduction The Iligan Institute of Technology of the Mindanao State University (MSU-IIT) is mandated to develop the scientific manpower and technical capability of the Mindanao region in order to achieve a speedy economic development of the country. As an academic institution, it must offer and support programs that will bring about the effective fulfillment of its goals. The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) identified it as a Graduate Center for Chemistry under its Mindanao Advanced Education Project (MAEP). As such, it is tasked to help produce the critical mass of scientists in the field of chemistry that will catalyze the development of Mindanao. Recently, it was identified by CHED as a Center of Excellence (COE) in Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry of MSU-IIT, being one of the academic divisions of the institute, must strive towards the realization of this mandate. One way of achieving this is to offer graduate programs in Chemistry, specifically Doctor of Philosophy Program in Chemistry and Master of Science in Chemistry, in addition to its specific tasks of undertaking basic, applied, and missionoriented researches. The graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Chemistry aims to increase knowledge and competence in research and teaching in the various fields of chemistry. The areas of specialization include Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, Physical, Environmental, and Biochemistry.

Objectives 1.

To increase the absolute and relative numbers of highly trained manpower in chemistry research especially for the Mindanao and Visayas regions.

2.

To upgrade college and university chemistry teaching in content and in methodology.

3.

To provide chemical industries with highly trained manpower in chemistry to man analytical and quality control laboratories.

Admission Requirements All applicants must: 1.

2.

Have a B.S. in Chemistry degree, or have completed the following undergraduate courses for non-B.S. Chemistry graduates: General Chemistry 10 units Inorganic Chemistry 3 units Organic Chemistry 10 units Physical Chemistry 10 units Analytical Chemistry 10 units Biochemistry 4 units Have a grade-point average (GPA) of 2.50 or its equivalent in undergraduate courses in Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics.

285

3.

Submit two (2) letters of recommendation from former undergraduate chemistry instructors/professors attesting to the student‘s intellectual capacity for graduate studies in chemistry.

Degree Requirements 5. 6.

7. 8.

Courses: Must have successfully completed at least 36 units of the course work (including 6 units of Thesis) specified in his/her program of study. GPA: A student enrolled in the M.S. in Chemistry Program must obtain an overall Grade Point Average (GPA) Grade of 2.0 or better after each semester for all courses taken. A student who fails to satisfy this requirement may be put on probation in the following semester upon recommendation of the Chemistry Graduate Committee. Failure to maintain the required GPA after the probation period of one semester shall automatically disqualify the student from the program. Comprehensive Examination: Must have passed a comprehensive examination in her/his chosen area of specialization. Defense: The student must have successfully defended his/her dissertation.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY (MS CHEM) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Hrs/Wk Course Course Title Units No. Lec Lab Total Chem Spectrochemical 220/ Methods of 3 3 0 3 220N Analysis Organic Chem Reactions 3 3 0 3 230 and Mechanisms Inorganic Chem Structures 3 3 0 3 250 and Reaction Mechanisms Chem Chemical 270/ Thermodynamics/ 3 3 0 3 272 Chemical Kinetics Total 12 12 0 12

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

None

None

None

None

None

None

None

None

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s) 286

Lec Lab Total Chem 221.2

Instrumental Methods of Analysis

2

0

6

6

Elective on the Cognate field of 1 specialization

3

3

0

3

Elective on the Cognate field of 2 specialization

3

3

0

3

Elective on the Cognate field of 3 specialization

3

3

0

3

1

1

0

1

12

10

6

16

Chem 291

Seminar I Total

Chem 220 or CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses or CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses or CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses

None

None

None

None

None

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Written Comprehensive Examination Chem 299

MS Thesis Total

2

0

0

2

2

0

0

2

PreCorequisite(s) requisite(s) 14 units of Chemistry core courses, GPA of 2.00 with no INC grade CGC‘s approval

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Elective on the Cognate field of 4 specialization

3

3

0

3

Elective on the Cognate field of 5 specialization

2

2

0

2

Chem 299

MS Thesis

2 Total

7

Prerequisite(s) 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘ approval

Corequisite(s) None

None

2 4

0

7

Second Year, Second Semester

287

Course No. Chem 292 Chem 299

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Thesis Seminar

1

1

0

1

None

MS Thesis

2

0

0

2

Passed the Comprehensive None Exam

3

1

0

3

Total

Chem 299

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CHEM 220/220N

SPECTROCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Spectroscopic methods, theory, structure elucidation and analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 221.2

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Chemistry Graduate Committee‘s (CGC‘s) Approval

INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Laboratory work in instrumental methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 230

: 2 units ( 6 hrs lab) : Chem 220 (Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis) or CGC‘s Approval

ORGANIC REACTIONS AND MECHANISMS

Study of structure including stereochemistry, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 250

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

INORGANIC STRUCTURES AND REACTION MECHANISMS

Structural concepts and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds and transition metal ions. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 270

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Theory and applications of classical thermodynamics. Credit

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) 288

Prerequisite(s) CHEM 272

: CGC‘s Approval

CHEMICAL KINETICS

Principles of kinetics, transport processes, reaction kinetics, theories of reaction rates. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 275

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY

Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 291

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

SEMINAR I

A seminar presentation of a research paper from current library scientific journals in any area of specialization. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 292

: 1 unit (1hr lec) : 9 units of core courses

THESIS SEMINAR

Presentation of the Thesis in a seminar. Credit Corequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : Chem 299 (M. S. Thesis)

289

CHEM 299

M.S. THESIS

May be enrolled three times at 2 units each time. A grade of ―passed‖ or ―failed‖ will be given only after the student has enrolled 6 units of M. S. Thesis. A student receives a grade of ―in Progress‖ for satisfactory performance each term the M. S. Thesis is enrolled until defended. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units (12 hrs lab) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMISTRY COGNATES ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 321

ELECTROANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Theory and analytical applications of electrochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 322

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Principles and applications of chromatographic methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 323

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

RADIOCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Theory and analytical application of radiochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 329

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in analytical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

290

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-BIOCHEMISTRY CHEM 331

CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS

Advances in the chemistry and biosynthesis, isolation techniques, and structure elucidation of natural products. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 332

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

POLYMER CHEMISTRY

Reactions, reaction mechanisms and synthesis of polymers. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 333

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

PHOTOCHEMISTRY

Theory of photochemistry and photoreactions. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 334

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ORGANIC MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

Study of organic compounds that are used as drugs or medicinal agents, their activity, applications, limitations, stability, forms and uses. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 335

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ORGANOMETALLICS

Reaction mechanisms of organometallic compounds and their role in homogeneous catalysis and biochemical processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 339

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units)

Advances and current researches in organic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 340

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

STRUCTURES AND FUNCTION OF BIOMOLECULES

291

Structure and function of biochemical systems, their regulation, biosynthesis and coordinated metabolic pathways. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 342

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

LIPIDS, PROTEINS, AND CARBOHYDRATES

Advances in lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates chemistry. Extraction and separation methods in lipids, proteins and carbohydrate analyses. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 343

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ENZYMES

Enzyme structure and function; allosterism. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of enzyme reactions. Coenzymes, functions and structure. Biochemical reaction mechanisms and their regulation. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 344

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEIC ACIDS

The replication of living organism‘s mutation. Repair mechanisms. Recent development in the biochemistry of nucleosides and nucleic acids. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 349

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in biochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY CHEM 351

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of complexes formulated by a central atom or ion surrounded by a set of other atoms, ions, or small molecules. Symmetry groups and molecular symmetry are the main concern of this study. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

292

CHEM 352

MACROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY

The study of characteristically interesting and unusual macrocyclic ligand systems. Areas of study include the structures and properties of macrocyclic compounds; synthesis; polyether crown and related systems; host-guest chemistry, kinetics; thermodynamics and electrochemical aspects of a range of macrocyclic system. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 353

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

SUPRAMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of intermolecular bond that is concerned with the structure and function of entities formed by the association of two or more molecular or ionic species. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 354

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

BIOINORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Explores the variety of function of metal ions in specific steps that they play in biology. This study includes areas on ion pumps and transport proteins and the biochemical catalysts, metalloenzymes. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 355

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY

The current enthusiasm for ―material chemistry‖ has greatly increased the synthesis and study of new inorganic solids. The study covers areas on basic concept of prototypical solid structures, lattice enthalpies, ionic and covalent bonding, intercalation compounds, crystal structures, electronic band structures, xray and neutron diffraction structures. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 359

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in inorganic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 371

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the 293

Chemistry Graduate Committee.) Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 373

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY

Semi-empirical method, molecular mechanics, ab-initio methods, density functional theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 375

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

MOLECULAR DYNAMICS** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.)

MD simulations of small systems, equilibrium and dynamical properties, timedependent phenomena. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 376

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CHEMICAL APPLICATION OF GROUP THEORY

Symmetry, matrix representation of groups, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules, molecular vibrations, molecular orbitals. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 377

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Ensembles, partition functions, application to thermodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

294

CHEM 379

CURRENT TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in physical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

ALLIED CHEMISTRY CHEM 381

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Advanced study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fate of chemical species in water, soil, and air environments, and the effects of technology thereon. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 382

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

AQUATIC CHEMISTRY

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of natural waters. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 383

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of the air environment. Gaseous inorganic and organic pollutants and their reactions. Photochemical smog chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 384

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

FATES OF POLLUTANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

Advanced treatment of the study of the fate of pollutants in air, water, and soil/sediment environments. Literature readings. Modeling. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 385

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL

Standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None : Chem 485.2 (Principles of Water Quality Control Laboratory)

295

CHEM 385.2

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORY

Laboratory experiments covering standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s) CHEM 386

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None : Chem 485 (Principles of Water Quality Control)

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS

Sampling methods, extraction methods, method validation techniques, advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air, water, soil and sediment environments. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 387.2

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB I

Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in water and wastewater environments. Liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-solid extraction, closedloop stripping, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 388.2

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB II

Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air and soil/sediment environments. Supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasonic extraction, microwave extraction, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 389

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in environmental chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

296

B.S. - M.S. IN CHEMISTRY STRAIGHT PROGRAM Introduction The B.S.-M.S. in Chemistry Straight Program is intended for exceptional undergraduate B.S. Chemistry students who are highly qualified to go into the M.S. Program. By going into the Straight Program, the number of years spent to get the M.S. degree (after the B.S. degree) is decreased, thereby producing M.S. graduates earlier, which is an advantage both to the student in particular and to the country in general. By graduating earlier, less government funds are spent, and earlier service to the country is rendered by the M.S. in Chemistry degree holder. This is a ―rider‖ program, which follows the latest approved B.S. in Chemistry Program and latest approved M.S. in Chemistry Program, and thus makes use of existing resources.

Objectives 1.

To produce M.S. in Chemistry graduates from highly exceptional undergraduate B.S. in Chemistry students in a relatively shorter time.

2.

To increase the absolute and relative numbers of highly trained manpower in chemistry research especially for the Mindanao and Visayas regions.

3.

To upgrade college and university chemistry teaching in content and in methodology.

4.

To provide chemical industries with highly trained manpower in chemistry to man analytical and quality control laboratories.

Admission Requirements 1.

Must have taken all the course requirements of the latest approved B.S. in Chemistry Program up to the Fourth Year Level except the following: Seminar II (Chem 192 B) ………………… 1 unit Cognates ..................................................... 8 units (in Proposed Revised B.S. Chemistry Curriculum) Thesis (Chem 199) ..................................... 3 units

2.

Must have an overall GPA of 2.00 or better (for all courses taken) at the end of the Third Year level.

297

3.

Must take a qualifying examination in the four areas of Chemistry namely: Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry. Qualifying examinations are rated as either ―Q‖ (Qualified), ―P‖ (Passed), or ―D‖ (Deficient). Qualifying exams will be given as scheduled by the department.

To qualify for the straight program requires a rating of at least ―Q‖ in two areas with at least ―P‖ in the other 2 areas. A student who obtains only ―P‖ ratings in the four areas (with no ―Q‖s) will have to go through the regular B.S. program. Upon completion of the B.S., the student can apply for admission into the regular M.S. program. Upon being qualified, the student, with his adviser, prepares his program of study for approval by the Chemistry Graduate Committee. He should now register for graduate thesis, instead of undergraduate thesis, and graduate courses, instead of the cognates. In case he opts not to finish the M.S. requirements, he applies for substitution of courses to credit his graduate courses for the B.S. Chemistry Degree.

Degree Requirements To qualify for the B.S. in Chemistry degree together with the MS in Chemistry degree through the B.S.-M.S. Straight Program, a student must comply with the following requirements: 1.

Undergraduate Courses: Must have successfully completed all the course requirements of the latest approved B.S. in Chemistry Program up to the Fourth Year level, except Chem 192B (Seminar II, 1 unit), Cognates (8 units), and Chem 199 (Undergraduate Research, 3 units).

2.

Graduate Courses: Must have successfully completed at least 36 units of the course work (including 6 units of M.S. Thesis) specified in his/her program of study.

3.

GPA: Must have an overall Grade Point Average Grade of 2.0 or better after each semester, for all graduate courses taken. A student who fails to satisfy this requirement may be put on probation in the following semester upon recommendation of the Chemistry Graduate Committee. Failure to maintain the required GPA after the probation period of one semester shall automatically disqualify the student from the program.

4.

Comprehensive Examination: Must have passed a comprehensive examination in her/his chosen area of specialization.

5.

Defense: Must have successfully defended his/her M.S. Thesis.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY (MS CHEM) 298

(LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Eng 1

College English I Philippine Hist 1 History Introduction to Psych 1 Psychology Math 2 College Algebra

3

Prerequisite(s)

Hrs/Wk

Lec Lab Total 3 0 3 None

Corequisite(s) None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

Department‘s Consent

None None

Fil 1

Sining ng Komunikasyon

3

3

0

3

None

Chem 15

General Chemistry I

3

3

0

3

None

Chem 15.2

General Chemistry Lab I

2

0

6

6

None

2

0

2

2

None

None

(3)

0

3

3

None

None

18

11

29

Physical Fitness and Health National Service NSTP 1 Training Program I PE 1

Total 22(25)

Math 2 or Math 17 & Chem 15.2 Math 2 or Math 17 & Chem 15

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Prerequisite(s)

Hrs/Wk

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total College English Eng 2 II Oral Eng 3 Communication College Math 15 Trigonometry Pagsulat at Fil 2 Pagbasa sa iba‘tibang Disiplina Bio 1 Basic Biology Chem 16

General Chemistry II

3

3

0

3

Eng 1

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

Math 2

None

3

3

0

3

Fil 1

None

3

2

2

5

3

3

0

3

None Chem 15 & 15.2 and Math 2 or Math 17

None Chem 16.2 and Math 15 or Math 17 299

Chem 16.2

General Chemistry Lab II Martial PE 2 Arts/Dance National Service NSTP 2 Training Program II

2

0

6

6

None

Chem 16

2

0

2

2

PE 1

None

(3)

0

3

3

None

None

17

15

32

Total 22(25)

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Prerequisite(s)

Hrs/Wk

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total History of the Muslim Filipinos and the Hist 3 Indigenous Peoples of MINSUPALA Philippine Government and Constitution, Pol Sci Agrarian Reform 2 and Taxation, Family Planning and Population Education Analytic Math 51 Geometry and Calculus I Phys 21 General Physics I Phys 21.1 Chem 35 Chem 35.2 PE 3

Laboratory Physics I Organic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry Lab I Individual and Dual Sports Total

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

6

6

0

6

Math 15 or Math 17

None

3

3

0

3

Math 15 or Math 17

Math 51

1

0

3

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

Chem 16 & 16.2

Chem 35.2

2

0

6

6

None

Chem 35

2

0

2

2

PE 1

None

23

18

11

29

Second Year, Second Semester Course

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Pre-

Co300

No.

requisite(s)

requisite(s)

Lec Lab Total Analytic Math 61 Geometry and Calculus II General Physics Phys 31 II Phys Laboratory 31.1 Physics II Chem Organic 36 Chemistry II Chem 36.2 Chem 28 Chem 28.2 PE 4

Organic Chem Lab II Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Lab Team Sports Total

6

6

0

6

Math 51

None

3

3

0

3

Phys 21

Math 61

1

0

3

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

Chem 35 & 35.2

Chem 36.2

2

0

6

6

None

Chem 36

3

3

0

3

Chem 16 & 16.2

Chem 28.2

2

0

6

6

None

Chem 28

2

0

2

2

PE 1

None

22

15

17

32

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Prerequisite(s)

Hrs/Wk

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total Analytic Math 71 Geometry and Calculus III General Physics Phys 41 III Phys Laboratory 41.1 Physics III Chem Elementary 45 Biochemistry

6

6

0

6

Math 61

None

3

3

0

3

Phys 21

Math 71

1

0

3

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

Chem 32 & 35.2 or Chem 36

Chem 45.2

None

Chem 45.2

Chem 45.2

Elementary Biochemistry Lab

2

0

6

6

Chem 73

Physical Chemistry I

3

3

0

3

2

2

0

2

1

0

3

3

Chem 123 Chem

Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis Spectrochemical

Chem 28 & 28.2, Math 61, Phys 31 Chem 28, 28.2 and Chem 36 & 36.2 None

None

Chem 123.1 Chem 123 301

123.1

Methods of Analysis Lab Total

22

17

12

29

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Pre-requisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Math 17 or its equivalent

None

Lec Lab Total Introduction to CSc 101 computer Programming Chem Inorganic 151 Chemistry Elective Chem 74

3

2

3

5

3

3

0

3

Laboratory Physics III

3

3

0

3

Physical Chemistry II

3

3

0

3

Chem 73

None

3

0

3

3

As required by specific course

As required by specific course

2

0

6

6

Chem 73

None

2

2

0

2

Chem 28, 28.2 and Chem 35 & 35.2

Chem 128.1

1

0

3

3

None

Chem 128

Chem 36&36.2, Chem 73&73.2, Chem 123&123.1, and None Chem 128&128.1

Cognate Chem 73.2 Chem 128 Chem 128.1

Chem 198

Physical Chemistry Lab I Separation and Chromatographic Methods Separation and Chromatographic Methods Lab Methods of Chemistry Research Total

1

1

0

1

21

17

12

29

Chem 35 & 35.2 None and Chem 73 As required As required by by specific specific course course

Fourth Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Prerequisite(s)

Hrs/Wk

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total Argumentation in Philo 2 Contemporary

3

3

0

3

None

None

302

Society Chem 31&31.1 or Chem None 35&35.2 Chem 45&45.2, Chem 73&73.2 None and Chem 123&123.1

Chem 181

Environmental Chemistry

2

2

0

2

Chem 196A

Chemistry Seminar I

1

1

0

1

Chem 74.2

Physical Chemistry Lab II Life and Works of Rizal Introduction to Literature

2

0

6

6

Chem 74

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

Eng 2

None

1

1

0

1

As required As required by by specific specific course course

15

13

16

19

Hist 5 Eng 4 Elective

Total

Fourth Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total Chem 220/ 220N Chem 230 Chem 250 Chem 270 /272

Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis Organic Reactions and Mechanisms Inorganic Structures and Reaction Mechanisms Chemical Thermodynamics/ Chemical Kinetics Total

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

12

12

0

12

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Chem 220 or CGC‘s

None

Fourth Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Chem 221.2

Instrumental Methods of

2

0

6

6

303

Analysis Cognate 1

Elective on the field of specialization

3

3

0

3

5

3

6

9

Written Comprehensive Examination Total

approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval 14 units core courses, GPA of 2.00 w/ no INC

None

Fifth Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Prerequisite(s)

Hrs/Wk

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total Cognate 2

Elective on the field of specialization

3

3

0

3

Cognate 3

Elective on the field of specialization

3

3

0

3

Cognate 4

Elective on the field of specialization

3

3

0

3

Cognate 5

Elective on the field of specialization

3

3

0

3

Chem 291

Seminar I Total

1

1

0

1

12

12

0

12

9 units core courses or CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses or CGC‘s approval 9 units core courses and CGC‘s approval

9 units core courses or CGC‘s approval

None

None

None

None

Fifth Year, Second Semester Course No. Chem 299

Course Title MS Thesis

Units 2

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total 0

0

2

Prerequisite(s) Passed the Comprehensive

Corequisite(s) None

304

Exam Total

2

0

0

2

Fifth Year, Summer Course No. Chem 299

Course Title MS Thesis Total

Units

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

2

0

0

2

2

0

0

2

PreCorequisite(s) requisite(s) Passed the Comprehensive None Exam

Sixth Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Chem 292

Thesis Seminar

1

Chem 299

MS Thesis

2

Total

3

Hrs/Wk

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Lec Lab Total 0 0 1 None Chem 299 Passed the 0 0 2 Comprehensive None Exam 0 0 3

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CHEM 220/220N

SPECTROCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Spectroscopic methods, theory, structure elucidation and analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 221.2

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : Chemistry Graduate Committee‘s (CGC‘s) Approval

INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

305

Laboratory work in instrumental methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 230

: 2 units ( 6 hrs lab) : Chem 220 (Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis) or CGC‘s Approval

ORGANIC REACTIONS AND MECHANISMS

Study of structure including stereochemistry, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 250

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

INORGANIC STRUCTURES AND REACTION MECHANISMS

Structural concepts and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds and transition metal ions. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 270

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Theory and applications of classical thermodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 272

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMICAL KINETICS

Principles of kinetics, transport processes, reaction kinetics, theories of reaction rates. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 275

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY

Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 291

: 3 unit (3 hrs lec) : CGC‘s Approval

SEMINAR I

A seminar presentation of a research paper from current library scientific journals in any area of specialization. 306

Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 292

: 1 unit (1hr lec) : 9 units of core courses

THESIS SEMINAR

Presentation of the Thesis in a seminar. Credit : 1 unit (1 hr lec) Corequisite(s) : Chem 299 (M. S. Thesis) CHEM 299

M.S. THESIS

May be enrolled three times at 2 units each time. A grade of ―passed‖ or ―failed‖ will be given only after the student has enrolled 6 units of M. S. Thesis. A student receives a grade of ―in Progress‖ for satisfactory performance each term the M. S. Thesis is enrolled until defended. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units (12 hrs lab) : CGC‘s Approval

CHEMISTRY COGNATES ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 431/331 ELECTROANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Theory and analytical applications of electrochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

307

CHEM 432/332 CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS OF ANALYSIS Principles and applications of chromatographic methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 434/334 RADIOCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS Theory and analytical application of radiochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 429/329 CURRENT TOPICS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY* Advances and current researches in analytical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

:

1 unit (1 hrs lec) : None

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-BIOCHEMISTRY CHEM 431/331 CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS Advances in the chemistry and biosynthesis, isolation techniques, and structure elucidation of natural products. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 432/332 POLYMER CHEMISTRY Reactions, reaction mechanisms and synthesis of polymers. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 433/333 PHOTOCHEMISTRY Theory of photochemistry and photoreactions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

308

CHEM 434/334 ORGANIC MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY Study of organic compounds that are used as drugs or medicinal agents, their activity, applications, limitations, stability, forms and uses. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 435/335 ORGANOMETALLICS Reaction

mechanisms of organometallic compounds and their role in

homogeneous catalysis and biochemical processes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 439/339 CURRENT TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.) Advances and current researches in organic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 440/340 STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF BIOMOLECULES Structure and function of biochemical systems, their regulation, biosynthesis and coordinated metabolic pathways. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 442/342 LIPIDS, PROTEINS, AND CARBOHYDRATES Advances in lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates chemistry. Extraction and separation methods in lipids, proteins and carbohydrate analyses. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 443/343 ENZYMES Enzyme structure and function; allosterism. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of enzyme reactions. Coenzymes, functions and structure. Biochemical reaction mechanisms and their regulation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 444/344 NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEIC ACIDS 309

The replication of living organism‘s mutation. Repair mechanisms. development in the biochemistry of nucleosides and nucleic acids. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

Recent

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 449/349 CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.) Advances and current researches in biochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY CHEM 451/351 COORDINATION CHEMISTRY The chemistry of complexes formulated by a central atom or ion surrounded by a set of other atoms, ions, or small molecules. Symmetry groups and molecular symmetry are the main concern of this study. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 452/352 MACROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY The study of characteristically interesting and unusual macrocyclic ligand systems. Areas of study include the structures and properties of macrocyclic compounds; synthesis; polyether crown and related systems; host-guest chemistry, kinetics; thermodynamics and electrochemical aspects of a range of macrocyclic system. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 453/353 SUPRAMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY The chemistry of intermolecular bond that is concerned with the structure and function of entities formed by the association of two or more molecular or ionic species. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

310

CHEM 454/354 BIOINORGANIC CHEMISTRY Explores the variety of function of metal ions in specific steps that they play in biology. This study includes areas on ion pumps and transport proteins and the biochemical catalysts, metalloenzymes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 455/355 SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY The current enthusiasm for ―material chemistry‖ has greatly increased the synthesis and study of new inorganic solids. The study covers areas on basic concept of prototypical solid structures, lattice enthalpies, ionic and covalent bonding, intercalation compounds, crystal structures, electronic band structures, xray and neutron diffraction structures. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 459/359 CURRENT TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.) Advances and current researches in inorganic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

1 unit (1 hrs lec) None

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 471/371 QUANTUM CHEMISTRY** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.) Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 473/373 METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY Semi-empirical method, molecular mechanics, ab-initio methods, density functional theory. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

311

CHEM 475/375 MOLECULAR DYNAMICS** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.) MD simulations of small systems, equilibrium and dynamical properties, timedependent phenomena. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 476/376 CHEMICAL APPLICATION OF GROUP THEORY Symmetry, matrix representation of groups, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules, molecular vibrations, molecular orbitals. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 477/377 STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS Ensembles, partition functions, application to thermodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 479/379 CURRENT TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.) Advances and current researches in physical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

ALLIED CHEMISTRY CHEM 481/381 ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Advanced study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fate of chemical species in water, soil, and air environments, and the effects of technology thereon. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 482/382 AQUATIC CHEMISTRY Advanced treatment of the chemistry of natural waters. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 483/383 ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY 312

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of the air environment. Gaseous inorganic and organic pollutants and their reactions. Photochemical smog chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 484/384 FATES OF POLLUTANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT Advanced treatment of the study of the fate of pollutants in air, water, and soil/sediment environments. Literature readings. Modeling. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 485/385 PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL Standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s)

CHEM 485.2/385.2

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None : Chem 485.2 (Principles Laboratory)

of

Water

Quality

Control

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORY

Laboratory experiments covering standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s)

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None : Chem 485 (Principles of Water Quality Control)

CHEM 486/386 ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS Sampling methods, extraction methods, method validation techniques, advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air, water, soil and sediment environments. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (3 hrs lec) None

CHEM 487.2/387.2 ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB I Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in water and wastewater environments. Liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-solid extraction, closedloop stripping, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

2 units (6 hrs lab) None

313

CHEM 488.2/388.2 ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB II Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air and soil/sediment environments. Supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasonic extraction, microwave extraction, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

2 units (6 hrs lab) None

CHEM 489/389 CURRENT TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.) Advances and current researches in environmental chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

1 unit (1 hr lec) None

Ph.D. IN CHEMISTRY (REVISED CURRICULUM) Introduction

314

The Iligan Institute of Technology of the Mindanao State University (MSU-IIT) is mandated to develop the scientific manpower and technical capability of the Mindanao region in order to achieve a speedy economic development of the country. As an academic institution, it must offer and support programs that will bring about the effective fulfillment of its goals. The Commission on Higher Education (CHED) identified it as a Graduate Center for Chemistry under its Mindanao Advanced Education Project (MAEP). As such, it is tasked to help produce the critical mass of scientists in the field of chemistry that will catalyze the development of Mindanao. In 1998, it was identified by CHED as a Center of Excellence (COE) in Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry of MSU-IIT, being one of the academic divisions of the institute, must strive towards the realization of this mandate. One way of achieving this is to offer graduate programs in Chemistry, specifically Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry Program, in addition to its specific tasks of undertaking basic, applied, and mission-oriented researches.

Objective The Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry Program aims to provide advanced training in the Science of Chemistry which will enable the student to conduct an independent investigation of a research problem.

Admission Requirements (1)

Applicants must possess an M.S. Chemistry degree or its equivalent.

(2)

Applicants must submit the following: (a) a completed application form of the MSU-IIT Graduate School; (b) a certified true copy of the Official Transcript of Records; and (c) two letters of recommendations from former lecturers/professors.

(3)

All applications will be evaluated by the Chemistry Graduate Committee. An interview with the applicant may be required in some cases.

Degree Requirements 1.

Courses: A minimum of six (6) total units of course work after the M.S. degree, three (3) units of thesis proposal preparation, four (4) units of seminar presentations, twelve (12) total units of thesis work, and one (1) unit of thesis seminar, are required. The directed research work consists of a laboratory investigation of a research problem leading to the Ph.D. Thesis. The graduate seminars are one (1) unit courses involving the presentation of a research paper arising from library, directed research work, and thesis.

2.

Defense: The student must have successfully defended his/her Ph.D. Thesis.

3.

Publication: In addition to the comprehensive examination requirement, the student must have at least 1 refereed international publication (full length paper) from his/her Directed Research Work or Ph.D. Thesis. No student will be cleared for graduation 315

without showing proof (e.g., galley proof of the paper, or original reprint of the published paper) of the required publication. Acceptability of proofs will be decided upon by the Chemistry Graduate Committee. If all requirements have been met except the publication, the student is required to register in Chem 599 (Ph.D. Thesis) for residency purposes only every term until the publication requirement is complied.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN CHEMISTRY (Ph.D. CHEM) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Cognate 1 Cognate 2 Chem 590

Course Title

Hrs/Wk Lec Lab Total

Units

Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

-

3

3

0

3

None

None

-

3

3

0

3

None

None

3

3

0

3

None

None

9

9

0

9

Ph.D. Thesis Proposal Total

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Chem 591 Chem 598

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

Seminar I

1

1

0

1

None

None

Doctoral Directed Research

0

-

-

-

Chem 590

None

1

1

-

1

Total

Summer 1 An Oral Comprehensive Examination must be applied at the Graduate School by the students after passing Cumulative Exams. Passing the comprehensive exam is a prerequisite for the conduct of the Ph.D. Thesis. The student may retake the PhD comprehensive examination only once; the retake examination must be done within one year of the first try. The student has an option to continue enrolling in Chem 598 (Doctoral Directed Research) in this term Summer 1.

Second Year, First Semester Course No.

Hrs/Wk Course Title

Units

Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s) 316

Chem 598

Doctoral Directed Research

0

-

-

-

Chem 590

None

Chem 592

Seminar II

1

1

0

1

Chem 591

None

1

1

-

1

Total

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Hrs/Wk Course Title

Units

Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s)

Chem 598

Doctoral Directed Research

0

-

-

-

Chem 590

None

Chem 593

Seminar III

1

1

0

1

Chem 592

None

1

1

-

1

Total

Summer 2 The student has an option to continue enrolling in Chem 598 (Doctoral Directed Research) in this term Summer 2.

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Hrs/Wk Course Title

Units

Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s)

Chem 598

Doctoral Directed Research

0

0

-

-

Chem 590

None

Chem 594

Seminar IV

1

1

0

1

Chem 593

None

1

1

-

1

Total

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Hrs/Wk Course Title

Units

Lec Lab Total

Prerequisite(s) Corequisite(s)

317

Doctoral Directed Research Ph. D. Thesis Seminar

Chem 598 Chem 595 Chem 599

Ph. D. Thesis Total

0

0

-

-

Chem 590

None

1

1

0

1

Chem 594

Chem 599

12*

0

-

12

Compre. Exam Chem 595 and Chem 598

13

1

-

13

*credit only, not actual course work.

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CHEMISTRY COGNATE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 421

ELECTROANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Theory and analytical applications of electrochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 422

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Principles and applications of chromatographic methods of analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 423

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

RADIOCHEMICAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Theory and analytical application of radiochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 429

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in analytical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY-BIOCHEMISTRY 318

CHEM 431

CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS

Advances in the chemistry and biosynthesis, isolation techniques, and structure elucidation of natural products. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 432

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

POLYMER CHEMISTRY

Reactions, reaction mechanisms and synthesis of polymers. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 433

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

PHOTOCHEMISTRY

Theory of photochemistry and photoreactions. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 434

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ORGANIC MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

Study of organic compounds that are used as drugs or medicinal agents, their activity, applications, limitations, stability, forms and uses. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 435

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ORGANOMETALLICS

Reaction mechanisms of organometallic compounds and their role in homogeneous catalysis and biochemical processes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

CHEM 439

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in organic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 440

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF BIOMOLECULES

319

Structure and function of biochemical systems, their regulation, biosynthesis and coordinated metabolic pathways. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 442

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

LIPIDS, PROTEINS, AND CARBOHYDRATES

Advances in lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates chemistry. Extraction and separation methods in lipids, proteins and carbohydrate analyses. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 443

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ENZYMES

Enzyme structure and function; allosterism. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of enzyme reactions. Coenzymes, functions and structure. Biochemical reaction mechanisms and their regulation. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 444

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEIC ACIDS

The replication of living organism‘s mutation. Repair mechanisms. development in the biochemistry of nucleosides and nucleic acids. Credit Prerequisite(s)

Recent

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

320

CHEM 449

CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in biochemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY CHEM 451

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of complexes formulated by a central atom or ion surrounded by a set of other atoms, ions, or small molecules. Symmetry groups and molecular symmetry are the main concern of this study. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 452

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

MACROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY

The study of characteristically interesting and unusual macrocyclic ligand systems. Areas of study include the structures and properties of macrocyclic compounds; synthesis; polyether crown and related systems; host-guest chemistry, kinetics; thermodynamics and electrochemical aspects of a range of macrocyclic system. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 453

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

SUPRAMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of intermolecular bond that is concerned with the structure and function of entities formed by the association of two or more molecular or ionic species. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 454

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

BIOINORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Explores the variety of function of metal ions in specific steps that they play in biology. This study includes areas on ion pumps and transport proteins and the biochemical catalysts, metalloenzymes. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 455

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

SOLID STATE CHEMISTRY 321

The current enthusiasm for ―material chemistry‖ has greatly increased the synthesis and study of new inorganic solids. The study covers areas on basic concept of prototypical solid structures, lattice enthalpies, ionic and covalent bonding, intercalation compounds, crystal structures, electronic band structures, xray and neutron diffraction structures. Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec) Prerequisite(s) : None CHEM 459 CURRENT TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.) Advances and current researches in inorganic chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEM 471

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.)

Theorems of quantum mechanics, variational methods, perturbation theory, manyelectron atoms, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 473

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY

Semi-empirical method, molecular mechanics, ab-initio methods, functional theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 475

density

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

MOLECULAR DYNAMICS** (**Or equivalent course in other departments as approved by the Chemistry Graduate Committee.)

MD simulations of small systems, equilibrium and dynamical properties, timedependent phenomena. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 476

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CHEMICAL APPLICATION OF GROUP THEORY

Symmetry, matrix representation of groups, electronic structure of polyatomic molecules, molecular vibrations, molecular orbitals. 322

Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 477

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS

Ensembles, partition functions, application to thermodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 479

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

CURRENT TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY* (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in physical chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

ALLIED CHEMISTRY CHEM 481

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Advanced study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fate of chemical species in water, soil, and air environments, and the effects of technology thereon. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 482

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

AQUATIC CHEMISTRY

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of natural waters. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 483

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Advanced treatment of the chemistry of the air environment. Gaseous inorganic and organic pollutants and their reactions. Photochemical smog chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

323

CHEM 484

FATE OF POLLUTANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

Advanced treatment of the study of the fate of pollutants in air, water, and soil/sediment environments. Literature readings. Modeling. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 485

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL

Standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 485.2

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

PRINCIPLES OF WATER QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORY

Laboratory experiments covering standard methods of chemical analysis to determine the quality of water and wastewater. Credit Corequisite(s) CHEM 486

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : Chem 385 (Principles of Water Quality Control)

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS

Sampling methods, extraction methods, method validation techniques, advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air, water, soil and sediment environments. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 487.2

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : None

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB I

Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in waterand wastewater environments. Liquid-liquid extraction, liquid-solid extraction, closedloop stripping, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 488.2

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None

ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS LAB II

Advanced instrumental analysis of environmental contaminants in air and soil/sediment environments. Supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasonic extraction, microwave extraction, etc. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (6 hrs lab) : None

324

CHEM 489

CURRENT TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (*May be enrolled three times for a maximum of 3 units.)

Advances and current researches in environmental chemistry. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 590

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

Ph.D. THESIS PROPOSAL

An adviser-guided preparation and writing of the student's Ph.D. Thesis proposal. The output at the end of the semester should be a bound copy successfully defended before the student's Thesis Guidance Committee. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 591

: 3 units : None

SEMINAR I

A journal paper seminar presentation of a research paper from recent issues of scientific journals. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 592

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : None

SEMINAR II

A journal paper seminar presentation of a research paper from recent issues of scientific journals in different areas being covered in Chem 591. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 593

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : Chem 591

SEMINAR III

A journal paper seminar presentation of a research paper from recent issues of scientific journals in different areas being covered in Chem 591 and Chem 592. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 594

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : Chem 592

SEMINAR IV

A journal paper seminar presentation of a research paper from recent issues of scientific journals in different areas being covered in Chem 591, Chem 592 and Chem 593. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 595

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : Chem 593

Ph.D. THESIS SEMINAR 325

Seminar presentation of the doctoral dissertation. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 598

: 1 unit (1 hr lec) : Chem 594

DOCTORAL DIRECTED RESEARCH

An adviser-guided laboratory investigation of a research problem leading to the Ph.D. Thesis/Dissertation. Requires research proposal, experimentation, and final report as the outputs. Credit Prerequisite(s) CHEM 599

: 0 unit (xth hrs lab) : Chem 590 (Ph.D. Thesis Proposal)

Ph.D. THESIS

A scientific investigation of an original research problem. Requires at least one (1) publication of research in international journal (ISI journals) of whole or in part of the thesis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 12 units (credit only, not actual course work) : Chem 590 (Ph.D. Thesis Proposal) Chem 598 (Doctoral Directed Research) Passing the Written Comprehensive Exam

326

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Almeda, Ma. Cecilia V.

MS Chemistry (Analytical/Organic Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 1986 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1999

2 Anonas, Manuelita S.

MS Chemistry (Biochemistry), UP-Diliman, 1993 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1981

3 Bajo, Lydia M.

Ph.D. Chemistry (Biochemistry), UP-Los Baños, 2000 MS Biochemistry, MSU-IIT, 1994 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1983

4 Cabanos, Luisita S.

MS Chemistry (Biochemistry), Up-Diliman, 1991 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1981

5 Capangpangan, Mario B.

Ph.D. Chemistry (Environmental/Analytical Chemistry), Drexel Univ., 1996 MS Environmental Science, Drexel Univ., 1981 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1975

6 Creencia, Evelyn C.

MS Chemistry (Biochemistry), UP-Diliman, 1991 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1979

7 Gultiano, Analyn U.

MS Chemistry (Analytical Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 2008 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1999

8 Ignacio, Edgar W., Ph.D.

Ph.D. Chemistry (Physical Chemistry), Wayne State University, 1991 MS Physical Chemistry, UP-Diliman, 1983 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1978

9 Inutan, Ellen dlV.

MS Chemistry (Analytical/Physical Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 2001 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1994

10 Laviña, Jessica dlC.

MS Chemistry (Analytical/Inorganic Chemistry), ADMU, 1977 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1973

11 Mahinay, Myrna S., Ph.D.

Ph.D. Chemistry (Inorganic Chemistry), James Cook University of North Queenland, 1997 MS Chemistry (Inorganic Chemistry), UP-Diliman, 1985 BS Chemistry, Silliman University, 1978

327

12 Malmis, Conmar C.

MS Chemistry (Biochemistry), MSU-IIT, 2008 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT

13 Ochotorena, Zenaida L.

Ph.D. Chemistry (Analytical Chemistry), Michigan State University, 1978 MAT Chemistry, UP-Diliman, 1968 BS Chemistry, University of San Carlos, 1961

14 Peteros, Nonita P.

MS Chemistry (Organic Chemistry/Natural Products Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 1997 BS Chemistry, University of San Carlos, 1978

15 Pinzon, Lunesa C.

MS Chemistry (Organic Chemistry/Natural Products Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 1995 BS Chemistry, Silliman University, 1977

16 Rivera, Anita P.

MS Chemistry (Biochemistry), University of San Carlos, 1986 BS Pharmacy,University of San Carlos, 1977

17 Salazar, Myrna H.

MS Chemistry (Biochemistry), UP-Diliman, 1989 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1977

18 Salvaña, Conception M.

MS Chemistry (Organic Chemistry/Natural Products Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 1995 BS Chemistry, MSU-Marawi, 1981

19 Samson, Jesusima V.

MS Chemistry (Electroorganic/Analytical Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 1996 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1984 MS Chemistry (Analytical Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 2001 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1986

20 Tenido, Felipa Gisela dL.

21 Uy, Mylene M., D.Sc.

D.Sc. (Biological Science), Hiroshima University, 2005 MS Chemistry (Organic/Natural Products Chemistry), MSU-IIT, 1999 BS Chemistry, MSU-IIT, 1991

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 328

MASTER OF MATHEMATICS Introduction More than ten years of implementation of the Master of Science in Mathematics (MS MATH) program reveals that many applicants seeking for admission to the program have inadequate preparation for graduate mathematics. These applicants have either Bachelor‘s degree from related disciplines and who decide to pursue a degree in mathematics because of their present occupation such as teaching tertiary mathematics or applicants with degree in a mathematics curriculum who has insufficient mathematics components towards a standard MS Math program. Admitted to the MS Mathematics program under conditional status, these type of applicants are required to undertake a one or two semesters of undergraduate advance mathematics coursework, many are not able to acquire the necessary maturity to tackle mathematics courses in the MS Math curriculum. Having no other options provided by the Mathematics Department, the student would either stay another year of transition courses or leave the MS Math program. To prevent wastage in educating the prospective tertiary mathematics teachers and to make graduate offerings more flexible, the Mathematics Department designed a masteral degree curriculum that provides advanced training for teaching tertiary mathematics which can also be used by students as a qualifying degree for MS Math.

Objectives 1. 2.

To provide training in Mathematics concepts for high school or tertiary teaching up to the level of calculus; To serve as post baccalaureate qualifying degree for a standard MS Mathematics curriculum.

Admission Requirement An applicant for the Master of Mathematics program must have: 1.

2. 3. 4.

A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, science, science education, engineering or other related disciplines with at least 24 units of Mathematics including the standard calculus sequence; an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.0; Two letters of recommendation from two former professors attesting to the applicant‘s intellectual capacity for advance studies; and Must comply with the general admission requirements of the university and the MSU-IIT Graduate School.

Degree Requirement 329

Core Courses Major Courses/Electives Seminar Course Comprehensive Examination Special Project Total

18 units 12 3 _ 3_ 36 unit

MASTER OF MATHEMATICS (MOM) (LISTOF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Math 208 Math 225.1

Course Title

Units

Advanced Calculus I

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

3

Fund. of Abstract Algebra I Math Elective Total

3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Math 209 Math 225.2 Math 221.1

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Course Title

Units

Advanced Calculus II

3

Math 208

3

Math 225.1

Fund. of Abstract Algebra II Fund. of Linear Algebra I Total

Lec

Pre-requisite(s)

3 9

First Year, Summer Course No. Math 210

Course Title

Units

Advanced Calculus III

3

Math Elective

3 6

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s) Math 209

Second Year, First Semester Course

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Pre-requisite(s) 330

Lec

No. Seminar on Math 297 Selected Topics Math230/ Statistical Methods Stat 201 Total

Lab

Total

3 3 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Math 299

Math elective Special Project Total

3 3 6

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 36

CATALOGUE OF COURSES MATH 201

LOGIC AND SET THEORY

331

Sets; relations, mappings; equivalence, order; cardinals, ordinals, transfinite arithmetic; axiom of choice and its equivalents; the generalized continuum hypothesis. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 204

: 3 units : Undergraduate set theory or consent of Instructor

TRANSFORMATION GEOMETRY

Euclidean Geometry is studied using transformations. Topics: properties of transformations, translations and halfturns,reflections, congruence, the product of 2 reflections , even isometries,plane isometries,equation for isometries,frieze groups wallpaper groups , tessellation‘s, similarities on the plane, affine transformations , transformation in R3 , space and symmetry. Credits MATH 205

: 3 units GEOMETRIC STRUCTURES

Axiomatic and intuitive studies of geometries, Euclidean Geometry, NonEuclidean geometries, projective geometries, Hilbert‘s Axioms. Credits MATH 206

: 3 units ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY

Peano‘s Axoims, properties of the natural numbers, the system of integers as a well-ordered integral domain, Euclidean Algorithm, unique factorization theorem, prime numbers, congruences, residue class rings, quadratic reciprocity. Others topics. Credits MATH 208

: 3 units ADVANCED CALCULUS I

Topics: set and functions, topology of Rn: compact sets, the Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem, Heine-Borel Theorem; Monotone Sequence Property of R, Cauchy sequences; continuity, uniform continuity, properties of continuous functions, limits of functions, discontinuities; differentiation of real-valued Theorem and L‘Hospital‘s rule, Taylor‘s Theorem; integration of functions of R2, properties of integrals, change of variables, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, improper integrals. Credits

MATH 209

: 3 units

ADVANCED CALCULUS II

Contents: Continuation of Math 208. Topics: infinite series of constant terms , convergence tests , rearrangement of series ,double series ; sequence and series of functions , uniform convergence ,Weierstrass test , uniform convergence theorem for the Riemann integral , a continuous nowhere monotone function , a continuous 332

nowhere differentiable function ,Tietze‘s Extension Theorem , power series , integrals with parameters , the Gamma function , Fourier series ; differentiation of vector-valued functions , local approximation ,the Mean-Value Theorem , The Inverse Function Theorem , The Implicit Function Theorem,functional dependence. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 210

: 3 units : Math 208

ADVANCED CALCULUS III

Contents: Derivatives of set functions , change of variables for multiple integrals ; curves and arc lenght,surface and surface area , integration over curves and surfaces ; differential forms , integration of differential forms , the theorems of Green , Gauss , Stokes ,exact forms and the Poincare Lemma ; introduction to numerical methods: locating zeroes , fixed point methods, extremal problems , approximation. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 221.1

: 3 units : Math 209

FUNDAMENTALS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA I

Matrices & system of linear equations, real vector spaces, linear transformation and matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 221.2

: 3 units : Undergraduate calculus courses or consent of instructor

FUNDAMENTALS OF LINEAR ALGEBRA II

Linear functional, bilinear and quadratic forms, canonical forms, dual spaces, product spaces, orthogonal and unitary transformations, spectral theorem. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 225.1

: 3 units : Math 221.1

FUNDAMENTALS OF ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I

Binary operations, groups, subgroups, mapping, permutations, groups of permutations, cyclic groups, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, automorphisms, Cayley‘s theorem, direct products, cosets, groups of cosets, normal subgroups, factor groups, simple groups, Sylow‘s theorems. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 225.2

: 3 units : Undergraduate calculus courses & Math 201

FUNDAMENTALS OF ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II 333

Rings, subrings, fields, integral domains, fermat‘s theorem, homomorphisms of rings, ideals, quotient rings, field of quotient of an integral domain, maximal and prime ideals, prime fields, rings of polynomials, factorization of polynomials over a field, unique factorization domain, Euclidean domains extension fields, geometric construction and splitting fields, Galois theory. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 212

: 3 units : Math 225.1

REAL ANALYSIS I

The real number system; lebesque measure and integration; differentiation; metric spaces and topological vector spaces; Stone-Weirstrass theorem. Credits MATH 214

: 3 units INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Solution of linear systems; least square approximations, non-linear algebraic equations interpolations and quadrature. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 216

: 3 units : Linear Algebra I and consent of instructor

COMPLEX ANALYSIS I

The comples number system; complex integration and differentiation; Cauchy's theorems; analytic functions and harmonic functions; conformal mappings; infinite series; singularities; residue theory. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 223

: 3 units : Undergraduate complex analysis or consent of instructor.

LINEAR PROGRAMMING

The simplex method; duality; geometry of linear programs; dual simplex method; parametric programming; integer programming; network analysis including PERT-CPM; algorithms for linear programming; decomposition and upper-bound technique. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 230

: 3 units : Linear algebra

STATISTICAL METHODS

This is a survey course in basic statistical methods which includes broad topics on frequency distribution; measures of central tendency, dispersion, kurtosis, skewness, association and relationship; sampling and theoretical distributions,

334

estimation; tests of hypothesis; one-way ANOVA and some non-parametric methods. Credits MATH 231

: 3 units

PROBABILITY THEORY

Probability spaces; probability distributions; Random variables; independence; conditional expectation; weak and strong laws of large numbers; moment generating functions; central limit theorem. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 250

: 3 units : Real Analysis or consent of instructor

MODERN GEOMETRY

Skewfields and fields; permutation groups; classical projective planes; dual spaces and homogeneous coordinates; cross ratio; polarities; conics; elementary properties of projective and affine planes; duality principles; coordination of projective and affine planes. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 251

: 3 units : Linear Algebra I

ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Existence, uniqueness, and dependence theorems; linear systems; stability of nonlinear systems; perturbation of periodic solutions; Poincare-Bendixson theory; equations in banach space. Credits Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Linear Algebra I & Real Analysis I or consent of instructor

335

MATH 261

TOPOLOGY I

Topological spaces; continuous functions, product spaces and quotient spaces; convergence structures (nets and filters); separation axioms and countability properties; connectedness; metrizable spaces. Credits Prerequisite(s)

MATH 270

: 3 units : Undergraduate courses in set theory/and advanced calculus, or consent of instructor.

COMBINATORIAL MATHEMATICS

Permutations and combinations; generating functions; principles of inclusiond and exclusion; recurrence relations; matrices of zeros and ones; partition function. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 275

: 3 units : Modern Algebra I and instructor's consent

GRAPH THEORY

Graphs and associated matrices; oriented graphs and kernels; domination and independence; matching theory; groups and graphs. Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 297

: 3 units : Linear Algebra I and Modern algebra I

SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS

This is a seminar on topics of mathematical disciplines not included among those specified in mathematics course numbered 288 to 296 above. This course may be repeated provided course contents are different. Credits MATH 298

: 3 units INDEPENDENT STUDY

Credits Prerequisite(s) MATH 299

: 3 units : Adviser‘s consent

SPECIAL PROJECT

Credits

: 3 units

336

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS Introduction The M.S. in Mathematics program is primarily designed to upgrade mathematics training of college teachers in the teaching profession as well as to cater the mathematics needs of those in other profession related to mathematics.

Objectives 1. Provide one a career in teaching mathematics and prepare him for doctoral work in mathematics. 2. Provide students a good initial know-how in research and motivate them to participate in some research endeavors in mathematics.

Admission Requirements 1. 2.

Must undergo an evaluation test in Advanced Calculus, Algebraic Structures, Finite Mathematics or their equivalents. In case a student has deficiencies, he/she needs to take some undergraduate courses. These courses will be determined by the Department of Mathematics. A passing mark not below 2.5 is required in each of these courses.

Degree Requirements 1.

2.

3.

The MS Mathematics Program requires a minimum of 36 units of course work which include 18 units of three of the four sequential courses, 12 units of mathematics electives and 6 units of thesis work. The masteral thesis should be a contribution to the field. However, in practice, due to the difference in students‘ capabilities in doing research work, thesis output may either contributory to the field or expository in nature (thesis substitute). In the latter case, the student should take 6 units of math courses other than the required electives and must be of levels higher than the three sequential courses. These substitute courses of 6 units are in a way, preparatory courses for a doctoral program. The student will be required to demonstrate his grasp of fundamentals by taking comprehensive examination in two of the three sequential courses. The comprehensive examination may be repeated once within a span of one year. Failure to pass in the second attempt will mean disqualification from the program. The examination, if needed, may be taken only in areas of failure.

337

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS (MS MATH) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Math 212 Math 225

Course Title

Units

Real Analysis I Modern Algebra I Math Elective Total

3 3 3 9

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Math 213 Math 226N Math 221

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

Real Analysis II

3

Math 212

Modern Algebra II

3

Math 225

Linear Algebra I Total

3 9

First Year, Summer Course No. Math 261

Course Title

Units

Math Elective Topology I Total

3 3 6

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Math 222/ 262

Course Title Linear Algebra II/ Topology II Math Elective Comprehensive Examinations Total

Units 3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s) Math 221 or 261

3

6

338

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Math 300

Course Title

Units

Master‘s Thesis Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

6 6

Note: Student should take additional six (6) units of math courses higher than those courses required if the thesis is expository in nature. TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS:

36 42

(if thesis is original) (if thesis is expository)

CATALOGUE OF COURSES MATH 212

REAL ANALYSIS I

The real number system; Lévesque measure and integration; differentiation; metric spaces and topological vector spaces; Stone-Weirstrass theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 213

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

REAL ANALYSIS II

This is a continuation of Real Analysis I. Topics include classical Banach spaces and topics in general measure and integration theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 214

: 3 units : Math 212

INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Solution of linear systems; least square approximations, non-linear algebraic equations interpolations and quadrature. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 121 and instructor‘s consent

MATH 214N, 215N NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I, II Iterative methods of solving equations, linear difference equations, application to solutions of polynomial equations, difference and integral formulas; minimal solution to ordinary differential equation; round-off error bounds Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Numerical Methods

339

MATH 215

INTRODUCTION TO APPROXIMATION THEORY

Normed linear spaces; convexity; existence and unicity of best approximations; Tchebycheff approximation by polynomial and other related families; least square approximation and related topics; rational approximation. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 216

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

COMPLEX ANALYSIS I

The complex number system; complex integration and differentiation; Cauchy's theorems; analytic functions and harmonic functions; conformal mappings; infinite series; singularities; residue theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 217

: 3 units : Math 116 or instructor‘s consent

COMPLEX ANALYSIS II

This a continuation of Complex Analysis I. Topics include Poison integral formula and its applications; inverse functions; analytic continuation; entire functions; infinite products; Hadamard factorization theorem; families of analytic functions; the prime number theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 218

: 3 units : Math 216

MEASURE THEORY

Measure spaces; Radon-Nikodym theorem; LP spaces; inner and outer measures; Tonelli's and Fubini's theorems, Daniell integral, mappings of measure spaces; Hear measure; ergodic theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 221

: 3 units : Math 213

LINEAR ALGEBRA I

Vector spaces; basis; subspaces; linear transformations; matrices; systems of linear equations; Hermite normal form; determinants; adjoint; elgenvalues; Hamilton-Cayle theorem; Jordan normal form; linear functional. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 222

: 3 units : Math 121, Math 116 or instructor‘s consent

LINEAR ALGEBRA II

340

This is a continuation of Linear Algebra I. Topics include linear functionals; bilinear forms; inner product spaces; orthogonal and unitary transformations; Gram - Schmidt orthogonalization process; Linear programming. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 223

: 3 units : Math 221

LINEAR PROGRAMMING

The simplex method; duality; geometry of linear programs; dual simplex method; parametric programming; integer programming; network analysis including PERT-CPM; algorithms for linear programming; decomposition and upper-bound technique. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 224

: 3 units : Math 221

NON-LINEAR PROGRAMMING

Properties of convex sets and functions; constrained and unconstrained optimization; Kuhn-Tucker conditions; quadratic programming; convex programming; saddle-point theorems; algorithms for non-linear programming. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 225

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

MODERN ALGEBRA I

Groups; permutation groups; Lagrange's theorem; Cayley's theorem;isomorphism theorems; correspondence theorem; Sylow's theorems; Remark-Krull-Schmidt theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 226N

: 3 units : Undergraduate modern algebra course or instructor‘s Consent

MODERN ALGEBRA II

Rings and ideals; extension fields; Galois theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 227

: 3 units : Math 225

THEORY OF RINGS

Rings and ideals, prime and maximal ideals; nilradical and Jacobson radical, modules projective, injective, flat modules, Rhoetherian and Arthinian rings. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 225 341

MATH 228

LATTICE THEORY

Partially ordered sets; lattices; complete modular and distributive lattices; applications. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 229

: 3 units : Undergraduate set theory or instructor's consent.

THEORY OF GROUPS

Abelian groups; finite groups; solvable groups; free groups; infinite abelian groups; group representations. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 230

: 3 units : Math 225

STATISTICAL METHODS

This is a survey course in basic statistical methods which includes broad topics on frequency distribution; measures of central tendency, dispersion, kurtosis, skewness, association and relationship; sampling and theoretical distributions, estimation; tests of hypothesis; one-way ANOVA and some non-parametric methods Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 231

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

PROBABILITY THEORY

Probability spaces; probability distributions; Random variables; independence; conditional expectation; weak and strong laws of large numbers; moment generating functions; central limit theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 232

: 3 units : Math 218 or instructor‘s consent

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I

Sampling theory; asymptotic sampling theory for large samples; order statistics; linear statistical estimation; parametric and nonparametric statistical estimation; statistical hypotheses and statistical tests; sequential analysis; decision theory. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 231

342

MATH 233

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II

Linear regression and correlation; multiple regression; polynomial regression; analysis of variance; fixed-effect model; random effects model; randomized block designs; factorial experiments. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 234

: 3 units : Math 232

INTEGER PROGRAMMING AND COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION

Applications of integer programming; converging and primal cutting plane algorithms; branch-bound methods; transportation problem; application of graph theory and mathematical programming. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 235

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

INTRODUCTION TO STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Markov chains, their basic theorems and applications; renewal theory; branching processes; queuing theory; birth and death processes; branching processes; Poison processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 236

: 3 units : Math 231 or Instructor‘s consent

CATEGORY THEORY

Categories, functions; natural transformations; representable functions and limits of diagrams; adjoint functions and limits of diagrams; adjoint function; Abelian and homological categories. Credit Prerequisite(s)

MATH 242

: 3 units : Undergraduate set theory and Math 226 or instructor‘s consent

APPLIED DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

Deterministic dynamic programming; probabilistic dynamic programming; applications of dynamic programming forward and backward recursion; continuous state dynamic programming; multiple state variables. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 223

343

MATH 243

QUEUING THEORY

Stochastic models of waiting lines and related systems, classification of queuing; designs; parametric description of queues; optimal control of queues; applications Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 244

: 3 units : Math 235 or instructor‘s consent

NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA

Computer aspects with linear algebra; linear equation and matrices, direct and iterative methods, eigenvalues and eigenvectors with matrices, error analysis Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 250

: 3 units : Linear Algebra

MODERN GEOMETRY

Skewfields and fields; permutation groups; classical projective planes; dual spaces and homogeneous coordinates; cross ratio; polarities; conics; elementary properties of projective and affine planes; duality principles; coordination of projective and affine planes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 251

: 3 units : Math 221

ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Existence, uniqueness, and dependence theorems; linear systems; stability of nonlinear systems; perturbation of periodic solutions; Poincare-Bendixson theory; equations in Banach space. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 252

: 3 units : Math 221 & Math 212 or instructor‘s consent

PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Existence and uniqueness theory in partial differential equations; generalized solutions and convergence of approximate solutions to partial differential systems; elliptic, hypo-elliptic, and hyperbolic operators. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 221 & Math 212 or instructor‘s consent

344

MATH 253

NUMERICAL EQUATIONS

SOLUTIONS

TO

ORDINARY

DIFFERENTIAL

Numerical solution to initial value problems by Runge Kutta methods, general one-step methods and multi-step methods; analysis of truncation error; discretization error and rounding error; stability of multi-step methods; numerical solution of boundary and eigenvalue problems by initial value problem techniques and finite difference methods Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 255

: 3 units : Math 214n

INTRODUCTION TO DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

Discrete dynamical systems: orbit analysis, bifurcations, symbolic analysis, chaos, fractals; continuous dynamical systems: trajectories of ordinary differential equations, Poincare-Bendixon Theory Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 256

: 3 units : Math 81 and Csc 11 or equivalent

INTRODUCTION TO FRACTAL GEOMETRY

Metric topology, complete metric spaces, Hausdorf metric, shift maps, iterative function systems, fractal sets, Hausdorf measure and Hausdorf dimension, Cantor sets and Cantor functions, Sierpinski carpets, Koch curves, Peano space-filling curves, introduction to fractal measures. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 257

: 3 units : Math 112 and Csc11 or equivalent

NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS TO PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

Numerical solution with hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic equations by finite difference methods; iterative methods for solving elliptic equations, discretization and round-off errors; implicit and explicit methods for parabolic and hyperbolic systems, the method of characteristics, the concept of stability for initial value problems Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 261

: 3 units : Math 215n

TOPOLOGY I

Topological spaces; continuous functions, product spaces and quotient spaces; convergence structures (nets and filters); separation axioms and countability properties; connectedness; metrizable spaces. Credit

: 3 units 345

Prerequisite(s)

MATH 262

: Undergraduate courses in set theory & advanced calculus or intructor‘s consent

TOPOLOGY II

This is a continuation of Topology I. Topics include completeness, connectedness, uniform spaces, proximity spaces. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 263

: 3 units : Math 261

INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY

The homotopy relation; the fundamental group and higher homotopy groups; complexes, polytapes and their homology groups; cohomology; Lofschatz's fixedpoint theorem; the Brouwer fixed-point theorem, mappings of spheres. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 264

: 3 units : Math 262, Math 225 & instructor‘s consent

INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL TOPOLOGY

Differentiatable manifolds; tangent bundles; vector fields; differential forms; selected topics. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 265

: 3 units : Math 262, Math 213, & Math 221

THEORY OF PROXIMITY SPACES

Proximity spaces, compactifications; clusters and grills; uniform spaces; generalized uniform structures. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 266

: 3 units : Topology II

ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY

Homology and cohomology theories; homotopy theory, and applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Introduction to Algebraic Topology

346

MATH 270

COMBINATORIAL MATHEMATICS

Permutations and combinations; generating functions; principles of inclusion and exclusion; recurrence relations; matrices of zeros and ones; partition function. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 275

: 3 units : Math 225 Instructor's consent

GRAPH THEORY

Graphs and associated matrices; oriented graphs and kernels; domination and independence; matching theory; groups and graphs. Credit Prerequisite(s)

MATH 276

: 3 units : Math 221 and Math 225 or Instructor‘s consent

THEORY OF HYPERGRAPHS

Conformal and representable graphs; sums and products of hyper graphs; cycles; symmetry; regularity and colorability or hypergraphs. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 277

: 3 units : Math 275

FINITE GRAPHS AND NETWORKS

Basic graph theory and applications to optional path problems; flows in networks; combinatorial problems. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 281

: 3 units : Math 275

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS I

Topological vector spaces; Banach spaces; Hilbert spaces; Hanh-Banach theorem; duality; linear bounded operators; spectral theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 282

: 3 units : Math 213 or instructor‘s consent

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS II

This is a continuation of Functional Analysis I. Topics include distributions and Fourier transforms; unbound operators. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 281

347

MATH 284

COMPUTER MODELLING AND SIMULATION

Techniques for computer modeling and simulation, inputs, driving function, errors, outputs, interactive simulation as applied to physical system and analysis performance, queuing models and discrete event simulation introduced via problem solving approach to enable the student to apply the techniques in real life situations. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 290

SEMINAR IN ANALYSIS

Credit Prerequisite(s)

MATH 291

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

SEMINAR IN GRAPH THEORY / COMBINATORICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 295

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

SEMINAR IN PROBABILITY THEORY AND MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 294

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

SEMINAR IN ALGEBRA

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 293

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

SEMINAR IN FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 292

: 3 units : Programming and Numerical Methods

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

SEMINAR IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

348

MATH 296

SEMINAR IN TOPOLOGY

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 297

SEMINAR ON SELECTED TOPICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 298

Credit

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 300

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

: 3 units : Adviser‘s consent

MASTER‘S THESIS : 6 units

349

MASTER IN APPLIED STATISTICS Introduction The Master in Applied Statistics programs is designed primarily for non-BS Math or Statistics graduates but are practitioners of Statistics, with the objective to provide strong foundation in statistical methods and competence in using Statistical software. As a professional program in Statistics, it offers adequate theory and training of the different statistical procedures which is enhanced through actual data gathering and analysis through the use of computers.

Objectives 1. 2.

Provide a strong foundation in statistical methods; Introduce the methods for computing and data management

Admission Requirements 1. 2. 3.

Bachelor's degree or its equivalent from a recognized institution of higher learning. An adequate background in mathematics as determined by the Graduate Committee. Other requirements as provided by the School of Graduate Studies Academic rules and regulations.

Degree Requirements 1. 2.

Complete a total of 39 units of course work which include 26 units of core course, 3 units elective, 4 units of seminar courses and 6 units of thesis work. Successful defense of a thesis which is a research work on application of methods and evaluation of the methods used.

350

MASTER IN APPLIED STATISTICS (MAS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Stat 201

Course Title

Statistical Methods I Statistical Stat 221N Computing Stat 231 Statistical Theory Total

Units

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3

3

Lec 3

3

2

1

3

3 9

3 8

0 1

3 9

Prerequisite(s)

Stat 220

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Stat 252 Stat 242 Stat 232

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 1 3

Course Title

Units

Statistical Method II Sampling Techniques

3

Lec 2

3

3

0

3

Statistical Inference

3

3

0

3

3

3

0

3

12

11

1

12

Stat Elective Total

Prerequisite(s) Stat 201 Stat 201 and Stat 231 Stat 201 and Stat 231

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Stat 243 Stat 256 Stat 258 Stat 290

Course Title Data Collection and Management Statistical Methods III Multivariate Methods Seminar Course in Stat I Total

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

2

1

1

2

Stat 201

3

2

1

3

Stat 252

3

2

1

3

Stat 252

2

0

0

0

10

5

3

8

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Stat 300 Stat 291

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 0

Course Title

Units

Master's Thesis Seminar Course in Stat II Total

6

Lec 0

2

0

0

0

8

0

0

0

Pre-requisite(s)

351

COURSES OFFERED Stat 201 Stat 231 Stat 221 Stat 232 Stat 252 Stat 256 Stat 242 Stat 223 Stat 258 Stat 290 Stat 291 Stat 300

Statistical Methods Statistical Theory I Statistical Computing Statistical Inference Statistical Methods II (Regression & Correlation Analysis) Statistical Methods III (Experimental Designs) Sampling Techniques Data Collection and Management Multivariate Methods Seminar Course in Stat I Seminar Course in Stat II Master‘s Thesis

Stat Electives (6 units) Stat 243 Stat 244 Stat 226 Stat 227 Stat 236

Time Series Analysis Non-Parametric Statistical Techniques Categorical Data Analysis Exploratory Data Analysis Stochastic Processes

CATALOGUE OF COURSES STAT 200

MATHEMATICS IN STATISTICS

This course is intended for those who do not meet the mathematics admission requirement of the program. It covers topics on differential calculus, integral, calculus, and matrices. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 201

: 5 units : Instructor‘s consent

STATISTICAL METHODS 1

This is a survey course in basic statistical methods which includes broad topics on frequency distribution; measures of central tendency, dispersion, kurtosis, skewness, association and relationship; sampling and theoretical distributions, estimation; tests of hypothesis; one-way ANOVA and some non-parametric methods. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 220

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

STATISTICAL COMPUTING 352

Introduction to computers and its operating system; principles of programming, DOS program, statistical programming with familiarization to available statistical softwares. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 221N

: 3 units (2 units lec/1unit lab) : Adviser‘s consent

STATISTICAL COMPUTING

Computer programming using any high level language (Pascal, Fortran, Basic, C, etc.) Programming in SAS, SPSS, and other statistical softwares. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 231

: 3 units (2 units lec/1unit lab) : Stat 220 or adviser‘s consent

STATISTICAL THEORY

This is a course on introductory probability with applications which includes the basic probability structure, the concept of random variables, distribution function, the treatment of expectation and introduction of some special distributions such as binomial, poisson, etc. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 232

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

STATISTICAL INFERENCE

This course involves foundation topics of inference such as methods of estimation, hypothesis testing, and sampling distribution. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 233

BIOSTATISTICS

Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 236

: 3 units : Stat 201 and Stat 231

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Markov Chains, transition and absolute probabilities, irreducible Markov Chains, stationary stochastic sequences, Markov processes, discontinuous and continuous transitions, non-Markovian processes, stationary and stochastic processes. Credits STAT 242

: 3 units SAMPLING TECHNIQUES

353

Simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, ratio estimators, regression estimators, systematic sampling, single-stage cluster sampling, two-stage cluster sampling. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 243

: 3 units : Stat 201 and Stat 231

DATA COLLECTION AND MANAGEMENT

This course includes the study of sample survey design; planning a survey;

preparation of questionnaires; processing a data and preparation of reports. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 252

: 2 units : Stat 201

STATISTICAL METHODS II

This course is a sequel to Statistical Methods I and covers topics in regression analysis and introduction to time series analysis. Regression analysis includes topics on simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, selecting the best regression and regression diagnostics. Time series analysis includes topics on exponential smoothing, introduction to Box-Jenkins method and forecasting. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 253

: 3 units : Stat 201

TIME SERIES ANALYSIS

Time series, stationary time series, autocorrelation, moving average process, autoregressive time series, prediction, estimation for moving average and autoregressive time series, regression, trend and seasonality, Box-Jenkins methodology, forecasting. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 255

: 2 units : Stat 252 and Stat 231

CATEGORICAL DATA ANALYSIS

Categorical data, cross-classification tables, analysis using log-linear and logic models; casual analysis, incomplete cross-classified tables. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 256

: 3 units : Stat 252

STATISTICAL METHODS III

354

This is an introductory course in experimental designs. It covers topics on principles of experimentation, complete randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, latin-square design and other designs. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 257

: 3 units (2 units lec/1 unit lab) : Stat 252

EXPLORATORY DATA ANALYSIS

Displaying and summarizing batches; re-expressing data, analyzing two and threeway tables, robust and resistant measures, regression. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 258

: 3 units (2 units lec/1 unit lab) : Stat 252

MULTIVARIATE METHODS

This is an introductory course in multivariate methods that includes matrix operations in multivariate data, multivariate normal distribution, inferences in multivariate data and multivariate techniques such as principal component analysis, factor analysis, discriminant and classification analysis and clustering. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 262

: 3 units (2 units lec/1 unit lab) : Stat 252

NON-PARAMETRIC STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES

Binomial Test, Chi-squared one sample test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov one sample test, one sample Runs test, sign test, Wilcoxon matched pairs, rank test, median test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov two sample test, Wald-Wolfowitz run test, Cochran‘s Q test. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 271

: 3 units : Stat 231

SPECIAL TOPICS IN STATISTICS

This course includes any topic of interest in Statistics which are not listed as regular course. This course maybe taken more than once provided that different topics are discussed. Credits Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Instructor‘s consent

355

STAT 290

SEMINAR COURSE IN STATISTICS I

This course is designed to introduce the students to topics that are not covered in other statistics courses. It requires the student to attend and participate in Statistics seminars. Credits Prerequisite(s)

STAT 291

: 2 units : Instructors consent

SEMINAR COURSE IN STATISTICS II

This is the course in which the student prepares and presents his/her thesis proposal. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 300

: 2 units : Instructor‘s consent

MASTER‘S THESIS

This is a research work on the application of statistical methods and evaluation of the methods used. Credits

: 6 units

356

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN STATISTICS Introduction The M.S. Statistics program is the first and so far the only such degree program being offered in the Mindanao and Visayas regions. It is especially designed to provide the knowledge, skills and training one needs in professionalizing his career in statistics and is a prerequisite program for those who intend to pursue a doctorate in statistics. A two-year degree program, the M.S. Statistics covers in-depth studies in statistical theories and concepts coupled with actual field surveys and use of statistical software.

Objectives 1.

Develop a new breed of intellectuals to initiate and promote the growth of statistics, which is an indispensable tool for research and development, in this region.

2.

Provide government agencies and industries with employees who are competent to handle sensitive tasks such as: evaluate government programs, formulate policies, and conduct researches.

Admission Requirements In addition to the requirements of the University for admission into the Graduate School, an applicant must possess a baccalaureate degree in either mathematics or statistics, or must be able to satisfy the minimum requirements as determined by the Graduate Committee.

Degree Requirements The student must: 1. complete a total of 36 units of approved coursework which includes 6 units of master's thesis; 2. pass the comprehensive examination in all core and required courses which the exam must be taken after successful completion of all the core and required courses; and 3. defend a thesis successfully.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN STATISTICS (MS STAT) 357

(LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Stat 331 Stat 342 Stat 325

Course Title

Units

Theory of Probability Sampling Designs Statistical Computing I Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

3

3

0

3

Math 112

3

3

0

3

2

1

3

4

Stat 131 Math 108 or CSc 11

8

7

3

10

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Stat 332 Stat 351 Stat Elective

Course Title

Units

Theory of Statistical Inference Linear Models

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

3

3

0

3

Stat 331

3

3

0

3

Stat 132

3

3

0

3

Stat 331

9

9

0

9

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Stat 358 Stat Elective Stat Elective Stat 398

Course Title

Units

Multivariate Analysis

Graduate Seminar Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Pre-requisite(s)

3

3

0

3

Stat 351

3

3

0

3

Stat 331

3

3

0

3

Stat 331

1 10

1 10

0 0

1 10

Stat 332

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Stat Elective Stat 400

Course Title

Units

Master's Thesis Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

3

3

0

3

6 9

0

0

0

Pre-requisite(s) Stat 331

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 36 * May be chosen from the list of electives in Option A (Computational Statistics) or in Option B (Mathematical Statistics), depending on the student's interest.

COURSES OFFERED Core Courses 358

Stat 331 Stat 332 Stat 342 Stat 351 Stat 358

Theory of Probability Theory of Statistical Inference Sampling Designs Linear Models Multivariate Analysis

Required Course Stat 325

Statistical Computing I

Electives Four (4) subjects or twelve (12) units to be chosen from the list of electives in Option A or in Option B, depending on the student's interest. Option A (Computational Statistics) Stat 326 Stat 343 Stat 353 Stat 354 Stat 355 Stat 359 Stat 360 Stat 362 Stat 364 Stat 365 Stat 371

Statistical Computing II Categorical Data Analysis Econometric Methods Survival Analysis Time Series Analysis Neural Networks Environmental Statistics Nonparametric Methods Statistical Quality Control Operations Research Special Topics in Statistics

Option B (Mathematical Statistics) Stat 356 Stat 357 Stat 361 Stat 363 Stat 366 Stat 367 Stat 368 Stat 371 Stat 398 Stat 400

Chaos Theory Fuzzy Sets Bayesian Analysis Robust Statistics Stochastic Processes Decision Theory Density Estimation Special Topics in Statistics Graduate Seminar Master's Thesis

359

CATALOGUE OF COURSES STAT 325

STATISTICAL COMPUTING I

Introduction to scientific computing which includes programming tools, modern programming methodologies, design of data structure and algorithms, numerical computing and graphics, and use C++ for several substantial scientific programming projects. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 326

: 2 units (1 hr lec, 3 hrs lab) : Math 108 or CSc 11 (Basic Computer Programming)

STATISTICAL COMPUTING II

Advance scientific computing which includes programming languages for simulation. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 331

: 3 units (2 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab) : Stat 325 (Statistical Computing I)

THEORY OF PROBABILITY

Sample space, random variables, probability distributions, expectation, convergence of sequences of random variables, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, characteristic functions, moment generating functions, conditional probabilities. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 332

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Math 112 (Real Analysis I)

THEORY OF STATISTICAL INFERENCE

Estimation, methods of properties of estimation, tests of hypothesis, characteristic of the test. Credits Prerequisite(s) STAT 342

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 331 (theory of Probability)

SAMPLING DESIGNS

Concepts in designing sample surveys, non-sampling errors, simple random sampling, systematic sampling, sampling with varying probabilities, stratified sampling, use of auxiliary variable, cluster sampling, multi-stage sampling, and adaptive sampling. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 131 (Probability and Probability Distributions)

360

STAT 343

CATEGORICAL DATA ANALYSIS

Cross classified tables, multi-dimensional tables, log-linear models, logistic regression, measures of association, inference for categorical data. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 351

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

LINEAR MODELS

Subspaces and projections, multivariate normal distributions, non-central distributions, distribution of quadratic forms, the generalized linear model of full column rank, tests about the mean and variance, the generalized linear model not of full column rank, estimability and testability, regression analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 353

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 132 (Statistical Inference)

ECONOMETRIC METHODS

Dynamic econometric models, simultaneous-equation models and time-series economics. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 354

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

SURVIVAL ANALYSIS

Functions of survival time, estimation and survival functions, survival distributions and their applications, distribution fitting and Goodness-of-Fit test. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 355

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

TIME SERIES ANALYSIS

Descriptive techniques, stationary and non-stationary processes, estimation of process mean and auto-covariance function, invariable Box-Jenkins methodology. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 356

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

CHAOS THEORY

Introduction to dynamical systems and chaos, sensitive dependence, critical points, strange attractors, applications of chaos. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 331 (Theory of Probability)

361

STAT 357

FUZZY SETS

Fuzzy systems, introduction to fuzzy logic, operations on fuzzy sets, fuzzy relations, the extension principle. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 358

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 331 (Theory of Probability)

MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS

Multivariate normal distribution, multivariate analysis of variance, multivariate regression, principal component analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, multidimentional scaling, correspondence analysis, canonical correlation analysis, graphical and data oriented techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 359

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 351 (Linear Models)

NEURAL NETWORK

Introduction of neural networks, component and structure, application of neural networks, artificial neural networks. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 360

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

ENVIRONMENTAL STATISTICS

Statistics for Ecology, Biology, Chemistry, Forestry and Fishery, sampling strategies, spatial sampling, distance sampling. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 361

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

BAYESIAN ANALYSIS

Bayesian statistical methods, structure of Bayesian inference, sequential experiments, empirical and hierarchical analysis, robustness, numerical procedures. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

362

STAT 362

NONPARAMETRIC METHODS

Distribution-free statistics, U-statistics, power functions, asymptotic relative efficiency of tests, confidence intervals and bounds, point estimation, linear rank statistics, other methods of constructing distribution-free distributions. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 363

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

ROBUST STATISTICS

Breakdown point and robust estimators, influential functions, M, R and L estimators, robust tests, robust regression. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 364

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL

Principles of statistical quality control in manufacturing: modeling, process quality, control charts, process capability, acceptance sampling, methods and reliability. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 365

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Introduction to operations research, linear programming, dynamic programming, queuing theory and inventory models, PERT-CPM and network analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 366

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 331 (Theory of Probability)

STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Markov chains, Markov processes, Poisson processes, renewal processes, Martingales. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 367

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 331 (Theory of Probability)

DECISION THEORY

Basic concepts, risk functions, Bayes and minimax solutions of decision problems, statistical decision problems and functions, information of general decision problems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 331 (Theory of Probability)

363

STAT 368

DENSITY ESTIMATION

Methods of density estimation, nonparametric density estimation, optimal properties of estimates, asymptotic properties. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 371

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

SPECIAL TOPICS IN STATISTICS

New development in Statistics. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 398

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hr lab) : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

GRADUATE SEMINAR

Thesis proposal preparation and presentation by students. Credit Prerequisite(s) STAT 400

: 1 unit : Stat 332 (Theory of Statistical Inference)

MASTER‘S THESIS

Research work, explanatory study, or extensive survey on a certain topic in statistics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 6 units : Passed comprehensive examination is a requirement of the oral thesis defense.

364

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MATHEMATICS Introduction The country's science and technology capability must be developed to a level where it can contribute to the realization of our vision for the Philippines in the new millennium. Our vision is clear. We hope that somehow we can compete with the rest of the world and attain economic prosperity. But until today, many problems remain and there are hardly any solutions. Amidst all the imaginable answers to our problems, mathematics education stands out. Our leaders should realize that mathematics is vital because it is the key to science and technology. To help address the countless demands confronting our nation today, the Department of Mathematics of MSU-IIT, along with the Mathematics Department of MSU-Marawi, works hard to expand and enrich its graduate programs. With the Ph.D. in Mathematics program, the MSU system supports the needs of future researchers in the industries, in pure and applied mathematics, in science and technology, and in other allied fields. It also encourages colleges and universities around Visayas and Mindanao to maintain and develop their own mathematics programs, knowing that they can send their math instructors to MSU-IIT for advanced studies, where expenses are much less compared to Manila. With this, MSU stays at forefront in the development of mathematics in this part of the country. The Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics is designed for college graduates majoring in mathematics or for M.S. Mathematics students planning to pursue further studies to prepare themselves either for college teaching or for mathematics research.

Objectives 1. 2. 3.

Provide an accessible venue for higher Mathematics education; Improve Mathematics education in the country; Stimulate and encourage research in pure and applied mathematics

Admission Requirements In addition to the entry requirements of the university and the MSU-IIT Graduate School, the following must be met by the applicant: 1.

2. 3. 4.

He (or She) must have completed at least 30 units of M.S. courses in mathematics from any recognized and acceptable institution and these courses should include Algebra, Analysis, and Topology; His weighted average grade (GPA) in all graduate math courses must be 1.75 or better; He must submit two (2) letters of recommendation from former graduate math professors; In case of deficiencies, the Mathematics Graduate Committee may, in addition, require him to (i) have a graduate GPA of 1.75 or better; and/or (ii) undergo an interview.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MATHEMATICS (PH.D. MATH) 365

(LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Math 412 Math 425

Course Title

Units

Real analysis I Abstract Algebra I Math Elective Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s) Math 213 Math 225

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Math 413 Math 426 Math 421

Course Title

Units

Real analysis II Abstract Algebra II Linear Algebra I Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s) Math 412 Math 425 Math 221

First Year, Summer Course No. Math 461

Course Title Topology I Total

Units 3 3

Lec 3 3

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3

Prerequisite(s) Math 261

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Math 416 Math 431

Course Title

Units

Complex Analysis I Probability Theory I Math Elective Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s) Math 212 Math 212

Second Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title Math Electives Math Electives Math Electives Total

Units 3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s)

Third Year, First Semester 366

Course No.

Course Title

Units

Math Electives Math Electives Math Electives Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s)

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Dissertation

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

12 12

Total

Fourth Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Dissertation (continuation)

Fourth Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Dissertation (continuation)

SANDWICH PROGRAM Third Year Doctoral Dissertation (At this stage the student may solicit support for research training outside the country) Fourth Year Math elective (9 units) and Doctoral Dissertation. Oral defense during summer.

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 60

CATALOGUE OF COURSES MATH 406

NUMBER THEORY

367

Congruences, the function Φ(n), congruences of degree two, power residues, quadratic residues, Legendre symbol, quadratic reciprocity, Jacobi symbol, numerical functions, Moebius inversion formula, recurrence functions, some Diophantine equations, theory of primitive roots Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 407

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY

Free abelian groups, algebraic numbers and integers, conjugate and determinants, integral bases, norms and traces, quadratic and cyclotomic fields, factorization into irreducibles, prime factorization, Euclidean quadratic fields, the RamanujanNagell Theorem, prime factorization of ideal, norm of an ideal. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 412

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 206 and Math 226

REAL ANALYSIS I

Abstract measure spaces, lebesgue measure and integration, comparison of Lévesque and Reimann integrals, Lévesque dominated convergence theorem, Vitali covering lemma, fundamental theorem of calculus, Riesz representation theorems. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 413

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 213

REAL ANALYSIS II

Lp spaces, Banack spaces, Hahn-Banach, open mapping, closed graph and Banach-Steinhaus theorems, Absolutely continuous functions and functions of bounded variation, Radon-Nikodym theorem, Jordan decomposition, product measures, Fubini theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 414

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 412 or equivalent.

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Interactive methods for solutions of linear equations, linear least squares problems, theory of difference equations and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations, systems of nonlinear equations, numerical quadrature, polynomial and rational approximation theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 416

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 212 and Instructor‘s consent

COMPLEX ANALYSIS I

368

Complex Numbers, infinite series, analytic functions, theorems of MittagLeffler, Weierstrass and Runge, conformal mapping. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 417

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 212

COMPLEX ANALYSIS II

Analytic continuation, the Riemann mapping theorem, special functions, introduction to Riemann surfaces. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 421

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 416 (Complex Analysis I)

LINEAR ALGEBRA I

Decomposition of a single linear transformation; the characteristic polynomial; determinants; matrices and maps; rank and equivalence; right modules and duality; bilinear forms; alternating bilinear forms; sesquilinear duality; structure bilinear forms; symmetric forms; orthogonal basis; hyperbolic spaces; quadratic maps; symmetric forms over ordered fields; hermitian forms; spectral theorem; alternating forms; lemma of Schur; Euclidean and unitary spaces; orthogonal complete reducibility; Euclidean geometry reducibility; Euclidean geometry; semi-definite transformations; polar factorization of an arbitrary linear transformation; unitary space. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 422

: 3 units : Math 221

LINEAR ALGEBRA II

Selected applications of linear algebra on topics such as vector geometry; finite conic and linear inequalities; linear programming communication theory; vector calculus; spectral decomposition and linear transformations; systems of linear differential equations; small oscillations of mechanical systems; representations of finite groups by matrices. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 421 (Linear algebra)

369

MATH 423

LINEAR PROGRAMMING

Introduction to classical LP models; definition, the assumptions or limitations of LP models; the geometry and LP solutions; the art of LP formulation; algorithms used in LP models: simplex algorithm, revised simplex and the penalty methods; duality and sensitivity analysis; parametric analysis; goal programming; the transportation models; network models, e.g. shortest-route, maximal flow. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 424

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 421 (Linear Algebra)

DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

Definition of dynamic programming; (DP); elements of the DP models; some classical DP problems, e.g. resource allocation, equipment replacement, traveling salesman, inventory models, cargo-loading and capital budgeting; the recursive equations; dimensionality in DP; solutions of some linear programming models by DP methods; stochastic processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 425

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 423

ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I

The structure of groups which includes topics on the action of a group on a set; the Sylow theorems; classification of finite groups; nilpotent and solvable groups; normal and subnormal series; free abelian groups; finitely generated abelian groups. Finally, this course also deals with modules which includes topics on modules, homomorphisms and exact sequences; free modules and vector spaces; projective and injective modules; homomorphism and duality; modules over a principal ideal domain. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 426

: 3 units : Math 225

ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II

This course deals with fields and Galois theory which includes topics on field extensions; the fundamental theorem; splitting fields; algebraic closure and normality; the Galois group of a polynomial; finite fields; cyclic extensions; cyclotomic extensions; radical extensions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Math 425

370

MATH 431

PROBABILTY THEORY I

Treatment of abstract probability theory as a branch of measure theory, probability spaces, random variables, general theory of distribution functions and their characteristic functions. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 432

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 212 (Real Analysis I)

PROBABILITY THEORY II

Conditional probability, independent random variables and the central limit problem, dependent random variable, Markov processes, stationary processes and theory of linear predictions. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 436

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 431

STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Markov Chains, transition and absolute probabilities, irreducible Markov Chains, stationary stochastic sequences, Markov processes, discontinuous and continuous transitions, non-Markovian processes, stationary and stochastic processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 451

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 431 (Probability Theory I)

ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Some special classes of differential equations; systems of differential equations; stability of differential equations; Liapunov's second method (stability theory continue); Volterra integral equations; Fredholm heory of linear integral equations; self adjoint integral equations; some applications. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 452

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Fourier series and Fourier transforms, distribution, elliptic quations, initial value problems Cauchy problems), evolution quations, hyperbolic equations, Green's functions and spectra. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

371

MATH 461

TOPOLOGY I

Topological spaces, homeomorphisms, subspaces, Hausdorff spaces, regular and normal spaces, connectedness, product and quotient spaces, separability, metric spaces and compactness, Urysohn and Tietze's theorems, completely regular spaces, covering of spaces, metrization of topological spaces, uniform spaces, sequence and nets, filterbases, countable and local compactness, Baire spaces, category, function spaces, the spaces C(Y), and complete spaces. Credit rerequisite(s) MATH 462

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 261

GENERAL TOPOLOGY II

Homotopy and applications, maps into spheres, topology of En, homotopy type, path spaces, H-spaces, fiber spaces. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 470

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 461 (General Topology I)

COMBINATORICS

Fundamentals of combinatorial mathematics, principles of inclusion and exclusion, recurrence relations, theorem of Ramsey, systems of distinct representatives, matrices of zeros and ones, orthogonal latin squares, combinatorial designs, perfect difference sets, and other topics Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 475

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Consent of Instructor

GRAPH THEORY

Graphs and associated matrices; connectivity; traversability; factorization; planarity; and colorability of graphs, groups and graphs; spectrum of graphs; digraphs. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 476

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Consent of Instructor

THEORY OF HYPERGRAPHS

Hypergraphs and their duals; transversals; chromatic number of a hypergraph; balanced hypergraphs and unimodular hypergraphs; matroids. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 475 (Graph Theory)

372

MATH 481

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS I

Topological vector spaces, Banach spaces, Hilbert spaces and their duals, bounded linear transformations, Banach-Steinhaus and Banach Alaoglu theorems, KreinMilman theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 482

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 413 (Real Analysis II)

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS II

Linear operators on a Banach space, the spectrum and resolvent of a linear operator, compact operators, spectral theorem for compact Hermitian operators on a Hilbert space, integral equations. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 490

SEMINAR: ANALYSIS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 491

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: GRAPH THEORY/ COMBINATORICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 495

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: PROBABILITY THEORY & MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 494

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: ALGEBRA

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 493

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 492

: 3 units : Math 481

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

373

MATH 496

SEMINAR: TOPOLOGY

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 497

SEMINAR: SELECTED TOPICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 498

Credit

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SPECIAL PROJECT

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 500

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Credit Prerequisite MATH 499

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

DOCTORAL DISSERTATION : 12 units

DOCTOR OF MATHEMATICS 374

Introduction The D. Math (Doctor of Mathematics) Program, an option of the existing Ph.D. in Mathematics Program of the Department of Mathematics , is designed to cater to the needs of a broader clientele, encompassing MS degree holders in mathematics and other related fields, who are competent to undergo the rigors of learning mathematics but are more inclined into the art of teaching mathematics rather than in mathematics research. Whereas the Ph.D. Math Program, which is directed towards mathematics research, requires 60 academic units in math courses in various fields, a comprehensive exam and a dissertation with original contribution in a chosen field of specialization, which is publishable in refereed journals, the D. Math Program requires 72 units of academic requirement, a comprehensive exam and a doctoral thesis , which may be expository in nature but with sufficient degree of originality and does not require publication. A student can be awarded either a Ph.D. Math or D. Math degree but not both. However, a student who has successfully defended his doctoral thesis may opt to write a dissertation to obtain a Ph.D. Math degree.

Objectives 1. 2. 3.

Develop more experts in teaching mathematics courses in all levels; Increase the number of doctoral students at no additional cost; and Keep at pace with the trend of in graduate mathematics programs worldwide.

Admission Requirements In addition to the requirements of the University for admission to the Graduate School, the following must be met by the applicant: 1. He (or She) must have completed at least 30 units of MS Math courses , which includes Algebra, Analysis and Topology, from any recognized and acceptable institution; 2. His weighted average grade (GPA) must be 1.75 or better in all graduate math courses; 3. He must submit two letters of recommendation from former graduate professors; 4. He must submit a copy of his transcript of records; 5. In case of deficiencies of the above requirements, the Mathematics Graduate Committee may in addition require the applicant to undergo an interview and have a GPA of 1.55 or better to determine his admissibility to the program.

DOCTOR OF MATHERMATICS (D. Math) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER)

375

First Year, First Semester Course No. Math 412 Math 425

Course Title

Units

Real analysis I Abstract Algebra I Math Elective Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s) Math 213 Math 225

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Math 413 Math 426

Course Title

Units

Real analysis II Abstract Algebra II Math Elective Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s) Math 412 Math 425

First Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title

Units

Math Elective Math Elective Total

3 3 6

Lec 3 3 6

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 6

Prerequisite(s)

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Math 416 Math 421 Math 461

Course Title

Units

Complex Analysis Linear Algebra General Topology Math Elective Total

3 3 3 3 12

Lec 3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 12

Prerequisite(s) Math 212 Math 221 Math 261

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Math 431

Course Title

Units

Probability Theory Math Elective Math Elective Total

3 3 3 9

Lec 3 3 3 9

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 9

Prerequisite(s) Math 212

Second Year, Summer Course No.

Course Title Math Elective

Units 3

Lec 3

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3

Prerequisite(s)

376

Total

3

3

0

3

Third Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title Math Elective Math Elective Math Elective Math Elective Total

Units 3 3 3 3 12

Lec 3 3 3 3 12

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 12

Prerequisite(s)

Third Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Doctoral Thesis Total

12 12

Lec 0 0

Hrs/Wk Lab Total 0 12 0 12

Prerequisite(s)

Fourth Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Doctoral Thesis (Continuation)

Fourth Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

Doctoral Thesis (Continuation)

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 72

CATALOGUE OF COURSES MATH 406

NUMBER THEORY

377

Congruences, the function Φ(n), congruences of degree two, power residues, quadratic residues, legendre symbol, quadratic reciprocity, Jacobi symbol, numerical functions, Moebius inversion formula, recurrence functions, some Diophantine equations, theory of primitive roots Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 407

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY

Free abelian groups, algebraic numbers and integers, conjugate and determinants, integral bases, norms and traces, quadratic and cyclotomic fields, factorization into irreducibles, prime factorization, Euclidean quadratic fields, the RamanujanNagell Theorem, prime factorization of ideal, norm of an ideal. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 412

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 206 and Math 226

REAL ANALYSIS I

Abstract measure spaces, lebesgue measure and integration, comparison of Lévesque and Reimann integrals, Lévesque dominated convergence theorem, Vitali covering lemma, fundamental theorem of calculus, Riesz representation theorems. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 413

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 213

REAL ANALYSIS II

Lp spaces, Banack spaces, Hahn-Banach, open mapping, closed graph and Banach-Steinhaus theorems, Absolutely continuous functions and functions of bounded variation, Radon-Nikodym theorem, Jordan decomposition, product measures, Fubini theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 414

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 412 or equivalent.

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Interactive methods for solutions of linear equations, linear least squares problems, theory of difference equations and numerical methods for ordinary

differential equations, systems of nonlinear equations, numerical quadrature, polynomial and rational approximation theory. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 212 and Instructor‘s consent 378

MATH 416

COMPLEX ANALYSIS I

Complex Numbers, infinite series, analytic functions, theorems of MittagLeffler, Weierstrass and Runge, conformal mapping. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 417

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 212

COMPLEX ANALYSIS II

Analytic continuation, the Riemann mapping theorem, special functions, introduction to Riemann surfaces. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 421

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 416 (Complex Analysis I)

LINEAR ALGEBRA I

Decomposition of a single linear transformation; the characteristic polynomial; determinants; matrices and maps; rank and equivalence; right modules and duality; bilinear forms; alternating bilinear forms; sesquilinear duality; structure bilinear forms; symmetric forms; orthogonal basis; hyperbolic spaces; quadratic maps; symmetric forms over ordered fields; hermitian forms; spectral theorem; alternating forms; lemma of Schur; Euclidean and unitary spaces; orthogonal complete reducibility; Euclidean geometry reducibility; Euclidean geometry; semi-definite transformations; polar factorization of an arbitrary linear transformation; unitary space. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 422

: 3 units : Math 221

LINEAR ALGEBRA II

Selected applications of linear algebra on topics such as vector geometry; finite conic and linear inequalities; linear programming communication theory; vector calculus; spectral decomposition and linear transformations; systems of linear differential equations; small oscillations of mechanical systems; representations of finite groups by matrices. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 423

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 421 (Linear algebra)

LINEAR PROGRAMMING

Introduction to classical LP models; definition, the assumptions or limitations of LP models; the geometry and LP solutions; the art of LP formulation; algorithms used in LP models: simplex algorithm, revised simplex and the penalty methods; duality and sensitivity analysis; parametric analysis; goal programming; the transportation models; network models, e.g. shortest-route, maximal flow. 379

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 424

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 421 (Linear Algebra)

DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

Definition of dynamic programming; (DP); elements of the DP models; some classical DP problems, e.g. resource allocation, equipment replacement, traveling salesman, inventory models, cargo-loading and capital budgeting; the recursive equations; dimensionality in DP; solutions of some linear programming models by DP methods; stochastic processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 425

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 423

ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I

The structure of groups which includes topics on the action of a group on a set; the Sylow theorems; classification of finite groups; nilpotent and solvable groups; normal and subnormal series; free abelian groups; finitely generated abelian groups. Finally, this course also deals with modules which includes topics on modules, homomorphisms and exact sequences; free modules and vector spaces; projective and injective modules; homomorphism and duality; modules over a principal ideal domain. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 426

: 3 units : Math 225

ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II

This course deals with fields and Galois theory which includes topics on field extensions; the fundamental theorem; splitting fields; algebraic closure and normality; the Galois group of a polynomial; finite fields; cyclic extensions; cyclotomic extensions; radical extensions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

MATH 431

: 3 units : Math 425

PROBABILTY THEORY I

Treatment of abstract probability theory as a branch of measure theory, probability spaces, random variables, general theory of distribution functions and their characteristic functions. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 212 (Real Analysis I) 380

MATH 432

PROBABILITY THEORY II

Conditional probability, independent random variables and the central limit problem, dependent random variable, Markov processes, stationary processes and theory of linear predictions. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 436

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 431

STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

Markov Chains, transition and absolute probabilities, irreducible Markov Chains, stationary stochastic sequences, Markov processes, discontinuous and continuous transitions, non-Markovian processes, stationary and stochastic processes. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 451

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 431 (Probability Theory I)

ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Some special classes of differential equations; systems of differential equations; stability of differential equations; Liapunov's second method (stability theory continue); Volterra integral equations; Fredholm theory of linear integral equations; self adjoint integral equations; some applications. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 452

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Fourier series and Fourier transforms, distribution, elliptic equations, initial value problems (Cauchy problems), evolution equations, hyperbolic equations, Green's functions and spectra. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 461

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

TOPOLOGY I

Topological spaces, homeomorphisms, subspaces, Hausdorff spaces, regular and normal spaces, connectedness, product and quotient spaces, separability, metric spaces and compactness, Urysohn and Tietze's theorems, completely regular spaces, covering of spaces, metrization of topological spaces, uniform spaces, sequence and nets, filterbases, countable and local compactness, Baire spaces, category, function spaces, the spaces C(Y), and complete spaces. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 261

381

MATH 462

GENERAL TOPOLOGY II

Homotopy and applications, maps into spheres, topology of En, homotopy type, path spaces, H-spaces, fiber spaces. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 470

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 461 (General Topology I)

COMBINATORICS

Fundamentals of combinatorial mathematics, principles of inclusion and exclusion, recurrence relations, theorem of Ramsey, systems of distinct representatives, matrices of zeros and ones, orthogonal latin squares, combinatorial designs, perfect difference sets, and other topics Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 475

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Consent of Instructor

GRAPH THEORY

Graphs and associated matrices; connectivity; traversability; factorization; planarity; and colorability of graphs, groups and graphs; spectrum of graphs; digraphs. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 476

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Consent of Instructor

THEORY OF HYPERGRAPHS

Hypergraphs and their duals; transversals; chromatic number of a hypergraph; balanced hypergraphs and unimodular hypergraphs; matroids. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 475 (Graph Theory)

382

MATH 481

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS I

Topological vector spaces, Banach spaces, Hilbert spaces and their duals, bounded linear transformations, Banach-Steinhaus and Banach Alaoglu theorems, KreinMilman theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 482

: 3 units (3 hours lec, 0 hours lab) : Math 413 (Real Analysis II)

FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS II

Linear operators on a Banach space, the spectrum and resolvent of a linear operator, compact operators, spectral theorem for compact Hermitian operators on a Hilbert space, integral equations. Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 490

SEMINAR: ANALYSIS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 491

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: GRAPH THEORY/ COMBINATORICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 495

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: PROBABILITY THEORY & MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 494

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: ALGEBRA

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 493

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 492

: 3 units : Math 481

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SEMINAR: APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

383

MATH 496

SEMINAR: TOPOLOGY

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 497

SEMINAR: SELECTED TOPICS

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 498

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

SPECIAL PROJECT

Credit Prerequisite(s) MATH 500

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Credit Prerequisite MATH 499

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

: 3 units : Consent of Instructor

DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Credit

: 12 units

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Acal, Penelyn L.

MS Mathematics (Real Analysis), MSU-IIT, 1996 384

BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1990 2 Aniversario, Imelda S.

Ph.D. Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 2007 MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 1996 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1986

3 Artes, Rosalio G., Jr.

MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 2004 BS Mathematics, CMU, 2001

4 Arugay, Esperanza B.

Ph.D. Mathematics(Graph Theory), ADMU,1990 MS Mathematics, UP-Diliman, 1977 BSE Mathematics, UST, 1967

5 Baguio, Carolina B.

Ph.D. Applied Mathematical Science, MPSC, 1999 MS Statistics (Applied Statistics), UP-Diliman, 1989 MS Mathematics, UP-Diliman, 1979 BS Statistics, MSU-Marawi, 1973

6 Benitez, Julius V.

MS Mathematics (Real Analysis), MSU-IIT, 2000 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1998

7 Buenavista, Rolando N.

MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 1996 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1982

8 Calio, Gloria L.

Ph.D. Math, UP-Diliman & Chinese Acad. of Sci., Beijing, PROC, 1998 MS Mathematics, University of Tennesse, Knoxville TN, 1976 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1970 Field of Specialization: Analysis (Differential Equations/Dynamical System)

9 Canoy, Sergio, Jr. R.

Ph.D. Math, UP Diliman & National University of Singapore, 1994 Ph.D. Math Ed, MPSC, 2007 MS Mathematics (Analysis: Integration Theory), 1988 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1983

10 Capilitan, Oliver R.

MS Mathematics (Group Theory), 2002 BS Mathematics, 1997

11 Carpio, Harry M.

Ph.D. Math, ADMU & Univ. of Erlangen, Germany MS Mathematics (Analysis: Real Analysis & Probability Theory), 1976 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1968

12 Chacon, Emmy C.

MS Mathematics (Algebra: Group Theory), 1996 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1992

385

13 Dagondon, Susan C.

MS Mathematics (Graph Theory/Statistics), 1998 BS Statistics, MSU-IIT, 1991 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1991

14 Dumanjug, Charlotte, F.

MS Statistics, UP-Diliman, 2007 BS Statistics, MSU-IIT, 1997

15 Duyaguit, Ma. Cristina L.

Ph.D. in Science (Math: Algebraic Geometry), Niigata University, Japan, 2004 MS Mathematics (Real Analysis), MSU-IIT, 1998 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1993

16 Elnas, Calixto G., Jr.

MS Statistics, UP-Diliman, 2004 BS Statistics, MSU-IIT, 1994

17 Evardone, Chita P.

Ph.D. Mathematics, MSU-IIT & Arizona State University, 2002 MS Statistics, University of Calgary, Canada, 1988 MS Statistics, UP-Diliman, 1983 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1973 Field of Specialization: Appied Mathematics / Dynamical Systems

18 Florida, Veronica B.

MS Mathematics (Group Theory), MSU-IIT, 2005 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 2000

19 Frondoza, Michael B.

MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 2007 BS Mathematics , NDU Cotabato City, 2002

20 Gaquing, Napoleon A.

Ph.D. Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 2007 MS Mathematics (Analysis), MSU-IIT, 1992 BS Mathematics, 1979

21 Guerrero, Romulo C.

Ph.D. Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 2002 MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), 1987 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1982

22 Isla, Rowena T.

Ph.D. Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 2000 MS Mathematics, ADMU, 1984 BS Mathematics, UP, 1977

23 Jamboy, Norma A.

Master of Applied Statistics, MSU-IIT, 2001 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1977

24 Lagare, Emmanuel M.

Ph.D. Mathematics, ADMU & National University of Singapore, 1987 MS Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN, 1977 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1971 386

Field of Specialization: Analysis (Numerical Analysis) 25 Lopez, Rosadelima V.

MS Statistics, UP Los Baños, 1982 BS Mathematics

26 Malacas, Gina A.

MS Mathematics (Group Theory/Statistics), MSU-IIT, 1996 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1992

27 Merca, Catherine I.

MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 1992 BS Mathematics, UP-Baguio, 1986

28 Paler, Mary Elvi A.

MS Statistics, UP-Los Baños, 2001 BS Statistics (Statistical Measurements), UP-Los Baños, 1992

29 Petalcorin, Gaudencio C.

Ph.D. Mathematics (Algebra: Group Theory), UP-Diliman & Australian Nat‘l University., 1996 MS Mathematics, UP-Diliman, 1993 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1986

30 Polestico, Daisy Lou C.

Ph.D. in Science (Mathematical Statistics), Niigata University, Japan, 2005 MS Mathematics (Analysis/Statistics), MSU-IIT, 1999 BS Statistics, MSU-IIT, 1994

31 Racines, Teresita U.

MS Statistics, UP-Diliman, 1983 BS Mathematics (Statistics), USC, 1972

32 Rara, Helen M.

MS/Ph.D. Mathematics (Graph Theory), ADMU & Nat‘l Univ. of Singapore, 1991 BS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-Marawi, 1980

33 Roscom, Brigida A.

Ph.D. Statistics, UP-Diliman & Ohio State University, 1990 MS Statistics (less thesis), UP-Diliman, 1983 MS Mathematics, UP-Diliman, 1975 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1967 Field of Specialization: Density Estimation

34 Serquiña, Ruth P.

MS Mathematics (Mathematics Ecology), MSU-IIT, 1994 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1988

35 Supe, Arnulfo P.

Ph.D. Statistics, UP-Diliman MS Mathematics (Mathematics Ecology), MSU-IIT, 1994 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1976

36 Tejano, Corazon P.

MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 1993 387

BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1978 37 Tubo, Bernadette F.

MS Statistics (Statistical Modeling), UP-Diliman, 2001 BS Statistics, MSU-IIT, 1993

38 Uy, Joselito A.

Ph.D. Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1999 MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 1990 BS Mathematics, MSU-Marawi, 1986 BS Physics, MSU-Marawi, 1983

39 Vega, Mary Ann Ritzell P. Ph.D. Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 2007 MS Mathematics (Graph Theory), MSU-IIT, 1995 BS Mathematics, Xavier University, 1987 40 Vilela, Jocelyn P.

Ph.D. Mathematics (Group Theory), UP-Diliman, 2005 MS Mathematics (Algebra: Group Theory), MSU-IIT, 1997 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1991

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS MASTER OF PHYSICS Rationale 388

Consistent with the mandate of the Commission of Higher Education (CHED) as Center-of-Excellence (COE) of Physics outside of Luzon and as a DOST-PCASTRD accredited institution in Physics, the Department of Physics of MSU-IIT recognizes its special responsibility to continually improve the quality of physics research and instructional delivery system of physics in the country specially in Southern Philippines. Recognized by CHED as COE by virtue of CHED Resolution No. 021-98, the Institute is proud of its role as premier institution producing a generation of brilliant physics graduates who are now holding teaching and research positions in universities of the country. The existing Master of Science in Physics (MS) program at MSU-IIT is designed for those who intend to proceed to the Ph.D. Physics program or engage in teaching advanced physics courses or do research both in the academe and Industry. Faced with stringent requirements that the MS Physics program demands only very few students can be admitted into this program since there are only few Bachelor of Science (BS) Physics graduates in the country. The present overwhelming need is to address the cause of deteriorating quality of tertiary physics education in the country. The implementation of Master of Physics (MOP) program in the Philippine‘s Center-of-Excellence in Physics responses to the call of the Commission on Higher Education with its Higher Education Development Project to improve and upgrade the academic qualifications of the university and college physics instructors. MOP program enables engineering and allied science degree holders to enroll in a regular master‘s degree program designed for those teaching physics in the tertiary level. Quality physics instruction and advanced research facilities of the Department of Physics uphold the MOP program of the Institute by introducing students to the challenge and excitement of understanding the broad principles of physics.

Objectives 

To provide an effective learning environment for students thereby equipping them to be responsive to the manpower needs of the country.



To produce highly competent graduates with solid and rigorous training in advanced physics courses for tertiary instruction.

Admission Requirements i.) Possession of a bachelor‘s degree in engineering, mathematics, chemistry, or physics education or, if not a graduate of any of these, a GPA of 2.0 (or its equivalent) or better in the following undergraduate courses: General Physics (10 units), Calculus (10 units), and Differential Equations (3 units). ii.) Pass the entrance examination in general physics and mathematics. Two (2) letters of recommendation from former professor and immediate supervisor attesting to the applicant‘s intellectual capacity for advanced studies. iii.) Compliance of the School of Graduate Studies and the Institute admission requirements. 389

iv.) Submission of a certified true copy of official Transcript of Records.

Degree Requirements Units 21 9 6

Core Courses Discipline Related-Courses Special Project TOTAL

36

Delivery Mode a. b. c.

Full time student during summer Weekend lectures Equivalent number of hours compressed in few days. The lecture venue maybe inside or outside MSU-IIT campus.

MASTER OF PHYSICS (MOP) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. Phys 290.1 Mathematical Physics I Phys 220.1 Theoretical Mechanics I

Units

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6

First Year, Second Semester Course Course Title No. Phys 230.1 Electromagnetism I Phys 240.1 Modern Physics I

Units

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6

First Year, Summer Course Course Title No. Phys 230.2 Electromagnetism I Phys 240.2 Modern Physics I

Units

Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6 390

Second Year, First Semester Hrs/Wk Course Course Title Units Prerequisite(s) No. Lec Lab Total Phys 232.1 Electronics I (Elective) 2 Phys 236.1 Electronics Lab (Elective) 1 Physics 3 Elective Total 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course Course Title No. Phys 242.1 Quantum Mechanics I Physics Elective

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 Total

6

Second Year, Summer Course Course Title No. Phys 299.1 Special Project

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 36 Note: 1. 2.

One (1) hour is allotted for every unit of lecture courses. Three (3) hours is allotted for every unit of laboratory courses.

CATALOGUE OF COURSES PHYS 220.1

THEORETICAL MECHANICS I

Newtonian mechanics of particles and systems of particles, vector analysis, conservation of energy, conservative forces, central forces, Gravitation, special relativity and the covariant formulation. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 230.1

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Math 151 and Phys 41

ELECTROMAGNETISM I 391

A rigorous treatment of classical electromagnetism using vector analysis and partial differential equations, electric fields and potentials, solutions of Laplace‘s and Poisson‘s equations, dielectric materials, magnetostatics, magnetic materials, circuit analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 232.1

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Phys 41 and Phys 290.1

ELECTRONICS (ELECTIVE)

Circuit analysis and Instrumentation Credit PHYS 236.1

:

2 units (2 hours lecture)

ELECTRONICS LABORATORY (ELECTIVE)

Laboratory course to accompany Phys 232.1 Credit PHYS 240.1

:

1 unit (3 hours laboratory)

MODERN PHYSICS I

Historical and experimental foundation of relativity, relativistic mechanics, early atomic theories, Planck‘s radiation law, photoelectric effect, the Rutherford atom, Bohr theory and its triumphs, generalizations and difficulties, de Broglie hypothesis and its consequences. Wave mechanics and the Schroedinger equation, applications to one-dimensional systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

PHYS 230.2

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Phys 41 and Phys 290.1

ELECTROMAGNETISM II

Maxwell‘s equations and their applications, electromagnetic waves, reflection and refraction, wave guides, resonant, cavities, antennas, special relativity and the formulation of electrodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 240.2

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Phys 230.1

MODERN PHYSICS II

Continuation of Phys 240.1: Topics include Schroedinger theory and its application to atomic and molecular physics, solids, nuclei and elementary particles. 392

Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 242.1

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Phys 240.1

QUANTUM MECHANICS I

Wave Functions, Schroedinger Equation (time-dependent and time-independent), The Uncertainty Principle, Schroedinger Equation in spherical coordinates, Hydrogen atom, System of particles, Solids, and Quantum Statistical Mechanics. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 248.1

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Phys 230.2 and Physics 240.2

ADVANCED LABORATORY I (ELECTIVE)

Conduct different experiments using the advanced apparatuses of the four existing laboratories of the department (Material Science Laboratory, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Computational Physics laboratory, and Photonics Laboratory). Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 258.1

: :

3 units (9 hours lab) Phys 230.2 and Physics 240.2

ADVANCED LABORATORY II (ELECTIVE)

Continuation of Phys 248.1. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: :

3 units (9 hours lab) Phys 230.2 and Physics 240.2

393

PHYS 260.1

THERMAL AND STATISTICAL PHYSICS I (ELECTIVE)

Thermodynamic systems, equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, phase changes, entropy, kinetic theory of gases, distribution of molecular velocities, molecular transport phenomena, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, and introduction to statistical mechanics. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 290.1

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Phys 220.1 and Physics 240.2

MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS I

Selected topics in linear ordinary and partial differential equations: self-adjoint and eigenvalue problems, Green‘s functions, Sturm-Liouville theory, Fourier series and eigenfunction expansions, orthogonal functions, integral equations, vector spaces and matrix theory. Credit PHYS 295.1

:

3 units (3 hours lecture)

SPECIAL TOPICS I (ELECTIVE)

A course on selected advanced topics not covered in formal courses; course content is variable and depends on the expertise of the instructor. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 299.1 Credit

: :

3 units (3 hours lecture) Instructor‘s consent

SPECIAL PROJECT :

6 units

394

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICS Admission Requirements 1.

Possession of a BS Physics degree from a reputable institution or, for non-physics majors, a GPA of 2.5 or better in at least 15 units in the following advanced undergraduate courses: Mechanics Electromagnetic Theory Quantum Mechanics Statistical Physics and Thermodynamics Differential Equations/Mathematical Physics

2.

Passing the entrance exam in any three of the five areas listed above.

3.

Submission of a certified true copy of Official Transcript of Records.

MASTER OF SCIENCES IN PHYSICS (MS PHYS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER, THESIS OPTION) First Year, First Semester Course No. Phys 221 Phys 231 Phys 241

Course Title

Units

Classical Mechanics I Classical Electrodynamics I Quantum Mechanics I Total

3 3 3 9

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Phys 232 Phys 242 Phys 261

Course Title

Units

Classical Electrodynamics II Quantum Mechanics II Statistical Mechanics I Total

3 3 3 9

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Second Year, First Semester Course

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Prerequisite(s) 395

No. Phys 295 Physics Elective

Lec Graduate Laboratory I

Lab

Total

2 6 Total

8

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Phys 296 Physics Elective Phys 300

Course Title

Units

Graduate Seminar

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

2 3

Masteral Thesis Total

6 11

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 37

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICS (MS PHYS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER, NON-THESIS OPTION) First Year, First Semester Course No. Phys 221 Phys 231 Phys 241

Course Title

Units

Classical Mechanics I Classical Electrodynamics I Quantum Mechanics I Total

3 3 3 9

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Phys 232 Phys 242 Phys 261

Course Title

Units

Classical Electrodynamics II Quantum Mechanics I Statistical Mechanics I Total

3 3 3 9

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

Second Year, First Semester Course

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Prerequisite(s) 396

No. Phys 210 Physics Elective

Lec Graduate Laboratory I

Lab

Total

2 6 Total

8

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. Phys 295 Physics Elective

Course Title

Units

Graduate Seminar

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

2 9 Total

11

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 37 In the non-thesis option, the curriculum consists of 37 units course work including Phys 210. The M.S. Physics degree will be awarded upon obtaining a passing grade in the Comprehensive Examination to be given by the Graduate Committee

397

CATALOGUE OF COURSES PHYS 210

GRADUATE LABORATORY I

An advanced course in experimental physics which deals with the laboratory techniques required in actual research development work. PHYS 211

GRADUATE LABORATORY II

Laboratory course for Computational Physics Class hours: 6 hours laboratory Credit PHYS 221

: 2 units (6 hours laboratory) CLASSICAL MECHANICS I

An advanced course in Newtonian and relativistic mechanics: particle and rigid body motions, Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formulation, relativistic covariant formulation. Credit PHYS 222

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) CLASSICAL MECHANICS II

Continuation of Physics 221: canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, small oscillations, Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formulation of continuous systems and fields. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 231

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 221

CLASSICAL ELECTRODYNAMICS I

An advanced course in electricity and magnetism; electrostatics and magnetostatics in vacuum and material media, Maxwell‘ equations, electromagnetic waves, wave guides,resonant cavities, radiations. Credit PHYS 232

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) CLASSICAL ELECTRODYNAMICS II

Continuation of Physics 231: radiating systems, radiation by moving charges, breamsstrahlung, multipole fields, relativistic dynamics of charges, classical electron theory, magnetohydrodynamics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

PHYS 241

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 231

QUANTUM MECHANICS I 398

An advanced course in quantum theory and its applications: historical and experimental background, Schrodinger equation, stationary states, stationary perturbation, Hilbert-space formulation, observables and operator theory, angular momentum, central potentials. Credit PHYS 242

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) QUANTUM MECHANICS II

Continuation of Physics 241: symmetry and conservation of laws, identical particles, spin, non-stationary perturbation, scattering theory, semi-classical theory of radiation, applications to atoms, molecules and nuclei. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 243

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 241

ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS I

An introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics: the relativistic equations, their solutions and interpretations. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 244

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 242

ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS II

An introduction to quantum fields: classical field theory, quantization of fields, interacting fields, quantum electrodynamics. Credit PHYS 253

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS

Quantum theory of angular momentum, one-electron and multi-electron atoms, Pauli principle, radiative transitions, selection rules, molecular rotations and vibrations, group theory and symmetry, line widths. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 255

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 242

SOLID STATE PHYSICS

An advanced course in the quantum theory of solids: lattice structure, quantization of lattice vibration, thermal properties, free-electron theory, electron-phonon interaction, electron-electron interaction, super conductivity. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 261

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 242

STATISTICAL MECHANICS I 399

Statistical methods, equilibrium statistical thermodynamics, partition functions, equi-partition theorem, ideal gases, quantum statistics and applications to noninteracting particles and degenerate systems. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 262

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physic 241

STATISTICAL MECHANICS II

Continuation of Physics 261: systems of interacting particles, transport theory, irreversible processes, fluctuations. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 263

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 261

COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS I

Numerical methods; introduction to linear and dynamic programming; ordinary and partial differential equations; matrix operations; boundary value and eigenvalue problems. Credit PHYS 264

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS II

Principles of simulation and modeling; statistical description of data; modeling of data; minimization and maximization of functions; Monte Carlo method. Credit PHYS 265

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS

Selected advanced topics of current interest in computational physics Credit PHYS 271

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) NUCLEAR PHYSICS I

A quantum approach to nuclear physics: properties of nuclei, radioactivity, nuclear models, isospin formalism, fission and fusion, electromagnetic and nuclear interactions, beta decay. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 275

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 242

ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS I

A course on the properties and interactions of the fundamental particles.

400

Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 276

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 243

EXPERIMENTAL METHODS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS

Advanced laboratory techniques and instrumentation of elementary particle physics. Credit PHYS 285

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) GENERAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY I

An introduction to the Einsteinian theory of gravitation: special relativity, principle of equivalence, tensor analysis, Einstein‘s field equations, Schwarzschild solution, post-Newtonian approximation, gravitational radiation, experimental tests. Prerequisite(s) PHYS 286

: Physics 222, 232

GENERAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY II

Continuation of Physics 285: relativistic astrophysics, gravitational collapse, spacetime singularities, differential geometry, tetrad formalism, symmetric spaces, cosmology. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 291

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 285

MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS I

Selected topics in linear ordinary and partial differential equations: self-adjoint and eigenvalue problems, Green‘s functions, Sturm-Lioville theory, Fourier series and eigenfunction expansions, orthogonal functions, integral equations, vector spaces and matrix theory. Credit PHYS 292

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS II

Hilbert spaces, operator algebras and representation theory. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 293

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 291

MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS III

Discrete and continuous groups, group representation, differential geometry, Lie groups and Lie algebras, rotation group, Lorentz group, unitary groups, special functions. 401

Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 295

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Physics 291

GRADUATE SEMINAR

A seminar course on recent developments in physics. Students will be required to discuss current research results and implications. Credit PHYS 296

: 2 units, repetitive credit SPECIAL TOPICS I

A course on selected advanced topics not covered in formal courses; course content variable. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 297

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Instructor‘s consent

SPECIAL TOPICS II

Continuation of Physics 296. Credit Prerequisite(s) PHYS 298

: 3 units (3 hours lecture) : Instructor‘s consent

SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS

Advanced laboratory techniques and instrumentation in a specialized area of experimental physics that is not covered in the other courses. Credit PHYS 300 Credit

: 2-3 units MASTERAL THESIS : 6 units

402

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN PHYSICS Objectives The program aims to produce graduates with advanced training in physics who are capable of: (1) undertaking original and independent research in experimental or theoretical physics; and (2) assuming top -level physicist positions in academic, industrial and/or research institutions.

Admission Requirements Admission to the Ph. D. Physics program shall require: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

An M. S. Physics degree or its equivalent from a recognized institution of higher learning A copy of the Official Transcript of Records Three (3) letters of recommendations from former professors and immediate supervisors attesting to the applicant‘s intellectual capacity for advanced studies Compliance of the School of Graduate Studies and the institute admission requirements. If necessary, an entrance examination covering the core courses at the M.S. Physics level will be administered.

Course Requirements A minimum of sixty-two (62) units consisting of eighteen (18) units of course work after the M.S Physics course, thirty (30) units of doctoral research work, two (2) units of seminar presentation and twelve (12) units of Ph. D. dissertation are required. The course work will be chosen from the Physics 300 series course offerings. This shall be determined by the Graduate Program Committee based on the student‘s academic background and research interests. The graduate seminars are one-unit subjects involving the presentation of a research paper arising from library, independent research and dissertation works. The doctoral research work will be taken after the student has completed all the course requirements and has passed the candidacy examination. This research work is done towards the completion of the student‘s Ph. D. dissertation. The subsequent enrollment in doctoral research work is contingent upon the certification of the student‘s adviser that his/her work is satisfactorily in progress every semester. The Ph. D. dissertation is enrolled on the semester when the student is ready for the final doctoral examination.

Other Requirements 403

Other requirements include: 1. 2. 3.

pass a written examination in his/her area of specialization. pass an oral defense of his/her dissertation. submit a preprint based on the approved dissertation and endorsed as an acceptable article for publication in a refereed scientific journal.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN PHYSICS (PH.D. PHYS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. Phys 300 series Phys 300 series Phys 300 series

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 Graduate Seminar Total

1 10

First Year, Second Semester Course No. Phys 300 series Phys 300 series Phys 300 series

Course Title

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 Graduate Seminar I Total

1 10

First Year, Summer Course Course Title No. Phys 399 Doctoral Research Work

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Second Year, First Semester

404

Course Course Title No. Phys 399 Doctoral Research Work

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Second Year, Second Semester Course Course Title No. Phys 399 Doctoral Research Work

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Second Year, Summer Course Course Title No. Phys 399 Doctoral Research Work

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Third Year, First Semester Course Course Title No. Phys 399 Doctoral Research Work

Units Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Third Year, Second Semester Course Course Title No. Phys 400 Doctoral Dissertation

Units Total

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

12 12

TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS: 62 Course Offerings: Phys 301 Phys 305 Phys 311 Phys 312 Phys 313 Phys 335 Phys 336 Phys 341 Phys 342 Phys 351 Phys 355

Special Topics in Experimental Physics Special Topics in Theoretical Physics Advanced Mathematical Physics I Advanced Mathematical Physics II Advanced Mathematical Physics III Plasma Physics I Plasma Physics II Quantum Field Theory I Quantum Field Theory II Advanced Statistical Mechanics Advanced Atomic and Molecular Physics

1-3 units 1-3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 405

Phys 361 Phys 362 Phys 371 Phys 372 Phys 375 Phys 381 Phys 385 Phys 387 Phys 390 Phys 398 Phys 399 Phys 400

Quantum Electronics I Quantum Electronics II Advanced Solid State Physics I Advanced Solid State Physics II Advanced Low-Temperature Physics Advanced Nuclear Physics Current Topics in Particle Theory Current Topics in Experimental Particle Physics Independent Study Graduate Seminar Doctoral Research Work Ph. D. Dissertation

3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 1 unit 50 units max. 12 units

CATALOGUE OF COURSES PHYSICS 301

SPECIAL TOPICS IN EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS

Advanced laboratory techniques and instrumentation in specialized area of experimental physics that is not covered in the other courses. This subject maybe taken repeatedly. Credit PHYSICS 305

: 1 to 3 units SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEORETICAL PHYSICS

Advanced topics in specialized area of theoretical physics that is not covered in the other courses. This subject maybe taken repeatedly. Credit PHYSICS 311

: 1 to 3 units ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS I

Structure and representation theory of various Lie groups. Credit PHYSICS 312

: 3 units ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS II

Selected advanced topics in topology, differential geometry and related areas of mathematics that are important in contemporary theoretical physics. Credit PHYSICS 313

: 3 units ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS III

Selected advanced topics in functional analysis, operator algebras and related areas of mathematics that are important in contemporary theoretical physics. 406

Credit PHYSICS 335

: 3 units ADVANCED PLASMA PHYSICS

Selected advanced topics of current interest in plasma physics. Credit PHYSICS 341

: 3 units QUANTUM FIELD THEORY I

Lagrangian field theory; field quantization; Feynman path integral in field theory; renormalization, dimensional regularization and its application to 4 theory. Credit PHYSICS 342

: 3 units QUANTUM FIELD THEORY II

Path integral formulation of gauge theories; perturbative evaluation of gauge theories; some applications to the theory of elementary particles; current problems. Credit PHYSICS 351

: 3 units ADVANCED STATISTICAL MECHANICS

Selected advanced topics of current interest in statistical mechanics. Credit PHYSICS 355

: 3 units ADVANCED ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS

Selected advanced topics of current interest in atomic and molecular physics. Credit PHYSICS 361

: 3 units QUANTUM ELECTRONICS I

Selected advanced topics in laser physics such as advanced laser systems; optical detectors and modulators; optical fibers and optical communication; optoelectronic devices‘ integrated optics. Credit

: 3 units

407

PHYSICS 362

QUANTUM ELECTRONICS II

Selected advanced topics of current interest in non-linear optics and quantum optics. Credit PHYSICS 371

: 3 units ADVANCED SOLID STATE PHYSICS I

Selected advanced topics in solid state physics with focus on semiconductors, metals, surfaces and interfaces, thin films and amorphous materials. Credit PHYSICS 372

: 3 units ADVANCED SOLID STATE PHYSICS II

Selected advanced topics in solid state physics with focus on dielectric materials, magnetic materials, phase transitions and low-dimensional systems. Credit PHYSICS 375

: 3 units ADVANCED LOW-TEMPERATURE PHYSICS

Selected advanced topics of current interest in superconductivity and superfluidity. Credit PHYSICS 381

: 3 units ADVANCED NUCLEAR PHYSICS

Selected advanced topics of current interest in nuclear physics. Credit PHYSICS 385

: 3 units CURRENT TOPICS IN PARTICLE THEORY I

Current topics in the gauge theories of strong, weak and electromagnetic interactions as well as the unification problem. Credit PHYSICS 386

: 3 units CURRENT TOPICS IN PARTICLE THEORY II

Additional current topics in theoretical particle physics. Credit

: 3 units

408

PHYSICS 390

INDEPENDENT STUDY

A short-term laboratory investigation of an assigned problem. This subject may be taken repeatedly. Credit PHYSICS 398

: 3 units GRADUATE SEMINAR

Involves the presentation of a research paper arising from library, independent research and dissertation research works. This subject maybe taken repeatedly. Credit PHYSICS 399

: 1 unit DOCTORAL RESEARCH WORK

Credit Prerequisite(s)

PHYSICS 400

: 6 units up to a maximum of 50 units total credit : Passing of the candidacy examination and completion of all course requirements. This subject maybe enrolled repeatedly.

PH. D. DISSERTATION

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 12 units : Passing of the candidacy examination and completion of all course requirements.

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Ambalode, Leo Cristobal II C.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2008 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2002

2 Arogancia, Dennis C.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2003 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1999

3 Bacala, Angelina M.

Ph.D. Physics, Louisiana State University, 1989 MS Physics, UP-Diliman, 1983 BS Physics for Teachers (Cum Laude), PNC, 1978

4 Bastatas, Lyndon D.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2008 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2005

5 Bornales, Jinky B.

Ph.D. Physics, UP-Diliman, 2006 MS Physics, UP-Diliman, 1999 BS Physics, MSU-Marawi, 1990

6 Confesor, Mark Nolan P.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2007 409

BS Physics (Magna Cum Laude), MSU-IIT, 2003 7 Enobio, Eli Christopher I.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2008 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2001

8 Gooc, Hermogenes, Jr., C.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2003 BS Physics (Cum Laude), MSU-IIT, 1996

9 Gravador, Enrico B.

MS Physics, UP-Diliman, 1996 BS Physics, Siliman University, 1981

10 Jacosalem, Editha P.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1999 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1992 Diploma in Electronics Eng‘g Tech., MSU-IIT, 1980

11 Magallanes, Jingle B.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2002 BS Physics (Magna Cum Laude), MSU-IIT, 1998

12 Nawang, Salasa A.

Ph.D. Physics, Hiroshima University, 2006 MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1999 BS Physics, MSU-Marawi, 1992

13 Pastrano, Wilfredo S.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2004 BS Physics (Magna Cum Laude), MSU-IIT, 1983 Diploma in Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Eng‘g Tech. (with honors), MSU-IIT, 1977

14 Ramirez, Anthony Paul D.

MS Physics (Cum Laude), MSU-IIT, 2007 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2002

15 Reserva, Rosario L.

MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2001 MA Physics, UP-Diliman, 1993 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1987

16 Tee, Remigio G.

Ph.D. Physics, University of Colorado, USA, 1978 BS Physics (Magna Cum Laude), MSU-Marawi, 1969

17 Ungui, Lolita D.

MS Environmental Eng‘g, Illinois Technological Institute, USA, 1980 MAT (Physics), MSU-Marawi, 1977 BS Chemical Engineering, USC, Cebu City, 1969

18 Vequizo, Reynaldo M.

Ph.D. Physics, Niigata University, 2007 MS Physics, MSU-IIT, 2002 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1998

410

SScch ho oo oll o off cco om mppuutte er r ssttuuddiie ess

List of Programs         

Master of Science in Computer Application Master of Science in Computer Science Master of Science in Information Management Master of Science in Information Technology Master of Computer Application Master of Computer Science Master of Information Management Master of Information Technology Master in Information and Library Systems

411

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Introduction The multi-disciplinary program, Master of Science in Computer Applications (MSCA), is geared to satisfy the demand for IT practitioners in various fields. It is flexible and can be tailored to the growing needs of industry, business and academe in the country, especially in the Southern Philippines. The program was introduced in 1997 in answer to the requirements outlined in the CHED Mindanao Advanced Education Program. While graduates of the program have mostly served in the academe, they were primarily empowered to organize information in the solution of problems in science, engineering, and business. Very recent developments necessitate the adaptation of the program to exploit the opportunities available to the university and the students. MSCA thus, branches out to the following programs: Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT) Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM) Master of Computer Applications (MCA) Master of Computer Science (MCS) Master of Information Technology (MIT) Master of Information Management (MIM) This is to give the students wide array of choices on whether to pursue a research or an application track in their program of study. This setup also gives the students greater access to the programs through fellowship grants that will be available through the choice of program.

Objectives The MSCA program is offered with the following objectives: 1.

to provide advanced training in the application of computers and information technology in the various fields of science, technology and business;

2.

to teach computational methods to solve problems in science, technology and business;

3.

to contribute to the manpower needs of the industries, business and academe in the country; and

4.

to stimulate and encourage researches in fields of science, technology and business.

412

Admission Requirements To apply for admission into the program, a prospective student must have: 1.

A baccalaureate degree in Computer Science, Information Technology, Information Management, Engineering, Mathematics or other fields that may prepare him for the specialization he/she wants to pursue;

2.

Demonstrable proficiency in at least one high-level programming language which may be through passing a formal course in programming or a Programming Proficiency Examination or an equivalent certification examination;

4.

An undergraduate GPA of at least 2.0;

5.

Recommendations from two former professors; and

6.

Pass an interview with the Program Admissions Committee.

Students pursuing a Computer Science or Information Technology specialization must have a background in Calculus covering at least Integral and Differential Calculus. Moreover, those interested in specializing in Computer Science must have a background in Discrete Mathematical Structures, Theory of Computation, Data Structures and Algorithm, Operating Systems, Programming Languages, Database Systems, and Software Engineering.

Required Courses 

All students will have to take the following courses: i. Data Structures (ICT 201) ii. Computer Organization and Architecture (ICT202) iii. Operating Systems (ICT 206)



Computer Science, Information Technology students are required to take programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology (ICT 203) while Information Management students are to take Programming Languages for Information Management (ICT 207).



Those students who plan to get a degree in computer Applications must take Numerical Methods (Math 214/ICT 204) and Computer Interfacing (ICT 205).

Students whose training include a strong background in Discrete Mathematical Algorithm, Operating Systems, Programming Languages, Database Systems and Software Engineering may apply for advanced credits for ICT 201 (Data Structures), ICT 202 (Computer Organization and Architecture), ICT 203

413

(Operating Systems), ICT 206 (Programming Languages) by passing an equivalency examination on topics covered in these courses.

Specialization Courses (18 units for Master of Science and 24 units for Master's): Specialization Courses are courses that the adviser feels will strengthen the education of the student in his/her chosen area of specialization. These will be identified in the program of study to be prepared by the student together with his/her registration adviser prior to his/her first semester in the program taking into account the preparation of the student and the study goals. This list may be modified upon consultation with thesis/project adviser when the thesis/project/special problem of the student shall have been identified.

Research Seminar (1 unit) Each student will be asked to enroll in a research seminar course where he/she will report on the progress and/or results of his/her research relevant to the thesis or special problem/project chosen.

Thesis (6 units) A thesis is required for students who want to obtain a Master of Science degree. It shall be continually enrolled until the student graduates or is removed from the program.

Special Problem/Project This is required for a student who plans to earn a Master‘s degree and not a Master of Science degree. The special problem/project will equivalent to 6 units. The student will continually enroll in this course unit the student graduates or is dropped from the program.

Additional Courses (6 units) Additional 6 units of Specialization Courses are required of students doing a Master‘s program (not Master of Science) if their preparation is weak as determined by the admissions committee through exam and/or interview.

Comprehensive Examination Students enrolled in Master‘s program are required to take a comprehensive examination in the required courses. They may take this exam after completing 18 units of coursework to include required courses. A student must be in good 414

standing (GPA of 2.0 or better) before taking the examination. The exam must be passed within two tries.

Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Thesis Comprehensive Examination Total

15 units 15 1 6 37 units

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER APPLICATION (MSCA) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 ICT 205

Course Title

Units

Data Structure Computer Organization and Architecture Computer Interfacing Total

3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 204 SC SC ICT 299

Course Title

Units

Numerical Methods Specialization Course Specialization Course Research Seminar Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 10

Second Year, Second Semester Course

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk

Prerequisite(s) 415

No. ICT 399

Lec Master‘s Thesis Total

Lab

Total

6 6

Specialization Courses ICT 132 ICT 240 ICT 249 ICT 285 ICT 287 ICT 290 ICT 291 ICT 292 ICT 293 ICT 294 ICT 295 ICT 296 ICT 297

Biomedical Informatics Computer simulation and Modeling Mobile Computing Robotic Systems Biomorphic Computation Digital Signal Processing Digital Audio Processing Digital Image Processing Digital Image Analysis Advanced Multimedia Systems Computer Vision I Computer Vision II Introduction to Biomedical Imaging

416

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Thesis Comprehensive Examination Total

12 units 18 1 6 37 units

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (MSCS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 SC

Course Title

Units

Data Structures Computer Organization and Architecture Specialization Course Total

3

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 203 SC SC ICT 299

Course Title Programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology Specialization Course Specialization Course Research Seminar Total

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 10

417

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 399

Course Title

Units

Master‘s Thesis Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Specialization Courses ICT 212 ICT 221 ICT 232 ICT 233 ICT 240 ICT 242 ICT 247 ICT 248 ICT285 ICT 286 ICT 287 ICT 312 ICT 330 ICT 340

Parallel Algorithms programming Language Implementation (compiler Design and Construction) Biomedical Informatics Probabilistic Methods in computer Science Computer simulation and Modeling Theory of Computation Cryptography Computational Mathematics Robotic systems Models of Symbolic Learning Biomorphic Computation Advanced Algorithms and Randomized Algorithms Advanced Scientific Computing Advanced Topics in Computational Science

418

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Thesis Comprehensive Examination Total

12 units 18 1 6 37 units

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (MSIM) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 SC

Course Title

Units

Data Structures Computer Organization and Architecture Specialization Course Total

3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 203 SC SC ICT 299

Course Title Programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology Specialization Course Specialization Course Research Seminar Total

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 10

Second Year, Second Semester 419

Course No. ICT 399

Course Title

Units

Master‘s Thesis Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Specialization Courses ICT 256 ICT 261 ICT 270 ICT 271 ICT 272 ICT 273 ICT 274 ICT 278 ICT 279 ICT 303 ICT 276 ICT 280 ICT 283 ICT 288 ICT 289 ICT 252 ICT 257 ICT 258 ICT 259 ICT 263 ICT 264

Design of Interactive systems Developing multimedia Information Systems Information Organization and Retrieval Information Users Society Distributed Computing Applications and Infrastructure Information Technology Management IS Policy and Strategy Analysis of Information Organization and Systems Group and Organizational Approaches to Information Systems Information In Society User Interface Design and Development Management of Information Systems and Services Project and Change Management Information policy Strategic Computing and Communications Technology Economic methods for Decision Making Economics of Information Legal Issues in Information Management Intellectual Property Principles of Information Retrieval Organization of Information in Collections

420

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Thesis Comprehensive Examination Total

12 units 18 1 6 37 units

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (MSIT) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 SC

Course Title

Units

Data Structures Computer Organization and Architecture Specialization Course Total

3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 203 SC SC ICT 299

Course Title Programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology Specialization Course Specialization Course Research Seminar Total

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 10

421

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 399

Course Title

Units

Master‘s Thesis Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

6 6

Specialization Courses ICT 212 ICT 208 ICT 249 ICT 254 ICT 256 ICT 261 ICT 273 ICT 283

Parallel Algorithms Computational Complexity / Complexity Theory Mobile computing Software Reliability and Reusability Design of Interactive Systems Developing Multimedia Information Systems Information Technology Management Project and Change Management

MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

422

Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Thesis Comprehensive Examination Total

15 units 15 1 6 37 units

MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATION (MCA) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 ICT 205

Course Title

Units

Data Structure Computer Organization and Architecture Computer Interfacing Total

3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 9

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 204 SC SC ICT 299

Course Title

Units

Numerical Methods Specialization Course Specialization Course Research Seminar Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 10

Second Year, Second Semester

423

Course No. ICT 398 SC

Course Title

Units

Special Projects Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6

Specialization Courses ICT 132 ICT 240 ICT 249 ICT 285 ICT 287 ICT 290 ICT 291 ICT 292 ICT 293 ICT 294 ICT 295 ICT 296 ICT 297

Biomedical Informatics Computer simulation and Modeling Mobile Computing Robotic Systems Biomorphic Computation Digital Signal Processing Digital Audio Processing Digital Image Processing Digital Image Analysis Advanced Multimedia Systems Computer Vision I Computer Vision II Introduction to Biomedical Imaging

424

MASTER OF COMPUTER SCIENCE Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Special Projects Comprehensive Examination Total

12 units 27 1 3 43 units

MASTER OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (MCS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 SC SC

Course Title

Units

Data Structures Computer Organization and Architecture Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

3

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 3 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

425

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 203 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 12

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 398 SC

Course Title

Units

Special Projects Specialization Course Total

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 6

Specialization Courses ICT 212 ICT 221 ICT 232 ICT 233 ICT 240 ICT 242 ICT 247 ICT 248 ICT285 ICT 286 ICT 287 ICT 312 ICT 330 ICT 340

Parallel Algorithms programming Language Implementation (compiler Design and Construction) Biomedical Informatics Probabilistic Methods in computer Science Computer simulation and Modeling Theory of Computation Cryptography Computational Mathematics Robotic systems Models of Symbolic Learning Biomorphic Computation Advanced Algorithms and Randomized Algorithms Advanced Scientific Computing Advanced Topics in Computational Science

426

MASTER OF INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Special Projects Comprehensive Examination Total

12 units 27 1 3 43 units

MASTER OF INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (MIM) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 SC SC

Course Title

Units

Data Structures Computer Organization and Architecture Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

3

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 3 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 207 SC SC SC

Course Title Programming Languages for Information Management Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

427

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 398 SC

Course Title

Units

Special Projects Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6

Specialization Courses ICT 256 ICT 261 ICT 270 ICT 271 ICT 272 ICT 273 ICT 274 ICT 278 ICT 279 ICT 303 ICT 276 ICT 280 ICT 283 ICT 288 ICT 289 ICT 252 ICT 257 ICT 258 ICT 259 ICT 263 ICT 264

Design of Interactive systems Developing multimedia Information Systems Information Organization and Retrieval Information Users Society Distributed Computing Applications and Infrastructure Information Technology Management IS Policy and Strategy Analysis of Information Organization and Systems Group and Organizational Approaches to Information Systems Information In Society User Interface Design and Development Management of Information Systems and Services Project and Change Management Information policy Strategic Computing and Communications Technology Economic methods for Decision Making Economics of Information Legal Issues in Information Management Intellectual Property Principles of Information Retrieval Organization of Information in Collections

428

MASTER OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Degree Requirements Core Courses Specialization Courses Research Seminar Special Projects Comprehensive Examination Total

12 units 27 1 3 43 units

MASTER OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (MIT) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 201 ICT 202 SC SC

Course Title

Units

Data Structures Computer Organization and Architecture Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

3

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 12

First Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 206 SC SC SC

Course Title

Units

Operating Systems Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Lab Total

3 3 3 3 12

Second Year, First Semester Course No. ICT 203 SC SC SC

Course Title Programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology Specialization Course Specialization Course Specialization Course Total

Units

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 3 1 12

429

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. ICT 398 SC

Course Title

Units

Special Projects Specialization Course Total

Lec

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lab Total

3 3 6

Specialization Courses ICT 212 ICT 208 ICT 249 ICT 254 ICT 256 ICT 261 ICT 273 ICT 283

Parallel Algorithms Computational Complexity / Complexity Theory Mobile computing Software Reliability and Reusability Design of Interactive Systems Developing Multimedia Information Systems Information Technology Management Project and Change Management

CATALOGUE OF COURSES ICT 200

INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED LOGIC Structures: relations between structures, term structures; description: rotation and meaning, substitution operations, first order formulas, database languages, program verification conditions, semantics valuation, normal forms, quantifier reduction, axiomatic theories; proof: resolution, sequential calculi, natural deduction, automated theorem proving, semantic completeness; limits of formalization: compactness, undecidability of truth, undecidability of canonical theories, non-formalizability of database theory. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 201

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DATA STRUCTURES Advanced data structures; algorithm design techniques and mathematical tools in the analysis of algorithms: models, recurrences, summations, growth rates; probabilistic techniques, upper and lower bounds; worst-case and average-case analysis, amortized analysis, dynamization; comparison-based algorithms: search, selection, sorting, hashing; information extraction algorithms (graphs, databases); graphs algorithms: spanning trees, shortest paths, connectivity, depth-first search, breadth-first search.

Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) Prerequisite(s) : None ICT 202 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE

430

Basic computer logic: truth tables; logic equations, gates, combinatorial logic; basic computer arithmetic; binary numbers; addition and subtraction; floating point representation; system hierarchy; integrated circuit technology; performance; metrics; closing benchmarks; Amhdal‘s law; instruction sets and operations; MIPS; assembly Language; machine language; examples of other instruction sets. Credit Prerequisite(s) ICT 203

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Systematic approach to programming languages, relationships among languages, properties and features of languages: imperative, functional, logic-based and object-oriented. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 204

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

NUMERICAL METHODS/ANALYSIS Topics include numerical solution of algebraic and transcendental equations; linear systems and the algebraic eigenvalue problem; interpolation and approximation; numerical integration; difference equations; numerical solution of differential equations; and finite difference methods. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 205

: 3 units (3 hrs lec / 0 hrs lab) : None

COMPUTER INTERFACING The course includes the discussion of the parallel port and the serial port of a PC, both the hardware and the software and its communication with the internal circuit. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 206

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

OPERATING SYSTEMS Topics include operating system structures, multiprogramming and multiprocessing; process management; memory management; storage management, I/O systems; distributed systems; protection and security. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 207

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 431

Topics include survey of different programming languages, evaluation and performance of each programming language, relationships and features. This course is intended for Information Management and may not be credited for Computer Science and Information Technology. Credit Prerequisite(s) ICT 208

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

COMPUTATIONAL COMPLEXITY / COMPLEXITY THEORY Computational complexity classes, their intrinsic properties and relations between them; time and space computational complexity; classification of decision problems; complexity of optimization problems; reducibility and completeness of problems within complexity of classes, circuit complexity classes; space-time, memory-hierarchy tradeoffs; hard and complete problems; relativization of the P=? NP conjecture; parallel computation models and the class NC. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 209

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 242 (Theory of Computation)

SPECIFICATION AND VERIFICATION Topics include tools and techniques for rigorous reasoning about software and digital hardware; safety, reliability, security, and other design-critical applications; decision algorithms; projects involving the use of automated reasoning, such as model checkers, theorem provers, and program transformation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 210

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING Managerial level of technical knowledge and terminology for data, voice, image, and video communications and computer networks to effectively communicate with technical, operational and management people in telecommunications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 212

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 202 (Computer Organization and Architecture)

PARALLEL ALGORITHMS Models of parallel computation; performance measures, scalability, pipelining techniques for analyzing parallel algorithms; interconnection network topologies; and applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 213

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 202 (Computer Organization and Architecture)

NETWORK PERFORMANCE AND MONITORING 432

Network performance evaluation; measurement techniques and tools; simulation, queuing models, case studies and applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 221

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None ICT 210 (Data Communications and Networking) or Consent of Instructor.

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE IMPLEMENTATION (COMPILER DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION) The implementation of traditional and nontraditional computer programming languages; compilation including lexical analysis, parsing, optimization, code generation, testing and techniques in error correction and recovery; run-time support including run-time libraries, storage management, input-output; comparison of implementation techniques and extensive laboratory exercises and project. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 230

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 203 (Programming Languages for Computer Science and Information Technology)

SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Overview of computer hardware, software, and numerical methods that are useful on scientific workstations and supercomputers; high-performance computer architectures, software tools and packages; characteristics of numerical methods in common use; graphical presentation of results and performance analysis and improvement. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 232

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None Consent of Instructor

BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS Computational methods for managing and analyzing information about biomedical systems; standards and tools in biomedical informatics. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None Consent of Instructor

433

ICT 233

PROBABILISTIC METHODS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Random combinatorial structures and their applications to computer science. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 240

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None Consent of Instructor

COMPUTER SIMULATION AND MODELING Basic principles of simulation and simulation languages; overview of probability theory; mathematical modeling; random number generation; discrete simulation models; queuing theory and stochastic processes; applications and comparison of simulation languages. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 242

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

THEORY OF COMPUTATION Deterministic and nondeterministic automata; regular expressions; pumping lemmas; context-free languages; parsing; pushdown automata; context-sensitive languages; LBA, LR(k) languages; closure and decidability of language classes; Turing machines; random access machines; grammars; general recursive functions; equivalence of computation models; universal machines; relative computing; unsolvability, semi-recursive sets and Rice‘s Theorem. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 243

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : CSc 133 (Theory of Computation) and Consent of Instructor

COMPUTER GRAPHICS Introduction to graphics hardware and software; two-dimensional graphics methods; transformations, and interactive methods; three-dimensional graphics; transformations; viewing geometry, object modeling and interactive manipulation methods; basic lighting and shading; video and animation methods. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 245

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

NETWORK OPTIMIZATION Algorithms for network optimization problems; shortest paths, maximum flows; minimum cuts; matching, assignment problems and applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

434

ICT 247

CRYPTOGRAPHY Primality testing; finite fields; elliptic curves; protocols: public key cryptography, digital signatures; zero-knowledge proofs, and other cryptographic protocols. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 248

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS Overview of computational mathematics; algorithms for computing with algebraic structures and computer algebra systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 249

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

MOBILE COMPUTING Mobile computing systems; data management; packet transmission; mobile IP; routing protocols; reliability and issues in mobile wireless networks. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 250

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Economic perspectives on software engineering; historical evolution of software knowledge capital; cost effectiveness analysis; technology investments; cost and constraint models; cost estimation technologies; software estimation methods; COCOMO; SLIM; function point cost estimation models; activity based costing; validation of software effort and schedule models; and valuation of software as knowledge capital. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 251

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DATABASE SYSTEMS Physical and logical organization; file structures; indexing; entity relationship model; hierarchical, network and relational models; normalization; query languages and database logic; stored procedures; security and management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 252

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

ECONOMIC METHODS FOR DECISION MAKING Use of economic methods for management decisions; understanding costs and pricing; microeconomics for information and information organizations; financial management. 435

Credit Prerequisite(s) ICT 253

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

ISSUES, TRENDS, AND STRATEGIES FOR COMPUTER SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT Technological advances in computer systems; problems relating to ethics, security, the proliferation databases, risk analysis, telecommunications, artificial intelligence, and human-machine interaction. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 254

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

SOFTWARE RELIABILITY AND REUSABILITY Principles of reliability, reusability, initiatives, and standards in software engineering, such as function point as a measure of complexity and reliability; software reliability models; software fault analysis; types of software errors; types of design errors and inherent characteristics of software that determine reliability; software redundancy; automating tools for software reliability prototypes; and real-time software reliability. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

INTRUSION DETECTION, COMPUTER FORENSICS

INCIDENT

RESONSE,

AND

Theory, skills, and tools needed in intrusion detection and computer forensics; techniques for identifying vulnerable target systems and types of malicious code, for mitigating security risks, ad for recognizing attack patterns; the conceptual and operational tools necessary for analysis and resolution of problems with respect to effective filters and firewalls; attack tracing; system recovery; continuity of operation; evidence collection; evidence analysis; and prosecution. Credit Prerequisite(s) ICT 256

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DESIGN OF INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS Interactive design, iterative design, usability analysis, prototyping and evaluation, mental models, conceptual models, interaction styles, the use of guidelines; normative, descriptive and formative approaches to work analysis; modeling user‘s activities, defining and validating requirements, presenting interactive system designs, and the theoretical foundations underlying the design of interactive systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None 436

ICT 257

ECONOMICS OF INFORMATION Measurement and analysis of the role information plays in the economy and the resources devoted to production, distribution, and consumption of information; economic analysis of the information industry; macroeconomics of information. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 258

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

LEGAL ISSUES IN INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Introduction to legal issues in information management, antitrust, contract management, international law including intellectual property, trans-border data flow, privacy, libel, and constitutional rights. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 259

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Philosophical, legal, historical, and economic analysis needed for and uses of laws protecting intellectual property; types of intellectual property (copyright, patent, trade secrecy), the interaction between law and technology, various approaches (including compulsory licensing), and the relationship between the intellectual property and compatibility standards. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 261

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DEVELOPING MULTIMEDIA INFORMATION SYSTEMS Concepts and practices associated with the creation, utilization and evaluation of multimedia for information delivery; basics of digitizing and manipulating text, sound and video/still images; and multimedia design and implementation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 262

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DISTRIBUTED DATABASE SYSTEMS File allocation; dead-lock detection and prevention, synchronization; update consistency; query optimization and fault tolerance.

Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) Prerequisite(s) : None ICT 263 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION RETRIEVAL Theories and methods for searching and retrieval of text and bibliographic information; analysis of relevance, utility; statistical and linguistic methods for automatic indexing and classification. 437

Credit Prerequisite(s) ICT 264

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 270 (Information and Organization Retrieval) or Consent of Instructor

ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION IN COLLECTIONS Standards and practices for description and organization for bibliographic, textual, and nontextual collections; design, selection, maintenance and evaluation of cataloging, classification, indexing and thesaurus systems for particular settings; vocabulary control; codes, formats and standards for data representation and transfer. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 265

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 270 (Information and Organization Retrieval) or consent of Instructor

EXPERT SYSTEMS Artificial intelligence; cognitive psychology; linguistics; and philosophy; dialog structure interface; inference engine techniques; knowledge base representations; explanations certainty factors and human factors; expert system construction: problem selection; knowledge acquisition, representation, and programming; evaluation; and maintenance. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 267

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DATA WAREHOUSE TECHNOLOGIES Designing and implementing a data warehouse; data model approaches; and performance challenges. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 270

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

INFORMATION ORAGANIZATION AND RETRIEVAL Organization, representation, and access to information; categorization, indexing, and content analysis; data structures; design and maintenance of databases, indexes, classification schemes, and thesauri; use of codes, formats and standards; analysis and evaluation of search and navigation techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 271

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

INFORMATION USERS AND SOCIETY Impact of information and information systems, technology, practices, and artifacts on how people organize their work, interact, and understand experience; social issues in information systems design and management: assessing user 438

needs, involving users in system design, and understanding human-computer interaction and computer-mediated work and communication; use of law and other policies to mediate the tension between free flow and constriction of information. Credit Prerequisite(s) ICT 272

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING APPLICATIONS AND INFRASTRUCTURE Technical side of distributed computing, complexity management, concurrency, protocols, security, performance, networking, and middleware; application examples including collaboration, electronic commerce; information access and control; economics and policy considerations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 273

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Principles and guidelines in managing hardware and software technology; system architecture for single user, central and networked computing systems; and single and multi-user operating systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 274

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

IS POLICY AND STRATEGY Development and implementation of policies and plans to achieve organizational goals; Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 275

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 281 (Software Engineering)

NEURAL NETWORKS Basic principles and history of neurocomputing; various models and their common ideas; applications in machine learning and pattern recognition and hybrid system. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 276

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

USER INTERFACE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT User interface design and human-computer interaction; examination of alternative design; tools and methods for design and development; human computer interaction; methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality. 439

Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 277

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 271 (Information Users and Society) or Consent of Instructor

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Propositional and predicate logic, notions of logical consequence and provability, soundness and completeness of inference methods, resolution and unification; theorem proving; definition of AI; heuristic, adversary and other search methods for problem solving and games; principles of knowledge representation; AI languages and survey applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 278

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION ORGANIZATIONS AND SYSTEMS Project planning and scheduling, process design, project management and coordination; analysis of alternatives, design of alternatives; quantitative methods and tools for analysis and decision making; document management; design implementation, and evaluation of a project. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 279

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 270 (Information Organization and Retrieval), ICT 271 (Information Users and Society) and ICT 272 (Distributed Computing Applications and Infrastructure)

GROUP AND ORGANIZATIONAL APPROACHES TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS Transmission and use of information within groups such as work groups and organizations; information flows in organizations; organizations as information processors; collaboration; computer assisted cooperative work; influencing strategies; adoption of innovation; the uses of information for coordination and communications within organizations. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 280

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 271 (Information Users and Society) or Consent of Instructor

MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND SERVICES Introduction to internal and external management issues and practices in information organizations; internal issues: organizational behavior; organizational theory; personnel; budgeting; planning; external issues: organizational environments, politics, marketing, strategic planning, funding sources. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 271 (Information Users and Society) or Consent of 440

Instructor ICT 281

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Software engineering principles; and systems analysis and design processes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 282

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 280 (Data Management)

SOFTWARE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT METHODOLOGY Design, analysis, implementation and testing of software used in information management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 283

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

PROJECT AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT Development of detailed project plans, schedules, and budgets; estimate project resources; allocate/coordinate resources; and interface with management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 284

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 281 (Software Engineering)

INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS Major issues and approaches in artificial intelligence; principles of reactive, goalbased, and utility-based agents; problem-solving, intelligent search optimization methods; knowledge representation and design of representational vocabularies; inference and theorem proving, reasoning under uncertainty, and planning; overview of machine learning, natural language understanding; speech and pattern recognition; other current methods in intelligent systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 285

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Computer Programming and Consent of Instructor

ROBOTIC SYSTEMS Biologically-motivated robotic systems; reactive, deliberative, and hybrid architectures; knowledge representation for robotic systems; sensor fusion and perceptual strategies; and adaptation and social behavior. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 284 (Intelligent Systems) or equivalent

441

ICT 286

MODELS OF SYMBOLIC LEARNING Symbolic artificial intelligence methods for learning; inductive and explanationbased generalization; failure-driven learning; case-based learning; operationality of explanations and utility of learning; goal-driven learning; criteria for when, what and how to learn; learning in integrated architectures: pattern recognition, parametric and non-parametric learning, decision trees, Bayesian and neural networks and reinforced learning. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 287

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 284 (Intelligent Systems) or Consent of Instructor

BIOMORPHIC COMPUTATION Biologically-inspired approaches to the design of intelligent systems; distributed and perceptually-grounded representations; temporal processing; neural network approaches to vision and natural language processing; evolutionary computation; comparison of symbolic and biomorphic approaches to intelligence; introduction to computing and dynamical systems. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 288

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 284 (Intelligent Systems) or Consent of Instructor

INFORMATION POLICY Examination of the nature of corporate, non-profit, and governmental information policy; the appropriate role of the government in production and dissemination of information, the tension between privacy and freedom of access to information; issues of potential conflicts in values and priorities in information policy. Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) Prerequisite : None

442

ICT 289

STRATEGIC COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY Factors strongly impacting the success of new computing and communications products and services (based on underlying technologies such as electronics and software) in commercial applications; technology trends and limits, economics, standardization, intellectual property, government policy and industrial organizations; strategies to manage the design and marketing of successful products and services. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 291

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DIGITAL AUDIO PROCESSING Audio processing; speech processing and recognition; voice recognition and synthesis; compression of audio signals; and layers of compression. Credit : 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) Prerequisite : ICT 290 (Digital Signal Processing)

ICT 292

DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING Digitized image and its properties; data structures for image analysis; image preprocessing; an introduction to segmentation; linear discrete image transforms; image data compression and elementary case studies. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 293

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 290 (Digital Signal Processing)

DIGITAL IMAGE ANALYSIS Include shape representation and description; object recognition; mathematical morphology; texture and more advanced case studies in image analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 294

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 292 (Digital Image Processing)

ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS Include video and audio processing; integration and compression; pre-processing of audio and video signals; post processing of signals; compression of synthesized signals. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 293 (Digital Image Analysis)

443

ICT 295

COMPUTER VISION I Include shape representation and description; object recognition and case studies in high level processing. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 296

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 293 (Digital Image Analysis)

COMPUTER VISION II Pattern recognition and artificial intelligence techniques; advanced topics in segmentation; 3D vision, geometry and radiometry; use of 3D vision; motion analysis and advanced studies in computer vision. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 297

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None ICT 295 (Computer Vision I) and ICT 277 (Artificial Intelligence)

INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL IMAGING Understanding of images with physiological feature; data acquisition and preprocessing of images from x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 298

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 293 (Digital Image Analysis)

SPECIAL TOPICS New and highly specialized topics in Computer Science and Information Technology. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 299

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Consent of Instructor

RESEARCH SEMINAR Independent seminar under the direction of a faculty member. Student is required to render a seminar every week on the progress of his research. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Completion of Academic Requirements

444

ICT 303

INFORMATION IN SOCIETY Societal needs and demands; sociology of knowledge and science; diffusion of knowledge and technology; information seeking and use; information and culture; and technology and culture. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 312

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 271 (Information Users and Society) or Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED ALGORITHMS ANALYSIS AND RANDOMIZED ALGORITHMS Fast algorithms for classical problems; lower bounds results; statistical behavior and construction and analysis of randomized algorithms; expected performance of randomized algorithms; fundamental limitations on probabilistic computations; complexity issues and applications. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 330

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : ICT 201 (Data Structures)

ADVANCE SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Representation, program dependence, control structures; multiprocessor organization: vectorization, memory organization, processor topologies and architectures; models of parallelism; programming language and systems for scientific and high performance computing; environments for interactive scientific experiments and databases; distributed programming tools; parallelism in scientific problems: parallel computer architectures; parallel algorithmic techniques; parallel algorithms and models, parallel performance analysis and debugging. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 340

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Consent of Instructor

ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE Special topics in computational science and scientific computing. May be repeated for credit with permission. Topic should be indicated for record purposes. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Consent of Adviser

445

ICT 354

NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING Fundamentals of Linguistic, Computational Linguistic, and Language Formalisms: Unification Grammar, Lexical Functional Grammar, Head Driven Phrase Structure Grammar, NLP areas: Machine Translation, Database Query, Summarization, Question and Answering Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 397

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : None

DIRECTED STUDY Topics that best contribute to the academic goals of the student but are not appropriately covered in courses offered. These can be studied by the student himself but under the direction of a faculty member. Students intending to enroll in the course must request for approval from the faculty member and the department concerned before registration. The course may be taken for a credit of

1-15 units with a grade of S or N (Satisfactory or Not Satisfactory). At most 6 units may be no lectures but laboratory work may be done as needed. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 398

: 1-15 (0 hr lec, as needed lab hours) : None Consent f Instructor, department concerned and completion of 18 units of required coursework to include 6 units of specialization courses.

SPECIAL PROJECTS Independent study under the direction of a faculty member, culminating in a written report. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ICT 399

: 6 units (0 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Coursework (Completion of 12 units including 6 units of specialization courses.)

THESIS Research under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty leading to an MS thesis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (3 hrs lec, 0 hrs lab) : Must have completed all coursework

FACULTY PROFILE 446

1 Ambe, Aloha May H.

MIT (Multimedia & Interactive Systems), ADMU, 2006 BS Info Tech, MSU-IIT, 2002

2 Cabido, Manuel C.

MS Computer Science (Software Engineering), ADMU, 1999 BS Mathematics, MSU-IIT, 1988

3 Dimalen, Davis M.

MS Computer Science (Natural Language Processing), DLSU, 2004 BS Computer Science, MSU-Marawi, 1988

4 Dimalen, Editha D.

MS Computer Studies (Natural Language Processing), DLSU, 2003 BS Computer Science, MSU-Marawi, 1998

5 Dinawanao, Dante D.

MS Computer Science (Operating System, Computer Networks, Distributed Computing), DLSU, 2003 BS Computer Science, MSU-IIT, 1994

6 Empig, Ernesto E.

MS Information Technology, Ateneo de Davao University, 2005 BSIEd Electronics, MSU-IIT, 1993

7 Malabanan, Cenie V.

MIT (Multimedia), Queensland Univ. of Tech., Australia, 2004 Diploma in Commerce, University of Wollongong, Australia, 1993 Bachelor of Engineering Technology, MSU-IIT, 1988 Diploma in Engineering Technology, MSU-IIT, 1980

8 Mostrales, Eli S.

MS Electrical Engineering, 1976, University of the Philippines-Diliman, Quezon City BS Electrical Engineering, 1972, MSU-Main, Marawi City

9 Porquis, Lope Ben C.

MS in Computer Application, MSU-IIT, 2007 BSECE, MSU-IIT, 2001

10 Pinzon, Jeremy V.

MS Computer Science (Computer Hardware System) ADMU, 1986 BS Electrical Engineering, MSU-Marawi, 1972

11 Que Esteves, Chona B.

Master in Business Management (General Management), MSU-IIT, 1993 Associate in Secretarial Science, University of San Carlos, 1974 Bachelor of Arts, Dansalan College, 1972

12 Soliva, Delilah L.

Master in Business Management, MSU-IIT, 1985 447

BS Business Administration (Accountancy), MSU-IIT, 1975 13 Taculin, Alquine Roy F. MS Computer Science, UP-Los Baños,2006 BS Computer Science, MSU-IIT, 2001

448

MASTER IN INFORMATION AND LIBRARY SYSTEMS Rationale The design of the existing MLS curriculum was last revised in 1986. It was based on the old/traditional way of library operations. Recent developments in technology have however radically changed the format of information sources, the way of seeking, accessing and delivering information and of the learning styles. It has also brought about the existence of other alternative information providers serving as competitors of the library in the information market place. More so, the capabilities and capacities of technology have increasingly transformed libraries into a virtual place. The expectation of the 21st century setting has expanded the role of librarians from mere passive custodians of library materials to librarians with knowledge of computer database and library automation systems. Today‘s librarian is expected to act as: a) Information Architect - having the ability to set up information on the Internet and to control the flow of information inside the organization b) Infopreneur - an information professional who could pore over public database, who can scan electronic sources, conduct on-line searches then synthesize, package or customize information for a client. c) Information Broker - a freelancing researcher needed by private corporations and consulting firms. d) Data Manager - a worker for software developers e) Knowledge Navigator - a personal aide to users in identifying suitable website and getting information through the web f) Webmaster - a facilitator of individual knowledge gathering g) Information Specialist - the ―ultimate search engine‖ skilled in organizing and retrieving information. To adapt to all these developments and expectations means that library instruction has to restructure its curriculum. Degreed librarians today must have taken courses in basic computing, automated information management, design and implementation of distributed information methods, web site exploration, network management, etc. They have to evolve and stay ahead of changes in the environment; otherwise, other private information providers will usurp the librarian‘s place. One role that they should be in the forefront now is to involve themselves in system design and to actively participate in the development of information services products (like GOPHER, and other internet products), rather than just coping with the finished information service products. Hence, this revision, which is inherently ICT-based and interdisciplinary, having links with other related disciplines like IT, and computer applications.

449

Objectives Courses in this program are designed: 1. 2.

3.

to equip students for professional post in information management, customized library operations and in cognate fields; to enable students to gain understanding of the flow of information and methods of managing organizational knowledge, especially gaining techniques of accessing information; and to produce graduates updated in current information and information technology with the ability to identify, analyze and evaluate the information needs of different groups and make informed decisions to satisfy them.

Admission Requirements 1. 2. 3.

At least three (3) units in logic and algorithms, and three (3) units in basic computer course Six (6) units in basic library science courses Undergraduate GPA of at least 2.0

Retention Policies 1.

2.

A student must maintain a grade point average of 2.0 per semester. Otherwise, his status during the succeeding semester will be probationary, subject to the improvement of his GPA. The maximum residence requirement is five (5) years to be reckoned from the students‘ initial enrollment

450

MASTER IN INFORMATION AND LIBRARY SYSTEMS (MILS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec. Lab Total Background in Foundation of Libraries, Info 2 3 5 Mgt, Info Organization & Servicing, and their equivalent

ILS 210

Collection Development

3

ILS 220

Information Organization, Storage, Retrieval and Presentation

3

1

6

7

3

3

0

3

None

3 12

3 9

0 9

3 12

None

Specialization Course 1 Specialization Course 2 Total

Same

First Year, Second Semester Course No.

Course Title

Units

ILS 230

Information Products and Services

ILS 240

Information Preservation and Conservation

Specialization Course 3 Elective 1 Total

Hrs/Wk Lec. Lab Total

Prerequisite(s)

3

1

6

7

Background in Foundation of Libraries, Info Mgt, Info Organization & Servicing, and their equivalent

3

2

3

5

Same

3 3 12

3 3 9

0 0 9

3 3 18

None None

451

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Elective 2 ILS 399

Course Title

Units 3 6

Thesis Writing

Compre Total

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec. Lab Total 3 0 3 None None All core and specialization courses

9

Second Year, Second Semester Course No. ILS 399

Course Title Thesis Writing

Hrs/Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec. Lec. Lec. Residency Residency/Graduation None Units

Total

GRAND TOTAL 33 UNITS

452

Summary Of Courses And Units Particulars A. Core Courses

Present (Units)

Proposed (Units)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 none none none none

3 none none none none none none 3 3 3 3

21

12

none none none

3 3 3

Sub-Total C. Comprehensive Examination D. Electives LS 230 LS 244 LS 290 ILS ___ ILS ___

0

9

Sub-Total E. Thesis LS 299 (ILS 399)

9

6

6

6

Sub-Total

6

6

Grand Total

36

33

LS 220 LS 225 LS 234 LS 237 LS 238 LS 241 LS 264 ILS 210 ILS 220 ILS 230 ILS 240 Sub-Total B. Specialization Choice 1 Choice 2 Choice 3

3 3 3 3 3

453

CATALOGUE OF COURSES PRE-ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS LOGIC AND ALGORITHM Study of logic and algorithms used in programs. Introduction in preparing pseudocodes; development and design of algorithms. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units : none

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING Basic computer concepts; introduction to programming language like Pascalsimple data types, looping, functions and procedures, arrays, user-defined data types, text files and records. Includes object-oriented programming. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units : none

FOUNDATION OF LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT (or its equivalent.) Comparative study of the different types of libraries, documentation centers, information centers and other information providers with focus on their varying forms of information needs. Includes legal issues in information management. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION ORGANIZATION AND SERVICING (or its equivalent) Basic theories in collection development, cataloguing and classification, indexing/ abstracting, thesaurus making etc. and strategies of reference service. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

CORE COURSES ILS 210

COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT Principles and procedures involved in building library collections, including conservative and networked collection development, collection evaluation

454

and collection maintenance in an automated library setting, and virtual libraries. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 220

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : Background in Foundation of Libraries, Information Management, Information Organization and Servicing, or its Equivalent

INFORMATION ORGANIZATION, STORAGE, RETRIEVAL AND PRESENTATION The use of standard catalog and classification of information sources including MARC format for inputting cataloguing data into machine readable file; Indexing and Abstracting. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 230

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : Background in Foundation of Libraries, Information Management, Information Organization and Servicing, or its equivalent

INFORMATION PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Designing of value-added and customized information packaging and servicing. Includes electronic information tools such as on-line information system (machine readable bibliographic database) and networking. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 240

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : Background in Foundation of Libraries, Information Management, Information Organization and Servicing, or its Equivalent

PRESERVATION AND CONSERVATION OF INFORMATION SOURCES Management of digital and non-digital information resources including issues of authentication, integrity, version control, legacy control, storage, personal privacy, and right of access. Conservation of information from one medium to another including data format conversion and digitization. Standards regarding quality of physical materials and digital surrogates. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : Background in Foundation of Libraries, Information Management, Information Organization and Servicing, or its equivalent

455

SPECIALIZATION AREAS RETRIEVAL AND REPRESENTATION OF INFORMATION ILS 250

MULTIMEDIA INFORMATION Concepts and methods of design, management, creation, and evaluation of multimedia databases. Organization and retrieval of digital multimedia. Issues of image and sound capture storage and storage standards, display, networking, standards, copyright, and vocabulary control. Review of applicable digital technology. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 251

: 3 units (1 hr lec ; 6 hrs lab) : none

INFORMATION VISUALIZATION AND PRESENTATION The design and presentation of digital information. Use of graphics, animation, sound, visualization software, and hypermedia in presenting information to the user. Methods of presenting complex information to enhance comprehension and analysis. Incorporation of visualization techniques into human-computer interfaces. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 252

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

LIBRARY AND INFORMATION DATA SYSTEMS Development of library networks at the local, state, regional and national levels with consideration of organization, administration, services, funding and legislation. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 253

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION AND METADATA Processing of information and metadata using standard tools such as cataloguing and classification, indexing and abstracting and the use of Dublin Core and other application softwares. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 254

: 3 units (1hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

COGNITIVE APPROACHES TO INFORMATION Individual information behavior and use and their relation to information system

456

design. Basics of cognitive psychology applied to information systems. Methods of cognitive psychology. Credit Prerequisite ILS 255

: 3 units (3 hrs lec) : none

GROUP AND ORGANIZATIONAL APPROACHES TO INFORMATION SYSTEM USE The transmission and use of information within groups such has work groups and organizations; information flows in organizations. Organizations as information processes; computer assisted cooperative work; influencing strategies; adoption of innovation; the uses of information for coordination and communication within organizations. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 256

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : none

PRIVACY, SECURITY, AND CRYPTOGRAPHY Policy and technical issues related to insuring the accuracy and privacy of information. Encoding and decoding techniques including public and private key encryption. Survey of security problems in networked information environment including viruses, worms, Trojan horses, Internet address spoofing. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : none

INFORMATION RESOURCE SYSTEM ILS 260

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEM Introduces concepts and practice associated with the creation, utilization and evaluation of information delivery. Includes the basics of digitizing and manipulating text, sound and video/ still image. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 261

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT Introduction to principles of information design and to the use of database management systems. Design considerations and evaluation; data modeling and implementation planning. Characteristics and evaluation of general and specialized database management systems. Design, implementation, and evaluation of a database using commercial database management software. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

457

ILS 262

ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION ORGANIZATIONS AND SYSTEM Project planning and scheduling, process design, project management and coordination; analysis of information needs specification of system requirements, analysis of alternatives, design of alternatives; quantitative methods and tools for analysis and decision-making; document management; design, implementation, and evaluation of a project. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 263

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION: USE OF AUTHORING TOOLS, DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM, ETC. Development of informational or instructional resource products using authoring tools; development of specifications based on user needs; system design, implementation, evaluation and testing; development of documentation. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 264

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

DESIGN OF INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS Focuses on interactive system design methods in common use covering such topics as interactive design, iterative design, usability analysis, prototyping and evaluation, mental models, conceptual models, interaction styles, the use of guidelines; normative, descriptive, and formative approaches to work analysis; modeling user‘s activities, defining and validating requirements, presenting interactive system designs, and the theoretical foundations underlying the design of interactive systems. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 265

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

KNOWLEDGE -BASE SYSTEMS Introduces the concepts, principles and techniques of knowledge base systems, with a focus on implementation of a working expert system. Presents the expert system development life cycle with a focus on analysis and conceptual modeling techniques. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 266

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM Study of management and use of information for control, planning and decision-

making; development and use of database systems with emphasis on the computer approach. 458

Credit Prerequisite ILS 267

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

INFORMATION USERS IN SOCIETY The impact of information and information systems, technology, practices, and artifacts on how people organize their work, interact, and understand experiences. Social issues in information systems design and management: assessing user needs, involving users in system design, and understanding human-computer interaction and computer-mediated work and communication. Use of law and other policies to mediate the tension between free flow and constriction of information. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 268

: 3 units (2 hrs lec; 3 hrs lab) : none USER INTERFACE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design; tools and methods for design and development; human computer interaction; methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

APPLICATION AREAS ILS 270

INTRODUCTION TO NETWORKED APPPLICATIONS AND COMPUTING Introduction to application of networked computers, especially social, educational, and information management. Understanding of the networking, computing, and software infrastructure enabling and constraining networked applications, with the goal of empowering the students to use these technologies effectively in their personal and professional life. Related policy, legal, economic, and industry issues will be covered. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 271

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

DESIGN OF LIBRARY AUTOMATION SYSTEM The design of computer software for library automation, including acquisitions, serials, circulation systems, and library catalogs; group development of a library

automation software package including functional specifications, design, programming, testing, and system implementation.

459

Credit Prerequisite ILS 272

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

APPLICATION SOFTWARE PACKAGES Comparative use and different structure, format and style of softwares for application in various library operations. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 273

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION Focuses on the design and design of human-computer interfaces covering such topics as task analysis techniques for gathering design information, iterative design through prototyping, formative and summative usability testing; theoretical foundations of HCI and cognitive modeling of user interactions; the integration of HCI techniques into the software development life cycle and the use of user constraints to generate new interactions designs. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 275

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

LIBRARY AND INFORMATION DATABASE SYSTEMS Concepts and database structure, design and applications in library and information services. Includes case studies and database projects in real life situations. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 276

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING APPLICATIONS AND INFRASTRUCTURE Technical side of distributed computing, including complexity management, concurrency, protocols, security, performance, networking, and middleware. Credit Prerequisite

ILS 277

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

DESIGN OF LIBRARY SERVICES The organization and administration of library services and their place in the institutions and communities they serve. Governance, collections and building, planning, organizing, staffing, budgeting, controlling in library and information system; and includes digital libraries and economic aspects. Credit Prerequisite

: 3 units (1 hr lec; 6 hrs lab) : none

460

SSuusstta aiinna ab blle e dde ev ve ello oppm me enntt SSttuuddiie ess

List of Programs  Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies a) b) c) d) e) f)

Sustainable Resource Management (SRM) Sustainable Community Development (SCD) Sustainable Economic Development Sustainable Rural and Urban Planning (SRUP) Sustainable Environmental Education (SEE) Sustainable Environmental Engineering (SEEng’g)

 Master in Sustainable Development Studies

461

DOCTOR IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (DISDS) Rationale The unprecedented advances in science and technology have raised continuing challenges that need to be addressed in the academe. The past and the present strategies of industrialization led to an unacceptable damage to the biophysical environment and affected social inequalities both within the developed communities and the non-industrialized world. Global warming, climate change, resource depletion, wastefulness and pollution generation are some of the challenges faced by societies. There is a need to formulate solutions and new strategies to deal with these issues employing appropriate tools to address poverty, health and other societal and environment-related issues. Likewise, it is imperative to understand the scientific issues behind climate, hydrology, disease, ecology, biodiversity, soil science, infrastructure engineering and toxicology, in order to implement government policies, business strategies, technologies and proper attitude to be imbibed and options have to be undertaken to attain economic progress, ecological protection and social justice towards greater sustainability. Iligan Institute of Technology, the CHED CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, has been mandated to contribute to the development of the MINSUPALA Region. The concern of IIT is for the entire region of Mindanao, Sulu and Palawan to develop solutions to multi-faceted environment-related problems. The realities in the socio-cultural, political and economic environment prompted MSU-IIT and DENR-MGB to develop a graduate program in Sustainable Development Studies that is geared towards sustainability of community based resources and its utilization by the present and the future generations. The graduate program in Sustainable Development Studies is ladderized type, especially designed to attract people in the government and private sectors who deal with the utilization of the country‘s natural resources. The graduate diploma (Graduate Diploma in Sustainable Development Studies) requiring 18 units only can be completed in one year. An additional of 17-20 units is required for the master‘s degree (Master in Development Studies) which needs another year. To proceed to the doctoral program (Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies), an additional of 24-26 units must be taken for another year. Students spend one year for graduate diploma, two years for masters and three years for doctoral degrees. Almost all courses/subjects include 25% classroom-based activities and 75% research or activities which are field-based. In the three options, students learn how to become more effective in conceptualizing, planning, and implementing sustainable development programs through better understanding of the issues, enhanced technical skills and improved awareness of the commercial and management techniques in delivering more sustainable practices in their socio-cultural, political and economic milieu.

462

Objectives The program aims: 1. To produce professional experts on sustainable development with the understanding and skills necessary to conceive and deliver fitting solutions to society‘s needs and to address local challenges within a sustainability framework; 2.

3.

4.

To explore value frameworks which are based on the concepts of sustainable development that can guide the design and management of environmentally critical projects so that their impacts are addressed at every stage of planning, implementation, evaluation and monitoring; To develop a strong socio-eco-political awareness among graduates and to foster an understanding of the foundations of management theory in the areas of strategy, organization, social marketing and environmental economics, the connections between technology and management, and the introduction of change within organizations; and To encourage and stimulate an appreciation of trade offs and conflicts inherent in decision making and the need to seek wider and alternative solutions to technical problems so that graduates of the course can engage in strategic and critical thinking during their employment within industry, business or government.

Admission Requirements Academic backgrounds: 1. 2.

3.

Any baccalaureate degree from recognized institution of higher learning with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better; A background, formal or informal on governments or non-government organizational operations, on industrial establishments, or any organization related to or having to do with the environment and its resources; Any master‘s degree from a recognized institution of higher learning with a GPA of 2.0 or better can proceed to doctoral degree provided the total number of units to be taken will include a balanced combination of the core and the major and/or elective or cognate courses;

Formal: The student shall submit the following upon application for admission: 1. Duly accomplished application form 2. Curriculum vitae 3. The original and one duplicate copy of the undergraduate and graduate official transcript of records; 4. Duly accomplished recommendations forms from two former professors or immediate supervisors attesting to students intellectual capacity to undertake advanced studies; 5. Payment of application fees (non-refundable)

463

6.

7.

Certification of English Proficiency (Test of English as Foreign Language, TOEFL average score of 500), for foreign students whose native language and medium are not English; Other requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, such as health clearance, student accident insurance, and other special admission requirements that may be imposed by the Graduate School

All completed applications shall be processed in the School of Graduate Studies, and evaluated by the Graduate Program Coordinator and endorses the same to the Dean of the Graduate Studies.

Degree Requirements The Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies (DiSDS) as a ladderized or progressive program, requires 18 units only for the graduate diploma and can be completed in one year; an additional of 17-20 units is required for master‘s degree which need another year; and an additional of 26 units must be taken for another year, by doctoral students. Students will spend one year for diploma, two years for masteral, and three years for doctoral degrees. To qualify for the doctoral degree, the following conditions need to be satisfied: 1. Completion of an approved Program of Study; 2. Maintenance of a Cumulative Weighted Average Grade of not lower than 1.75 for the duration of the study; 3. Passing of the Preliminary Examination that should be taken after completing the core courses of not less than 12 units for those taking the degree under the ladderized program; 4. Passing the Comprehensive Examination after completing at least fourteen (14) units of major courses, for all students whether under the ladderized or lateral programs; 5. Completion of graduate seminar and yearly presentation of dissertation in progress in College Research Colloquia; 6. Submission of a paper based on the dissertation which is published in a reputable refereed journal; 7. Completion and successful public defense of a doctoral dissertation; and 8. Submission of at least eight bound certified copies of the approved dissertation. Students with Masteral degrees in any field of specialization can be admitted to the degree program in Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies (DiSDS) after passing the preliminary exam given after one semester of coursework equivalent to, but not less than 10 units of core courses, and will be required to take a total of 44 units, distributed as follows: (1) Core courses (2) Major courses (3) Cognate courses (4) Doctoral dissertation

11 units 14 units 7 units 12 units 464

Total

44 units

The core courses must include the following: SDS 201 EnSci 206

Foundation of Sustainable Development Environmental Impact Assessment Total

3 units 4 units -------------------7 units

and at least four (4) units of any of the following core courses: SDS 202 SDS 203 SDS 204 SDS 205 SDS 206

Socio-economic and Political Dimensions of SD Resource Management and Accounting Environmental Laws, Policies and Ethics Administration of SD Programs Principles of Modeling and Simulation

2 units 2 units 2 units 2 units 3 units

Professionals with Doctoral or Ph.D. degrees in other fields of other specialization can be awarded a Post-doctoral Certificate in Sustainable Development Studies (PdCiSDS) upon fulfillment of the following: 1.

2.

At least 2 years of extensive research as a Project Leader of a high impact Sustainable Development Project implemented and administered to any community in collaboration with a senior faculty of the SDS Graduate Program; Publication of at least 2 articles in a reputable refereed ISI journals

465

DOCTOR IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (DiSDS) (LIST OF COURES BY SEMESTER) (LADDERIZED) First Year, First Semester Course No.

Course Title

Foundation of Sustainable Development Socioeconomic and Political Dimensions of SDS 202 Sustainable Development Resource Management SDS 203 and Accounting Environmental Laws, SDS 204 Policies and Ethics Administration of SDS 205 Sustainable Development Programs SDS 296A Seminar Total SDS 201

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk Corequisite(s) Fieldwork Total

3

2

3

5

None

2

1

3

4

None

2

1

3

4

None

2

1

3

4

None

2

1

3

4

SDS 201

1 12

1 7

0 15

1 22

SDS 201

First Year, Second Semester* Course No.

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Fieldwork Total

Environmental Impact 4 1 9 10 Assessment Policy Formulation, SDS 207 Theories and 2 1 3 4 Intervention SDS 295 Independent Studies 2 1 3 4 Environmental SDS 298 3 2 3 5 Research Methods SDS 296B Seminar B 1 1 0 1 Total 12 6 18 24 *Preliminary examination may be taken anytime during this semester. EnSci 206

None SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 296A

466

Second Year, First Semester Course No. SDS 206

Course Title Prin. Of Modeling and Simulation

Major 1 Major 2 Major 3 Major 4 Major 5 Total

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Fieldwork Total

3

2

3

5

SDS 201

2 2 2 2 2 13

1 1 1 1 1 7

3 3 3 3 3 18

4 4 4 4 4 25

SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 201

Second Year, Second Semester** Course No. Major 6 Major 7 Major 8 Major 9 Major 10 Major 11

Course Title

Total

Units 2 2 2 2 2 2 12

Lec 1 1 1 1 1 1 6

Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Fieldwork Total 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 18 24

** Comprehensive Examination may be taken after completing this semester of course work.

Third Year, First Semester Course No. SDS 400

Course Title Doctoral Dissertation Total

Lec

Hrs./Wk Fieldwork

Total

6

0

18

18

6

0

18

18

Units

Prerequisite(s) Completed all academic requirements.

Third Year, Second Semester*** Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Lec Fieldwork Total Doctoral Dissertation 6 0 18 18 Total 6 0 18 18 *** In case the student failed to present his/her dissertation output during this semester, he/she must enroll in SDS 400 for residence during the semester that he/she intends to present his dissertation. Course No. SDS 400

Course Title

Units

DOCTOR IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (DiSDS) (LIST OF COURSES BY SEMESTER) 467

(LATERAL ENTRY to the Doctoral Program) First Year, First Semester Course No. SDS 201 EnSci 206

Course Title Foundations of Sustainable Development Environmental Impact Assessment

Core Core SDS 296A Seminar A Total

Lec

Hrs./Wk Fieldwork

Total

3

2

3

5

None

4

1

9

10

None

2 2 1 12

1 1 1 6

3 3 0 18

4 4 1 24

None None SDS 201

Units

Corequisite(s)

First Year, Second Semester* Course No. SDS 298 Major 1 SDS 295 Major 2 SDS 296B

Course Title Environmental Research Methods Independent Studies Seminar B Total

Units

Lec

Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Fieldwork Total

3

2

3

5

SDS 201

2 2 2 1 10

1 1 1 1 6

3 3 3 0 12

4 4 4 1 18

SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 201 SDS 296A

* Preliminary Examination may be taken anytime during this semester to show competency for the Doctoral Program.

Second Year, First Semester Course No. Major 3 Major 4 Major 5 Major 6 Major 7

Course Title

Total

Units 2 2 2 2 2 10

Lec 1 1 1 1 1 5

Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Fieldwork Total 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 3 4 SDS 201 15 20

Second Year, Second Semester** Course

Course Title

Units

Hrs./Wk

Prerequisite(s) 468

No. SDS 400

Lec Dissertation Total

Fieldwork Total

6

0

18

18

6

0

18

18

Completed all academic requirements.

** DOCTORAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION must be taken in MAY of this Academic Year

Third Year, First Semester Course No. SDS 400

Course Title Dissertation Total

Units 6 6

Lec 0 0

Hrs./Wk Prerequisite(s) Fieldwork Total 18 18 18 18

Third Year, Second Semester*** ***Student must enroll in SDS 400 for RESIDENCE if he/she intends to present his/her DOCTORAL DISSERTATION..

469

Summary Of Courses And Units Proposed Curricula for Graduate Program in Sustainable Development Studies GD = Graduate Diploma; MiSDS = Master in Sustainable Development Studies; DiSDS = Doctor in Sustainable Development Studies Courses A. Core Courses B. Major Courses (based on chosen area of concentration) C. Cognates SDS 295 – Independent Study SDS 296A – Seminar A SDS 296B – Seminar B SDS 298 – Environmental Research Method SDS 299 – Special Project SDS 400 – Doctoral Dissertation Total number of units

A. Core Courses (Number/Description) SDS 201 (Foundation of SD) SDS 202 (Socioeconomic and Political Dimension of SD) SDS 203 (Resource Management and Accounting) SDS 204 (Environmental Laws, Policies and Ethics) SDS 205 (Administration of Sustainable Development Programs) SDS 206 (Principles of Modeling and Simulation) SDS 207 (Policy Formulation, Theories and Interventions) EnSci 206 (Environmental Impact Assessment)

Number Of Units Required LD GD MiSDS LT DiSDS 15 4 0 11 0 9 14 14 3 2 1 0

7 0 0 1

12 0 0 0

19 2 1 1

0

3

0

3

0 0 18

3 0 38

0 0 12 12 61-64 44 Legend: LD ladderized program direct Doctoral LT lateral entry to the Doctoral program

Lec

Fieldwork*

2

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

3

2

1 (Lab)

2

1

1

4

1

1

Credit Units 3

470

Courses *Fieldwork can be any of the following activities as prescribed by the instructor in the syllabus and implied in the course description. A written report of such activity which will include the student‘s interpretation and analysis of data and perception is required as partial fulfillment of the course: a. reconnaissance survey b. primary/secondary data collection c. field observation d. immersion in the community SIX (6) Areas of Concentrations 1. Sustainable Resource Management 2. Sustainable Community Development 3. Sustainable Economic Development 4. Sustainable Rural and Urban Planning 5. Sustainable Environmental Education 6. Sustainable Environmental Engineering. Summary of Core Courses for the ladderized program (LD) and lateral (LT) entry to the program: DiSDS Core Courses SDS 201 (Foundations of SD) SDS 202 (Socioeconomic and Political Dimensions of SD) SDS 203 (Resource Management and Acctg.) SDS 204 (Environmental Laws, Policies, and Ethics) SDS 205 (Administration of Sustainable Development Programs) SDS 206 (Principles of Modeling and Simulation) SDS 207 (Policy Formulation, Theories and Interventions) EnSci 206 (Environmental Impact Assessment)

Number Of Units Required

SRM SCD SED SRUP SEE SEEng‘g DiSDS Units LD (ladderized) Required

3

LT (lateral entry) required

Required

2

optional

Required

2

optional

required

2

optional

required

2

optional

optional

3

optional

optional

2

optional

required

4

required

Required = 15 units Areas of concentration: 1. Sustainable Resource Management (SRM) SDS 241 (Environmental Geology) SDS 242 (Environmental Chemistry) SDS 243 (Health and Environmental Toxicology)

Credits Units 2 2

Required = 7 units Lec 1 1

Fieldwork*/ ELP 1 1

471

Courses SDS 244 (Forest Resources Management) SDS 245 (Water Resources Management) SDS 246 ( Land Resources Management) SDS 247 (Assessment of Alternative Energy Resources) SDS 248 (Aquatic Ecological and Resources Management) SDS 249 (Integrated Energy Management) SDS 250 (Energy Systems Design) SDS 255 (Indigenous Knowledge Management) SDS 261 (Technologies for Sustainable Development) 2. Sustainable Community Development (SCD) SDS 251 (Rural and Urban Development SDS 252 (Community Organizing) SDS 253 (Peace & Conflict Management) SDS 254 (Gender and Development) SDS 255 (Indigenous Knowledge Management) SDS 256 (Society, Science & Technology) SDS 257 (Social Change and Development) SDS 258 (Human Ecology) SDS 259 (Population Growth) SDS 261 (Technologies for Sustainable Development) SDS 265 (Farming system Design for Sustainability) SDS 268 (Environment – friendly Economics) 3. Sustainable Economic Development (SED) SDS 261 (Technologies for Sustainable Development) SDS 262 (Economy and Ecotourism Development) SDS 263 (Community-based Entrepreneurial Development) SDS 264 (Population, Consumption and Consumerism) SDS 265 (Farming System Design for Sustainability) SDS 268 (Environment-friendly Economics) SDS 269 (Integrated Waste Management) SDS 249 (Integrated Energy Management) SDS 251 (Rural and Urban Development)

Number Of Units Required 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2

1

1

2

1

1

2 2

1 1

1 1

2

1

1

2

1

1

Credit Units 2 2 2 2

Lec 1 1 1 1

Fieldwork 1 1 1 1

2

1

1

2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 Credit Units

1 Lec

1 Fieldwork

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

472

Courses SDS 253 (Peace and Conflict Management) SDS 255 (Indigenous Knowledge Management) SDS 258 (Human Ecology) 4. Sustainable Rural & Urban Planning (SRUP) SDS 271 (Planning and the Development Process) SDS 272 (Planning Law and Practice) SDS 273 (Strategies in Rural and Urban Planning) SDS 274 (Utilities Management) SDS 275 (Development Communication) SDS 276 (Hazard Management) SDS 277 (Planning, Environment and Sustainability) SDS 245 (Water Resource Management) SDS 246 (Land Resources Management SDS 251 (Rural and Urban Development) SDS 258 (Human Ecology) SDS 262 (Economy and Ecotourism Development) SDS 263 (Community-based Entrepreneurial Development) SDS 264 (Population, Consumption and Consumerism) SDS 265 (Farming Systems Design for Sustainability) SDS 269 (Integrated Waste Management) 5. Sustainable Environmental Education (SEE) SDS 281 (Education for Sustainable Development) SDS 282 (Environment Awareness & Sustainability in Schools & Communities SDS 283 (Information, Education and Communication for SD SDS 284 (Information and Communication Technologies for SD. SDS 248 (Aquatic Ecological Resources Management) SDS 253 (Peace and Conflict Management) SDS 254 (Gender and Development) SDS 255 (Indigenous Knowledge Management) SDS 256 (Science, Technology and Society) SDS 261 (Technologies for Sustainable Development)

Number Of Units Required 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 2 2

1 1 1

1 1 1

2

1

1

2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 Credit Units

1 Lec

1 Fieldwork

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

2

1

1

473

Courses SDS 263 (Community – based Entrepreneurial Development) SDS 264 (Population, Consumption, and Consumerism) SDS269 (Integrated Waste Management) 6. Sustainable Environmental Engineering (SEEng’g) SDS 241 (Environmental Geology) SDS 242 (Environmental Chemistry) SDS 243 (Health and Environmental Toxicology) SDS 245 (Water Resources Management) SDS 246 (Land Resources Management) SDS 247 (Assessment of Alternative Energy Resources) SDS 249 (Integrated Energy Management) SDS 250 (Energy Systems Design) SDS 261 (Technologies for Sustainable Development) SDS 265 (Farming System and Design for Sustainability) SDS 269 (Integrated Waste Management) SDS 271 (Planning and the Development Process) SDS 273 (Strategies in Rural and Urban Planning) SDS 274 (Utilities Management) SDS 276 (Hazard Management) SDS 277 (Planning, Environment and Sustainability) SDS 301 (Introduction to Sustainability Engineering) SDS 310 (Environmental Life Cycle Assessment and Green Design) SDS 320 (Advanced Topics in the Air Pollution) SDS 330 (Water Quality Engineering) SDS 340 (Sustainable Processing of Engineering Materials) SDS 350 (Industrial Audit) SDS 390 (Special Topics in Sustainable Environmental Engineering) SDS 391 (Special Problem in Sustainable Environmental Engineering)

Number Of Units Required 2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

Credit Units

Lec

Fieldwork

2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

2

1

1

2 2

1 1

1 1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 2

1 1

1 1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2 2

1 1

1 1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

474

D. Units Per Semester for Fulltime Student Admitted with Baccalaureate Degree and Intends to the Doctoral Degree.

Ladderized (Direct Doctoral Program)

Lateral entry to the Doctoral Program

12 12 0

12 10 0

13 12 0

10 6 0

6 6 61

6 (6) Residency 44

First Year First Semester Second Semester Summer Second Year First Semester Second Semester Summer Third Year First Semester Second Semester Grand Total

CATALOGUE OF COURSES CORE COURSES SDS 201

FOUNDATIONS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Provides an overview of the subject on the sustainable development as it applies to local, national, and global environments. This includes the principles of ecology and environmental science as a background. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 202

: 3 units (2 units lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : None

SOCIOECONOMIC AND POLITICAL DIMENSIONS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Deals with socio-cultural, economic and political theories and models on HumanEnvironment interactions; eco-governance in the Philippines and other related issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 203

: 2 units (1 unit lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : None

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING Explains the concepts, methods and tools in the management of a resource; deals with the underlying ethical and scientific principles in resource management within the framework of sustainable development, environmental resource supply and allocation.

475

Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 204

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : None

ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS, POLICIES AND ETHICS Environmental laws and policies in research and development in support to environmental management, planning and community advocacy. Institutional framework / organizations involved with environmental issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 205

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : None

ADMINISTRATION OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS Explores techniques in planning, implementation and monitoring of SD programs case studies and discussions on implemented SD programs. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 206

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

PRINCIPLES OF MODELING AND SIMULATION Focuses on information and systems with emphasis on areas such as modeling and simulation, introduction to geographic information systems and techniques for decision making. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 207

: 2 units (1 lecture, 2 units laboratory) : SDS 201

POLICY FORMULATION, POLICIES AND INTERVENTIONS Analysis of existing policies on SD, Philippine Agenda, and develop an understanding on how local and national policies are formulated and implemented. Students will be exposed to some intervention techniques to equip them with skills to become effective agents of change for SD. Credit Prerequisite(s)

ENSCI 206

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Framework and methodology for environmental impact assessment; prediction and assessment of impacts on the physical and biological environment, assessment of environmental resources in terms of their potential utilization and corresponding impact to human activities.

476

Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 4 units (1 lecture, 3 units fieldwork) : SDS 201

COGNATES: (REQUIRED COURSES) SDS 295

INDEPENDENT STUDY An independent research project in a specific area of study under the guidance of a panel of multidisciplinary faculty members. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 296A

: 2 units : SDS 201

SEMINAR A

Organize a seminar by inviting resource speakers of a topic / theme. Credit Co-requisite(s) SDS 296B

: 1 unit : SDS 201

SEMINAR B

Delivery of a topic of choice based on the theme of the class or topic conducted under his Independent Studies. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 298

: 1 unit : SDS 296A

ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH METHODS Deals with the appreciation of research in the context of environmental problems / issues as well as comparing various physical, biological, social and statistical research methods for environmental analysis and management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 3 units (2 units lecture, 1 unit laboratory or fieldwork) : SDS 201

477

SDS 299

SPECIAL PROJECT Research and development for knowledge and application undertaken by master‘s students such as a contribution and fulfillment of the requirements of the degree.

Credit : 3 units Prerequisite(s) : Core courses completed SDS 400 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Research and development for knowledge and application undertaken by doctoral students as a contribution and fulfillment of the requirements of the degree. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 12 units : All academic courses completed

AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Sustainable Resource Management (SRM) SDS 241

ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY Geologic processes, hazards and human activities that change geological environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 242

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Study of a major chemical cycles involved in environmental processes and chemical elements affecting life within ecosystem. Factors controlling these chemical cycles, interaction of atmosphere, water solid surfaces and life involved in chemical cycles. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 243

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY Hazardous waste management, classification and major characteristics of major groups of pollutants, controversy and concern about synthetic organic compounds, understanding dose-response and its relationship to LD50 and ED50, ecological gradients and tolerances. Process of biomagnification and its importance in toxicology. Threshold effects of environmental toxins and how they can be controlled in the environment. Risk assessment in toxicology. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 244

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

FOREST RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 478

Basic principles in the of forest management, including its historical context, conserving existing forests, roles of parks in the conservation of wilderness, representative natural areas, and wildlife habitants for outdoor recreation and scientific research. Includes deforestation, reforestation programs, and certification of forest practices, forest management. Credit : 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) Prerequisite(s) : SDS 201 SDS 245 WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Overview of water resources planning and management, including the basic principles of hydrology and hydrogeology; the social, economic and policy framework for water resources management; application of environmental criteria for water supply projects; regional water supply planning issues ; emerging technical and policy issues related to national, state and local water resources management. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 246

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

LAND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Review of ecosystems and modifiers in the system (climate, water, nutrients, etc), fundamentals of natural resource response that contribute to the successful land management. How to read and understand the land which includes the classification, suitability, productivity including mineral resources management. An interface between managers and mineral resources, focusing on a selection of practical topics related to minerals and mining. Role of mining activities in the development process, global, national, and provincial distribution of resources; policy issues relating to environmental, economic and political consequences of nonrenewable resource exploitation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 247

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ASSESSMENT OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY RESOURCES Alternatives to fossil fuels, geothermal, solar, waterpower, wind, tidal energy and others. Basic tools used to analyze and assess alternative energy and environmental futures, specific issues regarding resource scarcity – availability, energy quality, new technologies and technological change, conventional / renewable /perpetual / alternative energy sources and sustainable energy development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 248

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL AND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Human exploitation of foreshore and onshore minerals deposits including the continental and deep ocean floor deposits submarine waste dumping, marine, fresh 479

and brackish water resources on tropical coast and the objectives and techniques of management, analysis and modeling of resource use and knowledge of techniques for promoting sustainable harvesting of resources, resource management failures of the past, tropical coastal aquaculture, its environmental impacts, and interaction between capture and culture fisheries. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 249

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED ENERGY MANAGEMENT Global energy issues, objective, strategies, policies, and the environmental impacts of alternative energy sources, energy issues. Objectives, strategies, and policies, assess alternatives, appreciation of policy strategies and instruments and formulate an energy policy for a region. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 250

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENERGY SYSTEM DESIGN Introduction to design of energy systems by synthetic and/or experimental procedures. Technical and economic feasibility study to be established. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 255

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Identification and rational utilization of indigenous knowledge system for environmental conservation and community development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 261

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Technological applications considering economic development that enhances and protect the natural resource quantities and qualities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

480

AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Sustainable Community Development (SCD) SDS 251

RURAL AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Studies rural and urban areas, their nature, structure/ function, and change / problems and relate them sustainable development issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 252

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Deals with community organizing as a process and method of improving community life through people empowerment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 253

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Offers fundamental concepts and principles in understanding peace and conflict – related issues. It explores basic approaches in conflict resolution and management in both traditional and modern settings. It also relates the issue to the building of a culture of peace towards sustainable development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 254

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Analysis of sex/gender differentiation; theories of gender inequality, and analysis of the ways women and men effect, and are affected by environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 255

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Identification and rational utilization of indigenous knowledge system for environmental conservation and community development: Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

481

SDS 256

SOCIETY, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY An analysis of the interrelationship between science, technology, culture and society. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 257

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

SOCIAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT Theories of social change and empirical studies of determinant and consequences of change. Experiences of underdeveloped and develop countries will be examined. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 258

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

HUMAN ECOLOGY Models of human adaptation to various environmental and socio-cultural settings, and patterned responses to changes in these setting as a result of technological advances and urbanization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 259

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

POPULATION GROWTH Deals with population impacts to resource depletion and degradation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 261

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Technological applications considering economic that enhances and protect the natural resource quantities and qualities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 265

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

FARMING SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY Principles and strategies for designing sustainable farming systems or agricultural production characterized by social, political, and economic conditions in the context of global environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 268

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENT-FRIENDLY ECONOMICS 482

Innovative economics that promote environment-friendly and highly efficient utilization of resources to ensure sustainable growth and development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Sustainable Economic Development (SED) SDS 261

TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Technological applications considering economic that enhances and protect the natural resource quantities and qualities.

Credit : 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) Prerequisite(s) : SDS 201 SDS 262 ECONOMY AND ECOTOURISM DEVELOPMENT Designs, monitor, evaluate, and improve ecotourism as a tool for poverty alleviations and biodiversity conservation through sustainable practices and principles. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 263

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

COMMUNITY-BASED ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT Farm and non-farm small businesses grounded on the foundation of shared understanding about public entrepreneurship where leadership training, community driven planning and applied research and entrepreneurial support organizations are key to its sustenance. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 264

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

POPULATION, CONSUMPTION AND CONSUMERISM Household consumption patterns affecting the environment, the changes of consumer habits that cause damage or would benefit the environment and whose data base with input-output models is used to calculate impacts of different kind of consumer expenditure. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

483

SDS 268

ENVIRONMENT-FRIENDLY ECONOMICS Innovative economics that promote environment-friendly and highly efficient utilization of resources to ensure sustainable growth and development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 269

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT System assessment for wastes collection and recovery and institutional linkages disposal strategies in private – public partnership. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 249

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED ENERGY MANAGEMENT Global energy issues, objective, strategies, policies, and the environmental impacts of alternative energy sources, energy issues. Objectives, strategies, and policies, assess alternatives, appreciation of policy strategies and instruments and formulate an energy policy for a region. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 251

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

RURAL AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Studies rural and urban areas, their nature, structure/ function, and change / problems and relate them sustainable development issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Sustainable Rural and Urban Planning (SRUP) SDS 271

PLANNING AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Examines planning as applied to industrial, housing, transport, and infrastructure and land development. Takes into account the spatial and intersectional implications of planning in these sectors. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

484

SDS 272

PLANNING, LAW AND PRACTICE Provides students with an understanding and working knowledge of planning legislation in the country together with general appreciation of legislation in related fields and its implication for the planning process. The course also aims to develop in students a critical awareness of planning procedures and the role and responsibilities of the professional planner in rural and urban context. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 273

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

STRATEGIES IN RURAL AND URBAN PLANNING Examines the analytical models and management techniques commonly used to assist decision making in both rural and urban settings and will focus on some selected models and techniques.: population estimation, social and spatial analysis, economic based and multiplier analysis, optimization methods, system simulation and dynamics, project appraisal and project dynamics, project appraisal and proactive planning, program evaluation, rural and urban modeling and urban policy analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 274

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Examines the nature and the role of transports systems, energy systems, and water systems in the mainly urban context with special reference to high density development. The topics will include among others the nature and characteristics of passenger transport - its management and functions, energy supply systems – supply and demand analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 275

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATION Explores different communication techniques as they apply to sustainable development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 276

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

HAZARD MANAGEMENT Deals with geo-environmental and man-made hazards and its impact to the environment and affected communities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

485

SDS 277

PLANNING, ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY Focus on the interface between planning systems and environmental management using the concept of sustainable development as an integrating conceptual framework. The evolution of the concept of sustainable development is discussed and attention is focused on the development and use of sustainability indicators, policies for sustainability and the transition to sustainable development paths. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 245

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Overview of water resources planning and management, including the basic principles of hydrology and hydrogeology; the social, economic and policy framework for water resources management; application of environmental criteria for water supply projects; regional water supply planning issues ; emerging technical and policy issues related to national, state and local water resources management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 251

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

RURAL AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Studies rural and urban areas, their nature, structure/ function, and change / problems and relate them sustainable development issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 258

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

HUMAN ECOLOGY Models of human adaptation to various environmental and socio-cultural settings, and patterned responses to changes in these setting as a result of technological advances and urbanization. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 262

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ECONOMY AND ECOTOURISM DEVELOPMENT Designs, monitor, evaluate, and improve ecotourism as a tool for poverty alleviations and biodiversity conservation through sustainable practices and principles. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 263

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

COMMUNITY-BASED ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT 486

Farm and non-farm small businesses grounded on the foundation of shared understanding about public entrepreneurship where leadership training, community driven planning and applied research and entrepreneurial support organizations are key to its sustenance. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 264

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

POPULATION, CONSUMPTION AND CONSUMERISM Household consumption patterns affecting the environment, the changes of consumer habits that cause damage or would benefit the environment and whose data base with input-output models is used to calculate impacts of different kind of consumer expenditure. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 265

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

FARMING SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY Principles and strategies for designing sustainable farming systems or agricultural production characterized by social, political, and economic conditions in the context of global environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 269

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT System assessment for wastes collection and recovery and institutional linkages disposal strategies in private – public partnership. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Sustainable Environmental Education (SEE) SDS 281

EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT The pivotal aim of this course is the development of method, procedures and competencies necessary of teaching environment, environmental protection and sustainable development. It includes principles of environmental ethics towards enhancement of knowledge, skills, attitude and values; development of testing curriculum, projects on environment and sustainability focus on resources like water, energy and biodiversity and other resources. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

487

SDS 282

ENVIRONMENT AWARENESS AND SUSTAINABILITY IN SCHOOL AND COMMUNITIES Focuses on environmental education in schools and communities. Through the schools and communities, the course will bring together students, teachers, administrators for schools or people and officials to the community on how to manage the school or community resources to efficiently address issues of water, energy, waste, biodiversity, health and other resource management issues. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 283

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INFORMATION, EDUCATION COMMUNICATION FOR SD The purpose of this course is to equip students with some skills in development of materials on information and communication strategies to raise awareness on environment and sustainable development issues.

Credit : 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) Prerequisite(s) : SDS 201 SDS 284 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR SD Deals with the use of information technology and communication to access knowledge and resources about global trends, emerging technologies and programs on environment and sustainable development websites; databases for environmental issues. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 248

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL AND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Human exploitation of foreshore and onshore minerals deposits including the continental and deep ocean floor deposits submarine waste dumping, marine, fresh and brackish water resources on tropical coast and the objectives and techniques of management, analysis and modeling of resource use and knowledge of techniques for promoting sustainable harvesting of resources, resource management failures of the past, tropical coastal aquaculture, its environmental impacts, and interaction between capture and culture fisheries. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 253

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

PEACE AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT Offers fundamental concepts and principles in understanding peace and conflict – related issues. It explores basic approaches in conflict resolution and management in both traditional and modern settings. It also relates the issue to the building of a culture of peace towards sustainable development. Credit

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) 488

Prerequisite(s) SDS 254

: SDS 201

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT Analysis of sex/gender differentiation; theories of gender inequality, and analysis of the ways women and men effect, and are affected by environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 255

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Identification and rational utilization of indigenous knowledge system for environmental conservation and community development: Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 256

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

SOCIETY, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY An analysis of the interrelationship between science, technology, culture and society. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 261

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Technological applications considering economic that enhances and protect the natural resource quantities and qualities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

489

SDS 263

COMMUNITY-BASED ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT Farm and non-farm small businesses grounded on the foundation of shared understanding about public entrepreneurship where leadership training, community driven planning and applied research and entrepreneurial support organizations are key to its sustenance. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 264

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

POPULATION, CONSUMPTION AND CONSUMERISM Household consumption patterns affecting the environment, the changes of consumer habits that cause damage or would benefit the environment and whose data base with input-output models is used to calculate impacts of different kind of consumer expenditure. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 268

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENT-FRIENDLY ECONOMICS Innovative economics that promote environment-friendly and highly efficient utilization of resources to ensure sustainable growth and development. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 269

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT

System assessment for wastes collection and recovery and institutional linkages disposal strategies in private – public partnership. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Sustainable Environmental Engineering (SEEng’g) SDS 241

ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY Geologic process, hazards and human activities that change geological environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

490

SDS 242

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Study of a major chemical cycles involved in environmental processes and chemical elements affecting life within ecosystem. Factors controlling these chemical cycles, interaction of atmosphere, water solid surfaces and life involved in chemical cycles. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 243

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY Hazardous waste management, classification and major characteristics of major groups of pollutants, controversy and concern about synthetic organic compounds, understanding dose-response and its relationship to LD50 and ED50, ecological gradients and tolerances. Process of biomagnifications and its importance in toxicology. Threshold effects of environmental toxins and how they can be controlled in the environment. Risk assessment in toxicology. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 245

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Overview of water resources planning and management, including the basic principles of hydrology and hydrogeology; the social, economic and policy framework for water resources management; application of environmental criteria for water supply projects; regional water supply planning issues ; emerging technical and policy issues related to national, state and local water resources management. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 246

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

LAND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Review of ecosystems and modifiers in the system (climate, water, nutrients, etc), fundamentals of natural resource response that contribute to the successful land management. How to read and understand the land which includes the classification, suitability, productivity including mineral resources management. An interface between managers and mineral resources, focusing on a selection of practical topics related to minerals and mining. Role of mining activities in the development process, global, national, and provincial distribution of resources; policy issues relating to environmental, economic and political consequences of nonrenewable resource exploitation. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 247

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ASSESSMENT OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY RESOURCES 491

Alternatives to fossil fuels, geothermal, solar, waterpower, wind, tidal energy and others. Basic tools used to analyze and assess alternative energy and environmental futures, specific issues regarding resource scarcity – availability, energy quality, new technologies and technological change, conventional / renewable /perpetual / alternative energy sources and sustainable energy development. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 249

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED ENERGY MANAGEMENT Global energy issues, objective, strategies, policies, and the environmental impacts of alternative energy sources, energy issues. Objectives, strategies, and policies, assess alternatives, appreciation of policy strategies and instruments and formulate an energy policy for a region. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 250

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENERGY SYSTEM DESIGN Introduction to design of energy systems by synthetic and/or experimental procedures. Technical and economic feasibility study to be established. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 261

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Technological applications considering economic that enhances and protect the natural resource quantities and qualities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 265

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

FARMING SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY Principles and strategies for designing sustainable farming systems or agricultural production characterized by social, political, and economic conditions in the context of global environment. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 269

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT

492

System assessment for wastes collection and recovery and institutional linkages disposal strategies in private – public partnership. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 271

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

PLANNING AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Examines planning as applied to industrial, housing, transport, and infrastructure and land development. Takes into account the spatial and intersectional implications of planning in these sectors. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 273

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

STRATEGIES IN RURAL AND URBAN PLANNING Examines the analytical models and management techniques commonly used to assist decision making in both rural and urban settings and will focus on some selected models and techniques.: population estimation, social and spatial analysis, economic based and multiplier analysis, optimization methods, system simulation and dynamics, project appraisal and project dynamics, project appraisal and proactive planning, program evaluation, rural and urban modeling and urban policy analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 274

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

UTILITIES MANAGEMENT Examines the nature and the role of transports systems, energy systems, and water systems in the mainly urban context with special reference to high density development. The topics will include among others the nature and characteristics of passenger transport - its management and functions, energy supply systems – supply and demand analysis. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 276

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

HAZARD MANAGEMENT Deals with geo-environmental and man-made hazards and its impact to the environment and affected communities. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 277

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

PLANNING, ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY

493

Focus on the interface between planning systems and environmental management using the concept of sustainable development as an integrating conceptual framework. The evolution of the concept of sustainable development is discussed and attention is focused on the development and use of sustainability indicators, policies for sustainability and the transition to sustainable development paths. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 301

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY ENGINEERING Concept of sustainability engineering, including changing attitude and values towards technology and the environment. Tools for sustainability engineering including metrics of sustainability, principles of design for the environment, methods of pollution preventions, substitution of materials and, and the use of mass and energy balances in the design of sustainable systems. The concept of industrial ecology is also explored, where the flows of mass and energy through industrial systems are examined. Comparison of engineering decisions under the old paradigm of limitless resources and under the new paradigm of finite earth. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 310

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT AND GREEN DESIGN Cradle-to-grave analysis of new products processes and policies to avoid undue environmental harm and achieve extended product responsibility. Approaches and methods for life assessment and for green design of typical products and processes. Process-based analysis models, input-output and hybrid approaches for life assessment. Use of software programs in process analysis. A life cycle assessment project is required. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 320

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ADVANCED TOPICS IN AIR POLLUTION Fundamentals of air pollution behavior, with emphasis on physical processes governing aerosols dynamics. Characterization of aerosol populations, studies of particle coagulation and interaction with surfaces and examination of control technology principles. Air pollution data acquisition, interpretation and management will also be discussed. The subject of the matter is developed through references to current practice, critique of completed design, design exercises and field trips. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 330

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

WATER QUALITY ENGINEERING 494

Fundamentals and engineering aspect of water quality. Basic principles of water chemistry, physical, chemical and biological phenomena affecting water quality; and application and examination of water quality using titrimetric, spectrometric, potentiometric and reductive / oxidative techniques. Credit Prerequisite(s) SDS 340

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

SUSTAINABLE PROCESSING OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS Deals with environmentally, economically, and socially viable routes of materials and processing and develop sustainable processes that minimize pollution, wastes, and energy consumption, while increasing recyclability and adding value to waste materials. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 350

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENTAL AUDIT Environmental Concerns. Audit as a Management Tool. The Structure of Environmental Audit. Waste Audits. Advantages and Disadvantages of Environmental Audits. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 360

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND RISK MANAGEMENT Identification, evaluation and assessment of risk that has the potential of harm to the environment, resources and human health. This course also includes the application of the identified risks in managing the environmental system or specific ecosystem posed with possible contamination. This requires students‘ knowledge of the basic statistical probability theory. Credit Prerequisite(s)

SDS 390

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 201

SPECIAL TOPICS IN SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Various approaches to sustainable development looking at major theories of international development and how they are applied in practical situations. A closer look at on – going development projects in selected countries with implication to the role of engineering (and engineers). Analysis of the project from engineering point of view within the context of sustainable development. Field trip to the development project site. Credit

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) 495

Prerequisite(s) SDS 391

: SDS 301

SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Supervised individual research on technological applications of engineering or reference to existing development projects in different communities and localities. Project proposal and initialization as expected output of course. Credit Prerequisite(s)

: 2 units (1 lecture, 1 unit fieldwork) : SDS 301

FACULTY PROFILE 1 Abellana, Virgilio Y.

Ph.D. MSE, UP, 2004 MS MetE, UP, 1991 BS Che, CIT, 1982

2 Allen, Deuel H.

MS Mechanical Engineering, UP Diliman, 1983 BSME, MSU, 1975

3 Amorado, Faith B.

MS Biology, University of San Carlos, 1991 BS Med. Tech., Silliman University, 1972

4 Amparado, Ruben F.

Ph.D. Applied Biological Sciences (Envi. Tech.), University of Ghent, Belgium, 1996 MS Envi. Sanitation, University of Ghent, Belgium, 1991 BS Forestry, MSU-Marawi, 1982

5 Ancog, Geronides P.

MS Structural Eng‘g & Construction, Asian Inst. of Tech. 1978 BSCE, CIT, 1973

6 Anies, Olive S.

MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 BS Nursing, Liceo de Cagayan, 1992 BS Biology, MSU Marawi, 1987

7 Aranico, Edgardo C.

Master of Science in Forestry, UP-Los Baños, 1981 BS Forestry, UP-Los Baños, 1973

8 Balacuit, Rosalinda C.

MSMetE, UP, 1990 MAT Chemistry, UP, 1977 BS Che, MSU-Marawi, 1967

9 Ballesta, Arturo D.

BS Electrical Engineering, Silliman University, 1976

10 Bautista, Pinky A.

Master of Engineering, MSU-IIT BS Electronics and Communications Eng‘g, 496

MSU-IIT, 1992 11 Bracamonte, Nimfa L.

Ph.D. Sociology, UP-Diliman, 1996 MA Sociology, Xavier University, 1981 AB Political Science, MSU-Marawi, 1971

12 Castro, Sevidal L.C.

Ph.D. Philippine Studies, Socio-Anthro, UP-Diliman, 1997 MA Asian Studies, U.P. Diliman, 1975 AB Asian Studies, MSU-Marawi, 1967

13 Chuy, Oscar

MS Electrical Engineering, UP, 2001 BS Electrical Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1996 BS Electronics and Communications Eng‘g, MSU-IIT, 1994

14 Clar, Jose D.

Ph.D. in Energy Engineering, UP Diliman, 1994 Master of Mechanical Engineering, UP Diliman, 1977 MBA, MSU-IIT, 1983 BSME, MSU, 1971, Cum Laude

15 Demayo, Cesar G.

Ph.D. Entomology, UPLB, 1998 MS/Ph.D. Genetics, UPLB, 1985/1990 BS Biology, MSU Marawi

16 Deocampo, Annielyn H.

MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT 1999 BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1993

17 Domiguez, Florencio, Jr.

MIM (Environmental Management)

18 Donasco, Edgar Alan A.

MS Environmental Engineering, UP, 2001 BS Mechanical Engineering, MSU, 1976

19 Empig, Vicente E.

Master of Engineering (Geotechnical), AIT, 1981 BSCE, MSU, 1973

20 Eya, Anna Arlene A.

MS Applied Statistics, MSU-IIT, 2007 MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1984

21 Espenido, Mercurio

MS MetE, UP, 1983 MBM, UP, 1983 BS MetE, UP, 1978

22 Estoperez, Noel R.

MOE, MSU-IIT, 1999 BS Physics, MSU-IIT, 1989 BS Electrical Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1989

23 Garcia, Maricis Gay P.

MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 497

BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1993, Magna Cum Laude 24 Gomez, Randy B.

MS Electrical Engineering BS Electronics and Communications Eng‘g, MSU-IIT, 1998

25 Ibarra, Ephraim E.

MS CerE, Nagoya Institute of Technology, 1990 BS MetE, MSU-IIT, 1981

26 Ignacio, Ma. Teresa T.

MS MetE, UP, 1983 BS MetE, UP, 1977

27 Jarligo, Ma. Ophelia D.

MS Material Science, UP, 2000 BS Ceramics Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1995

28 Jimenez, Buenaflor D.

MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 1996 BS Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1975 BS Pre-med, Southwestern University, Cebu City, 1974

29 Kadil, Helen O.

MA Sociology BS Sociology

30 Lacuna, Dorothy G.

Ph.D. Biological Oceanography, Hiroshima Univ., Japan, 2001 MS Biology, UP-Diliman, 1993 BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1986

31 Lagumbay, Randy S.

MS Computational Fluid Dynamics, Univ. of New South Wales, Australia, 2000 BS Mechanical Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1997

32 Lahoylahoy, Lucilyn

MS Microbiology, UP-Los Baños, 2003 BS Biology, MSU-IIT, 1999

33 Lambino, Mercedenia A.

MS Electronics and Communications Engineering, DLSU, 1994 BS Elcetronics and Communications Engineering, UE, 1982

34 Menchavez, Ruben L.

Master of Engineering, MSU-IIT, 2002 BS Ceramics Engineering, MSU-IIT, 1995

35 Mendoza, Myrma Jean A. Ph.D. Sociology, Up-Diliman, 2005 MA Sociology, MSU-IIT, 1992 AB Sociology, MSU-Marawi, 1978 36 Metillo, Ephrime B.

Ph.D. Aquatic Zoology, University of Tasmania, Australia, 1995 498

Graduate Diploma of Science (Zoology), University of Tasmania, 1992 BS Zoology, MSU, 1988, Magna Cum Laude 37 Milano, Alan E.

MS Civil Engineering (Structural), CIT, 1981 BS Civil Engineering, CIT, 1983

38 Minoza, Dario R.

MS Public Management MS Business Management Master of Engineering (Water Resource Dev.), AIT, 1982 BS Civil Engineeiring, MSU, 1974

39 Mostrales, Daniel S.

40 Nanaman,Marilou S.

Ph.D. Peace and Development

41 Nuñeza, Olga M.

Ph.D. (Animal Physiology), UPLB, 1992 MS Zoology, UPLB, 1978 BS Biology, MSU, 1978

42 Oclarit, Jose M.

Ph.D. Applied Biochemistry, Hiroshima University, 1994 MS Biology (Physiology), UP, 1987 BS Zoology, MSU, 1979

43 Orbita, Ma. Luisa W.

Ph.D. Marine Biology, Hokkaido University, Japan, 2006 MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 1998 BS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT, 1993

44 Orejudos, Jerson N.

Ph.D. (Design & Construction Tech.) Niigata Univ., Japan, 1995 Master of Engineering (CE), Niigata Univ., Japan, 1992 Master of Engineering (Construction Mgt.) AIT, Thailand, 1987 BSCE, MSU-Marawi, 1983, Magna Cum Laude

45 Ortega, Eduardo P.

MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2007 BS Biology, Silliman University, 1969 BS PreMed, Silliman University, 1967

46 Poblete, Teresita O.

Ph.D. Social Work & Community Development

47 Ponce, Sulpecia L.

Ph.D. Sociology, XU-Cagayan de Oro City, 2005 MA Sociology, MSU-IIT, 1993 AB Sociology, MSU-IIT, 1982

48 Ravelo, Jean

MS Business Management

49 Responte, Jose Angelo A. MS Marine Biology, MSU-IIT BS Marine Bio/BS Zoology/BS Biology, MSU- Marawi, 1985 50 Rivero, Henry I. MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2004 499

BS Biology, PNU-Manila, 1990 51 Salgado, Geoffrey G.

Ph.D. (CAR) Philippine Studies, UP-Diliman MA History, UP-Diliman AB History,University of San Carlos, Metro Cebu

52 Solon, Christine Cherry E. MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2000 BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1988 53 Tabaranza, Alicia MS Biology, UP-Los Baños, 1987 BS Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1975 54 Teves, Franco G.

Ph.D. Microbilogy/Molecular Genetics, UP-Los Baños/Universidad de León, Spain, 2001 MS Food Microbiology, UPLB, 1987 BS Med. Tech., Silliman University, 1980, Magna Cum Laude

55 Tobias, Ermelinda G.

Ph.D. Zoology, UP Diliman, 1995 MS Zoology, UP Diliman, 1982 BS Biology, MSU Marawi, 1974, Cum Laude

56 Torres, Mark Anthony J.

MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2007 BS Biology, MSU-IIT, 1992 Magna Cum Laude

57 Trinidad, Ariston G.

Master of Engineering (Structural Eng‘g & Mech.) AIT,1987 BSCE, MSU, 1977, Cum Laude

58 Trinidad, Metodia M.

Master of Engineering (Transportation Engineering) AIT,1987 BSCE, MSU, 1982, Cum Laude

59 Uy, Rolando, Jr. S.

MS Engineering Science, Australia National University, 1995 MS Forestry, UPLB, 1980 BS Forestry, UPLB, 1971

60 Valdez, Sasha Anne

MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2003 BS Medical Technology, Silliman University, 1995

61 Villanueva, Eliseo P.

Ph.D. ME, University of South Wales, Sydney Australia, 1999 MS Nuclear Engineering, UP-Diliman, 1984 BS ME, MSU-Marawi, 1976

62 Villanueva, Josefa D.

MS Botany, UP Diliman, 1986 BS Biology, MSU-Marawi, 1974

63 Viloria, Liwayway S.

Ph.D. Philippine Studies, UP-Diliman, 2002 MA Philippine Studies, U.P. Diliman, 1986 500

BS Community Development, MSU-Marawi, 1974 64 Warguez, Dennis

MS Biology, MSU-IIT, 2001 BS Biology / BS Zoology, MSU-IIT, 1995

501

OFFICERS OF THE MSU SYSTEM DR. MACAPADO A. MUSLIM President, Mindanao State University DR. DATUMANONG A. SARANGANI Executive Vice President DR. EMMANUEL M. LAGARE Acting Vice President, Academic Affairs PROF. ABDULLAH D. ALONTO Acting Vice President for Planning and Development ATTY. MUSTAPHA L. DIMAKUTA University Secretary

ATTY. LINDAO M. BORANSING Director, Alumni Relations and Placement Office EDUARDO B. ARUGAY, MA Director, Sports Development Office

Academic Affairs DR. ARNULFO P. SUPE Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs DR. JERSON N. OREJUDOS Dean, School of Graduate Studies PROF. GEOFFREY G. SALGADO Dean, College of Arts and Social Sciences

MSU-IIT ADMINISTRATION PROF. MARCELO P. SALAZAR Chancellor for MSU-IIT

PROF. ALITA T. ROXAS Dean, College of Business Administration and Accountancy

MS. MARILYN J. NARIO OIC, Office of the Campus Secretary

DR. LYDIE D. PADERANGA Dean, College of Education

ATTY. ROBERTO C. PADILLA Legal Office

DR. FELICIANO B. ALAGAO Dean, College of Engineering

ENGR. WILFREDO A. DIMAMAY Director, Computer Facilities and Support Services

DR. ROMULO C. GUERRERO Dean, College of Science and Mathematics

JUANITA T. RICONALLA Director, Planning, Evaluation and Monitoring Office

PROF. CENIE V. MALABANAN Dean, School of Computer Studies

ALFREDO E. PEÑOLA, JR.. MPA Budget Officer, Budget Management Office GULAM D. SUCOR, CPA State Auditor IV, Audit Team Leader NAPOLEON P. LIMBACO OIC, Manila Information and Liaison Office

PROF. SANTIAGO R. EVASCO, JR. Director, School of Engineering Technology PROF. DIGNA C. PADURA Principal, Integrated Developmental School PROF. NORA A. CLAR Acting Institute Registrar MELES F. CASTILLANO OIC, Institute Library 502

PROF. NORA A. CLAR OIC, Office of Admission and Scholarship Administration

Coordinator, Center for Local Governance Studies

Administration and Finance MELVIN S. ROSCOM Director, Department of Students Affairs LUZVILLA G. SASAN OIC, Guidance Counseling Center

DR. POLAUS M. BARI Vice Chancellor, Administration & Finance

ZAYDA O. MACARAMBON Cultural Development Office

ESTRELLA G. ABREU OIC, Human Resource Management Department

Research and Extension

PROF. LESLIE T. HAMAK OIC, Physical Plant Division

DR. OLGA M. NUÑEZA Vice Chancellor, Research and Extension DR. FRANCO G. TEVES Director, Department of Research ALONGAN A. MANGORSI Director, Department of Extension Head, Entrepreneurial Studies and Development Unit PROF. CHRISTINE G. ORTEGA Head, Multimedia Information and Dissemination Unit

JULIETA B. LOPEZ, CPA OIC, Chief Accountant LOLITA D. PEÑOLA Institute Cashier RUBY ABRAGAN, M.D. Institute Physician MS. BALBINA AGAD, MPA OIC, Chief Supply Officer OIC, Purchasing Office STEPHEN SEAN M. DARAL OIC, Security Office

MARIETTA ESPERANZA P. CRUZ Head, Technology Application and Promotion Unit DR. MARILOU S. NANAMAN Coordinator, Iligan Center for Peace Education and Research

DR. HILTON J. AGUJA Prepared and submitted by the Graduate Coordinators‘ Committee: 503

___________________________ Dr. Jerson N. Orejudos Dean, School of Graduate Studies ___________________________ Dr. Ruben F. Amparado, Jr. Coordinator, Sustainable Development Studies

___________________________ Dr. Manuel B. Barquilla Coordinator, College of Education

___________________________ Dr. Ma. Cristina L. Duyaguit Secretary, School of Graduate Studies

___________________________ Prof. Milagros R. Narido Coordinator, College of Business Administration

___________________________ Dr. Maria Luisa S. Orbita Coordinator, College of Science & Mathematics

___________________________ Dr. Sulpecia L. Ponce Coordinator, College of Arts & Social Sciences

___________________________ Prof. Alquine Roy F. Taculin Coordinator, School of Computer Studies

___________________________ Dr. Eliseo P. Villanueva Coordinator, College of Engineering

Office Staff: Ms. Cheryl C. Encabo

___________________________

Ms. Vanessa Joy A. Namocatcat

___________________________

Mr. Benjamin V. Tubo

___________________________

Office/Student Assistants: Jivv Roy B. Manaloto

___________________________

Ian G. Trenia

___________________________

Cover Picture: Prof. Rosalio G. Artes, Jr.

___________________________

Prof. Julius V. Benitez

___________________________

504

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school of graduate studies catalogue - MSU-iiT

MSU-ILIGAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Andres Bonifacio Avenue, Tibanga 9200 Iligan City, Philippines SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES CATALOGUE A.Y. 2008-200...

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