Maritime Management Handbook.pdf - Institute of Commercial

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Contents 1 Introduction 2 The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM) 3 ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities 4 Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy 4.1 Assessment 4.2 Student Workload 5 ICM Qualifications and Progression 5.1 ICM Certificates (equivalent to NQF Level 4 Diplomas) 5.2 ICM Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 5 Diplomas) 5.3 ICM Advanced Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas) 5.4 ICM Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas) 5.5 ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 7 Diplomas) 5.6 Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications 6 Student Registration & Course/Level Entry Requirements 6.1 Student Registration 6.2 Student Registration Fees 6.3 Course/Level Entry Requirements 7 Examinations and Results 7.1 Examinations 7.2 Examination Entry Fees and Forms 7.3 Examination Timetable 7.4 Examination grades and remarking 7.5 Examination re-sits 7.6 Examination Closing Dates 7.7 Examination Results 7.8 Examination Grades 7.9 Transcript of Academic Results 7.10 Replacement Certificates 7.11 Deferrals 7.12 Subject Exemptions for Professional Programmes 7.13 Single Subject Candidates 8 Subject advice, educational guidance and student support 8.1 Study Methods 8.2 Payment Methods 8.3 Choosing your course of study 8.4 ICM Approved Centres 9 Textbooks 10 Students with learning difficulties 11 Copies of past examination papers and other forms of assessment 12 Unit Information 12.1 Programme Objectives 12.2 Recommended Course Objectives 12.3 Examination Grades 12.4 Continuing Education

1 1 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 6 6 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 14 15

13 Course Structure 13.1 Unit Syllabuses 13.1.1 International Trade & Transport Syllabus 13.1 2 Maritime Economics Syllabus 13.1.3 Maritime Operations Syllabus 13.1.4 The Business of Shipping Syllabus 13.1.5 Marine Insurance Syllabus 13.1.6 Maritime Law Syllabus 13.1.7 Maritime Security & Safety Management Syllabus 13.1.8 Marketing Planning & Decision Making – Maritime Syllabus 13.1.9 Finance of International Trade Syllabus 13.1.10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Syllabus 13.1.11 Port Operations & Management Syllabus 13.1.12 Shipbroking & Chartering Practices Syllabus

16 16 17 21 26 30 34 37 43 47 49 52 55 58

1

Introduction

The purpose of this Course Handbook is to provide you with general information about studying with the Institute of Commercial Management (ICM). This Handbook should be read in conjunction with other Guidelines available on the ICM website. The early pages of this Handbook provide general information about ICM and its programmes. Later sections give details about the equivalency of ICM Certificate (NQF* Level 4 qualifications), Diploma (NQF Level 5 qualifications), Advanced Diploma (NQF Level 6 qualifications), Graduate Diploma (NQF Level 6 qualifications) and Post Graduate Diploma Awards (NQF Level 7 qualifications). Please note that not all Levels are available for all programmes. The material in this Handbook is as accurate as possible at the time of production. *NQF: the UK National Qualifications Framework

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The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM)

Established in the early 1970s, the Institute of Commercial Management provides academic and vocational qualifications which are well recognised globally. In its capacity as a course developer and an examining and certifying Board, the Institute offers a wide range of professional and vocational awards in Business, Management and related vocational areas. ICM programmes are designed to address the personal development and training needs of those wishing to enter the commercial sector and to support the continued development and workplace flexibility of those already in employment. ICM’s global services include the design, development and certification of business education and training programmes for education providers; the development and certification of tailored education and training programmes for the corporate sector, emerging industries and the global workforce and the examination, assessment and certification of students undertaking business, management and related vocational education programmes. An acknowledged specialist in the design and development of progressive, practical and multi-functional programmes of study, the Institute works with a range of public and private sector clients including universities, business schools, colleges, training providers, International Development Agencies, government agencies and local authorities. ICM provides examinations in more than 200 subject areas ranging from accounting and finance to tourism and hospitality and from marketing and advertising to project management and examines and certifies candidates to an internationally consistent standard.

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ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities

The Institute has formal partnership arrangements with universities in the UK and overseas. A full list of progression routes from ICM qualifications into Undergraduate and Post Graduate courses at UK Universities is available from the ICM website. Established articulation arrangements provide direct access to the second and final years of a wide range of BA/BSc degrees for ICM Diploma qualifications (Level 5 Diploma) and

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Advanced Diploma qualifications (Level 6 Diploma). Access to Masters programmes also exist for those with ICM Graduate Diplomas (Level 6) and ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (Level 7). In addition, ICM Certificate (Level 4 Diploma) holders may be eligible for entry to year 1 of appropriate degrees. Subject to status and grades obtained, students holding ICM Diploma qualifications at levels 4, 5, 6 and 7 are accepted onto Undergraduate and Post Graduate degree programmes offered by institutions in continents across the globe. Our strategic partners have agreed that students can enter their degree programmes with Advanced Standing, provided they possess the right Grade profile and are able to meet other admissions criteria, such as language competence. The stated grade and points requirements may be subject to local variations. Entry to the First Year Application for entry to the first year of a relevant degree programme will be considered for those students who hold a relevant ICM Certificate Level Award. Entry to the Second Year Application for entry to the second year of an Honours degree programme will be considered for students who have passed a relevant ICM Diploma (Level 5) programme and have met the following requirements:  obtained at least 24 Points from 8 subjects leading to the qualification  obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Diploma Entry to the Final Year Students who have passed a relevant ICM Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) programme will be considered for final year entry if they have achieved the following:  obtained at least 32 Points from 12 subjects leading to the Advanced Diploma  obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Advanced Diploma Entry to the Post Graduate Year Students who have passed a relevant ICM Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) programme will be considered for entry to Masters programmes if they have achieved the following:  obtained at least 12 Points from the final 4 subjects leading to the qualification  obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Graduate Diploma

Converting ICM subject grades into points The following rules apply in relation to converting ICM subject grades into points:    

an ‘A’ grade is awarded 6 points a ‘B’ grade is awarded 4 points a ‘C’ grade is awarded 2 points a ‘D’ grade is awarded 0 points

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Progression Routes Students wishing to progress to degree programmes should review the range of courses available at our partner Universities. Information on appropriate university courses can be obtained from our website. The Institute’s qualifications are also recognised by leading professional examining bodies for either subject exemption or registration purposes. Further details can be obtained from the appropriate examination bodies. 4

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

Tuition in preparation for the Institute’s examinations takes place on a number of levels, including lectures, seminars, class discussion and problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information, which students build on through directed learning and self-managed study outside the classroom. Students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material, fostering a greater depth of learning experience. 4.1 Assessment Assessment for the majority of programmes is based on final examinations. The Institute has a traditional approach to assessment. Formative assessment is provided by ICM Teaching Centres as and when appropriate and may include; essays, in-class tests, role play exercises, presentations and projects. However, in terms of gaining a professional qualification, and in order to maintain standards, ICM believes that students should be formally assessed on the body of knowledge covered during the course and be examined as individuals on the required learning outcomes. 4.2 Student Workload In accordance with nationally accepted codes of practice in the UK, each 20 credit unit represents a total of approximately 200 hours of learning. Typically, each ICM award at undergraduate level comprises four units of 20 credits each. Students must complete four units at each level leading to the awards of Certificate (Level 4 Diploma), Diploma (Level 5 Diploma), Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) and Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma). Thus, for example, in order to gain an ICM Advanced Diploma, a student must have completed the Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma stages. The Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma) consists of 120 credits divided into six units. The learning hours for each unit are subdivided into appropriate categories of learning opportunities, such as lectures, seminars, preparation time, directed study, time spent on assessment items and exam preparation. At least one quarter of this time is usually devoted to formal contact time. A further one quarter of this time is related to directed learning. The balance of workload is comprised of individual, self-managed student learning and revision.

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Note that for a unit delivered in standard mode, the ICM examinations calendar accommodates a teaching year of approximately 2 x 20 teaching weeks, and four weeks of revision/end of year assessment. Furthermore, each unit is assigned to a particular ‘Level’, with each Level corresponding to the group of subjects contained within the programmes leading to the award of a Certificate (Level 4 Diploma), Diploma (Level 5 Diploma), Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma), Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) or Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma). 5

ICM Qualifications and Progression

Understanding your qualification is important and the following guidelines outline how ICM qualifications fit within the UK National Qualifications Framework and support vocational learning. ICM has benchmarked its qualifications against the UK National Qualifications Framework (NQF). In recognition of the NQF levels and with reference to appropriate National Occupational Standards, the Institute has produced the following level descriptors which should be read in conjunction with the table provided in section 5.6. 5.1 ICM Certificates (equivalent to NQF Level 4 Diplomas) ICM Certificates are awarded to those who have passed Part 1 (the first four or five subjects, depending on the course) of an ICM Diploma programme. See below for ICM Diploma Entry Requirements. ICM Certificates represent a level of qualification that recognises the ability to gain, and where relevant apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding. ICM Certificate holders should be able to display competence in the application of knowledge in the performance of a range of work activities, some of which may be routine and predictable with some being complex or non-routine. Learning at this level involves gaining knowledge and skills appropriate for individuals working semi-independently, or receiving basic supervision and training from others in their field of work. Students should begin to develop a degree of individual responsibility or autonomy in their study as well as the ability to collaborate with others, for example through participation in work groups or teams. Successful completion of the ICM Certificate enables entry to the first year of appropriate degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website. 5.2 ICM Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 5 Diplomas) Entry to an ICM Diploma programme requires completion of secondary education or an equivalent and recognised programme of study. ICM Diplomas represent a level of qualification which recognises the ability to gain, and where relevant apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding.

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ICM Diploma holders should be able to display competence in the application of knowledge in a broad range of varied work activities performed in a wide variety of contexts, most of which are complex and non-routine. Learning at this level involves obtaining detailed knowledge and skills appropriate for people working independently, or providing basic supervision and training of others in their field of work and people wishing to go to University. Progression is available from the ICM Diploma to the second year of relevant degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website. 5.3 ICM Advanced Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas) Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma programme requires completion of the ICM Certificate and Diploma in the selected programme. Students holding other relevant and equivalent qualifications which contain ICM Diploma subjects could qualify for entry as well as subject and Level exemptions. ICM Advanced Diplomas represent a level of qualification which involves specialist learning and detailed analysis of a high level of information, knowledge and skills in a specified area of work or study. Students undertaking an ICM Advanced Diploma should demonstrate the depth of knowledge and understanding of an area of work or study to enable them to formulate solutions and responses to complex problems and situations. ICM Advanced Diplomas are appropriate for people working in positions such as Senior Supervisors, Professionals or Managers. These individuals need to demonstrate significant levels of knowledge, a high level of work expertise in job roles and competence in managing and training others. Learning at this level is appropriate for people working in technical and professional jobs, and/or managing and developing others. The ICM Advanced Diploma is equivalent to NQF Level 6 and in terms of level and credit value these qualifications are comparable to UK Intermediate Higher Education qualifications such as HNDs, Diplomas of Higher Education and Foundation Degrees. Progression is available from ICM Advanced Diplomas to the final year of relevant degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website.

5.4

ICM Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas)

Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma programme requires prior completion of the ICM Diploma and Advanced Diploma in the selected programme. Advanced Standing and Exemptions: Students holding relevant degrees and equivalent qualifications which contain ICM Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma subjects could qualify for entry as well as subject and Level exemptions. Students at this level study highly developed and complex levels of knowledge enabling the development of in-depth and original responses to complicated and unpredictable problems and situations.

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Learning at the Graduate Diploma level involves the demonstration of high level specialist professional knowledge appropriate for senior professionals and managers. Indicative competencies involve the application of a range of fundamental principles across a wide and often unpredictable variety of contexts as well as the ability to perform technical or professional work activities in a variety of contexts with a substantial degree of personal responsibility and autonomy. A qualification at this level is appropriate for people working as knowledge-based professionals or in professional management positions. This qualification is equivalent to a Bachelors degree, and progression is available from the ICM Graduate Diploma to Post Graduate programmes such as Masters degrees. 5.5 ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 7 Diplomas) Entry to an ICM Post Graduate Diploma programme requires completion of an ICM Graduate Diploma, another Level 6 award, or a degree level qualification in an appropriate discipline. Refer to Section 6 for Advanced Standing arrangements for mature candidates. Students at this level of study should display a mastery of high level knowledge and skills and have professional and research-based skills. This qualification is equivalent to two thirds of a Masters degree (MBA or MA) and advanced standing can be given onto a range of Masters degrees. For a complete list of progression routes please refer to the website.

5.6

Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications

The following table gives an indication of the relative positioning of ICM awards, compared with other types of qualifications and levels. Reference is made to levels in the UK National Qualifications Framework and example qualifications at each level. In addition, the final column in the table (FHEQ) shows the ‘equivalent’ qualifications commonly being developed and delivered in the University sector. For example, these indicate that the ICM Advanced Diploma equates to an intermediate level award (in terms of credit accumulation this ICM qualification equates to a Higher National Diploma). Furthermore, the ICM Graduate Diploma equates to a Bachelors degree level qualification and the ICM Post Graduate Diploma equates to a Masters degree level qualification.

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Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications

National Qualifications Framework Framework for (Levels and example vocational ICM Levels qualifications) Level 7 Professional Diploma in Translation

Level 6 Diploma in Management

ICM Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma)

M (masters), Masters degrees, Post Graduate certificates and diplomas

ICM Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma)

H (honours) Bachelors degrees (BSc/BA)

ICM Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma)

I (intermediate) Diplomas of higher education, foundation degrees, Higher National Diplomas

Level 5 ICM Diploma BTEC Higher National Diploma in 3D (Level 5 Diploma) Design Level 4 Certificate in Early Years Practice

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Levels (FHEQ)

ICM Diploma (Level 5 Diploma)

C (certificate) Certificates of higher education

Level 3 Certificate in Small Animal Care NVQ in Aeronautical Engineering A levels Level 2 Diploma for Beauty Specialists NVQ in Agricultural Crop Production GCSEs Grades A*-C Level 1 Certificate in Motor Vehicle Studies NVQ in Bakery GCSEs Grades D-G Entry – e.g. Entry Level Certificate in Adult Literacy

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6

Student Registration & Course/Level Entry Requirements

6.1 Student Registration In order to undertake any ICM examination candidates must be Registered ICM Student Members. Student Membership can be obtained by completing the appropriate Student Registration Application form and returning the form and the Student Registration Fee to the Institute. Details of Student Registration Fees can be found on the ICM website. The Student Registration fee is valid for one year and can be renewed annually. Important Note: All students wishing to register for any ICM Advanced Diploma programme or above, MUST complete and attach an Academic History form to their Student Registration form. Copies of all qualifications and Awards obtained by the student must also accompany the Academic History form. The Academic History form is used to ensure that students are qualified to commence their studies at the Level they have selected.

6.2 Student Registration Fees Student Registration fees for standard ICM Awards and programmes are based on the country in which you will undertake your examinations. The current fees levels are as follows: Group 1: If you are based in Europe, and EU Member State, North America, a Gulf State, India, the Middle East, Australasia, Singapore, South Africa, China, Hong Kong or Malaysia your Registration Fee will be £50.00 Pounds Sterling. Group 2: If you are based in sub-Saharan Africa, Central or South America, Pakistan, Bangladesh, the Caribbean or North Africa your Registration Fee will be £25.00 Pounds Sterling. Group 3: A special rate exists for students in countries which have (a) emerged from conflict (b) countries in which the general population is subject to great poverty and (c) countries in which the UN acknowledge that the level of economic activity and national per capita income is unacceptably low.

6.3

Course/Level Entry Requirements

ICM professional programmes are structured in ‘Levels’. These Levels are designed to provide a structured and progressive level of knowledge. All students are required to commence their studies at the Diploma Level of all programmes unless they are able to claim subject-for-subject or Level exemptions. Subject-for-subject exemptions can be applied for if the student has (a) been examined, in the subject, by another recognised Awarding body and (b) has passed the examination/s set by the alternate body.

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The Institute operates an 'Open Entry' policy in respect of most of its Diploma Level vocational programmes, subject to appropriate work experience, but prospective students should note that the following qualifications are recommended for those wishing to undertake ICM Diploma Level programmes:

Entry to an ICM Diploma Level Programme (NQF Level 5) Entry to an ICM Diploma programme requires completion of secondary education or equivalent. For example:  One GCE A-level plus three GCSEs (or equivalents) or 5 GCSEs  A suitable BTEC National Award  Any qualification equivalent to one or more of the above The minimum age for registration for the majority of programmes is 18. Applicants over the age of 20 who do not hold one of the recommended entry qualifications may also register for some Diploma Level programmes providing they have been in full-time employment for a minimum of two years and can produce a letter from their employer to confirm this.

Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma Programme (NQF Level 6) Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma programme requires completion of the ICM Diploma Level of the selected programme.

Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma Programme (NQF Level 6) Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma requires completion of the ICM Diploma and Advanced Diploma in the selected programme.

Entry to an ICM Post Graduate Diploma Programme (NQF Level 7) Registration for an ICM Post Graduate Diploma is accepted from those:  who have completed an ICM Graduate Diploma  who hold any Level 6 business or management Award  holders of business and management degree level qualifications Mature Candidates. Applications from those over the age of 25 who do not meet the standard Entry Requirements will also be considered providing they:  Are over the age of 25  Have been in employment for 5 years – a letter of support is required from the applicant’s employer; and  Hold a management or senior supervisory position

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7

Examinations and Results

7.1 Examinations In order to achieve a consistent global standard the Institute sets all examination papers and all candidate scripts are returned to the Institute for marking. Invigilation of examinations is undertaken either by external Invigilators who are appointed by the Institute or by the British Council. Examinations are held in March, June, September and December and the Examination Timetable can be found on the ICM website. Candidates must be registered and paid-up Student Members of the Institute at the time they undertake their examinations. Examination papers are securely distributed to ICM Approved Centres and scripts are assessed and moderated in the UK by ICM Appointed Examiners. Full details of Examination dates can be found on the ICM website. 7.2 Examination Entry Fees and Forms Examination Entry fees are shown on the appropriate Examination Entry form for the subject/programme you are undertaking. The Examination fee is £35.00 Pounds Sterling per subject for Maritime Management. If you have any queries relating to fees please contact your Teaching Centre. In order to undertake any ICM Professional or Single Subject examination you must be a Registered and paid-up ICM Student Member. To enter for an examination you need to complete the relevant Examination Entry form and submit it to the Institute. 7.3 Examination Timetable ICM examinations take place four times each year, in March, June, September and December. The Timetable for each year states the Closing Date for receipt of entries for each examination Series. Please visit the website to view the ICM examination timetable. 7.4

Examination grades and re-marking

You can request that your examination script is re-marked if you are unhappy with your result. The fee for this is £35.00 Pounds Sterling per script. The Institute operates a triple marking and moderation system. In the event that the moderator increases the original marks awarded, the fee for re-marking your script will be refunded to you. Should the Grade awarded remain the same, you will be issued with a full Examiner’s Report detailing your examination performance. The Institute retains answer scripts for a maximum period of six months. Examination scripts/answer books are not returned to candidates under any circumstances.

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7.5

Examination re-sits

Although ICM Examinations are held every twelve weeks it should be noted that it takes an average of twelve weeks to mark the scripts after each Examination Series. If you sit, for example, for one or more subjects in March you will not receive your results until June. This means that if you were to fail a subject in March, you would not be able to resit the subject in June, as you will have missed the Closing Date for the June Series. Our advice is that you try to split your subject examinations between two consecutive Examination Series e.g. If your programme has four subjects you could take two subjects in one series and two in another series. On this basis, were you to fail one subject in March you would be able to re-sit it in September, giving you plenty of time for revision.

7.6

Examination Closing Dates

There is a Closing Date for receipt of Examination Entries and candidates entering for examinations must ensure that their completed Examination Entry forms and fees reach the Institute before the Closing Date for each Examination Series. Examination Timetables indicate the closing date for receipt of entries for each sitting and this information also appears on the ICM website. Entries received after the Closing Date are automatically carried forward to the next Examination Series. 7.7

Examination Results

Results are distributed within twelve weeks from receipt of scripts. Candidates are advised not to telephone the Institute for results as this information is confidential and cannot be disclosed over the telephone. 7.8

Examination Grades

Should you wish to re-sit any examination to improve your previous Grade, please note that the latest Grade you obtain will stand. 7.9

Transcript of Academic Results

You may request a transcript of your Academic Results, however please note there is a charge of £15 Pounds Sterling for each Award transcript requested. 7.10 Replacement Certificates Replacement certificates are available on payment of a fee of £20.00 Pounds Sterling per certificate. Please include your Student Registration Number together with your current postal address and indicate which certificate is required.

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7.11 Deferrals There is a fee of £15.00 Pounds Sterling per subject should you wish to defer your examinations to another Series for health or for any other reason. If you are unable to undertake your examinations, it is essential you advise ICM before the appropriate examination date, otherwise the full entry fee of £35.00 Pounds Sterling will be applicable. Please note that you may only defer examinations on one occasion. The full entry fee of £35.00 Pounds Sterling per subject will become due if you defer on more than one occasion. 7.12 Subject Exemptions for Professional Programmes Students holding relevant recognised qualifications from other professional bodies or recognised Higher Education institutions may apply for Subject Exemptions, on a subject-forsubject basis. It may also be possible, subject to qualifications held, to obtain exemption from a Level within a programme. Documentary evidence is required before any decision can be made in connection with the granting of Subject/Level Exemptions. No exemptions are given for case studies or assignments. Internally awarded school certificates and diplomas are not accepted for exemption purposes.

7.13 Single Subject Candidates Registered ICM students who do not want to complete a full ICM programme may study individual subjects. Single Subject candidates receive a Single Subject Diploma on successful completion of the relevant subject examination. Single Subjects qualify, on a subject-for-subject basis, for subject exemptions from ICM professional programmes. Note: 1. Case Studies, Assignments and Projects, including ALL subjects in any Post Graduate programme, do not qualify for Single Subject Awards. 2. A student who undertakes, on a Single Subject basis, subjects within a Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Graduate Diploma or Post Graduate ICM programme will not be entitled to a professional Award unless they are exempted from or have completed all lower Levels of that Award. 3. In order to comply with UKBA requirements, overseas students studying in the UK (excluding those from EU countries) are not permitted to undertake Single Subjects and must undertake a professional programme. 8

Subject advice, educational guidance and student support

You are expected to be independent and to take responsibility for your own academic and personal life. However, your study centre should also provide appropriate help and assistance. Your tutors will direct your studies and ensure that you know what work you need to cover in any given unit. Seek advice from academic staff either during or after class or try to see them during their office hours.

8.1 Study Methods Teaching Centres are provided with a detailed syllabus and reading list for each subject area. Each Unit Syllabus clearly defines the areas that you will be required to cover for each subject and your examination questions will be based on the areas and topics detailed for

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each unit. It is important to ensure that you obtain a copy of each unit syllabus from your Teaching Centre. Alternatively, this information can be obtained online at www.icm.education, in the ‘Single Subject’ section. Each Unit Syllabus is normally linked to one main textbook and the examiners base their questions on the contents of the nominated core text. The Unit Syllabuses also give details of 'Alternative Texts' and texts recommended for further reading. It is advised that you should refer to the 'Alternative Texts' in order to develop your skills and broaden your knowledge of the subject area. 8.2 Payment Methods For our accepted methods of payment, please refer to the ICM website: www.icm.education

8.3 Choosing your course of study As an ICM Student Member you can work towards obtaining either a recognised Professional qualification or study for one or more of the 200 Single Subject Awards from the list of subjects offered by the Institute. The choice is yours. 8.4 ICM Approved Centres Tuition leading to the Institute’s examinations can only be provided by Institutions which have been granted ICM ‘Approved Centre’ status. Please note that some ICM Teaching Centres specialise in particular subject areas and not all ICM Centres will necessarily offer tuition for every ICM course programme. Visit the website to find an ICM Approved Centre near you. 9

Textbooks

The recommended textbooks for each subject are shown on each subject syllabus. Examiners base their questions on the contents of the recommended texts and it is therefore important for you to ensure that you have access to the appropriate texts. You can obtain the full list of books available to purchase from ICM and/or place orders by either contacting your Centre or complete the Book Order Form and send it to ICM’s Book Sales Manager at: [email protected] .

10 Students with specific learning difficulties If you are diagnosed with a specific learning difficulty you may be granted special arrangements for your examination/s. We will require a copy of an Assessment Report issued within the last three years. The amount of additional time and any other arrangements will be determined on the basis of the Report relating to your circumstances. It is possible that you may be granted permission to use a computer or laptop without internet connection in your examinations.

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11 Copies of past examination papers and other forms of assessment The ICM website, www.icm.education, provides a database of recent examination papers, assignments and Case Studies. These can be found in the Student Resources section of the website. 12 Unit Information Covering all the major business studies areas and topics, the ICM Diploma, Advanced Diploma and Graduate Diploma programmes have, over a fifteen year period, achieved international recognition and are currently undertaken by students in over 40 countries. In addition to providing a comprehensive knowledge of each of the major business functions, the structure of the course ensures that students have the widest possible range of career, employment and higher education options open to them on successful completion of their studies. 12.1 Programme Objectives To provide prospective Maritime Management students with a body of knowledge which will:  Increase and broaden their employment opportunities within the Maritime industries worldwide  Provide them with a clear understanding of all economic, legal, technical and managerial parameters which apply in the shipping industry  Enable them to integrate their knowledge gained on the course in analysing and suggesting solutions to shipping management problems  Provide them with a recognised and respected qualification which will enable them to apply to higher programmes of study or to seek senior managerial positions 12.2 Recommended Course Duration To help calculate the duration of the programme, please refer to the section entitled ‘Student Work Load’ in section 4.2 of this handbook. It is expected that a student will need 18 months of full-time study at an ICM Approved Centre to complete the full Graduate Diploma programme (incorporating the Diploma and Advanced Diploma). 12.3 Examination Grades Grade A – Distinction Grade B – Credit Grade C – Pass Grade D – Marginal Pass Grade F – Fail

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70% and above 60% to 69% 50% to 59% 40% to 49% 39% and under

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Certification On successful completion of all the examinations in Part 1, students are awarded the ICM Diploma in Maritime Management. Similarly, on successful completion of all the examinations in Parts 1 & 2 students are awarded the ICM Advanced Diploma in Maritime Management. Similarly, on successful completion of all 12 subjects, students are awarded the ICM Graduate Diploma in Maritime Management. 12.4 Continuing Education The Maritime Management programme will serve as an excellent route for students who ultimately seek full professional status and will provide first class underpinning knowledge for the mainstream degrees in Shipping and Maritime Management. Holders of an ICM Diploma in Maritime Management may enter the ICM Advanced Diploma programme and completion of this may enable entry to the final year of appropriate Honours degree programmes. Similarly, Graduate Diploma holders will be eligible for access to appropriate Post Graduate courses.

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13 Course Structure The Diploma in Maritime Management – Part 1 1. International Trade and Transport 2. Maritime Economics 3. Maritime Operations 4. The Business of Shipping The Diploma in Maritime Management is awarded on completion of all Part 1 subjects The Advanced Diploma in Maritime Management – Part 2 5. Marine Insurance 6. Maritime Law 7. Maritime Security and Safety Management 8. Marketing Planning and Decision Making – Maritime The Advanced Diploma in Maritime Management is awarded on completion of Parts 1 & 2 The Graduate Diploma in Maritime Management 9. Finance of International Trade 10. Logistics and Supply Chain Management 11. Port Operations and Management 12. Shipbroking and Chartering Practices The Graduate Diploma in Maritime Management is awarded on completion of all 12 subjects

13.1 Unit Syllabuses Syllabuses for this programme are contained in the following sections.

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13.1.1 International Trade & Transport Syllabus

Course Title

International Trade & Transport

Unit Code

ITT-0605

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

TP

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit aims to develop the necessary skills and knowledge base to maintain a sound system for classifying and recording cost accounting information for stock valuation, profit measurement, and for assisting management in the profitable operation of a business. Main Topics of Study: Physical Distribution in Perspective ► Define marketing ► Domestic versus export markets ► Marketing research ► Market selection ► Bad reasons for exporting ► Good reasons for exporting ► Market selection criteria ► Methods of market research ► Sources of secondary information ► The marketing plan ► Indirect exports ► Direct sales ► Selection of distribution channels ► International physical distribution The Export Office ► The export office ► Organisation charts ► External organisations The Export Quotation ► Forms of export quotation ► Buyer documents ► International delivery terms ► Trade terms Inland Transport ► Packing and marketing ► Packing methods ► Factors affecting choice of packing ► Dangerous goods ► Conclusion International Transport Modes ► Freight forwarders

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► The services of the forwarder ► Sea freight services ► Charter party ► Types of sea freight services ► Road freight ► Rail freight ► Air freight ► Groupage ► Express operations ► Selection of transport mode ► Carrier selection ► Freight calculation ► Total distribution cost International Transport Documentation ► An overview of export documentation ► The transport conventions ► The bill of lading ► Types of bills of lading ► Waybills ► Air waybill ► Road waybill ► Rail waybill ► Sea waybill International Customs Controls ► An overview of customs controls ► Export ► Import ► Transit ► The European community/Union ► Export procedures ► SAD summary ► CHIEF ► Export declarations summary ► Why transit controls? ► Transport Internationaux Routiers ► TIR TABAC carnets ► Community transit system ► The single market ► Summary ► Community imports ► Import controls ► Non-tariff barriers ► The export invoice ► Customs management Risk Management ► Physical risk ► Credit risk

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► Exchange risk ► Cargo (marine) insurance ► Principles of insurance ► Credit insurance ► Exchange risk Methods of Payment ► Choosing terms and methods of payment ► Open account ► Bills of exchange (drafts) ► Documentary letter of credit (L/C) ► Documentary requirements ► Doctrine of strict compliance ► Avoiding rejection ► Types of letters of credit ► Cash in advance or with order ► Factors ► Countertrade The Future ► One-run systems ► Computer systems ► Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) ► The Single European Market ► Barrier to trade ► The channel tunnel Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Discuss characteristics of good and bad markets.

2.

Discuss considerations in choice of packaging.

3.

Discuss the function and use of a range of international transport documentation.

4.

Discuss the role and functions of customs controls.

5.

Discuss relative merits of a range of payment methods.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above module learning outcomes are related to particular cognitive and key skills: Knowledge & Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis /Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive & Group Skills

1-5

-

-

1,2,4,5

-

Self-appraisal/ Reflection on Practice

Planning and Management of Learning

Problem Solving

Communication & Presentation

Other skills (please specify):

-

1-5

-

1-5

-

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Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Principles of International Physical Distribution, Jim Sherlock, Blackwell Publishing Alternative Texts and Further Reading Economic Geography, H. Robinson, Pitman Understanding the Freight Business, D.E. Downs, Micor Export Practice & Management, Alan Branch, Thomson Business Press Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.2 Maritime Economics Syllabus

Unit Title

Maritime Economics

Unit Code

ME-0309

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

LL

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit will familiarise students with the key economic concepts and theories relevant to the operations of organisations in the Maritime industries and enable students to evaluate the impact of worldwide economic developments on the shipping industry. Main Topics of Study: Introduction to Shipping ► Sea transport and the global economy ► The origins of sea trade, 3000 BC to AD 1450 ► The global economy in the fifteenth century ► Opening up global trade and commerce, 1450-1833 ► Liner and tramp shipping, 1833-1950 ► Container, bulk and air transport, 1950-2006 ► Lessons from 5,000 years of commercial shipping The Organization of the Shipping Market ► Overview of the maritime industry ► The International transport industry ► Characteristics of sea transport demand ► The sea transport system ► The world merchant fleet ► The cost of sea transport ► The role of ports in the transport system ► The shipping companies that run the business ► The role of governments in shipping Shipping Market Economics ► Shipping market cycles ► Introducing the shipping cycle ► Characteristics of shipping market cycles ► Shipping cycles and shipping risk ► Overview of shipping cycles, 1741-1869 ► Tramp market cycles and shipping risk ► Overview of shipping cycles, 1741-2007 ► Sailing ship cycles, 1741-1869 ► Tramp market cycles, 1869-1936 ► Bulk shipping market cycles, 1945-2008 ► Lessons from two centuries of cycles ► Prediction of shipping cycles

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Supply, Demand and Freight Rates ► The shipping market model ► Key influences on supply and demand ► The demand for sea transport ► The supply of sea transport ► The freight rate mechanism The Four Shipping Markets ► The decisions facing shipowners ► The four shipping markets ► The freight market ► The freight derivatives market ► The sale and purchase market ► The new building market ► The demolition (recycling) market Shipping Company Economics ► Costs, revenue and cashflow ► Cashflow and the art of survival ► Financial performance and investment strategy ► The costs of running ships ► The capital cost of the ship ► The revenue the ship earns ► Shipping accounts, the framework for decisions ► Four methods of computing the cashflow ► Valuing merchant ships Financing Ships and Shipping Companies ► Ship finance and shipping economics ► How ships have been financed in the past ► The world financial system and types of finance ► Financing ships with private funds ► Financing ships with bank loans ► Financing ships and shipping companies in the capital markets ► Financing ships with special purpose companies ► Analysing risk in ship finance ► Dealing with default Risk, Return and Shipping Company Economics ► The performance of shipping investments ► The shipping company investment model ► Competition theory and the ‘normal’ profit ► Pricing shipping risk Seaborne Trade and Transport Systems ► The geography of maritime trade ► The value added by seaborne transport ► Oceans, distances and transit times ► The maritime trading network ► Europe’s seaborne trade ► North America’s seaborne trade, South America’s seaborne trade ► Asia’s seaborne trade, Africa’s seaborne trade

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► The seaborne trade of the Middle East, Central Asia and Russia ► The trade of Australia and Oceania The Principles of Maritime Trade ► The building-blocks of sea trade ► The countries that trade by sea ► Why countries trade ► Differences in production costs ► Trade due to differences in natural resources ► Commodity trade cycles ► The role of sea transport trade The Transport of Bulk Cargoes ► The commercial origins of bulk shipping ► The bulk fleet ► The bulk trades ► The principles of bulk transport ► Practical aspects of bulk transport ► Liquid bulk transport ► The crude oil trade ► The oil products trade ► The major dry bulk trades ► The minor bulk trades The Transport of Specialised Cargoes ► Introduction to specialised shipping ► The sea transport of chemicals ► The liquefied petroleum gas trade ► The liquefied natural gas trade ► The transport of refrigerated cargo ► Unit load cargo transport ► Passenger shipping The Transport of General Cargo ► The origins of the liner operation ► Economic principles of liner operation ► General cargo and liner transport demand ► The liner shipping routes ► The liner companies ► The liner fleet ► The principles of liner service economics ► Pricing liner services ► Liner conferences and cooperative agreements ► Container ports and terminals The Merchant Fleet and Transport Supply ► The ships that provide the transport ► What type of ship? ► Seven questions that define a design ► Ships for the general cargo trades ► Ships for the dry bulk trades ► Ships for liquid bulk cargoes

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► Gas tankers ► Non-cargo ships ► Economics criteria for evaluating ship designs The Regulation of the Maritime Industry ► How regulations affect maritime economics ► Overview of the regulatory system ► The classification societies ► The law of the sea ► The regulatory role of the flag state ► How maritime laws are made ► The international maritime organisation ► The international labour organisation ► The regulatory role of the coastal and port states ► The regulation of competition in shipping Maritime Forecasting and Market Research ► The approach to maritime forecasting ► Key elements of the forecast ► Preparing for the forecast ► Market forecasting methodologies ► Market research methodology ► Freight rate forecasting ► Developing a scenario analysis ► Analytical techniques ► Forecasting problems Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Evaluate the factors that can influence the levels of demand and supply.

2.

Calculate costs, revenues and cashflows of shipping operations.

3.

Assess the level of risk associated with the finance of ships.

4.

Explain the infrastructure required for the transportation of different cargoes.

5.

Appreciate the relationships between economic activities and international Maritime activities

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

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Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Maritime Economics, M. Stopford, Routledge Alternative Texts and Further Reading Maritime Economics: Management and Marketing, A. Branch, Routledge Lloyds List Lloyds Shipping Economist Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.3 Maritime Operations Syllabus

Unit Title

Maritime Operations

Unit Code

MO-0309

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

TP

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit will introduce students to the key areas of operations of shipping organisations and to highlight key functions and procedures associated with the shipping industry. Main Topics of Study: Introduction to Shipping and to the Ships ► Functions of shipping ► World seaborne trade and world fleet ► Challenges facing the shipping industry in the twenty-first century ► International navigation limits ► International convention on load lines 1966 ► Types and methods of tonnage measurement ► International convention on tonnage measurement of ships ► Types of ships, specialised vessels and their trades Ship Design and Construction ► Ship design and future trends ► Ship productivity ► General principles and factors influencing design, type and size of ship ► Safety and other regulations ► Vessel lengthening ► Cruise Vessel Manning of Vessels ► Duties and responsibilities of the Master ► Ship’s officers and crew manning ► IMO convention of standards of training ► Engagement and discharge of the crew Customs House and Ship’s Papers ► E-commerce; customs ► Value added tax ► Intrastat ► Export controls ► Customs tariff ► Customs Freight Simplified Procedures (CFSP) ► New Export System (NES) ► Unique Consignment Reference (UCR) ► Customs reliefs ► Importation and exportation of goods

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► Ship’s paper ► Ship’s protest Maritime Canals and Inland Waterways ► European inland waterways ► The Suez Canal Authority ► The Kiel Canal, The Panama Canal ► The St Lawrence Sea way ► The influence of canals on ship design ► Canal areas as points of economic growth Services Generated by Principal Shipping Organisations ► ISO, Intertanko, Lloyd’s Register, OECD, WTO, BIMCO, UNISTAD, Intercargo, ICS Passenger Fares and Freight Rates ► Theory of passenger fares ► Theory of freight rates and effect of air competition on cargo traffic ► Relation between liner and tramp rates ► Relation between voyage and time charter rates ► Types of freight Liner Conferences ► Liner conference system ► Deferred rebate and contract systems ► Harmonisation conference ► The future of the liner conference system Ship Operation ► Factors to consider in planning sailing schedules, fleet planning ► Interface between fleet planning and ship survey programme ► Relative importance of speed, frequency, reliability, cost and quality of sea transport ► Indivisible loads ► Ship and port security Bills of Lading ► Carriage of Goods by Sea Acts 1971 and 1992 ► Types of bills of lading ► Carriage of Goods by Rail, Carriage of Goods by Road Cargoes ► Cargo stowage/packaging overview ► Stowage of cargo ► Types of characteristics of cargo ► Cargo and container handling equipment, dangerous cargo The Shipping Company ► Liner organisation, tramp organisation ► Holding companies and subsidiaries ► Operational alliances ► Ship management companies ► Ownership of vessels ► Freight forwarders ► Chartered shipbrokers ► Future of shipbroking ► Ship’s agent

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► Lloyd’s Register quality assurance Charter Parties ► Demise and non-demise charter parties ► Voyage and time charter parties ► Approved forms of charter parties and related bills of lading ► Voyage estimates ► Sale and purchase of ships Containerisation ► Container ships; terminals ► Container distribution ► Container types ► Non-containerisable cargo ► Features of containerization Seaports ► Role of seaports in the twenty-first century and factors driving change ► Container port automation ► Floating terminals ► Factors influencing the shipowner’s choice of seaport ► Relationship between ships and ports Multi-modalism: Global Supply Chain Management and International Logistics ► Factors in favour of multi-modalism ► Rationale for the development of multi-modalism ► Features of multi-modalism ► Multi-modalism strategy ► Global supply chain management and international logistics The International Consignment ► Evaluation of transport model(s) for international consignment/s ► Delivery trade terms of sale and the export order ► Progress of export order and checklist Political Aspects ► Flag discrimination ► Flags of convenience ► Subsidies ► Contribution of shipping to invisible exports Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Describe the different types of ships and explain their functions.

2.

Discuss the key aspects of the maritime business environment.

3.

Explain the role of international agencies.

4.

Describe the documentation and procedures adopted for ships entering and leaving ports.

5.

Explain different types of cargoes.

6.

Comment on the nature of ship funding and ownership of world fleets.

7.

Discuss the development of operating alliances, mergers and acquisitions in the international maritime environment.

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Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Elements of Shipping, 9th edition, A.E. Branch, Routledge Alternative Texts and Further Reading Sea Transport, P.M. Alderton, Thomas Reed Publications Dictionary of Shipping International Business: Trade Terms and Abbreviations, A.E. Branch, Witherby Lloyds List and Shipping Gazette Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.4 The Business of Shipping Syllabus

Unit Title

The Business of Shipping

Unit Code

TBS-0309

Level

5 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

TP

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit will introduce students to the key operations associated with the shipping industry and familiarise them with different types of ships, cargoes and ports. Main Topics of Study: The Ship ► The number and classification of ships ► Parts of the ships ► Ship stresses and stability ► Markings on the ship ► Tonnage Types of Ships ► Passenger ships ► General cargo ships ► Container ships ► Barge-carrying ships and ro/ro ships ► Bulk carriers ► Specialist ships ► Types of engines ► Trends in ship types ► The economics of ship size ► The economics of speed The Crew ► Typical duties of those on board ► Reductions in crew size ► International crews ► Regulating crew size ► Crew recruitment and training ► Pay and conditions ► Industrial relations Navigation ► Whose responsibility is this? ► The choice of route ► The ship's navigational hardware ► Communications at sea Types of Cargo ► Pre-shipment planning

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► The stowage plan ► Stowage and discharge ► The care of cargo during the voyage ► Stuffing containers ► Bulk cargo ► Dangerous cargoes ► Deck cargo ► The theory of trade Costs and Freight Rates ► Cost classification ► The daily running cost (DRS) ► Propulsion, cargo-handling and other port costs ► Freight rates World Tonnage ► What determines the supply of shipping? ► The growth of national merchant fleets ► Reasons for encouraging and sustaining national fleets ► Maritime policy ► Flags of convenience Shipping Finance ► The operating profit ► Equity ► Debt Charters ► Different ways of chartering a ship ► Standard forms for charters ► Voyage estimating ► How shipowners get 'offers' for their vessels ► Arbitration in charter party disputes ► The tanker market and chartering The Liner Market ► Typical company organisation ► Marketing ► Consortia, alliances and conferences ► Logistics and/or intermodal transport Safety ► Spheres of risk ► The economics of safety ► Marine insurance ► Salvage ► Safety and environmental issues Documentation ► The bill of lading (B/L) ► Economic and operational problems of documentation ► Incoterms ► Ship's documents ► Customs

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Ports ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Port development Classification of ports Types of port ownership Time spent in port (cargo-handling) Number of berths needed in ports Comparing the various types of berth Alternatives to formal port systems Port labour Port management and administration Port charges Ship canals

Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Comment on different types of ships.

2.

Describe the purpose and functions of different ports and types of port ownerships.

3.

Discuss different types of cargoes and comment on security and safety matters.

4.

Understand the purpose of flags of convenience.

5.

Identify different ways of chartering a ship.

6.

Explain the importance of key documentation used by the industry.

7.

Identify international canals and their impact on world trade.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Sea Transport, P.M. Alderton, Thomas Reed Publications Alternative Texts and Further Reading The Business of Shipping, P. Kendall Dictionary of Shipping: International Business Trade Terms and Abbreviations, A. Branch, Witherby Lloyds List

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.5 Marine Insurance Syllabus

Unit Title

Marine Insurance

Unit Code

MI-0309

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

BJ

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit will familiarise students with the key principles of Marine Insurance and will also provide a clear understanding and knowledge of the key areas of general transport insurance markets. Main Topics of Study: History of Marine Insurance ► Bottomry and respondentia ► Origins of marine insurance in the UK ► Early marine insurance in other countries ► The phraseology of early policies ► Lloyd’s form of policy ► Formats used by other companies ► Legislation relating to marine insurance ► Developments since the Second World War The Principles of Marine Insurance ► Differences between faith and utmost faith ► What do we mean by ‘risk’? ► The function of marine insurance ► Rules of construction ► Utmost good faith ► Insurance intermediaries The UK and International Marine Insurance ► Lloyd’s insurers ► Insurance brokers ► The London market ► Placing risk Hull Insurance ► Types of hull policy ► Hull underwriting ► Analysis of the Institute Time Clauses (Hulls) 1995 ► Institute voyage clauses Cargo Insurance ► What are incoterms? ► What may be insured as cargo? ► Exclusions ► Institute trade clauses ► Institute cargo clauses: A, B and C

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Protection and Indemnity (P&I) Clubs ► Mutual insurance associations ► The history of the clubs ► The constitution of a club ► Management of club ► Termination of cover ► Coverage granted by clubs ► The international group of P&I clubs Salvage and General Average ► Salvage ► General average ► The York-Antwerp Rules 1994 Claims ► Proximate cause ► Included and excluded losses ► Additional perils clauses ► Fraudulent claims ► Under-insurance ► Cross-liabilities ► Imitation of liability Pollution ► What is a convention? ► TOVALOP ► CRISTAL ► International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation (ITOPF) ► Pollution liability and legislation ► Dumping at sea ► Controlling and preventing pollution War and Strikes Risks ► The waterborne agreement ► War exclusions ► War risk insurance ► Institute strikes clauses (cargo) Reinsurance ► Privity of contracts ► Types of reinsurance ► Methods of transacting reinsurance ► An insurer’s retention ► Solvency margins ► War risks and reinsurance ► Other forms of reinsurance

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Advise on the origins and history of marine insurance.

2.

Describe the purpose and function of the insurance markets.

3.

Explain the procedures that may affect insurance decisions.

4.

Understand the relevant Acts which provide the rules governing marine insurance.

5.

Explain the concepts of damage and loss and assess the implications.

6.

Discuss the main features of average and extraordinary loss.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Reeds Marine Insurance, B. Jervis, MacMillan Alternative Texts and Further Reading Marine Insurance: Principles and Basic Practice Vol 1, R.H. Brown, Witherby Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.6 Maritime Law Syllabus

Unit Title

Maritime Law

Unit Code

ML-0309

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

LL

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit will establish a clear understanding of the key national and international legal issues as they relate to the operations of shipping companies. Main Topics of Study: Introduction ► The charter party ► The bill of lading contract ► Charterers’ bills of lading ► The demise charter party Implied Obligations in a Contract of Affreightment The Undertaking as to Seaworthiness ► Nature of the obligation ► Incidence of obligation ► Burden of proof ► Effect of breach Obligation for Reasonable Dispatch ► Effect of breach Obligation not to Deviate from the Agreed Route ► Justifiable deviations ► Liberty clauses ► The effect of breach The Obligation to Nominate a Safe Port ► The period covered by the warranty ► The nature of the risks covered ► The nature of the undertaking-remedies available for breach ► The scope of the undertaking The Obligation not to Ship Dangerous Goods ► Meaning of dangerous goods ► Nature of liability ► Liability under the Hague-Visby Rules ► Statutory regulation The Effect of Frustration ► Types of frustration ► Factors to be taken into consideration ► Effect of frustration

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The Voyage Charter Party An Overview of the Charter ► Introductory clauses ► Cargo clauses ► Freight clauses ► Laytime provisions ► Other clauses ► Performance of the charter party The Arrived Ship ► Charter party provisions shifting risk of delay ► Readiness to load or discharge The Preliminary Voyage ► Nomination of port of lading ► The voyage to the loading port The Loading Operation ► Division of responsibility ► Provision of cargo ► Laytime ► Demurrage and damages for detention The Carrying Voyage The Discharging Operation ► Delivery The Time Charter Party General Legal Overview ► Clause describing vessel ► The charter period ► Off-hire ► Payment of hire – right to withdraw for non-payment ► Employment and indemnity clause ► Return to the vessel Description of the Vessel Period of Hire ► Specific clauses ► Effect of overlap Payment for Hire ► Payment in cash ► Payment in advance The Off-hire Clause ► Period of off-hire ► Effects of the operation of the off-hire clause Deductions from Hire Right to Withdraw Vessel for Non-payment of Hire ► Requirements for exercise of right of withdrawal ► Waiver of right to withdraw ► Possible bars to exercise of the right of withdrawal ► Effect of exercise of right to withdraw Employment and Agency Clause Redelivery of the Vessel

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Bills of Lading and their Functions Historical Introduction Functions of a Bill of Lading ► As receipt for goods shipped ► As evidence of the contract of carriage ► As a document of title Bills of Lading and Third parties ► Liability in tort ► Third party reliance on bill of lading terms Presentation of a Bill of Lading Problems in Presentation ► Short form bill of lading ► The waybill ► The straight bill of lading ► The registry system ► A possible practical solution Electronic Bills of Lading ► Atlantic container line datafreight system ► Electronic data exchange systems ► Bolero Switch Bills Application of the Hague-Visby Rules Application of the Rules ► Types of carriage covered by the rules ► The cargoes excluded ► Period of coverage of the rules Legal Effect of the Rules Basic Provisions of the Hague-Visby Rules ► Duties of the carrier ► Rights and immunities of the carrier ► Other provisions Incorporation of the Hague-Visby Rules in Charter Parties ► Effect of incorporation Bills of lading – Hamburg Rules ► Introduction ► Scope of application of the rules ► Basic carrier liability ► Limitation of liability ► Loss of right to limit liability ► Other provisions ► Prospects for adoption of the Hamburg Rules ► Later developments ► The CMI/UNCITRAL project Bills of Lading Issued under Charter Parties ► Where bill of lading issued to charterer ► Where bill issued to third-party shipper ► Who is the carrier? ► What are the terms of the contract?

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► Where bills indorsed by charterer to a third party ► Shipowner’s recourse against charterer Problems of Combined Transport The Liability of the Carrier ► Locating damage or loss ► Limitation of liability ► Claims in tort ► Combined transport and documentary and credits ► Effect of transhipment ► Transhipment and documentary credits ► Multimodal Convention 1980 Exceptions Common Law Exceptions ► Act of God ► Act of the Queen’s enemies ► Inherent vice Contractual Exceptions ► Perils of the sea ► Restraint of princes ► Strikes or lockouts ► Defective packing The Hague-Visby Exceptions ► Act, neglect, or default of the master, mariner, pilot or the servants of the carrier in the navigation or in the management of the ship ► Fire, unless caused by the actual fault or privity of the carrier ► The catch-all exception Bars to the Exceptions ► Negligence ► Unseaworthiness ► Fundamental breach Limitation of Liability Merchant Shipping Act 1995 ► Parties covered ► Types of claim covered ► Limitation amount ► Breaking the limits Freight The Basic Obligation ► Calculation of freight ► Deductions from freight ► The effect of deviation Advance Freight Specialised Types of Freight ► Lump sum freight ► Pro rata freight ► Back freight ► Dead freight

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Payment of Freight ► Party from whom freight due ► Party from whom freight payable Shipowners’ Liens Liens at Common Law ► Requirements for the exercise of the common law lien for freight ► Express contractual liens ► Characteristic of contractual lien Dispute Settlement Problems of Conflicts of Laws ► Jurisdiction of the English courts ► Choice of forum ► Choice of law clause Security for Claims ► The action in rem ► The freezing injunction Arbitration ► The Arbitration Act 1996 ► Basic principles ► Types of arbitration ► Commencement of arbitration ► Appeal from arbitration award ► Other challenges to an award ► Control by the court of arbitration proceedings ► Enforcement of arbitration awards Breach of Contract Forms of Breach ► Anticipatory breach The Effects of Breach ► Conditions and warranties ► Intermediate terms ► The effects of a repudiatory breach The Action for Damages ► Remoteness of damage ► Measure of damages ► Other relevant considerations in assessing damages Remedies other than Remedies ► Specific performance ► Injunction

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Understand the key principles of law as they apply to shipping operations.

2.

Explain the type of contracts used in the transport of goods.

3.

Discuss how breaches of contract can be handled and how disputes may be settled.

4.

Understand the role of agents and advise on the different type of agency agreements.

5.

Appreciate the legal issues associated with time charter parties and voyage charter parties.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Carriage of Goods by Sea, J.F. Wilson, Pitman Alternative Texts and Further Reading Shipping Law, S. Baughen, Cavendish Business and Law for the Mariner, Capt. I. Salter, Master Mariner, Brown, Son and Ferguson Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.7 Maritime Security & Safety Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Maritime Security & Safety Management

Unit Code

MSSM- 0309

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

LL

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit will introduce students to the problems facing the commercial maritime sector and their solution through an examination of the threat(s) and the deployment of effective and comprehensive security policies, measures, procedures and systems. Main Topics of Study: Commercial Seaports and Modes of Maritime ► Transport ► Commercial seaports ► Container terminals ► Bulk cargo terminals ► Cruise ship terminals ► Non-traditional ports ► Stakeholders ► Terminal owners ► Terminal operators ► Stevedore company ► Longshoremen ► Intermodalism ► Modes of maritime transport ► Tankers ► LNG tankers ► Chemical tankers ► Container ships ► Freighters ► Bulkers ► Oceangoing tugboats ► Cruise and passenger ships Documentation, Financial Transactions, and Business Entities in Commercial Maritime Transportation ► Purchase of goods ► Documents used to export and import cargo: bill of lading ► Shipper's export declaration ► Certificate of origin ► Commercial invoice ► Insurance certificate ► Export license

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► Consular invoice ► Inspection certificate ► Documents specific to import cargo only: arrival notice ► Pro forma invoice ► Customs entries forms ► Freight release ► Delivery order ► Duty drawback ► Bank draft ► Letter of credit ► Business entities in commercial maritime transportation International Maritime Security Regulation and Programmes ► Objectives ► Introduction ► The ISPS Code ► Amendments to SOLAS ► WCO’s framework of standards to secure and facilitate global trade Vulnerabilities in the Cargo Supply Chain ► Vulnerabilities and their potential impact ► Recommended security practices at the production/loading phase ► Recommended security practices at the export phase ► Carriers and seaports ► Recommended security practices at the importation/distribution phase ► Ports of entry and importers ► Special vulnerabilities in the maritime environment ► Cargo theft ► Internal conspiracies and techniques used to circumvent security ► Container seals ► "Red Flags" of possible criminal/terrorist surveillance Plagues of the Seas: Piracy and Stowaways ► Definition and historical beginnings ► Highlights of recent cases of piracy ► Trends in piracy ► The linkage between piracy, organised crime, and terrorism ► Stowaways ► The motivation of the stowaway ► Techniques and tactics used by stowaways Drug Smuggling via Maritime Cargo, Containers and Vessels ► Illegal drug origins and production ► Maritime smuggling routes and trends ► Drug smuggling methods and techniques Terrorism and Commercial Maritime Transportation ► Review of the history of terrorism ► Current trends in terrorism ► Types of weapons utilise ► Explosives ► Small arms and infantry weapons

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► Weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) ► Terrorist targeting of ships and ports ► Use of ships, cargo, and containers to transport ► Terrorists and materials Strategic Blueprint for World-Class Seaport ► External security ring ► Intelligence operations ► Government and law enforcement liaison ► Perimeter security ring ► Inner security ring ► Site and asset-specific security rings ► Vessel security ring ► Key vessel security procedures ► Pre departure search for contraband and unauthorised persons ► Security personnel employment and training ► Pre-employment screening ► Basic security training ► Security officer equipment ► Port security director ► Port facility security plan Port Security Management ► The port security director ► The systems approach, ISO certifications, strategic ► Planning, and metric management ► A multi organisational approach toward port security ► The importance of comprehensive job descriptions ► Planning and conducting security-related training ► Intelligence and its role in maritime security ► Risk management and port security ► Contingency planning ► The incident command system (ICS) and the national ► Incidents management system (NIMS) ► Testing training and planning through exercises and drills Threat Mitigation Strategies ► Mitigating pirate attacks ► Hostage survival and rescue ► Cargo container inspection techniques ► Security equipment, systems, and devices used to detect contraband and unauthorised persons in a container Information Security and Assurance ► History of information security ► The information security function in a maritime company ► Key concepts in the field of information security ► Essential infosec objectives ► Levels of computer security ► Common vulnerabilities in the electronic commerce environment ► Human threats to information security ► Technical risks

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Explain the importance of designing, implementing and managing effective port and vessel security programmes in a high risk environment.

2.

Understand the difficulties and risks of the cargo supply chain.

3.

Analyse the risk associated with piracy, stowaways, drug smuggling and terrorism.

4.

Understand the importance of Port Security Management, mitigation strategies and informal security.

5.

Recommend measures to improve security and safety of cargoes, equipment, personnel, and vessels.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Maritime Security, M. McNicholas, Butterworth Heinemann Alternative Texts and Further Reading Maritime Security, S. Jones, Nautical Institute Safety Management, Prof. C. Kuo, Nautical Institute Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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46

13.1.8 Marketing Planning & Decision Making – Maritime Syllabus

Unit Title

Marketing Planning & Decision Making – Maritime

Unit Code

MM-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

NK

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This is an introductory course in Marketing that will explore marketing decision making within an organisation using an applied framework of marketing planning and control. Main Topics of Study: Marketing Management ► The critical role of marketing in organisations and society ► Laying the groundwork through strategic planning ► Managing the marketing process and marketing planning Analysing Marketing Opportunities ► Marketing information systems and marketing research ► Analysing the marketing environment ► Analysing consumer markets and buyer behaviour ► Analysing business markets and organisational buying behaviour ► Analysing competitors Researching and Selecting Target Market ► Measuring and forecasting market demand ► Identifying market segmentation and selecting target markets Designing Marketing Strategies ► Marketing strategies for differentiating and positioning the marketing offer ► Developing, testing and launching new products and services ► Managing products through their product life cycle ► Deciding on international market entry ► Methods of entry ► International marketing programmes Planning Marketing Programmes ► Managing product lines, brands and packaging ► Managing service business and ancillary services ► Designing pricing strategies and programmes ► Selecting and managing marketing channels ► Managing retailing and wholesaling ► Designing communication and promotion-mix strategies ► Designing effective advertising programmes ► Designing direct marketing, sales-promotion and public relations programmes ► Managing the sales force ► Managing direct marketing operations

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► Implementing marketing programmes ► Controlling marketing activities Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Understand the theory and practice of marketing decision making.

2.

Formulate solutions to case studies, practical examples and exercises.

3.

Apply marketing decision making principles to a wide variety of contexts within the non-profit and private sectors from small as well as large enterprises and from services and industrial markets as well as the traditional area of consumer marketing.

4.

Develop a marketing plan for a product or service.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Marketing Management, Philip Kotler, Prentice Hall Alternative Texts and Further Reading Go International, Keith Monk, McGraw Hill Essentials of Marketing, G. Lancaster & L. Massingham, McGraw Hill Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops These interactive sessions will be used to discuss concepts and allow students to present findings.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Background research / individual and group preparation for seminars.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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48

13.1.9 Finance of International Trade Syllabus

Unit Title

Finance of International Trade

Unit Code

FIT-0409

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

AP

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit covers the key areas of finance of international trade and payments and identifies and explains methods to be considered in order to reduce the level of risk associated with international business decision-making. The unit can also provide practical methods and techniques to executives of maritime organisations operating in highly competitive international environments. By evaluating individual buyer’s risks, the student will be able to understand the most appropriate and practical methods of payment in the international trade. Main Topics of Study: The International Trade ► The law of comparative costs ► Origins of international trade ► The benefits of international trade ► The structure of international trade ► Economic, commercial and political factors ► Countertrade ► Trading with Eastern Europe ► Multinational companies and direct investment ► International organisations seeking to facilitate world trade ► Regional organisations seeking liberalisation Country and Buyer Risk ► Country risk ► Balance of payments ► The international monetary fund and the world bank ► Political risk ► Buyer risk ► Credit insurance The Quotation ► Delivery terms ► Calculation of the quoted export price ► Profit margin, pricing policy and delivery terms ► Credit terms ► Foreign exchange pricing Foreign Exchange ► Convertibility of currencies ► Quoting in currency, the exchange risk

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► Understanding rates of exchange ► Forward exchange contracts ► Forward exchange rates, calculating forward exchange rates ► Closing out forward contracts ► Pure currency options, the wider picture ► Avoiding the spread, euro-currency markets ► Tender to contract cover Agreeing a Method of Payment ► Risks associated with the country or the buyer ► The role of the credit controller ► Types of methods of payment, methods of remittance Documentary Collections ► The bill of exchange ► Uniform rules for collection Documentary Credits – Obtaining the Credit ► The definition of a letter of credit ► Opening a documentary credit ► The main categories of documentary credits, types of documentary credit Documentary Credits – Securing Payment ► Examination of a credit on receipt, amending letters of credit ► The doctrine of strict compliance ► Discrepancies in presentations, the pre-presentation examination ► Action in the event of discrepancies Banker’s Guarantees (Bonds) and Indemnities ► Guarantees issued by local banks ► The exporter’s liability to the bank ► Indemnities securing the release of goods ► Bank guarantees in support of loan or overdraft facilities ► Custom clearance guarantees Finance for International Trade ► Bank finance to establish export markets – overdrafts and loans ► Bank finance from contract to payment – overdrafts and loans ► Credit insurance cover, bills of exchange ► Forfeiting, factoring ► Other sources of finance, finance for imports Other Trading Methods ► Consignment trading ► Joint ventures overseas ► Pick-a-back schemes and group selling ► Royalty agreements and licensing

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Use cost data for the planning, monitoring and control of a business.

2.

Recommend, for any market, optimum mixes of trade finance.

3.

Identify and explain country and buyer risks in any export plan.

4.

Discuss methods to avoid trading losses arising from business conducted in foreign currencies.

5.

Critically assess methods of finance in international trade.

6.

Analyse and select appropriate procedures to secure payment for goods or services.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Principles of International Trade & Payments, Peter Briggs, Blackwell Publishing Alternative Texts and Further Reading Trade Finance: Payments & Services, D.B. Cox, Northwick Publishers Multi-National Finance, A. Buckley, Prentice Hall Exchange Rates & International Finance, Prof. L. Copeland, Dufey & Giddy Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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51

13.1.10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Logistics & Supply Chain Management

Unit Code

LSCM-0812

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: This unit introduces the concepts of logistics and supply chain management. In the modern global marketplace, companies need to be efficient in relation to the movement of supplies and delivery of the final products. The unit explores issues in relation to logistics including value, managing lead time and techniques including Just-in-Time, and incorporating the role of technology in this process. Main Topics of Study: Logistics and the Supply Chain ► Definitions ► Structuring ► Material and information flow ► Competing through logistics ► Supply chain strategies Serving the Customer ► Customer service ► Customer service as a link between logistics and marketing ► Customer service and customer retention ► Setting customer service priorities Value and Logistics Costs ► Sources of value ► Representing logistics costs ► Activity based costing ► Balanced measurement portfolio ► Supply chain operations reference model Managing Logistics Internationally ► Drivers and logistics implications of internationalisation ► Trend towards internationalisation ► Challenge of international logistics and location ► Organising for international logistics ► General tendencies Managing the Lead Time Frontier ► Role of time in competitive advantage ► P:D ratios and lead time ► Time based mapping ► Managing timeliness in the logistics pipeline ► Method for implementing time based practices

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Just-In-Time and Lean thinking ► Just-in-time ► Lean thinking ► Vendor managed inventory ► Quick response The Agile Supply Chain ► Market winners and qualifiers ► Agile practices Managing the Supply Cain ► Collaboration in the supply chain ► Efficient consumer response ► Collaborative planning ► Forecasting and replenishment ► Managing supply chain relationships ► Framework for managing the supply chain Partnerships in the Supply Chain ► Choosing the right partnership ► Partnerships in the supply chain ► Supply-based rationalisation ► Supplier networks ► Supplier development ► Implementing partnerships Logistics Future Challenge ► New supply chain environment ► Key management challenges ► Role of the internet ► Implementation issues Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Identify issues in the development of an efficient supply chain.

2.

Describe techniques for enhancing logistics operations.

3.

Demonstrate knowledge of logistics and supply chain in the business context.

4.

Identify the main elements of a robust supply chain.

5.

Analyse issues and potential solutions in a global context.

6.

Critically examine the importance to customers, suppliers and relationships in the overall implementation.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience.

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Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Logistics Management Strategy, A. Harrison & R. Van Hoek, Prentice Hall Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops These interactive sessions will be used to discuss concepts and allow students to present findings.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Background research / individual and group preparation for seminars.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.11 Port Operations & Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Port Operations & Management

Unit Code

POM- 0309

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

TP

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: The aim of this unit is to provide students with a clear understanding of the main activities associated with port operations and port management and highlight current and future opportunities and threats facing port operators and government regulators. Main Topics of Study: Introduction to Ports and their Functions ► The role of ports in international trade and transport ► Seaports and their functions in the twenty-first century ► The effect of globalisation on ports, logistics and distribution patterns ► Criteria used for port location ► Access, flexibility and interface with other transport modes ► Hub ports; feeder transhipment ► Types of port ownership and current trends Legal Aspects of Port Management ► Port constitutions and legal framework of ownership ► National legislation, port laws and bye-laws ► Government's role in financing port development Port Planning ► Government port development ► Port planning and project planning ► Infrastructure/operating structure ► Joint ventures, financing and management ► Berth occupancy, service time, waiting time, capacity calculations ► Layout, physical constraints and terminal planning ► Flow analysis ► Analysis of key environmental issues Port Ownership ► Differing types of ownership in the public and private sectors ► Deregulation ► Methods of privatisation; sale of shares, management buyouts ► Lease contract and joint ventures Finance of Port Operations ► Budgeting ► Control of capital and revenue expenditure ► Project evaluation and review techniques ► Capital investment appraisal

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► Analysis and monitoring of direct and indirect costs ► Analysis of performance ► Appraisal of finance and economics of port proposals and traffic forecasting Port Equipment ► Port buildings ► Large handling equipment ► Trends in vessels and cargo handling ► Vessel size ► Procurement and materials management Port Management 1 ► Structure ► Organisation of activities performance measurement ► Marine operations – conservancy, dredging, navigation aids etc. ► Avoidance of congestion Port Management 2 ► Role of trade unions, labour organisations and ITF ► Statutory bodies. customs, immigration, port health, marine safety ► Needs of port users, owners, operators, agents, forwarders ► Information flow Port Security Management ► Importance of safety management ► Prevention of terrorism ► Illegal immigration, theft and smuggling Port Competition and Marketing ► Nature of national and international port competition ► Market information trade growth, vessel development, commercial needs, financial viability ► Location, vessel transit times and port rotation ► Role of shipowners/operators, shippers, receivers, freight contractors, forwarders promotion to potential users ► Impact of inland transportation Port Pricing ► Nature and type of port charges ► Cost factors in pricing, infrastructure, navigation services, equipment, staff and labour etc. ► Pricing policy and mechanisms ► Effect of competition on pricing policy ► Demand influences ► Regulatory mechanisms Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Explain the importance of different type of ports in international trade.

2.

Identify the criteria used by shipowners for port selection.

3.

Discuss the main aspects of port planning.

4.

Highlight the role of seaports in the twenty-first century.

5.

Analyse the importance of different port equipment.

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6.

Evaluate problems of port operations and management and suggest appropriate courses of action.

7.

Explain the interface with other transport modes.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Port Management and Operations, P. Anderton, Lloyd’s Practical Shipping Guides Alternative Texts and Further Reading Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management, A. Branch, Routledge Export Practice and Management, A. Branch, Routledge Lloyd’s List and Shipping Gazette Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.12 Shipbroking & Chartering Practices Syllabus

Unit Title

Shipbroking & Chartering Practices

Unit Code

SCP-0409

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

LL

Pre-requisites Main Aim(s) of the Unit: The unit aims to provide students with a clear understanding of the key activities associated with the operations of shipbroking and chartering organisations and to provide clear references on the type of documentation required. Main Topics of Study: Introduction to Chartering and Shipbroking ► Roles of shipbrokers and chartering agents ► Benefits associated with the work of shipbrokers ► Types and functions of shipbrokers ► Types of charter parties ► Functions associated with chartering Chartering Activities ► Chartering negotiations ► Voyage and time charters ► Chartering procedures ► Offers and counter offers ► Ethical considerations and market practices Voyage and Time Charter Parties ► Voyage and time charter parties documentation ► Differences between voyage and time charter activities ► Elements and clauses of voyage charter parties ► Elements and clauses of time charter parties Voyage Estimating ► Benefits associated with the calculation of voyage estimates ► Bunkers, ports and distances, load line zones ► Techniques and approaches used in voyage estimate calculations ► Applications of voyage estimates Laytime Calculations ► Relevance of charter parties ► Time sheets ► Preparation of timesheets ► Statement of facts ► Applications and practical value of laytime calculations Dry Cargo Chartering ► Key features of dry cargo chartering operations ► Types of ships and ship specifications

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► Vessel utilisation ► Dry bulk cargo fleet and specifications ► Types of dry bulk cargoes ► Transport considerations of different types of dry cargo ► Ports and key characteristics ► Exporters and importers Tanker Chartering ► Differences between dry cargo chartering and tanker chartering ► Sale and purchase activities ► Role and contributions of charter parties ► Elements of different contracts relating to tanker chartering ► Characteristics of tanker chartering market ► Factors affecting the operations of the market Learning Outcomes for the Unit: At the end of this Unit, students will be able to: 1.

Comment on the activities and value of Shipbrokers and Chartering Agents.

2.

Explain the basic principles of shipbroking and chartering practices.

3.

Highlight the differences between voyage and time charter parties.

4.

Calculate laytime and prepare voyage estimates and advise on their practical applications and uses.

5.

Distinguish between dry cargo chartering and tanker chartering.

6.

Advise on key ethical issues to be considered by practitioners.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience. Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit: Main Text Shipbroking and Chartering Practice, L. Gorton, P. Hillenius, R. Ihre & A. Sadervam, Lloyd’s of London Press Alternative Texts and Further Reading Sea Trading Vol. 3, W.V. Packard, Fairplay Bulk Carrier Practice, Capt. J. Isbester, Nautical Institute Lloyd’s List

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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Maritime Management Handbook.pdf - Institute of Commercial

Contents 1 Introduction 2 The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM) 3 ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities 4 Learning, Teaching and Asses...

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