Guidance for the Texas Accountability Intervention System

Loading...

Guidance for the Texas Accountability Intervention System Needs Assessment Guidance                                                  

  Needs Assessment

Texas Accountability Intervention System (TAIS) Needs Assessment Guidance Needs Assessment Overall Purpose The intent of this document is to provide support for the  performance of needs assessment work of campuses and  LEAs.  The  process  set  forth  is  aligned  to  the  State  Framework,    which    includes    the  Texas    Accountability  Intervention   System   (TAIS)   continuous   improvement  process.  As a result, the following process is intended to  bring clarity to the needs of the LEA/campus in order to  effectively  plan  actions and  make  evidence‐ based  decisions.    Finally,    all    accountability    systems  require    a  thorough  needs  assessment  be  completed  to  inform  the  improvement    planning    process    (TEC   §39.106  and  P.L.1114 (b)). 

Needs Assessment

 

Design and Framework: This  guidance  document  is  designed  to  walk  an  LEA/  campus  intervention  team  through  a  needs  assessment  process  by  engaging  in  five  steps.  Each  step  includes  an  overview  of  the  purpose  of  the  step  and  critical  actions  to  be  taken  during  that  step.    In  addition,  tips  for  success  are  included  to  enhance  the  needs  assessment  work.  Some  steps  also  include  additional  suggestions  or  examples  to  help facilitate the process. Although parts of the document may be useful in isolation, the document is  designed  to  be  used  as  a  process.  After  the  five  steps  of  the  needs  assessment,  there  is  a  section  dedicated to transitioning into the development of a targeted improvement plan.  Whenever actions or  steps  in  this  guidance  satisfy  requirements  in  the  Texas  Education  Code  for  LEAs/campuses  in  accountability, it will be noted with the appropriate code citation. 

Needs Assessment Process Overview Step 1:

Clarify and Prioritize Problem Statements

Step 2:

Establish Purpose of the Needs Assessment and Establish the Team

Step 3:

Gather Data

Step 4:

Data Analysis Review

Step 5:

Root Cause Analysis  

Step 1: Clarifying and Prioritizing Problem Statements Purpose: As a result of the data analysis process, the problems that need to be addressed should be clearly  defined.    These  problem  statements  synthesize  the  data  analysis  process  into  objective  statements  that  bring  clarity  to  the  areas  that  should  be  included  in  the  improvement  plan.    A  problem  statement  is  also  used  to  pinpoint the gap in the data that is to be further examined through a root cause analysis.  QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER WHEN DEVELOPING PROBLEM STATEMENTS:  1. Has a general problem been identified?   2. Do we collectively agree it is a problem?   3. How is the problem relevant to our campus?  4. Is the problem based on real data?      Problem statements are concise and objective statements that reflect the currents state  according to the data. These statements do not assign causation as to why a gap in the  data  exists  or  provide  solutions  to  the  problems.  Essentially  problem  statements  capture the “where you are” compared to “where you want to be.”  These statements  articulate the gaps in data in order to create the starting point for a needs assessment  process that includes a root cause analysis.  NOTE:  Before  beginning  any  planning  or  needs  assessment,  it  is  important  to  have  a  true picture of what the problems are as the foundation for your planning. Well written  problem statements set the stage for a solid improvement plan.   

Actions: Reviewing problem statements   Effective problem statements meet the following criteria:        

Substantiated by facts and data  Written objectively  Use concise language  Include specific details (who, what ,when..)  Focus on a single, manageable issue  Has relevance   Avoids causation or assigning solutions 

Prioritizing problem statement  Prioritizing problem statements is a critical step when identifying areas to target in an  improvement plan. Consider the following questions:    1. Which problem statement(s) address our areas of low performance/need?  2. Which problem statement(s) impact the greatest numbers of students?  3. Which problem statement(s) focus on student achievement?  4. Which  problem  statement(s)  are  manageable,  relevant  and  focus  efforts  on  core  issues? 

 

Tips for Step 1:

•Make sure the team understands and agrees on the problem statements created •Use a prioritization process to hone in on the greatest areas of need and the greatest  areas of impact •Ensure you have a clear list of problem statements before moving onto Step 2

Step 2: Establish Purpose of Needs Assessment and Establish the Team Purpose: The purpose of the needs assessment should be understood and aligned to the shared vision and  mission  for  the  LEA/campus  and  helps  identify  the  root  cause  of  identified  problems.  A  clear  purpose  helps  safeguard  against  assumptions  and  keeps  the  work  focused  on  clear  and  targeted  outcomes  and  answers  the  question  WHY.    Understanding  the  purpose  and  objectives  ensures  all  stakeholders  are  able  to  provide  input  using a collaborative approach. The needs assessment is not a one‐time annual event; it is a continuous process. 

Actions: Establish the criteria for the team and other stakeholders needed (TEC §39.106 and P.L. 1114(b)).  Having the right voices at the table is essential. Be sure to identify the key players who are vested in the  needs assessment process and understand the vision and mission as well as the purpose of the needs  assessment.   



Who are the stakeholders that may not have had adequate representation in the past?  What will  be  the  process  for  ensuring  that  all  opinions  and  ideas  are  able  to  be  shared  within  the  norms  established by the group? 



For LEAs/campuses in improvement due to accountability, the intervention team (TEC§39.106(a))   would be members of the needs assessment team 

 

  Review the current LEA/campus vision and mission statements.   

Determine  whether  the  vision  and  mission  statements  still  reflect  shared  goals  and  values.  If  they  require updating, proceed with revision BEFORE beginning the needs assessment process. A review  of the vision and mission is critical to the success of the needs assessment. This step ensures that  everyone  understands  the  shared  vision  and  that  all  stakeholders  feel  vested  in  the  needs  assessment  process.  Having  a  clear  and  universal  understanding  of  the  vision  and  mission  is  foundational and essential to improvement efforts. 



Once the vision is agreed upon, develop logistics and a plan for conducting the needs assessment.  During  this  activity  establish  a  timeline,  a  calendar  for  needs  assessment  meetings,  which  include  target dates for completion of activities, and a communication plan for sharing the outcome of each  session. 



An important part of this action step is to establish norms for the needs assessment working group  so that the work remains focused and moves forward smoothly and collaboratively.  

  Reach  common  understanding  of  the  intended  goals  for  the  needs  assessment  based  on  the  LEA/campus  vision.   Revisit the vision and mission to check for alignment. The team should be able to articulate what the  ideal  LEA/campus  would  look  like  so  that  planning  and  goals  can  guide  the  organization  to  that  outcome.   

Having a clear idea of the desired goal will guide the needs assessment work.  



Once  the  team  has  established  the  goals,  refer  to  them  frequently  to  make  sure  that  the  work  remains on track.  

Begin with the end in mind:       

What does the organization want to learn as a result of this process?  What information does the LEA/campus want to uncover?  What are the objectives of the needs assessment?  How will the LEA/campus measure success toward identified objectives?  How  will  the  LEA/campus  use  the  information  to  drive  planning  and  improvement  efforts  continuously?  How will the LEA/campus know it has achieved the goals? 

Tips for Step 2:

•Adopt a process approach rather than needs assessment as a single event. •Avoid communicating the process as a compliance driven activity. •Represent a cross‐section of all stakeholders on the needs assessment team. •Be transparent and share the work of the needs assessment team.

Step 3: Gather Data Purpose: The  extensive  nature  of  the  needs  assessment  process  provides  the  information  and  insight  necessary for evidence‐based decision making.  In order to make informed discoveries to drive decisions, the use  of multiple data sources is imperative. The designation of a specific step for gathering data ensures that all data  essential for the completion of a thorough profile of the LEA/campus have been retrieved. This step provides an  opportunity  to  collect  additional  data  sources  that  enhance  the  team’s  ability  to  see  all  the  factors  that  are  impacting student achievement. It is important to stay focused on gathering data and organizing that data into  user‐friendly arrangements and documents without jumping to analysis. This step ensures the best information  has been gathered before moving forward.     NOTE:  The  LEA/campus  may  have  gathered  data  previously  by  using  the  Texas  Accountability  Intervention  System  (TAIS) Data Analysis Guidance  or an LEA designed  process; however, this step looks at additional data  sources and approaches to collecting data. The importance of collecting varied data sources is paramount to an  effective needs assessment so revisiting the action of gathering data action is prudent. 

Actions: Determine data sources necessary to address the stated objectives and purpose.  

Once  the  purpose,  vision and  mission,  and  desired  outcome  of  the  needs  assessment  are  established,  the team can start to gather and organize data. Staying focused on the purpose and vision can ensure  alignment of efforts. 



In order for the needs assessment team to achieve their goals, gathering the necessary data is critical in  having all of the right information and data available to get the whole picture of the LEA/campus. 

    Establish a lead from the needs assessment team to manage data collection.  

Gathering  data  takes  time,  so  dedicating  a  lead  can  help  to  facilitate  this  step  and  keep  the  team  working in a timely fashion. 



A data lead is also aware of the data that has been collected and can ensure there are not gaps in the  data. 

  Identify relevant data sources which already exist that are currently available for use such as:  1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7)

AEIS  Discipline referrals  OSS/ISS reports  Report card grades  CBAs  Attendance reports  Demographics 

8) TELPAS  9) Previously conducted  surveys or snapshots  10) PEIMS  11) Data by Critical Success  Factor (CSF)  12) Short term and long  term data 

13) PBMAS reports  14) Compliance reviews  15) Student Level  Information  16) Other

  Gather and review existing data sources.    

Are the data in a format that is easy to use?   Are they accurate and current?   Are there gaps in the data that prevent the team from seeing the whole picture?    Determine if other information is needed to meet the purpose of the needs assessment, so that the process  represents the entire landscape of the LEA/campus.  

The LEA/campus may need to revisit this action after completing Step 4 since data analysis may reveal  gaps  in  the  data  gathered,  which  will  mean  going  back  to  step  3  to  gather  more  data  before  moving  forward.     Collect additional data (teacher, student, community, other) such as:     

Surveys   Interviews   Focus groups   School climate data 

NOTE:  Campuses  have  easy  access  to  student  performance  and  demographic  data,  but  often  need  more  perception  data.  Collecting  additional  data  in  the  form  of  surveys  and  interviews  is  intended  to  secure  perception data and ensures stakeholder perspectives are considered in the needs assessment process.   

Tips for Step 3:

•Appoint a designated lead for data review and collection. •Remain objective and avoid jumping to analysis. •Understand data collection takes time. •Ensure adequate resources (time, personnel, materials and technology). •Organize and display data so that it is easy to interpret and “see”. •Encourage honest and open feedback. 

Step 4: Analyze and Organize Data (TEC §39.106 and P.L. 1114 (b))   

Purpose: In order to gain insight into what the data are saying about the work at the LEA/campus,  this step is focused on sets of data, which will help identify trends and reveal the big picture through  comparisons of the data. The intent is not to apply causal factors or begin to identify reasons for the  data, but to remain objective and reveal the facts of the data. By remaining objective, this step focuses  the team on looking for both trends and patterns over time.  This step entails a final look at the  problem statements before beginning the root cause analysis process.    Before beginning step 5, which digs deeper into the meaning of the data and the causal factors, it is  important  to  look  for  the  objective  facts  the  data  reveal.      Doing  so  will  both  establish  the  data  foundation  on  which  to  build  a  comprehensive  portrait  of  the  LEA/campus  and  drive  the  needs  assessment and planning processes.    NOTE:  As  previously  mentioned  in  step  3,  the  LEA/campus  may  have  analyzed  data  by  using  the  Texas  Accountability Intervention System  (TAIS) Data Analysis Guidance or LEA designed process; however, this step  looks  at  additional  data  sources  and  approaches  to  analyzing  data  aligned  to  the  state  framework.  The  importance  of  analyzing  data  is  critical  to  an  effective  needs  assessment.  This  step  will  help  the  LEA/campus  align  the  data  and  identified  needs  to  the  Critical  Success  Factors  (CSFs)  and  the  Texas  Accountability  Intervention System (TAIS) Framework.    For  LEAs/campuses  in  improvement  due  to  accountability,  particular  data  must  be  analyzed  during  the  needs  assessment process. (TEC § 39.106 (b)) See Appendix A for a complete list. 

Actions: Determine what data need to be kept on the table and what data need to be reserved for reference.  

Although all data collected in step 3 are important, some data will be consistently utilized. Other data  sources are best used for reference when questions arise through the needs assessment process.  



This additional reference data will likely be needed when the team begins the more in‐depth look at the  Critical Success Factors (CSFs) and/or support systems questions. Part of the balance is having all of the 

data necessary to uncover the core areas of need, while not overwhelming the process with too much  information.    Establish the data facts.   The goal of this action is for the LEA/campus to uncover the facts.  Only state what the data are saying without  assigning any perception or assumption.  It is important to read the data without trying to explain the data. This  can most easily be done by asking some simple questions, including but not limited to:     

What is increasing?  What is decreasing?  Are any trends evident from quarter to quarter or year to year?  Are there new areas that have not been a priority before that are being revealed in the numbers (e.g.  student groups, CTE, subject areas)? 

  Determine strengths and areas for improvement or focus.  To  guide  the  discussion  on  strengths  and  areas  for  improvement  or  focus,  begin  the  conversation  with  the  following questions:   

    

What do these data seem to reveal?  What do they not reveal? What else needs to be known?  What good news can be celebrated?  What needs for school improvement might arise from these data?  What are the gaps and the problem statements that have been developed to address the gaps?    Utilize the Critical Success Factors (CSF) and/or support system questions in Appendix B and C to target specific  areas of focus. LEAs will also want to analyze the district commitment questions. All of these questions can be  referenced in the appendices. 

Tips for Step 4:

•Appoint a designated lead for data discussions and a lead for keeping the needs  assessment team focused on this organizing data. •Understand that data discussion takes time. •Encourage honest and open feedback while avoiding causation. •Remain objective and avoid jumping to analysis.

Step 5: Conduct a Root Cause Analysis  

Purpose: Step 5 helps to identify WHY a problem has occurred. Often times when a problem is discovered,  an action or intervention is immediately applied to the problem in an attempt to resolve it. The danger in action  planning before drilling down to the root cause may only allow for the treatment of the symptoms of a bigger  problem.  Recall  that  the  data  analysis process  is  an  attempt  to  identify  WHAT  the  problem  is.  The  jump  from  WHAT the problem is to HOW it can be fixed overlooks the most important step which is determining WHY the  problem exists. In order to align actions with areas of need, the root cause must be identified. 

Actions: Begin with problem statements from the data analysis process that have been prioritized (TEC §39.106)   Problem statements are concise and objective statements that reflect the currents state according to the data.    Conduct a “10, 5, 5” process with each problem statement  The purpose of this protocol is to perform an initial brainstorm of the possible reasons why a problem   might  be  occurring.  Start  by  thinking  of  10  reasons  why  a  problem  might  be  occurring.  There  are  no  right  or  wrong  answers  during  this  brainstorming  process.  The  objective  of  this  exercise  is  to  generate  possible  ideas.  Next,  think  of  5  more  possible  reasons.    When  a  team  is  stretched  to  think  beyond  the  initial  5‐10  reasons,  reasons with greater depth tend emerge. Usually initial ideas focus on external factors such as students, parents  or the community.  When forced to think more deeply by generating a longer list, additional connections and  potential reasons for a problem can be revealed. Next, generate 5 more possible reasons to stretch the thinking  even further.  Once the team has brainstormed a list of 20 possible reasons, there is a need to pare down these responses. For  example, look for duplicated or very similar responses. The next protocol is another approach to narrowing the  responses.    Narrow the list of possible reasons a problem is occurring  During  this  step  the  team  reviews  the  brainstorm  list  and  removes  any  items  that  the  team  agrees  can  be  eliminated in order to fine tune the list.    Identify the sphere of control of the campus or district  The circle of control and circle of influence is an adaptation of Stephen Covey’s Circle of Influence and Circle of  Concern (Covey, S. R. (1989). The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. 1989, NY: Free Press).  The purpose of this protocol is to decide which reasons generated from 10,5,5 can be directly controlled by a  campus’ action(s), or influenced. It is in the best interest of the group to direct energy toward reasons that can  be directly controlled, allowing for greater impact of desired results. By looking at the list generated from the  10,5,5 activity, sort items by what can be directly controlled by the campus or district and those items that can  only be influenced.  A T‐chart is an easy format to use for the sorting activity.  Once you have sorted your list,  you will want to focus your efforts on the possible reasons for the problem (root causes) that are in the list of  items under your control.  The 5 Whys  Once you have sorted your brainstormed list, select one of the items from the circle of control list. Although we  have  generated  possibilities,  we  still  have  not  identified  WHY  this  might  be  the  cause  of  the  problem  or  established the connection to the problem statement. The 5 Whys protocol will help dig even deeper into the  potential root causes and connect to our problem statement.    Using the 5 Whys, conduct a deep dialogue around processes surrounding the identified problems and gaps.  (See the examples below on how to use the 5 Whys process.)    Example 1: Problem statement: Discipline referrals are increasing   

Why 1: Why do we have so many discipline referrals?   Because a lot of students act inappropriately.   

Why 2: Why do they act inappropriately? 



Because they don’t know the rules. 

 

Why 3: Why don’t they know the rules?   Because we haven’t explained and enforced the rules consistently.    

Why 4: Why haven’t we explained and enforced the rules consistently?   Because we haven’t agreed on a common set of expectations.   

Why 5: Why haven’t we agreed on common expectations?   Because we haven’t spent time together defining our philosophy. (Source: The handbook  for SMART School Teams: Conzemius and O’Neill, 2002)    Example 2: Problem statement: Teacher turnover rates are consistently high   

Why 1: Why is teacher turnover so high?   Because many teachers feel this job is too hard.   

Why 2: Why do they feel this job is too hard?   Because they don’t feel supported in the classroom.   

Why 3: Why don’t they feel supported in the classroom?   Because they don’t have a mentor teacher to turn to for support.    

Why 4: Why don’t they have a mentor teacher to turn to for support?   Because  the  campus  has  not  implemented  a  mentoring  program  to  assist  struggling  teachers.   

Why 5: Why hasn’t the campus implemented a mentoring program to assist struggling teachers?   Because we had concerns about time and resources.    Note:  At  this  point,  the  needs  assessment  team  would  want  to  discuss  how  time  and  resources  are  currently  allocated  and  prioritized.  It  is  a  possibility  that  a  mentoring  program  is  a  high  priority  and  needs  to  be  considered.    Example 3: Problem statement: The wrong materials for training courses have been delivered to training venues  on several occasions.   

Why 1: Why did this happen?   The  person  packing  and  dispatching  them  for  delivery  made  some  mistakes.  She  was  packing  materials  for  three  different  courses  at  the  time,  was  in  a  hurry  and  didn't  notice. (Symptom)  Why 2: Why was it overlooked?   She’s quite new to the job and there hadn’t been enough time for training. (Symptom)   

Why 3: Why was a new person doing this job without apparent back up?   The person who used to do that job had left and everyone else was busy also. And there  is  nothing  written  down,  such  as  a  checklist  of  materials  to  pack,  nor  any  procedure.  (Symptom)   

Why 4: Why is there no procedure or guideline? 



We've  just  had  so  many  new  staff  lately  (turnover  has  been  very  high)  that  there  has  been no time for training or writing procedures. (Symptom) 

 

Why is that? Root Causes:    There  is  no  effective  training  system  in  place.  And  no  priority  or  importance  has  been  placed on having some basic documentation in place: writing down essential information  to make sure that things are done consistently, despite changes of personnel.    Note: The 5 Whys is often done by restating the previous answer as a question.  Example 3 illustrates that this  does not always have to be the case.  The intent is to ask questions that will reveal the true causal factors.   

Tips for Step 5:

•Avoid treating the symptom rather than the problem.  •Keep problem statements factual. •Remember that schools are complex systems. Continue to ask “Why?” •Avoid passing judgment and focus on how to address the root causes. •Develop collective ownership of the identified gaps and problems. •Five is not the magic number for 5 Why’s analysis; there may be a need to dig  further and ask more questions.

Closing and Next Steps: After a needs assessment is conducted and the root causes have been identified, the next step is to develop an  improvement plan. For LEA/campus in interventions due to accountability, the improvement plan should be  targeted and address the reasons for low performance [TEC §39.106 (a) and 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC)  §97.1071] or ESEA flexibility waiver requirements. There are many resources to help support the LEA/campus in  this step.  When  beginning  the  improvement  plan,  the  team  will  want  to  look  at  all  resources  available,  technical  assistance options, as well as other factors such as timelines and school improvement requirements.    Many resources can be found at www.tcdss.net and at www.tea.state.tx.us/pmi.   If  you  need  assistance  developing  an  improvement  plan,  please  see  the  Texas  Accountability  Intervention  System (TAIS) Guidance Document on Improvement Planning. This guidance document has information on the  research to support targeted plans as well as specific instructions on how to develop a plan to be submitted into  ISAM if you are a LEA/campus designated for required improvement.        

Tips for Improvement Planning:

•Set annual goals and quarterly checkpoints to track progress. •Review the needs assessment findings and continue to dialogue around the problem  statements and root causes. •Consider the data that will need to be collected to track the progress of the  improvement plan as well as data to enhance the needs assessment process. •Communicate the plan with all stakeholders. •Utilize all available resources to support this process.

Appendix A: Needs Assessment Requirements in Texas Education Code LEAs and campuses in improvement due to accountability are required under TEC §39.106 (b) to analyze the  following in the needs assessment process. 

TEC §39.106 (b)  (b) An  on‐site  needs  assessment  of  the  campus  under  Subsection  (a)  must  determine  the  contributing  education‐related and other factors resulting in the campus's low performance and lack of progress.  The team  shall  use  all  of  the  following  guidelines  and  procedures  relevant  to  each  area  of  insufficient  performance  in  conducting a targeted on‐site needs assessment and shall use each of the following guidelines and procedures in  conducting a comprehensive on‐site needs assessment:  (1)  an  assessment  of  the  staff  to  determine  the  percentage  of  certified  teachers  who  are  teaching  in   their field, the percentage of teachers who are fully certified, the number of teachers with more than  three years of experience, and teacher retention rates;  (2)  compliance with the appropriate class‐size rules and number of class‐size waivers received;  (3)  an assessment of the quality, quantity, and appropriateness of instructional materials, including the  availability of technology‐based instructional materials;  (4)  a report on the parental involvement strategies and the effectiveness of the strategies;  (5)  an assessment of the extent and quality of the mentoring program provided for new teachers on the  campus and provided for experienced teachers on the campus who have less than two years of teaching  experience in the subject or grade level to which the teacher is assigned;  (6)  an assessment of the type and quality of the professional development provided to the staff;  (7)  a  demographic  analysis  of  the  student  population,  including  student  demographics,  at‐risk  populations, and special education percentages;  (8)  a report of disciplinary incidents and school safety information;  (9)  financial and accounting practices;  (10)  an assessment of the appropriateness of the curriculum and teaching strategies;  (11)  a  comparison  of  the  findings  from  Subdivisions  (1)  through  (10)  to  other  campuses  serving  the  same  grade  levels  within  the  district  or  to  other  campuses  within  the  campus's  comparison  group  if  there are no other campuses within the district serving the same grade levels as the campus; and  (12)  any other research‐based data or information obtained from a data collection process that would  assist the campus intervention team in:   (A)  recommending an action under Subsection (c); and   (B)  executing a targeted improvement plan under Subsection (d‐3). 

Appendix B: Critical Success Factor Questions to Consider   Appendix B includes additional questions to consider for each Critical Success Factor (CSF). These are optional  questions provided as a resource.   

CSF 1: Improve Academic Performance  1.  What  systems  are  in  place  to  ensure  that  students  are  being  assessed  at  the  level  of  rigor  that  is  established in the state standards and assessment?  2.   Which student interventions are having the greatest impact on student performance?  3.   Which interventions are not achieving desired results?  4.   Which students are benefiting? Why? Why Not?  5.   What is the process for monitoring and communicating student progress?  6.   What is the process for identifying essential knowledge and skills attainment by individual students?  7.   How are gaps in the curriculum and instruction identified?  8.   What is the process for monitoring, evaluating, and revising the curriculum to meet the needs of all  learners?  9.      How  does  the  LEA/campus  monitor  whether  the  scope  and  sequence  allows  adequate  time  for  students to learn the essential knowledge and skills?  10. How does the LEA/campus ensure that the assessed curriculum is being taught and monitored?  11. How does the LEA/campus ensure that vocabulary used in the assessment is being taught?  12.  How    does    the    LEA/campus    ensure    that    written,    taught,    and    assessed    curricula    are   implemented consistently by all teachers?  13. What feedback are teachers receiving and how often?  14. How does the LEA/campus ensure that action is taken with the feedback that is provided?  15. What percentage of the campus administrator’s time is spent on actions aimed at directly improving  academic performance?  16. What are the particular strengths in the process that can be attributed to the gains discovered in the  data analysis?  17. What areas will need continued focus in order to have a positive impact on academic performance?  18. What are the particular weaknesses in the process that could be attributed to the identified areas of  need?  19. Are the processes in place based on data driven decisions verses unsubstantiated “hunches”? 

CSF 2 Increase the Use of Quality Data to Drive Instruction:  1. How are formative assessment data used to inform decisions about classroom instruction and student  interventions?  2.   How are interim assessment data (e.g.  benchmarks)  used  to  inform  decisions  about  classroom  instruction, curriculum and programmatic adjustments?  3.      How  are  summative  assessment  data  used  to  identify  and  inform  future  instructional  needs,  revisions to curriculum, programmatic improvements, and professional development?  4.   Which students are making annual growth?  5.   Which students are making projected growth?  6.   How does this compare across content areas? 

7.      What    systems    are    in    place    to    ensure    the    transparent    communication    of    data    to    the   appropriate stakeholders?  8.   What is the process for teachers to track and utilize data for targeted instruction?  9.  How often are teachers reviewing student‐level data to determine necessary interventions?  10.  What is the process for reviewing campus‐wide performance level data by content area and 

  CSF 3 Increase Leadership Effectiveness:  1. What specific actions are taken to build leadership potential in all employees in the district?  2.   To what degree does the LEA/campus practice distributive leadership?  3.   What is the system/process for identifying and developing potential leaders?  4.   What is the process for succession planning (e.g. How  does the LEA/campus identify and develop  successors for critical leadership positions?)  5.   What resources are allocated toward the development of leaders at the LEA/campus?  6.   What specific professional development opportunities are provided at the LEA/campus to leaders?  7.      What    is    the    LEA/campus    process    for    monitoring    leadership    effectiveness    and    providing   targeted professional development opportunities?  8.   What is the system/process for providing career growth and opportunities at the LEA/campus?  9.   What is the system/process for providing job‐embedded professional development?  10.  What  types  of  job‐embedded  professional  development  opportunities  are  provided  to  the  LEA/campus?  11. What systems are in place to ensure effective, systemic and consistent professional development for  teachers, administrators, and other staff?  12. How is common language developed within these systems?  13. What are the LEA/campus non‐negotiable items?  14. What degree of flexibility does the LEA provide to campuses in regards to budgets?  15. What degree of flexibility does the LEA provide to campuses to establish schedules?  16. What degree of flexibility does the LEA provide to campuses with regard to recruiting and retaining  staff?  17.  What  degree  of  flexibility  does  the  LEA  provide  to  campuses  with  regard  to  implementing  interventions?  18. What are the particular strengths in the process that can be attributed to the gains discovered?  19. What areas will need continued focus in order to have a positive impact on leadership effectiveness?  20. What are the particular weaknesses in the process that could be attributed to the identified areas of  need?  21. Are the processes in place based on data driven decisions verses unsubstantiated “hunches”? 

  CSF 4 Increase Learning Time:  1.  What  is  the  process  for  ensuring  that  all  students  arrive  in  the  morning  on  time?      Which  students  consistently arrive late in the morning? What interventions are in place to support these students?  2.   How does the LEA/campus ensure that minimal time is wasted taking attendance?  3.   What is the process for ensuring that transitions between classes are well‐supervised and orderly?  4.   What  is  the  process  for  ensuring  that  all  teachers  have  efficient  procedures  and  expectations   for beginning and ending class?  5.   What is the process for ensuring that all teachers are utilizing effective pacing strategies?  6.   How have schedules been modified to maximize instructional time and eliminate down time within  the school day? 

7.      How  is  time  being  allotted  for  enrichment  activities,  teacher  planning,  and  professional  development?  8.   What is the time allocated for instruction, advisory periods, enrichment, and collaborative planning  periods?  9.      How    are    school    activities,    the    bell    schedule,    attendance,    and    other    factors    impacting   instructional minutes?  10.  How  are  data  used  to  inform  decisions  around  learning  time,  planning,  and  enrichment  activities?  What  data are collected?  11.  How  does  the  LEA/campus  ensure  enrichment  programming  supports  LEA/campus  goals  and  enhances student learning?  12.  How  does  the  LEA/campus  ensure  that  enrichment  activities  build  knowledge  and  skills  in  areas  beyond  core academic subjects to deepen student skills and interests?  13. How does the LEA/campus ensure that school‐wide expectations and norms are maintained within  enrichment activities?  14. Which students are participating in enrichment activities? Does data reveal a correlation to student  achievement?  15.  How  does  the  LEA/campus  ensure  that  sufficient  time  is  provided  to  teachers  to  discuss  student  learning  needs, share and review student data, and receive and provide feedback on instructional practices?  16.  How  does  the  LEA/campus  ensure  that  staff  collaborative  planning  time  is  utilized  to  improve  instruction and build the knowledge and skills of teachers?  17. What are the particular strengths in the process that can be attributed to the gains discovered?  18. What areas will need continued focus in order to have a positive impact on learning time?  19. What are the particular weaknesses in the process that could be attributed to the identified areas of  need?  20. Are the processes in place based on data driven decisions verses unsubstantiated “hunches”? 

  CSF 5 Increase Family and Community Engagement:  1. How does the LEA/campus convey their vision and mission to the community? Is it effective? Why or  why not?  2.   What  type  of  communication  exists  for  families  and  community  stakeholders  and  how  can  its  effectiveness be evaluated? What data are being collected to inform these decisions?  3.   What information is provided to families about how to help students at home with homework and  other curriculum‐related activities, decisions, and planning?  4.   What is the system/processes for school‐to‐home and home‐to‐school communication about  programs and student progress?  5.   What is the LEA/campus process for developing a comprehensive Family/Community Engagement  plan?  How are representative stakeholders included?  6.   What systems are in place to support varying methods and/or flexible scheduling to meet the needs  of families and community members?  7.   What is the system/process for recruiting and organizing families to support the campus?  8.   What degree of participation does the LEA/campus receive from families? How engaged are families  and community stakeholders in academic and extracurricular activities? 

9.   What is the system/process for identifying and integrating resources and services from the  community to strengthen school programs, family needs, and student learning?  How effective are  community partnerships at supporting identified needs?  10. How aware are students, families, and faculty/staff of the services offered in the community?  11. What are the particular strengths in the process that can be attributed to the gains discovered?  12. What areas will need continued focus in order to have a positive impact on family and community  engagement?  13. What are the particular weaknesses in the process that could be attributed to the identified areas of  need?  14.  Are the processes in place based on data driven decisions verses unsubstantiated “hunches”?   

CSF 6 Improve School Climate:   1. How does the LEA/campus ensure that classroom management strategies are linked to a positive and  proactive school‐wide behavioral support system?  2.   What behavioral strategies are utilized to create a positive climate?  3.   What secondary and tertiary level behavioral strategies are utilized to create a positive climate?  4.   What systems are in place to monitor and adjust attendance and discipline procedures based on  data?  5.   When was the LEA/campus vision and mission last revised?  6.   What  actions  were  taken  to  solicit  the  input  of  stakeholders  in  developing  and/or  revising   the vision/mission?  7.   What is the process for defining and communicating core values and expectations to students, staff,  family, and community members?  8.   How  does  the  LEA/campus  ensure  that  the  expectations  conveyed  to  students,  staff,  family,   and  community members is aligned to the vision/mission?  9.   What level of participation do students have in developing a positive climate?  10. Does the LEA/campus understand and promote social‐emotional learning?  11. How often does the LEA/campus collect student, staff, family, and community perception data?  12. How often does the LEA/campus celebrate the success of staff and students?  13. How does the LEA/campus ensure that all student groups are equally supported?  14. What systems are in place to provide support for staff in building relationships and connections to  families and the community?  15. What are the particular strengths in the process that can be attributed to the gains discovered?  16. What areas will need continued focus in order to have a positive impact on climate?  17. What are the particular weaknesses in the process that could be attributed to the identified areas of  need?  18. Are the processes in place based on data driven decisions verses unsubstantiated “hunches”?   

  CSF 7 Increase Teacher Quality:  1. What systems are in place to support consistent appraisal and walk‐through instruments with  feedback and follow up for all staff?  2.   What is the process for ensuring timely and specific feedback? 

3.   How does the LEA/campus ensure that all teachers are receiving the support necessary to continue  to improve their professional practice?  4.   What is the process for providing differentiated support to teachers based on experience level and  individual needs?  5.   What systems are in place to help provide, track, and monitor professional development?  6.   What systems are in place to assess the impact of professional development on instruction?  7.   What additional professional development and enrichment is offered or available for teachers?  8.   How are teachers part of decision making at the LEA/campus? How is the teacher perspective  utilized in planning?  9.   What opportunities are available for teachers to advance their craft and develop new knowledge and  skills?  10. What systems are in place to foster a positive, collaborative, and team‐oriented culture?  11. What actions are taken to create a school atmosphere built upon trust, professionalism, and  distributive leadership?  12. What are the faculty attendance, retention, and turnover rate?   13. What are the particular strengths in the process that can be attributed to the gains discovered?  14. What areas will need continued focus in order to have a positive impact on teacher quality?  15. What are the particular weaknesses in the process that could be attributed to the identified areas of  need?  16. Are the processes in place based on data driven decisions verses unsubstantiated “hunches”?    

Appendix C: Support System Questions to Consider Appendix  C  includes  questions  to  assist  the  LEA/campus  with  evaluation  of  support  systems  according  to  the  Texas  Accountability  Intervention  System  (TAIS)  Framework.  These  are  optional  questions  provided  as  a  resource. 

Organizational Structure:   The organizational structure has clearly delineated roles and responsibilities for personnel that focus on teach‐ ing and learning with accountability and impact on student achievement. District and campus leaders eliminate  barriers  to  improvement,  redefine  staff  roles  and  responsibilities  as  necessary,  and  empower  staff  to  be  responsive  in  support  of  improvement.  (Dufour  &  Marzano,  2011);  (Bottoms  &  Schmidt‐Davis,  2010);  (Fullan,  2010); (Honig, Copeland, Rainey, Lorton & Newton, 2010)  What priorities and responsibilities are communicated through the district’s organizational chart?  1. How  have  roles  and  responsibilities  of  district  level  staff  evolved  or  changed  in  response  to  changing  campus needs?     2.   How are chains of authority and responsibility defined and communicated at campus levels?    3.   When barriers to campus success are encountered, what interaction with central office staff occurs?    4.      In    what    ways    do    central    office    administrators    work    with    campus    staff    to    improve    student  performance?    5.   How do central office departments align their work to support campus goals?    6.      What    process    is    in    place    to    ensure    equitable    workloads    and    levels    of    responsibility    across  horizontal positions within the district?    7.   What structures exist to provide support to campuses based upon the campus’ needs? 

  Processes and Procedures:   Priority  is  placed  upon  teaching  and  learning  when  establishing  and  implementing  systemic  operational  protocols  that  guarantee  accountability,  availability  of  resources  and  their  effective  use.  (Bottoms  &  Schmidt‐ Davis, 2010); (Levine, 2013)  1. How are district procedures determined, articulated, and monitored for adherence?  2. How do campus and district personnel contribute to the development of systemic processes?  3. What process is used to identify and expedite resources needed at specific campuses?  4. What  is  the  district’s  response  to  a  campus  need  to  operate  outside  of  defined  district‐wide  processes and procedures?  5. How often are data used to inform the development or revision of processes and procedures?  6. How are district wide processes evaluated and tailored to support timeliness and ease of use?  7. How do all formally defined procedures support the district vision?  8. How do all formally defined procedures support student learning? 

Communications:   A  clearly  defined  process  that  ensures  a  consistent  message  is  being  sent,  received  and  acted  upon  using  multiple,  effective  delivery  systems.  Proactive  efforts  are  engaged  by  district  level  staff  to  establish  effective  internal communication systems and transparent external communication practices. Communication is focused  on a shared and clear vision for continuous improvement which streamlines collaborative efforts toward student  success. (Kouzes & Posner, 2007); (Dufour & Marzano, 2011)  1. What are the defined processes for delivering various types of information (emergency, special  announcement, periodic communications, etc.) to particular audiences?  2. How  do  district  and  campus  leaders  manage  the  potential  for  misperceived  and  inaccurate  organizational information?  3. How  do  district  and  campus  communication  protocols  demonstrate  support  for  student  success?  4. How  do  district  and  campus  communication  protocols  demonstrate  a  district  culture  of  high  expectations?  5. What steps are taken at all levels to ensure consistency of the leadership message?  6. What two‐way avenues exist for parents, community, and business members to dialogue with  district and campus staff?  7. How are all members of the organization, including the Board of Trustees, held accountable in  their use of established communication protocols?  8. What informal communication networks exist and how are they utilized productively?   

Capacity and Resources:  The district organization utilizes internal and external human capital and necessary resources to meet all needs  for  a  successful  learning  environment.  Expertise  is  purposefully  cultivated  and  sustained  through  targeted  recruitment, retention and succession planning. (Hargreaves, 2013); (Bottoms & Schmidt‐Davis, 2011)  1. What steps is the district taking to cultivate new leaders from within the organization?  2. What  processes  does  the  district  have  in  place  to  ensure  that  exceptional  professionals  at  all  levels have a viable career ladder?  3. How  is  professional  development  for  staff  determined,  obtained,  and  evaluated  for  effectiveness?  4. What  plans  and  actions  are  in  place  to  motivate  effective  staff  members  to  remain  employed  with the district?  5. How  does  the  district  support  campus  leadership  in  implementing  authentic  and  meaningful  evaluation processes that reflect employee performance levels relative to student success?  6. How are leaders empowered to hire high‐performing staff members and expeditiously remove  nonperformers?  7. What  process  is  used  to  determine  staffing  at  campuses  and  district  offices?    Is  this  staffing  based on student achievement and needs regarding school improvement?  8. What  strategies  are  in  place  to  support  and  ensure  new  staff  members  have  ample  opportunities for initial and long term success?  9. What  processes  are  in  place  to  ensure  that  the  district  is  recruiting  and  retaining  high‐quality  teachers, administrators, and district‐level leaders?  10. How  does  the  district  ensure  that  all  resources  (i.e.,  financial,  personnel,  etc.)  are  distributed  based upon need? 

Appendix D: District Commitments Questions to Consider   Appendix  D  includes  questions  to  assist  LEAs  with  evaluation  of  commitments  at  the  district  level.  These  are  optional questions provided as a resource.   

District‐wide Ownership and Accountability:   Leadership  recognizes  and  accepts  responsibility  for  all  current  levels  of  performance  and  transparently  interacts with stakeholders to plan and implement improvement initiatives. The district is engaged in continuous  review  of  systemic,  district‐wide  practices  to  ensure  effective  impact  on  critical  need  areas,  such  as  low  performing campuses. (Zavadsky, 2012); (Fullan, 2010)  1. What  is  the  process  for  district‐level  leadership  to  conduct  ongoing  meetings  with  campus  leadership for the purpose of reviewing current levels of performance and progress aligned with  campus and LEA goals?  2. What actions do district leaders take to support campuses in identifying campus needs?  3. What  actions  do  district  leaders  take  to  assist  campus  leaders  in  planning  and  implementing  targeted improvement strategies?  4. What is the district’s process for communicating campus level performance, progress, and goals  to stakeholders?  5. How is central office directly or indirectly involved in annual campus planning?  6. What differentiated or targeted support systems are provided from district‐level staff to support  campuses with varied needs?  7. What district‐wide policies and procedures exist to guide campus operations?  8. How  do  central  office  departments  interact  and  collaborate  with  each  other  to  support  individual campus needs?  9. What is the process for prioritizing district‐level intervention and support to campuses?  10. How are district level systems responsive to campus leaders’ needs and requests?    11. What processes are in place for a continuous review of district‐wide practices?   

High Expectations:   Explicit, rigorous standards are in place for student learning with adult and student confidence that success is  attainable. These expectations are pervasively evident and understood by all with a commitment to providing a  timely  response  and/or  adjustment  when  goals  are  not  met.    (Bambrick‐Santoyo,  2012);  (Kouzes  &  Posner,  2007); (Dufour & Marzano, 2011)  1. How does the district promote the belief that all campuses and students are capable of attaining  high levels of success?  2. How are ambitious goals actively promoted by all district level staff?  3. What  processes  occur  throughout  the  school  year  for  periodic  review  of  student  performance  data by district leadership?  4. How are expectations for employee performance communicated and monitored? 

5. What  district‐level  support  is  provided  to  campuses  when  campus  performance  falls  short  of  predetermined goals?  6. How does the district provide support to each campus for student interventions that promote  high achievement?  7. How does the district build the capacity and learning of their campus leaders?  8. What actions do district leaders take to model the pursuit of rigorous goals? 

  Sense of Urgency:   District staff, compelled by an intolerance of failure and dissatisfaction with deficits of the current state, set a  priority  and  press  for  rapid  action  to  change  ineffective  practices  and  processes  that  impede  student  success.  (Bambrick‐Santoyo, 2012); (Kouzes & Posner, 2007); (Dufour & Marzano, 2011)  1. How are district‐identified priorities emphasized and communicated with all stakeholders?  2. How do district leaders communicate to all stakeholders the need to ensure success across all  student groups?   3. What actions have central office leaders taken to improve performance at campuses and the  district?   4. How do central office leaders systematically evaluate current district practices in order to  improve support to campuses?   5. In what ways does the superintendent work in tandem with the board of trustees to ensure a  shared vision of support for significant transformation to address ineffective practices and  processes?  6. How does the district recognize, encourage, and support innovative solutions?  7. What does the district do to support a culture which encourages action research,  experimentation of methodologies, and the abandonment of ineffective practices?  8. How do central office leaders communicate and model expectations for staff and student in  regards to behavior and performance?  9. How does the district manage employees who do not demonstrate a willingness to change their  current practices in accordance with improvement initiatives?  10. How does the district interact and collaborate with the community to build support for  progressive, research based practices in the local educational system?   

Clear Vision and Focus:   The  district  strongly  articulates  a  focus  on  student  achievement  as  its  primary  work.  Clear  plans  across  the  district  are  developed  to  address  increasing  performance  for  all  students  on  all  campuses.  This  vision  is  embraced and embedded in daily practice by all staff members. (Kouzes & Posner, 2007); (Hargreaves, 2013)  1. How does the district establish goals to guide the determination of initiatives and strategies?  2. What  district‐wide  planning  process  is  used  to  evaluate  current  performance  and  set  district  wide priorities?  3. What  actions  are  taken  at  the  district  level  to  ensure  that  all  campuses  and  stakeholders  understand, support, and live the vision and mission of the district?  4. What processes are in place to align district goals and priorities with the goals of each campus?  5. How do budgets align with and support the academic priorities of each campus? 

6. What activities are conducted across the district to periodically review and calibrate staff beliefs  and behaviors with the district’s vision and mission?  7. How does the district’s academic calendar reflect a focus on student achievement?  8. What steps have been taken with regard to central office staffing and responsibilities to ensure  the focus on supporting each campus in meeting district goals?  9. How are professional development activities aligned with the district vision and specific campus  needs?  10. How is the district building the capacity of visionary leaders at all levels? 

  Operational Flexibility:   The district permits the agility to shift resources, processes, and practices in response to critical needs identified.  The  district’s  ability  to  address  the  needs  of  all  students  is  contingent  upon  allowing  customized  approaches,  expedition  of  resources,  and  departures  from  standard  practice  when  the  need  is  substantiated.  (Bottoms  &  Schmidt‐Davis, 2010); (Fullan, 2010)  1. How  does  the  district  leadership  support  campus  leaders  in  the  implementation  of  newly  identified campus‐based initiatives?  2. How are needed resources expedited to campuses with significant need?  3. How is professional development differentiated for priorities and identified needs?  4. What exceptions to district procedures are permitted when requested by campus principals who  present evidence and rationale to support their exception?  5. How  does  the  central  office  leadership  advocate  for  differentiated  resources  and  support  for  underperforming campuses and student populations?  6. How do campus master schedules and calendars reflect identified campus priorities?  7. How does district leadership encourage innovation and new ideas in campus management?  8. What process does the district utilize to project staffing needs for the future of each campus?  9. How are district decisions made regarding the delivery of district services to meet the needs of  various student populations and specialized academic opportunities?       

 

Appendix E: Cost – Benefit Analysis  

Purpose  A  cost  –  benefit  analysis  is  a  systematic  process  utilized  to  compare  the  cost  of  a  strategy/intervention  to  its  overall impact.  This process has two purposes:  1. To determine if a strategy/intervention should be continued or discontinued.  2. To provide a basis for comparing strategy/interventions.  By comparing the anticipated cost and impact  a LEA/campus can select between potential strategies/interventions.     

Target Audience  All staff (This activity can be conducted campus‐wide or by department)     

Time  Minimum  of  thirty  minutes–  the  time  needed  for  this  activity  is  contingent  upon  the  number  of  strategies/interventions analyzed.     

Materials  

List of strategies/interventions to be analyzed (including cost, data to indicate the impact of the activity  if the activity is currently being implemented, or an explanation of the expected impact) 



The Cost – Benefit Analysis template 



The Cost – Benefit Analysis Questions to Consider 



Poster size line graph with COST and IMPACT labeled on the X & Y axis   o

Chart paper or butcher paper with the line graph with a hand drawn line graph will suffice 



Markers 



Tape 

   

Process Protocol  1. Compile the materials needed to conduct the activity and hang the line graph on a wall in the meeting  space or place on an easel.  2. On  the  Cost  –  Benefit  Analysis  Template,  in  the  “strategy/intervention  column”,  list  all  strategies/intervention currently being implemented and/or proposed strategies/interventions.  a. NOTE: Please inform the participants to refrain from completing other sections.  3. Using the data that the campus staff has on hand and Cost – Benefit Analysis Questions to Consider as a  guide, begin to rank the level of implementation (if applicable), cost, and current or expected impact of  each strategy/intervention. 

a. In the “Data” column include any concrete data that the campus staff has to provide rationale  for the impact of each strategy/intervention.  b. If  the  strategy/intervention  is  being  considered  for  future  implementation,  include  data  that  would be collected to indicate impact.  4. After the campus staff has ranked the level of implementation (if applicable), cost, and impact of each  activity, plot each activity on the line graph in the relative intersection of the COST and IMPACT.  a. NOTE: Activities that the campus staff has ranked as LOW IMPLEMENTATION may be ranked  as  LOW  IMPACT.    If  campus  staff  believes  these  activities  have  the  potential  to  yield  high  impact  thus  decide  to  continue  implementing  these  activities,  identify  these  activities  and  continue to monitor the impact.    5. Once  campus  staff  has  graphed  each  strategy/intervention,  come  to  a  consensus  on  which  activities  should be continued, discontinued, or selected to integrate in future planning.  6. Using  Analysis  of  Grant  Activity  Questions  to  Consider  develop  immediate  actions  steps  needed  proceed  a. NOTE: The immediate action steps are not intending to be a detailed action plan, but rather  one‐to‐three actions needed to set things in motion.     

Comments to the Facilitator  Rather than following the steps, participants may attempt rank the implementation, cost, and impact as they list  each activity.  Completing this task in the order it is designed ensures that the activity is completed in a timely  manner.    Additionally,  though  graphing  the  activities  may  seem  unnecessary,  this  step  will  spark  a  deeper  dialogue around the strategies/interventions as a whole. 

Cost – Benefit Analysis: Questions to Consider Implementation 

   



When did the campus begin implementing this strategy/intervention? OR When does the campus plan to begin implementation of this strategy/intervention? Does the campus have a clear vision for the future of this strategy/intervention? Does the campus have a concrete system/process for this strategy/intervention? Do the key contributors to this system/process know their roles? Do the key contributors have the skills needed to successfully implement the strategy/intervention? Does the campus have a protocol for replacing key contributors (i.e, succession plan)?

Impact

Cost

HIGH

LOW









Has this activity positively impacted more than one of the Critical Success Factors, including Academic Performance? Will this strategy/intervention impact more than one of the Critical Success Factors , including Academic Performance, Will this strategy/intervention positively impact all of the Index/Indices or System Safeguards?



Does this strategy/intervention have NO to low financial cost associated with it? Does this strategy/intervention have low time investment?  

MEDIUM

MEDIUM









Has this strategy/intervention positively impacted more than one of the Critical Success Factors? Will this strategy/intervention impact more than one of the Critical Success Factors? Will this strategy/intervention impact at least one Index or System Safeguard?



Does this strategy/intervention have Medium financial cost and low time investment? Does this strategy/intervention have low financial cost and Medium time involvement?

LOW

HIGH







Has this strategy/intervention positively impacted one of the Critical Success Factors? Will this strategy/intervention positively impact on Critical Success Factor?

Data 







What evidence does the campus have to show that this strategy/intervention has made an impact? OR What data will the campus collect to indicate the impact of the strategy/intervention? Does the campus have baseline data to compare the impact against? Is the campus lacking significant data due to the level of implementation? What additional data does the campus need to collect?

Does this strategy/intervention have High financial cost and medium time involvement? Does this strategy/intervention have medium financial cost and High time involvement? Does this strategy/intervention have High financial cost and High time involvement?

Action Plan     

Immediate Questions for Consideration Does the campus have a compelling vision for the future of this activity? What is the campus’ long-range goal for this strategy/intervention? What is the campus’ short-range goal for this strategy/intervention (i.e., 90 days, 180 days, 270 days, 360 days)? What are the campus’ immediate actions for ensuring sustainability? Who will be responsible for implementing these strategies/interventions, and by when?

Future Questions for Consideration      

How will the campus monitor progress of implementation? How will the campus measure the impact of the strategy/intervention? Does the campus need to seek approval from the district/board to implement? What resources will the campus need to implement this strategy/intervention? What professional development or support is needed for all staff? How will the campus ensure that this strategy/intervention will continue if the leadership changes?

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

1.

NEXT STEPS:

2.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

3.

NEXT STEPS:

4.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

5.

NEXT STEPS:

6.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

7.

NEXT STEPS:

8.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

9.

NEXT STEPS:

10.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

11.

NEXT STEPS:

12.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

13.

NEXT STEPS:

14.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

Strategy/Intervention

Level of Implementation Low

15.

NEXT STEPS:

16.

NEXT STEPS:

Medium

High

Impact Low

Medium

Cost High

Low

Medium

Data High

 

MEDIUM          LOW  

COST

 

 

HIGH

Cost – Benefit Analysis

LOW  

 

 

 

 

 MEDIUM   

 

IMPACT

 

 

       HIGH 

Loading...

Guidance for the Texas Accountability Intervention System

Guidance for the Texas Accountability Intervention System Needs Assessment Guidance                                                     Needs Assessm...

1MB Sizes 1 Downloads 10 Views

Recommend Documents

Guidance handbook template - The Texas Education Agency
TEA Secure Applications Information . ...... These guidelines are accessible from the TEA Grant Opportunities page and,

National Guidance for Healthcare System Preparedness - PHE.gov
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Healthcar

Guidance for Computerized Student Recording Keeping System
Jun 15, 2009 - 1. Section 13. Guidance for Data Collection and Computerized Student. Record Keeping. 13.1 Overview ... M

Guidance for the Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System
contractor performance information though the consolidation of the Architect-Engineer Contract. Administration Support S

System Design | System Guidance – Arm Developer
What is system guidance? System guidance is a collection of resources, which provide a representative view of typical co

time for treaties - Stop the Intervention
Mar 14, 2016 - SPEAKERS: YINGIYA MARK GUYULA,Djambarrpuyngu Nation,. Yolngu Nations Assembly Spokesperson. TERRY MASON,

The Texas A&M University System - MetLife
that may last 30 years or more, you may need to save more to enjoy the retirement lifestyle you desire. Most of your ret

TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
Nov 7, 2013 - Finance and Audit. Planning and Construction. 12:30 p.m.. Board meeting recesses for the day. 12:30 p.m..

Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System - Texas DPS
Jan 1, 2017 - This program is managed by the Texas Department of Insurance and provides law enforcement officers with po

marketing accountability: the bottom line on marketing accountability
The last major study on marketing ROI found that 68% of marketers were unable to determine the ROI of their initiatives.