Graduate School of Business.qxp - University Registrar - The

Loading...

THE UNIVERSITY

T

H E

U

N I V E R S I T Y

O F

OF

CHICAGO

CHICAGO

T H E G R A D U AT E S C H O O L OF

BUSINESS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL of BUSINESS 2005 – 2006

ANNOUNCEMENTS

2005-2006

T HE U NIVERSITY of C HICAGO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL of BUSINESS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

2005–06

Let knowledge grow from more to more And so be human life enriched

THE UNIVERSITY AND THE SCHOOL 6 The University of Chicago 6 The Graduate School of Business 7 Campuses 7 The University of Chicago Administration 8 The Graduate School of Business Administration 8 The Council on the Graduate School of Business: 2005–06 Membership 9 International Council on the Graduate School of Business 12 PROGRAMS OF EDUCATION The Chicago Approach to Business Education The MBA Program The Full-Time MBA Program The Part-Time MBA Programs The Evening MBA Program 15; The Weekend MBA Program 15 The Flexible Curriculum Course Options 17; Degree Requirements 18; Program Information Course Marks and Credits 18; Dean’s List 18; Degree with Honors 19; Grade Requirements 19; Probation 19; Transfer Credits 19; Student-at-Large Status 19; The International MBA Program Degree Requirements Course Options 21 The Executive MBA Program The Executive MBA Program North America The Executive MBA Program Europe The Executive MBA Program Asia International Programs The International MBA Program International Joint MBA/AM Programs International Business Concentration International Business Exchange Program (IBEP) Special Programs Joint Degree Programs Curriculum and Residency Requirements 26; Area Studies and Business (MBA/AM) 26; Committee on International Relations and Business (MBA/AM) 26; Law and Business (MBA/JD) 26; Medicine and Business (MBA/MD) 26; Public Policy Studies and Business (MBA/MPP) 27; Social Service Administration and Business (MBA/AM) 27; Application Procedures 27; Financial Aid 27; Notification Procedures 27 Graduate Program in Health Administration and Policy Dual Degrees 28

13 13 14 14 15 15 18

20 20 22 22 23 23 24 24 24 24 25 25 25

28

The PhD Program Curriculum and General Degree Requirements Dissertation and Support Areas of Study Research Emphasis at the Graduate School of Business Application Procedure Tuition and Financial Aid Residence and Registration Requirements Standards of Performance Relationship to the MBA Program Joint PhD and JD Degrees Doctors of Philosophy Fields of Study Accounting Communications Econometrics and Statistics Economics Entrepreneurship Financial Management General Management Managerial and Organizational Behavior (MOB) 43; Organizations and Markets (O&M) 44; Strategic Management 45 Human Resource Management International Business Marketing Management Operations Management Course Descriptions

28 29 29 31 32 32 33 33 33 34 34 35 35 36 37 38 39 40 42

46 47 48 49 50

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS FACULTY

76

CENTERS, PROGRAMS, AND INSTITUTES Center for Decision Research Center for Population Economics Center for Research in Security Prices (CRSP) James M. Kilts Center for Marketing Michael P. Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State Initiative on Chicago Price Theory The University of Chicago Library System Joseph Regenstein Library Business and Economics Resource Center 88

86 86 86 86 87 87 87 88 88 88

RESEARCH FACILITIES Related Fields of Study The Divisions The Professional Schools

89 89 89 90

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS Admission Admissions Requirements Admissions: How to be Successful in the Application Process Admissions Interviews Apply to the Full-Time MBA Program Apply to the International Program Apply to our Dual Degree Programs International Studies/Joint Degree Programs Costs and Financial Aid Time of Entry 94; Deferrals 94 2005–06 Tuition and Fees 2005–06 Tuition 2005–06 Full-Time MBA Program Health Insurance Fees 2005–06 Full-Time MBA Program Additional Required Fees Fees for Special Circumstances Refunds Cost of Attendance Financial Aid Scholarships Student Loans Federal Loan Programs 97 Eligibility Requirements for Federal Financial Aid Application Process International Students

91 91 91 91 92 92 92 93 93 93

POLICIES AND RESOURCES University of Chicago Student Health Care Student Health Fee Health Insurance Requirement Enrollment Deadline 100; Automatic Enrollment 100; Eligibility 101; Students on Leave of Absence 101; Students on Medical Leave of Absence 101; Binding Coverage 101; Premiums 101; Immunization Requirements 102 University Policies Statement of Nondiscrimination Assistance for Disabled Students Learning Disabilities Domestic Partnership Policy

100 100 100 100

94 94 94 95 95 95 96 96 96 97 98 98 99

102 102 102 102 103 103

University Reports MBA Career Services Recruiting at Chicago GSB Career Management Programming Graduate Business Council Employment Opportunities Employment for Students Employment for Spouses of Students International Students and Spouses

104 106 106 106 107 107 107 108 108

DIRECTORY OF OFFICES

109

MAP

110

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 2005–07

112

T HE U NIVERSITY AND T HE S CHOOL THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business is an integral part of one of the world’s great research and teaching universities. Since its founding in 1890 by John D. Rockefeller, the University of Chicago has earned a place among the handful of educational institutions acknowledged to be world class. Few institutions are as well known for advancing knowledge. Based in the world-class city of Chicago, the University of Chicago includes the College, which offers 51 undergraduate concentrations, four graduate divisions (biological sciences, humanities, physical sciences, and social sciences) and six graduate professional schools (divinity, law, medicine, public policy studies, social service administration, and business.) Research launched at the university has helped shape the modern world view in fields as diverse as genetics, physics, economics, and philosophy. The nuclear era itself was ushered in with the first controlled, self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction, achieved by Enrico Fermi and his team on the university’s campus in 1942. Distinguished University of Chicago scholars include Janet Davison Rowley, who discovered the first consistent chromosomal abnormalities linked to cancer, demonstrating that cancer is a genetic disease; Willard Libby, who developed Carbon-14 dating and revolutionized archaeology; Albert A. Michelson, whose measurements of the speed of light made him the first U.S. scientist to win the Nobel Prize; and paleontologist Paul Sereno, who discovered Suchomimus tenerensis, a new species of sailbacked dinosaur with a crocodile-like skull, and Jobaria tiguidensis, a primitive, longnecked dinosaur. Research at the university also has led to the discovery of REM sleep, the mathematical foundations of genetic evolution, the study of black holes, and the nation’s first living-donor liver transplant. More than 75 Nobel Prize winners have been associated with the university as students, faculty, or researchers. In the past 30 years, 14 Chicago faculty members have been named Nobel laureates, including 10 in economic sciences: Milton Friedman, 1976; Theodore W. Schultz, 1979; George J. Stigler, 1982; Merton H. Miller, 1990; Ronald S. Coase, 1991; Gary S. Becker, 1992; Robert W. Fogel, 1993; Robert E. Lucas, Jr., 1995; former faculty member and Chicago GSB alumnus Myron S. Scholes, 1997; and James Heckman, 2000. The University of Chicago encompasses a worldwide alumni network of more than 134,000 alumni in more than 200 countries. Notable alumni include 27 winners of the Nobel Prize, actors, heads of state, social activists, university presidents, professors, researchers, CEOs, athletes, and Pulitzer Prize–winning writers, musicians, and playwrights, among every other walk of life.

6

The University and the School

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Founded in 1898, Chicago GSB is the second-oldest business school in the United States and one of the most distinguished. The school’s programs consistently rank highly in surveys, and the school has a strong reputation for innovation in both research and teaching. Our innovations in business education and our pathbreaking research have produced ideas and leaders that shape the world of business. Our unparalleled faculty is famous for producing theories that change business practice. We proudly claim six Nobel Laureates among our current and former faculty—including two Nobel laureates who currently teach. Some of our “firsts”include: • First business school to have a Nobel laureate on its faculty (George Stigler, 1982). • First business school to have had six Nobel prize–winning faculty members: George Stigler, 1982; Merton Miller, 1990; Ronald Coase, 1991; Gary Becker, 1992; Robert Fogel, 1993; and Myron Scholes, 1997. • First to offer an executive MBA program (1943). • First to publish a scholarly business journal (1928). • First to offer a PhD program in business (1920). • First to award a PhD in business to a woman (1929). • First to establish a minority scholarship program (1964). • First U.S. business school to offer an executive MBA program in Europe (1994) and Asia (2000). • First and only U.S. business school with permanent campuses on three continents: Asia (Singapore), Europe (London), and North America (Chicago: downtown and Hyde Park). Chicago GSB also developed an innovative program in leadership called Leadership Effectiveness and Development (LEAD). Chicago has been at the forefront of bringing a discipline-based approach to the study of business, and its methods have been widely copied by other schools.

CAMPUSES The main campus is the Chicago GSB Hyde Park Center, which opened in fall 2004. Located on the University of Chicago campus in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago, this new facility brought together all of the GSB’s previously existing Hyde Park campus buildings into one 415,000 square-foot space. Created by renowned architect Rafael Viñoly, the Hyde Park Center is designed around how teachers want to teach and how students want to learn. With the opening of the Chicago GSB Hyde Park Center, the GSB lays claim to the best business school facilities in the world. In downtown Chicago is Gleacher Center. Located just off Michigan Avenue in downtown Chicago, Gleacher Center provides state-of-the-art executive education and conference facilities and is home to the school’s Evening and Weekend MBA Programs and the Executive MBA Program North America, as well as the GSB’s Midway Club. In London, Woolgate Exchange in the central business district is the location of the school’s Executive MBA Program Europe. In Singapore, the House of Tan Yeok Nee, a renovated historic building in the center of Singapore’s business and government district, is the location for the Executive MBA Program Asia.

vvv

7

8

Graduate School of Business Announcements

THE ADMINISTRATION AND THE COUNCIL THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO ADMINISTRATION Don Michael Randel, President James Crown, Chairman of the Board of Trustees Richard Saller, Provost

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Edward A. Snyder, Dean Stacey R. Kole, Deputy Dean for the Full-Time MBA Program Richard Leftwich, Deputy Dean for Faculty Mark E. Zmijewski, Deputy Dean for Part-Time MBA Programs Pradeep K. Chintagunta, Director of PhD Studies Allan Friedman, Executive Director, Communications Ann Harvilla, Associate Dean and Dean of Students, Full-Time MBA Program Caroline Karr, Associate Dean, Alumni Affairs and Development William W. Kooser, Associate Dean, Part-Time MBA Programs Steve LaCivita, Associate Dean, Executive Education Lisa Messaglia, Executive Director, Faculty Services Ligia Moreno, Executive Director, Computing Services Julie Morton, Associate Dean, MBA Career Services Ellen Romberg, Executive Director, Human Resources James Veeneman, Associate Dean, Special Projects Robert Wilcox, Associate Dean, Career Development Office David Barclay, Chief Operating Officer, Center for Research in Security Prices Robert W. Fogel, Director, Center for Population Economics Sam Peltzman, Director, George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State Peter E. Rossi, Director, James M. Kilts Center for Marketing Ellen K. Rudnick, Executive Director, Michael P. Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship Richard Thaler, Director, Center for Decision Research

The University and the School

THE COUNCIL ON THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: 2005–06 MEMBERSHIP The business executives listed below, actively interested in the school and its objectives, form the Council on the Graduate School of Business. These individuals advise the school in its efforts to anticipate and serve the changing needs of business throughout the world.

Members Robert V. Adams,‘61*, Retired Executive Vice President, Xerox Corporation Andrew M. Alper, AB '80, MBA ‘81, President, NYC Economic Development Corporation, Former Managing Director, The Goldman Sachs Group John P. Amboian,‘84, President, Nuveen Investments Basil L. Anderson,‘71, Vice Chairman, Staples, Inc., Retired Chief Financial Officer, Campbell Soup Company Norman Barker, Jr., AB '47, MBA ‘53*, Former Chairman and CEO, First Interstate Bank of California Edward McCormick Blair*, Senior Director, William Blair & Company LLC Norman R. Bobins,‘67, President and Chief Executive Officer, LaSalle Bank Corporation Dennis S. Bookshester* David G. Booth, ‘71, CEO, Co.Chair, Founder, and Chief Investment Officer, Dimensional Fund Advisors, Inc. Barbara L. Bowles,‘71, Chairman and CEO, The Kenwood Group, Inc. Paul A. Branstad, Senior Vice President, Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. Peter C. Browning, XP-36*, Non-Executive Chairman, Nucor Corporation Dennis H. Chookaszian,‘68, Retired Chairman and CEO, CNA Insurance Cos. Charles I. Clough, Jr., CFA,‘66, Chairman and CEO, Clough Capital Partners, L.P. Kenneth J. Coates,‘64*, Senior Partner, TriMentor Group LLC Thomas A. Cole, JD '75, Partner, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Sidley Austin Brown & Wood LLP Linnea K. Conrad,‘90, Managing Director, Goldman Sachs & Co. Arlys M. Conrad* Robert M. Conway,‘69*, Senior Director, The Goldman Sachs Group Kenneth S. Crews,‘74, Partner and Managing Director, Greenhill & Co. Peter Dachowski,‘71, President and CEO, CertainTeed Corporation Patrice M. Daniels,‘84 Robert C. Davidson, Jr.,‘69, Chairman and CEO, Surface Protection Industries, Inc. Thomas W. Davis,‘77, Former Executive Vice President, Merrill Lynch & Company, Inc. Wendy L. de Monchaux,‘86, Senior Managing Director, Bear Stearns & Co., Inc. David J. Doerge,‘76, President/Founder, Doerge Capital, LLC James R. Donnelley,‘62*, Partner, Stet & Query Limited Partnership, Retired Vice Chairman, R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company James J. Drury III,‘66, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, JamesDruryPartners John A. Edwardson,‘72, Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, CDW Corporation

9

10

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Richard Elden,‘66, Founder and Chairman Emeritus, Grosvenor Capital Management L.P. Mark A. Ernst,‘86, Chairman, President, and CEO, H&R Block Lawrence I. Field*, CEO, Field Container Company, L.P. Joseph J. Fitzsimmons,‘74, Senior Vice President Finance & Treasurer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. David W. Fox, ‘58*, Retired Chairman and CEO, Northern Trust Corporation, Retired Chairman, Board of Governors, Chicago Stock Exchange Cheryl A. Francis,‘78, Former Chief Financial Officer, R.R. Donnelley & Sons Joel F. Gemunder,‘62, President and CEO, Omnicare, Inc. Timothy M. George, AB '74, MBA ‘75, Managing Director, Greenhill & Co., LLC Melvin R. Goodes, ‘60*, Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Warner-Lambert Company Kathryn C. Gould,‘78, Co-Founder and General Partner, Foundation Capital Judson C. Green ,‘76, President and Chief Executive Officer, NAVTEQ Corporation Robert P. Gwinn, PhB ‘29*, Chairman and CEO, Gwinn Oil Corporation, Chairman Emeritus, Encyclopedia Britannica Jean D. Hamilton, ‘74, CEO, Broadstairs Capital, Senior Managing Director, Brock Capital Group, LLC James W. Harding,‘40*, Retired President and Chairman, Kemper Financial Services, Inc. Michael E. Herman, ‘64, General Partner, Herman Family Trading Company, Retired President, Kansas City Royals Baseball Club Bruce Herzfelder, JD '87, MBA ‘87, Managing Director, I-Group LLC James Hill, Jr.,‘67, Chairman and CEO, Hill, Taylor, LLC Lee S. Hillman,‘79, President, Liberation Investment Advisory Group, LLC Robert S. Ingersoll*, Retired Chairman and CEO, Borg-Warner Corporation Marc S. James,‘88, Managing Director, Wachovia Bank David W. Johnson,‘58*, Retired Chairman, President and CEO , Campbell Soup Company Thomas L. Kalaris,‘78, Chief Executive, Americas, Barclays Capital Edward L. Kaplan,‘70, Chairman and CEO, Zebra Technologies Corporation Karen Katen, AB '70, MBA ‘74, Vice Chairman, Pfizer Inc., President, Pfizer Human Health Kenneth Kaufman, EX '69, MBA ‘76, Managing Partner, Kaufman Hall & Associates Polly B. Kawalek,‘78, Former President, Quaker Foods Division, PepsiCo Dennis J. Keller,‘68, Chairman, DeVry Inc. James M. Kilts, ’74, Chairman, President, and CEO, The Gillette Company Frederick A. Krehbiel, Co-Chairman, Molex Incorporated Robert J. Lavidge,‘47*, Elrick and Lavidge Jerry W. Levin,‘68, Chairman, JW Levin Partners LLC David Baker Lewis Esq.,‘67, Chairman and CEO, Lewis & Munday, Attorneys and Counselors James W. Lewis,‘70, Chairman, Geometry Group, Inc. Michael D. Lockhart,‘75, Chairman and CEO, Armstrong Holdings, Inc. William T. Lynch, Jr.*, President and CEO, Liam Holdings, LLC Joseph Mansueto, AB '78, MBA ‘80, Chairman and CEO, Morningstar Peter W. May, AB '64, MBA ‘65, President and Chief Operating Officer,Triarc Companies, Inc. Robert C. McCormack,‘68, Partner, Trident Capital, Inc. Mark G. McGrath,‘69, Senior Advisor, Gleacher Partners LLC Christopher J. McGurk,‘82, Media Consulting

The University and the School

John Andrew McQuown, Entrepreneur Leo Melamed*, Chairman and CEO, Melamed & Associates Rodney M. Miller, Sr.,‘86, Managing Director, Head of Mergers and Acquisitions-Americas, Credit Suisse First Boston Robert B. Nagel,‘63, Chairman and Partner, CEO Partners, Inc. Joseph Neubauer,‘65*, Chairman and CEO, ARAMARK Corporation James B. Nicholson,‘67, President and CEO, PVS Chemicals, Inc. Michael P. Polsky,‘87, Founder, President, and CEO, Invenergy, LLC Paul E. Purcell,‘71, President and CEO, Robert W. Baird & Co. Dale Anne Reiss ,‘70, Global & Americas Director of Real Estate, Hospitality & Construction Practices, Ernst & Young George G. Rinder, EX '41, MBA ‘42*, Reitred Vice Chairman, Marshall Field & Company Clayton S. Rose, AB '80, MBA ‘81, Logan Pass Partners, LLC Robert Rothman,‘77, Chairman and CEO, Black Diamond Group Steven G. Rothmeier,‘72*, Chairman and CEO, Great Northern Capital William C. Rusnack,‘70*, Former President and CEO, Premcor, Inc. George U. Sauter, ‘80, Chief Investment Officer and Managing Director, The Vanguard Group, Inc. Timothy A. Schlindwein,‘72, Managing Principal, Schlindwein Associates, LLC Frederick F. Seegers,‘89, CEO, Global Consumer Group EMEA, Citigroup, NA Thomas W. Sidlik,‘73, Member of the Board of Management, DaimlerChrysler AG Fred G. Steingraber,‘64*, Chairman, Board Advisors, LLC Joel M. Stern,‘74, Chairman and CEO, Stern Stewart & Co. Carl W. Stern,‘64*, Co-Chairman of the Board, The Boston Consulting Group, Inc. Philip W. K. Sweet, Jr.,‘57*, Reitred Chairman, Northern Trust Corporation Diane Swonk,‘89, Senior Managing Director and Chief Economist, Mesirow Financial, Inc. Mary Tolan,‘93, CEO, Accretive Health Roger M. Vasey,‘70*, Retired Executive and Vice President, Merrill Lynch & Company, Inc. David J. Vitale,‘76*, Chief Administrative Officer, Chicago Public Schools John S. Wadsworth, Jr., ‘63, Advisory Director, Morgan Stanley, Honorary Chairman, Morgan Stanley Asia Limited B. Kenneth West,‘60*, Retired Chairman, Harris Bankcorp, Inc. Patricia A. Wier, '78 (XP-41)*, President, Patricia A. Wier, Inc. Alison A. Winter, ‘75, President, Personal Financial Services-Northeast, Northern Trust Corporation Ernest R. Wish,‘71 (XP-29)*, Chairman, Wish Enterprises Donna F. Zarcone,‘87, President and COO, Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc. *Lifetime Member

11

12

Graduate School of Business Announcements

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL ON THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS James M. Kilts, ’74, Chairman, President, and CEO, The Gillette Company Václav Klaus, President, Czech Republic Francisco Luzón López*, CEO Division America, Banco Santander Central Hispano Claude Michaud, Director General, CEDEP Patrick Odier, ’82, Managing Partner, Lombard Odier & Cie Raymond G. Viault, Vice Chairman, General Mills, Inc. Marshall I. Wais, Jr., AB ’63, President and CEO, Marwais International L.L.C. Mark E. Zmijewski, Deputy Dean for Part-Time MBA Programs and Leon Carroll Marshall, Professor of Accounting, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business

vvv

P ROGRAMS of E DUCATION THE CHICAGO APPROACH TO BUSINESS EDUCATION The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, established in 1898, offers the master of business administration, international master of business administration, and doctor of philosophy degrees. Full-time enrollment includes approximately 115 PhD students and approximately 1,200 MBA and IMBA candidates. Part-time enrollment includes approximately 1,800 students in the evening, executive, and weekend MBA programs. Chicago GSB’s approach to business education is timeless, not trend-based. The GSB stresses discipline-based knowledge: how markets work, organizations function, and customers behave. We believe that superior management education requires the perspectives of economists, statisticians, behavioral scientists, mathematicians, lawyers, and accountants, as well as specialists in the operational areas of business. The faculty of the Graduate School of Business is drawn from a variety of disciplines, and the school’s close ties with the rest of the university enable it to integrate work in the school with work in other departments. We demand facts, question assumptions, and attack problems from all angles. These values shape all our programs and transform the way our students think. Our students develop critical, analytical, problem-solving, and decision-making capabilities and emerge with the basic knowledge and analytical tools to cope most effectively with business situations for which there is no formula, no case to refer to; when original thought is critical. This approach produces leaders with a superior ability to analyze problems, generate key insights, and implement creative solutions. Students in the school have access to the resources of the entire university. These include the professional schools (Divinity School, Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, Law School, Pritzker School of Medicine, and School of Social Service Administration) as well as the graduate divisions (Biological Sciences, Humanities, Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences) and the College.

13

14

Graduate School of Business Announcements

THE MBA PROGRAM THE FULL-TIME MBA PROGRAM The MBA curriculum is designed to prepare students for significant careers in management. It encompasses both the basic disciplines that underlie management and the operational areas specific to business. The courses are designed to provide understanding of the components of managerial decision making while furnishing perspective on the role of business as an economic, political, and social institution. The MBA experience is not restricted to the classroom at Chicago. Although the Graduate School of Business is not a case-study institution, a substantial percentage of the total course work, depending on the student’s choice of classes, will consist of various kinds of cases and applied analyses. Because of the school’s location in one of the world’s major commercial centers, students meet business, economic, labor, and political leaders at the numerous lecture and seminar series held on campus and through alumni and friends in Chicago’s business community. Freedom of choice is a way of life at the Graduate School of Business. Professors are free to use the teaching method they believe to be most effective; students are free to choose the courses and professors from whom they can best learn. In addition, students are encouraged to make use of the resources of the entire university, to take advantage of the critical and intellectual diversity that thrives on the campus. The Chicago MBA is characterized by a willingness to experiment, to judge people by their performances rather than their origins, to judge ideas by their consequences rather than their antecedents. The program leading to the degree of master of business administration is offered during the day to students on the quadrangles of the university (full-time program) and during the evening and on the weekend (part-time programs) at the Graduate School of Business Gleacher Center, 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive, along the north bank of the Chicago River between Michigan Avenue and Columbus Drive. Chicago’s innovative Leadership Effectiveness and Development (LEAD) program provides a common educational experience within a curriculum that has always offered exceptional flexibility. This required noncredit course for full-time program students strengthens general management skills through a cohort experience and experiential learning. Course content is driven largely by students drawing on the expertise of consultants, professional organizations, and faculty members to develop interactive workshops in areas of diversity, self-awareness, communication and presentation skills, and ethical decision making. Class activities in autumn quarter revolve around student cohorts that build a sense of community, instill the value of teamwork, and acquaint students with the school.

Programs of Education

THE PART-TIME MBA PROGRAMS The Evening MBA Program The University of Chicago pioneered the concept of part-time MBA study for men and women employed in management and the professions. Even though the school’s evening MBA program is more than fifty years old, it is still unique in the field of management education because it is identical in every important way to the full-time program. Entrance requirements and degree requirements are the same for both programs, and courses are taught by the same faculty. While the academic aspects of the full-time and part-time programs are the same, their logistics are quite different. Evening MBA classes meet on weeknights in the school’s convenient downtown location at Gleacher Center, 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive, along the north bank of the Chicago River between Michigan Avenue and Columbus Drive. Approximately 1,200 students, representing more than four hundred employers, are currently engaged in part-time study in the program. Many of the students come from Chicago-area banks and financial institutions; heavy industry, consulting, advertising, and the entrepreneurial and nonprofit sectors also are well represented. Job titles of current students range from new management trainees to senior executive officers. Classes are available in all four academic quarters, with students completing one or two courses per quarter. The program can be completed in two and one-half years, although the average graduation time is approximately three years. All MBA candidates are allowed a maximum of five years to complete the degree program.

The Weekend MBA Program Many managers often find it convenient to take their classes on Saturdays due to travel schedules or the location of their offices far from Chicago. To meet the needs of individuals and their companies, the Graduate School of Business provides an additional avenue of continuing education in its weekend MBA program. Students take courses on Saturday mornings and Saturday afternoons at the convenient downtown Gleacher Center and thereby can complete the MBA program in as little as two-and-one-half years. Some students fly in from as far away as California, Florida, New York, Texas, and Washington, D.C. for weekly classes. For students commuting by air, the school provides complimentary bus services to and from Midway and O’Hare airports and the Gleacher Center. The weekend MBA program follows in the Chicago tradition of offering all MBA candidates the same academic program, same faculty, and same degree as the full-time and evening MBA programs.

THE FLEXIBLE CURRICULUM One of the most important aspects of the MBA program at Chicago is curricular flexibility. The school operates on the premise that students will want to build on their previous education while avoiding repetition. The staff of the Dean of Students Office and the Evening and Weekend MBA Program Office is prepared to consult with students to help them design a program that makes the best use of their time at Chicago.

15

16

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Because each incoming class represents a wide variety of undergraduate majors, the individual student benefits from a curriculum wide-ranging enough to satisfy any interest. Each candidate for the MBA degree must successfully complete twenty courses (plus LEAD for students in the full-time program), meet certain grade requirements, and fulfill the distribution requirements of the program. Within the four major components listed below, there is only one specifically required course: LEAD. All other courses have approved substitutes. The curriculum has four major components: 1.

Foundations courses are the basis of the Chicago curriculum. The three required foundations courses—Financial Accounting (Business 30000), Microeconomics (Business 33001), and Statistics (Business 41000)—play a substantive role in supporting the rest of the curriculum and develop material that is vital to a management education. The required foundations courses are a “minimum set”of courses that are prerequisite for a business education. Students are encouraged to complete the foundation requirements by the end of their second quarter in the program. There are no waivers for required foundations courses. However, for Financial Accounting, Microeconomics, and Statistics, there is a list of approved substitute courses. Substituting any course not listed as an approved substitute in the subject area requires faculty permission via a substitution petition, which should be submitted prior to registration. 2.

Breadth courses provide the student with knowledge about the functional activities of business management and the environment in which firms operate. Students must take one course from at least four of the following six areas: finance, human resources management, macroeconomics, managerial accounting, marketing, and operations. There are no waivers for required breadth courses; however, there are approved substitutes for almost all breadth courses. Substituting any course not listed as an approved substitute in the subject area requires faculty permission via a substitution petition, which should be submitted prior to registration. 3.

General Management courses (Group A: Business 39001, 42001, and 42002 and Group B: Business 38001, 38002, 38003, 39002) focus on the concepts and techniques needed to manage effectively in organizations. Courses typically take the perspective of upper management, such as the head of an organization, a business unit, or a division. Courses are analytical, but students are regularly required to confront questions of application and implementation in realistic settings. Students must take two courses, one from each of the two groups. There are no waivers for the general management requirement. Substituting any course not listed as an approved substitute in the subject area requires faculty permission via a substitution petition, which should be submitted prior to registration. 4.

Elective courses allow students to pursue special interests in greater depth and may be chosen from any of the course offerings of the Graduate School of Business or other schools and divisions of the university. Students are advised to check the university time schedules each quarter for course offerings in such areas as behavioral

Programs of Education

sciences, divinity, East Asian studies, economics, international studies, Latin American studies, law, medicine, Middle Eastern studies, political science, public policy studies, social service administration, sociology, South Asian studies, statistics, and urban studies. A student may choose electives from any credit offering of the Graduate School of Business or the university at large, subject to the restriction that, in order to graduate, the student must have completed twenty courses (plus LEAD for students in the fulltime program), fourteen of which must be selected from the Graduate School of Business curriculum, and have satisfied the foundations, breadth, and general management course requirements. Typically, students in the Full-Time MBA Program (and not in a joint degree program) register for four business courses in three of their six quarters and three courses in the others to enable them to complete the required twenty-one courses by the end of six quarters in residence. A student capable of accelerating this schedule may complete the program in five quarters, but the course of study is rigorous and an accelerated program is not generally recommended. An evening MBA or weekend MBA student may take from two-and-one-half to five years to complete the degree; the average time of completion is just under four years. In general, no student is allowed more than five years to complete the requirements of the MBA degree.

Course Options Following are basic subject-area requirements for the MBA degree. An approved course may be substituted when an introductory course is not appropriate. The program consists of twenty courses (plus LEAD for students in the full-time program), nine of which satisfy the required areas. Number of Courses 3

4

FOUNDATIONS

Basic Courses*

Approved Substitutes†

Financial Accounting

30000‡

Microeconomics

33001

Statistics

41000

B30116, 30117, 30118, 30119, 30130 B33101, 33901; or Econ 30100, 30200 B41100 or any other statistics course from the GSB curriculum

BREADTH

One course from each of four areas selected from the following: Financial Management 35000 B35150, 35200, 35901, 35902 Human Resource 33031 or 33032 B33301, 33302, 33303 Management Macroeconomics 33040 B33401, 33402, 33403, 33502; or Econ 33000, 33100, 33200 Managerial Accounting 30001 B30115 Marketing Management 37000 Operations Management 40000 B40101, 40103, 40104

17

18

Graduate School of Business Announcements

2

GENERAL MANAGEMENT Group A

B39001, 42001, 42002

Group B

B38001, 38002, 38003, 39002

11

ELECTIVES

1

LEAD (required for students in the Full-Time MBA Program)

21

TOTAL COURSES

* Basic courses are suggested for students with little or no background. † Approved substitutes may be taken to satisfy requirements without faculty approval. ‡ Other courses require faculty approval on a substitution form. Provisional grades are not given in B30000, so it may not be taken in a student’s graduating quarter.

Degree Requirements To earn an MBA, candidates complete twenty courses, at least fourteen of which must be Graduate School of Business courses (plus LEAD for students in the Full-Time MBA Program). While only LEAD (for full-time program students) is a specifically required course, the distribution requirements of the program must be met. Students are required to maintain a C average, and coursework should be completed within five years. Candidates for a degree must file an application no later than the last day of the quarter prior to the quarter in which they wish to receive their degree. An application for a degree is valid only for the quarter for which it is filed.

PROGRAM INFORMATION (All full- and part-time MBA program students are expected to abide by the information outlined in the 2005–06 Chicago GSB Student Handbook. Each student is provided a hard copy of this handbook, and it is available online at gsbwww.uchicago.edu/dso/ handbook.pdf.)

Course Marks and Credits The following course marks are used: A, B, C, D, Pass, F, I (Incomplete), R (Registered), and W (Withdrawal). The marks A, B, C, D, and Pass are passing marks used for students who desire course credit.

Dean’s List A student registered for three or more GSB courses in a quarter will be named to the Dean’s Honor List for that quarter, subject to the following conditions: 1. Achieves 3.5 or higher grade point average in the courses taken during the quarter;

Programs of Education

2. 3.

4.

No grades earned other than A or B; No Pass/Fail, with the following exception—if a student has taken at least three GSB courses for a letter grade in a given quarter, the student may receive a Pass/Fail in a fourth GSB course that same quarter and be eligible for the Dean’s Honor List; No incompletes among any coursework in the given quarter. Dean’s Honor List will not be retroactively named for a student who completes a course previously taken for Incomplete.

Degree with Honors The GSB offers two honors designations, High Honors and Honors. The High Honors designation is assigned to the top 5 percent of the graduating class and the Honors designation is assigned to the next 15 percent, based on GPA averages of all graduating GSB students from the preceding academic year. The distinction is noted on a student’s diploma and transcript.

Grade Requirements To qualify for the IMBA/MBA degree, a student must have an overall average of not less than C (2.0). If a student takes more than the required minimum number of courses, the grade average will be calculated from the highest grades received, providing they are in courses that satisfy the distribution requirements of the curriculum.

Probation A student is placed on probation when his or her cumulative grade point average or the average of the three most recent courses is less than C. Joint degree students are evaluated according to these rules only in quarters of residence in the GSB. A student who fails to meet the terms of probation may be placed on administrative leave of absence and/or being dismissed from the school.

Transfer Credits Credits earned at other institutions cannot be transferred to meet the degree requirements for the IMBA/MBA. However, students are not required to repeat work done elsewhere, and such work always is considered in helping students design their programs. Certain credits earned at the Graduate School of Business prior to matriculation in the full- or part-time MBA program may, under strictly defined conditions, be counted toward the MBA degree. These guidelines are outlined in the 2005–06 Chicago GSB Student Handbook (gsbwww.uchicago.edu/dso/handbook.pdf.)

Student-at-Large Status The University of Chicago Graduate Student-at-Large Program is a part-time, fullcredit, nondegree program that serves a variety of students. Credits earned as a studentat-large may be counted toward the MBA degree, subject to the guidelines mentioned above. Students should contact the Graham School of General Studies at 773.702.0539 for more information.

19

20

Graduate School of Business Announcements

THE INTERNATIONAL MBA PROGRAM The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business also offers an international MBA (IMBA) degree. This program provides students with in-depth training in business fundamentals as well as the skills and training required to be competitive at the global level. The core of the IMBA program draws on the traditional strengths of the school’s MBA program. Students enjoy flexibility in course selection, few absolute course requirements, and access to the best business faculty in the world. They grasp the fundamentals of business and develop the skills necessary to apply those fundamentals in real-world situations. In addition, IMBA students develop a broad set of intercultural skills necessary for successful careers in international business. They master a foreign language, spend at least one term of study abroad, participate in specialized multicultural programming, and potentially work on real company projects as a part of specially tailored project courses while studying overseas. International education is delivered by GSB faculty, world-renowned scholars from other units of the university (such as East Asian Studies or International Relations), and by faculty from partner universities around the globe.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS To earn an IMBA, students must complete twenty courses, at least fourteen of which must be from the GSB, plus the noncredit LEAD program, for which no tuition is charged. Distribution requirements also must be met. Students are required to maintain a C (2.0) average. Requirements of the IMBA program include the following: • Business Courses: IMBA students complete twenty courses, plus LEAD, satisfying the foundation, breadth, and general management requirements described previously for the MBA students. • Study Abroad: IMBA students also must spend one quarter studying abroad through the International Business Exchange Program (IBEP) for which they will earn three credits towards their IMBA degree requirements. The application process for IBEP is managed through the Office of International Programs. • Courses in International Business: Within the twenty courses, IMBA students complete five courses that focus on the specific issues facing firms in a global market, such as international monetary policy and international financial policy. • Language Requirement: All IMBA students must demonstrate mastery of at least one nonnative language by the spring quarter of the second year. Language tutoring is available on a fee basis through other departments of the university or via private tutors. IMBA students are presumed to enter the program with an intermediate level of proficiency in their desired target language. Though the IMBA contains additional requirements, the IMBA program is completed in the same time frame as the traditional MBA program. As a result, most students should expect to complete the program in the twenty-one months usually required for the MBA program. Since expertise in international business is implicit in the IMBA degree, recognition of an international business concentration would be redundant; therefore, no IMBA student may declare an international business concentration.

Programs of Education

Acceptance into the IMBA program is based first on gaining admission to the FullTime MBA Program. During the first quarter of enrollment students may declare their intention to follow the IMBA curriculum. To obtain an MBA application, contact the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, or phone 773.702.4499.

Course Options Below are basic subject-area requirements for the IMBA degree. An approved course may be substituted when an introductory course is not appropriate. The program consists of twenty courses (plus LEAD). At least one term of study must be completed at an IBEP partner school. Number of Courses

3

4

FOUNDATIONS

Basic Courses*

Approved Substitutes†

Financial Accounting

30000‡

Microeconomics

33001

Statistics

41000

B30116, 30117, 30118, 30119, 30130 B33101, 33901; or Econ 30100, 30200 41100 or any other statistics course

BREADTH

One course from each of four areas selected from the following: Financial Management 35000 Human Resource Management 33031 or 33032 Macroeconomics 33040 Managerial Accounting Marketing Management Operations Management 2

30001 3700 40000

B35200, 35901, 35902 B33301, 33302 B33401, 33402, 33502; or Econ 33000, 33100, 33200 B30115 B40101, 40103, 40104

GENERAL MANAGEMENT Group A

39001, 42001, 42002

Group B

38001, 38002, 38003, 39002

21

22

Graduate School of Business Announcements

5

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 33501 or 33502, plus four additional courses from the following:

3

IBEP STUDY ABROAD

3

ELECTIVES

1

LEAD

B30119, 33302, 33402, 33501, 33502, 33503, 33504, 33510, 33520, 33521, 33522, 34703, 37304

(Note that several classes count for both the breadth and international business course requirements, and that students may petition to have up to two courses count from IBEP towards the international business course requirements. The result is additional electives up to the required twenty courses, plus LEAD.) * Basic courses are suggested for students with little or no background in these areas. † Approved substitutes may be taken to satisfy requirements without faculty approval. Other courses require faculty approval (substitution form obtained from the Academic Advisors). ‡ Provisional grades are not given in B30000, so it may not be taken during the last quarter prior to graduation.

THE EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM THE EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM NORTH AMERICA The Executive MBA Program North America is a part-time MBA program for mature executives. It is designed to prepare experienced executives to be more effective general managers. Each year, a group of approximately eighty-five students is admitted to this intensive twenty-month program of study. The curriculum emphasizes the value of learning in groups and sharing experiences; thus, all classes are taken together as a group. In addition, each member of the class is assigned to a study group of about five members, and this group meets outside of class to complete assignments, review class material, and prepare in general for the upcoming class. Each study group, by design, includes members who have a variety of professional and educational experiences. Although the format is different, the Executive MBA Program, like all Chicago MBA programs, is based on the Chicago approach to business education. This approach emphasizes developing an understanding of the fundamental forces in the economy, in organizations, and in individuals; using this understanding to analyze and produce creative, imaginative solutions to real-world problems; and staffing courses with regular full-time members of the faculty. After an orientation and academic session in June with students from the London and Singapore campuses, classes are conducted on concurrent Fridays and Saturdays every other week at Gleacher Center in downtown Chicago. Midway through the

Programs of Education

program, students join their counterparts from the Europe and Asia campuses again for three weeks of intensive study—one week in London, one week in Singapore, and one week in Chicago. Admission to the program is on the basis of individual application and an interview. For further information about the program, contact the director of the Executive MBA Program North America, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60611, phone 312.464.8750, e-mail [email protected]

THE EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM EUROPE The Executive MBA Program Europe, like the Chicago-based executive MBA program, targets middle- and upper-level executives with ten or more years of business experience.Taught exclusively by Graduate School of Business faculty members, the curriculum is the same as that of the Chicago-based executive MBA program but with a strong international emphasis. The group-study method is used. The twenty-month program allows the approximately eighty-five international executives admitted each year to continue working full time while pursuing their studies, completing sixteen one-week modules. Students join their counterparts from the North America and Asia campuses for four weeks of intensive study—one week in Chicago to start the program, then, midway through the program, for one week in London, one week in Singapore, and a second week in Chicago. Admission to the program is on the basis of individual application and an interview. For further information about the program, write to the director of the Executive MBA Program Europe, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, Woolgate Exchange, 25 Basinghall Street, London EC2V 5HA United Kingdom, phone 44(0)20.7070.2200 e-mail [email protected]

THE EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM ASIA The Executive MBA Program Asia, like the Chicago-based executive MBA program, targets middle- and upper-level executives with ten or more years of business experience. Taught exclusively by Graduate School of Business faculty members, the curriculum is the same as that of the Chicago-based executive MBA program but with a strong international emphasis. The group-study method is used. The twenty-month program allows the approximately eighty-five international executives admitted each year to continue working full time while pursuing their studies, completing sixteen one-week modules. Students join their counterparts from the North America and Europe campuses for four weeks of intensive study—one week in Chicago to start the program, then, midway through the program, for one week in London, one week in Singapore, and a second week in Chicago. Admission to the program is on the basis of individual application and an interview. For further information about the program, write to the director of the Executive MBA Program Asia, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, 101 Penang Road, Singapore 238466, phone 011.65.6835.6482, e-mail [email protected] ChicagoGSB.edu.

23

24

Graduate School of Business Announcements

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS Sensitive to the increased prominence of global business issues, the Graduate School of Business offers an exceptional variety of programs to give students the international knowledge and experience they seek. Many of these programs can be incorporated into the school’s standard full- and part-time MBA programs. A few of them require extended time or are designed for MBA graduates.

THE INTERNATIONAL MBA PROGRAM The cornerstone of the Graduate School of Business’s international programs is the International MBA program, leading to an IMBA degree. A complete description of the program can be found beginning on page 20.

INTERNATIONAL JOINT MBA/AM PROGRAMS For those individuals with an equal commitment to acquiring applied business skills and pursuing rigorous academic research, the Graduate School of Business, in conjunction with the University of Chicago Division of the Social Sciences, offers six international joint MBA/AM programs: MBA/AM in East Asian Studies MBA/AM in East European/Russian Studies MBA/AM in Committee on International Relations MBA/AM in Latin American Studies MBA/AM in Middle Eastern Studies MBA/AM in South Asian Studies Students in these programs anticipate that their personal pursuits or careers will demand both a complete set of international business skills and an intimate knowledge of international issues or another culture. These programs take two-and-one-half to three years to complete, depending on the AM discipline, foreign language sequence placement, and length of time necessary to complete a required integrative master’s thesis. For more information, see page 25,“Special Programs—Joint Degree Programs.” Admission to these programs requires a separate application process from general MBA admissions, and there is only one application deadline each academic year: January 8. To request an international joint MBA/AM application, contact the Admissions Office, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637. Students who enter the regular MBA program may only apply to the international joint MBA/AM program before January 6 of their first academic year.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CONCENTRATION Students in the full-time, evening, or weekend MBA programs may choose to take a concentration in international business. Students fulfill this requirement by choosing three courses from the list of international business courses approved for a concentration, outlined in “Fields of Study—International Business” page 47. Students may petition to substitute a course taken as a participant in the International Business Exchange Program (IBEP), but study abroad is neither required to receive a concentration in international business nor guarantees this concentration.

Programs of Education

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EXCHANGE PROGRAM (IBEP) Initiated in 1965, the exchange program is today one of the most extensive of its kind. Study opportunities range from one quarter to one year, and are open to students in full-time, evening, or weekend MBA programs. Through IBEP, Graduate School of Business students have the opportunity to gain firsthand knowledge of the business environment, culture, and people of the world’s most important regions through study at one of thirty-three international business schools in twenty-one countries worldwide. The length of study varies from one quarter to a full year, depending on the particular exchange agreement. Graduate School of Business students may attend these schools for one term (spanning one to two quarters) and receive credit for three elective courses toward their Chicago MBA. They apply to the IBEP during the winter quarter of their first year to go abroad during their second year. For a complete list of the international business schools, please visit gsbwww.uchicago.edu/programs/intprog/ibep/schoollist.htm. In addition, students have the unique opportunity of attending the following schools for a full academic year, and receiving a second degree from the host institution. Students who participate in the degree exchange have the option of reducing the Chicago MBA course requirements by four courses. Students can apply to the IBEP during the winter quarter of their first year or second year to study abroad the following academic year. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium For a complete description of each program, including registration, financial aid, and career services information, contact the Office of International Programs, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, or by phone, 773.702.4499. In addition, each year the Graduate School of Business welcomes students from each of the exchange partners listed above. These students study at the GSB for one quarter and enrich the classroom experience with their diverse international backgrounds. Students from these schools interested in participating in the International Business Exchange Program should contact the appropriate offices at their home institutions.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS In cooperation with other schools and centers throughout the university, the Graduate School of Business offers several joint degree programs. Each program integrates important analytical skills and fundamentals of management with the skills and principles of the complementary field.

25

26

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Curriculum and Residency Requirements Under the joint programs, a student must satisfy the curriculum requirements for each degree. In general, certain courses are used in partial satisfaction of the requirements for both degrees, permitting the student to complete the joint program in less time than would be required if each degree were pursued separately. The descriptions below outline the minimum requirements.

Area Studies and Business (MBA/AM) In this joint program, the student chooses one of five options: East Asian, East European/Russian, Latin American, Middle Eastern, or South Asian studies. Under each option the student completes twenty-eight courses to earn the two degrees. Candidates must complete fourteen business courses plus LEAD and satisfy the nine distribution requirements of the MBA program. Students fulfill their Graduate School of Business residency requirement by registering for all of their courses through the school. In addition, students must fulfill thirteen area- and language-study courses through one of the area centers and complete a master’s thesis. A joint degree student in this program may not receive either one of the degrees before completing the requirements of the other degree. Both degrees must be awarded simultaneously.

Committee on International Relations and Business (MBA/AM) In this joint program, the student must complete fourteen business courses plus the LEAD program and satisfy the nine distribution requirements of the MBA program. Students fulfill their Graduate School of Business residency requirement by registering for all of their courses through the school. In addition, the student is required to complete nine international relations courses, pass the international relations core examination, pass a university language examination, and satisfactorily complete a master’s thesis. One of the international relations courses may be a master’s paper preparation course. As with the area studies joint degree program, both degrees must be awarded simultaneously.

Law and Business (MBA/JD) A student in this joint degree program must complete fourteen business classes, including the foundations, breadth, and general management requirements, plus LEAD and ninety-three hours (approximately thirty-one courses) in the Law School. In addition, students must complete fourteen courses (excluding LEAD) while in residency at the GSB and be in residence full time for eight quarters in the Law School. Students must matriculate to the MBA program prior to starting the third year of Law School.

Medicine and Business (MBA/MD) A student in this joint degree program must complete fourteen business classes, including the foundations, breadth, and general management requirements, plus LEAD and fourteen academic quarters of full-time registration in the Medical School. In

Programs of Education

addition, students must complete fourteen courses (excluding LEAD) while in residency at the GSB. The business school requirements must be completed before starting the fourth year of Medical School.

Public Policy Studies and Business (MBA/MPP) A student in this joint degree program must complete fourteen business classes, including the foundations, breadth, and general management requirements, plus LEAD and thirteen courses in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies. In addition, students must complete fourteen courses (excluding LEAD) while in residency at the GSB.

Social Service Administration and Business (MBA/AM) A student in this joint degree program must complete fourteen business classes, including the foundations, breadth, and general management requirements, plus LEAD and thirteen courses in the School of Social Service Administration, including the basic requirements of the AM program. In addition, students must complete fourteen courses (excluding LEAD) while in residency at the GSB and be in residence for three quarters in the School of Social Service Administration.

Application Procedures Candidates for the joint degree programs must meet the entrance requirements and follow the application procedures described in the Announcements of each school. Separate applications to each school must be filed within the prescribed deadlines, and applicants must be admitted to both schools to participate in any of the joint programs. An applicant who is admitted to one school but not the other has the option of entering the school that offered admission to earn a single degree. Students interested in one of the international joint degree programs (area studies and/or international relations) who have already matriculated in one of the schools must apply to the joint degree programs no later than January 8 of their first year. Students who have matriculated in one of the other schools and who have not entered the last year of study in that school may seek admission to the joint program, but no advance assurance can be given that such admission will be offered. The joint programs are not open to students who have already earned one of the degrees.

Financial Aid Financial aid in the joint programs is awarded separately by each school. Applicants for financial aid must follow the procedures described in the Announcements of the particular school.

Notification Procedures Each school makes its own admissions decision and notifies the applicant separately. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the schools of plans to enroll in a joint degree program. A nonrefundable deposit from all admitted students is required by the Graduate School of Business. For the Announcements of the other schools, write to the dean of students of the appropriate school, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637.

27

28

Graduate School of Business Announcements

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY MBA students may apply to this certificate program in their first year of study. If accepted, students pursue a course of study by meeting the requirements for the MBA degree, including directed electives in health administration and policy issues. These elective courses are taught in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and/or the School of Social Service Administration. The program is administered by the GPHAP Program Office. Further information can be found at gphap.uchicago.edu and inquiries can be directed to [email protected]

Dual Degrees MBA students may apply to and be accepted by another degree program at the university with which the GSB does not have a joint degree program. Students who decide to matriculate to the second program must take a leave of absence from the GSB in the quarters they will pursue their coursework at the other division. All conditions of the leave of absence and inactive status apply to students pursuing a dual degree. Dual degree students are not eligible to participate twice in on-campus interviewing for internships; that is a privilege of joint degree students only. A student receiving financial aid for the second program must apply for loans through the Student Loan Administration for the other degree. Please contact that office at 773.702.6061 for further information.

THE PHD PROGRAM The PhD Program is an integral part of the Graduate School of Business. The school began its PhD program–the first PhD program in business in the United States–in 1920, and awarded its first PhD degree in 1922. Since then, more than six hundred degrees have been granted. The program leading to the degree of doctor of philosophy is designed for students of outstanding ability who desire advanced studies in preparation for careers in university teaching and research. The number of students admitted to the program each year is small and, within the framework of the general requirements described below, programs of study are designed to fit individual interests. Students with a variety of backgrounds are admitted to the program; undergraduates with strong academic backgrounds (e.g., economics, mathematics, psychology, sociology) and strong research interests are encouraged to apply. Students without strong academic backgrounds in their area of study may have to take prerequisite courses in economics, mathematics, or statistics. The Graduate School of Business faculty determines the design and content of the PhD Program. The Director of the PhD Program is responsible for the administration of the program. Information about the program and application materials may be requested from the PhD Program Office, The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, and are available online at ChicagoGSB.edu/phd.

Programs of Education

CURRICULUM AND GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The primary characteristic of the PhD curriculum is its great flexibility. Within the general requirements outlined below, incoming students can design programs to suit their individual research interests and educational backgrounds. 1. Dissertation area. Successfully complete the general examination requirements in the student’s dissertation area: accounting, econometrics and statistics, economics, finance, management science/operations management, managerial and organizational behavior, marketing, and organizations and markets. 2. Support area. Successfully complete the general examination requirements in an area that supports the student’s dissertation area, such as econometrics and statistics, economics, managerial and organizational behavior, or organizations and markets. 3. Coordinated sequence. Successfully complete a three-course sequence, generally in an area other than the student’s dissertation area or support area. 4. Dissertation area workshop. Successfully register for and participate in a workshop in the student’s dissertation area during the student’s second and third years in the program. Grading is Pass/Fail. A total of six quarters with a grade of Pass is required. Generally, each quarter the student must write and submit summaries of any two of the workshop presentations during that quarter. 5. Curriculum paper. Write an original research paper and present it in a curriculum paper workshop. 6. Dissertation proposal. Initiate a major piece of original research (the dissertation proposal) and present it for faculty approval at a dissertation proposal seminar. 7. Dissertation defense. Complete a satisfactory dissertation and defend it successfully at a dissertation defense seminar.This research is the completion and extension of the research presented at the student’s dissertation proposal seminar. Students with strong academic backgrounds in their area of study typically take a full schedule of courses during their first two years in the program. All students are required to begin their curriculum paper at the end of their second year, submit it at the end of autumn quarter of the third year, and present it in a workshop during the winter quarter of the third year. Students typically take a partial schedule of courses and begin work on their dissertation proposal during their third year and take specialized courses, if needed, and work on their dissertation during their fourth year in the program. During their fifth year students typically finish and defend their dissertation.

DISSERTATION AND SUPPORT AREAS OF STUDY Descriptions of the various areas of study appear below. Accounting: The PhD Program in accounting is focused on producing the next generation of accounting scholars. Its graduates are expected to pursue successful academic careers at the leading research-oriented universities. The program is designed to immerse students in the GSB’s active research environment and make available the school’s abundant, outstanding, and richly varied research resources. Students receive a thorough grounding in accounting, finance, economics, and econometrics, as well as in areas that are more specific to their individual abilities and interests. Courses offered by the Graduate School of Business can be supplemented by courses in the departments of behavioral sciences, economics, law, mathematics, and statistics.

29

30

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Econometrics and Statistics: Econometrics and statistics are concerned with the combination of economic, mathematical, and computer techniques in the analysis of economic and business problems such as forecasting, demand and cost analyses, model building, and testing empirical implications of theories. Study in this area integrates a comprehensive program of course work with extensive research. The program is designed for students who wish to do research in econometric and statistical methods that are motivated by business applications. Students are able to design an individual program of study by combining courses in specific areas of business, such as economics, finance, accounting, management, marketing, or international business, with advanced courses in statistical methods. Economics: Fields of study in economics include price theory, market structure, industrial organization, labor economics, financial economics, business cycles, economic growth, and international economics. Students take advantage of a wide range of course offerings in both the Graduate School of Business and the Department of Economics. After completion of course work, students write dissertations in fields of their choosing. Finance: The finance PhD Program is concerned with such areas as (1) the behavior and determinants of security prices, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures; (2) portfolio management; (3) the management of corporate and public funds, including the choice of investment projects and the choice of sources of funds; and (4) the management and regulation of financial institutions. Students take courses from both the Graduate School of Business and the Department of Economics as part of their training. Management Science/Operations Management: Management Science is concerned with the application of mathematics and computer methods to management problems. Primary areas of concern are mathematical programming, queuing theory, and inventory theory. The field of Operations Management applies the underlying methodologies of Management Science to deal with the problems of developing, producing, and delivering goods and services. The focus is on how to combine concepts, models and data to help managers develop better systems and make better decisions concerning operations. Managerial and Organizational Behavior: Managerial and Organizational Behavior (MOB) focuses on how people use information and make decisions, and how they interact with one another in doing so in dyads, groups, and organizations. Studies in this area draw on theory and research from cognitive and social psychology, economics, and other related fields. MOB applies these disciplines to the study of human behavior relevant to a range of different managerial contexts. Examples include cognitive processes of judgment and decision making; psychological aspects of economic behavior; learning, reasoning, and problem solving by individuals, groups, and organizations; processes of negotiations; power and influence; teamwork and group processes; and organizational decision making. Students in MOB can focus their studies on the subset of research areas that best suits their interests and career intentions. Studies in MOB can be paired with studies in marketing for a focus on consumer behavior, with organizations and markets for a focus on organizational structures and processes, with economics or finance for a focus on economic behavior, and with a variety of other PhD areas. In addition to courses offered in the Graduate School of Business, MOB students take courses in the psychology, sociology, public policy, and economics departments, among others.

Programs of Education

Marketing: Advanced research in marketing addresses a marketing issue or problem using skills acquired in one of two different areas: (1) consumer behavior; (2) economics/quantitative methods. The theoretical foundation provided in the marketing PhD Program is enhanced by the program’s flexibility, allowing choice between these areas. Students take courses not only in the GSB but also in the psychology, sociology, economics, and statistics departments. Specific examples of research in the marketing area include the study of consumer decision making in a variety of different contexts; the investigation of the signaling effects of price, advertising, and other marketing instruments; analyses of the effects of consumer and trade promotions; and crosscategory analysis of marketing effects on household brand choice behavior, etc. The program is designed for those seeking careers as university professors at leading research institutions. Organizations and Markets: The Organizations and Markets program focuses on the social organization of firms and markets. The program provides systematic conceptual grounding in these topics, with numerous applications, including how organizations operate, why they differ, how they emerge from prior organizations, how their behavior is influenced by their position in a structure of other organizations, and how individuals manage others and progress in organizations. The program offers broad training in social network analysis and organizational theory and prepares students for positions in the fields of strategic management and organizational behavior.

RESEARCH EMPHASIS AT THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The PhD program at the Graduate School of Business emphasizes the development of the student’s capacity to conduct original research. Successful completion of the program in a timely manner depends on the ability of the student to work independently and to identify, analyze, and solve problems effectively and creatively. Some key requirements designed to enhance students’ skills in these areas are the research workshops, the curriculum paper, and the dissertation proposal. Research Workshops: Workshops play an important role in the development of the student’s professional capabilities. They provide a forum for the discussion of faculty and student research and for lectures by visiting academic speakers, and often are held in conjunction with other academic units of the university. Every PhD student must be associated with a workshop before the end of the first year in the program and should be an active participant in at least one workshop associated with his or her dissertation area throughout the remainder of the program. Workshops provide a transition in emphasis from courses to research and afford a testing ground for dissertation proposals. The workshops supplement the formal coursework and give depth to the student’s understanding of his or her subject area. They also provide an opportunity for the student to gain experience in presenting material before an interested and critical group, thus developing the skills of exposition necessary for effective teaching. Currently, workshops are established for accounting, applied economics, behavioral science, econometrics and statistics, finance, macro/international economics, marketing, operations/management science, organizations and markets, and theory of organizations, among others. Curriculum Paper: Students are required to write an original paper and present it at a workshop during their third year in the program. Ideally, the curriculum paper is a preliminary work that will eventually become the student’s dissertation.

31

32

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Dissertation Proposal and Defense: Each student works with faculty members on a dissertation topic. A dissertation committee is formed, composed of the dissertation chairperson and three other faculty members. The chairperson serves as the student’s principal advisor in the preparation of the dissertation. To gain formal approval of the dissertation proposal, the student’s work must be presented at a proposal seminar. At this seminar, open to all PhD students and faculty members, the student has an opportunity to explain, defend, and modify the proposal. The final decision whether to permit the student to proceed with the dissertation topic is made by the dissertation committee, who also will oversee and approve the final draft of the dissertation.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE The application is due January 1 of the year in which admission is sought. Students enter the program at the beginning of autumn quarter. The application for admission may be filled out online or downloaded and printed from the Web site, ChicagoGSB.edu/phd. Persons unable to access the Web may request a paper copy of the application by writing to the PhD Program Office, The University of Chicago, Graduate School of Business, 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 or by emailing [email protected] All completed paper applications and all supplementary materials (recommendations, transcripts, official test scores) should be sent to the PhD Program Office at the above address. All applicants must take either the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), depending on area of study. Both are administered by the Educational Testing Service (www.ets.org). In addition, all international applicants whose native language is not English and who have not completed at least two years of study in the United States by the time of the application deadline must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) (www.ielts.org). Test scores from all the above-mentioned tests must reach the PhD Program Office by January 1.

TUITION AND FINANCIAL AID All students who are admitted to the PhD Program are automatically considered for financial aid. Financial aid is based on evaluation of the student’s potential for scholarship and creative research. Tuition and tuition-plus-stipend awards are granted. Full tuition support is available for five years of full-time study, conditional upon satisfactory progress in the program. It is the policy of the PhD Program that students offered stipend support upon admission to the program will continue to receive it for four years of full-time study provided they continue to make satisfactory academic progress. If awarded tuition plus stipend, during the first year in the program students will receive a PhD Program fellowship for the academic year and an additional fellowship at the end of the summer quarter of their first year provided that they remain in residence and write a paper with or under the supervision of a faculty member. During the second, third and fourth years in the program, students will receive a PhD Program fellowship and the program will guarantee the opportunity to earn additional income for teaching assistance, up to a maximum of three course sections per year. The program believes that by imposing no work requirements during the first year, students can devote all

Programs of Education

their energies to their scholastic studies. The additional first-year summer paper will provide an excellent introduction to research, the second element of training for an academic position. The teaching assistantships, during the second through fourth years in the PhD Program, will round out this training by helping students become more effective teachers.

RESIDENCE AND REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS The general policy of the university in granting advanced degrees requires each doctoral candidate to be registered in one of two categories: scholastic residence or advanced residence. Upon entrance into the program, the student spends four years in scholastic residence. The precise mix of courses and independent research during this period will depend on the individual program and the student’s academic progress. A student who receives a PhD during the period of scholastic residence is not required to register beyond the quarter in which the degree is awarded. Students who have not completed all degree requirements during the four-year period of scholastic residence must then register for advanced-residence status for the fifth year and beyond in the program. The typical student should plan on five years of full-time effort to complete the requirements for the PhD degree.

STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE The academic progress of each student in the PhD Program is subject to review at least annually by the director of the PhD Program. The purpose of these reviews is to assess the student’s progress in the program and make decisions about financial aid and further participation in the program. The director will consult with Graduate School of Business faculty when reviewing a student’s progress. If deemed appropriate, the director has the discretion to terminate a student’s participation in the program.

RELATIONSHIP TO THE MBA PROGRAM Upon faculty approval of the dissertation proposal, a PhD student can be awarded an MBA degree after completing eighteen MBA courses, including seven specified courses and eleven electives. No more than six electives may be taken outside of the GSB but at the University of Chicago. No courses may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis, and a grade of C or higher must be achieved in courses used to earn the MBA degree. The application to receive the MBA degree must be made to the associate director of the PhD Program. Under special circumstances, a student may petition the director of the PhD Program to appoint a four-person committee (one member being the director) to determine whether a PhD student should be granted an MBA degree before faculty approval of the dissertation proposal and fulfillment of all of the above requirements. The PhD Program does not contribute financial aid toward MBA courses unless the courses are approved by the director of the PhD Program as an integral part of the student’s doctoral study. A student who leaves the program prior to passing both general examinations or the dissertation proposal can petition to be admitted into the MBA program. A student must be approved to withdraw from the PhD Program by the director of the PhD Program and approved to transfer to the Full-Time MBA Program by the director of the Dean of

33

34

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Students Office. If the petition is granted, the student is withdrawn from the PhD program and must fulfill the general requirements for the MBA. Please note that this is a summary of the PhD Program; refer to the PhD Program Guidebook, available online at ChicagoGSB.edu/phd, for a more detailed description.

JOINT PHD AND JD DEGREES At the boundaries between law and various areas of business lie many important research issues. Addressing these questions and many others requires detailed knowledge of legal theory and practice as well as a thorough understanding of economic, accounting, financial and other business theories, data analysis, and testing methods. The joint program between the GSB PhD Program and the Law School, leading to both a PhD in business and a JD, provides especially talented students with the training to make major breakthroughs in these important interdisciplinary areas. Applicants to the joint program must meet the entrance requirements and satisfy the basic undergraduate degree prerequisites of both the Law School and the GSB. Admission decisions are handled separately. An applicant who applies to both schools concurrently and is admitted to both schools is automatically in the joint program. An applicant who is admitted to only one of the schools may enroll in the degree program in that school and reapply to the other school at a later date. An applicant who initially applies to only one of the schools may still pursue admission to the joint program by applying at the appropriate time during the first two years in the GSB or the first two years in the Law School. To obtain the joint degree, a student must satisfy the normal degree requirements of the Law School as well as those of the Graduate School of Business PhD Program for the student’s chosen dissertation and support areas. The purpose of the joint program is to allow some courses to satisfy both Law School and GSB requirements. It is anticipated that obtaining both degrees will take at least seven years. The joint program is administered by the director of the PhD Program at the Graduate School of Business and the deputy dean for academic affairs of the Law School, with the assistance of the joint degree advisor. Tuition support from the GSB is limited to six years. Students will compensate the Law School for eight quarters of tuition. Students admitted into the joint program are eligible for merit-based and need-based scholarships, loan programs, and other financial assistance under the same conditions as traditional law students.

DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY To learn more about the job placement of recent and prospective graduates of the PhD Program, please visit ChicagoGSB.edu/phd.

vvv

Programs of Education

FIELDS OF STUDY The following pages provide brief descriptions of the fields of study, lists of the faculty members teaching in each field, and lists of the courses available. Course descriptions appear in “Programs of Education—Course Descriptions.” Students in the MBA program choose elective courses from a variety of options, giving exceptional latitude to individual programs. Many students choose a program that prepares them for fairly broad management responsibility. Others may wish to give particular emphasis to one or more specific disciplines or fields. The concentration option is open to the student who wishes to follow a structured course of study designed to develop special competence in a given field. Not every field of study offers a concentration. In general, a concentration comprises three or four courses in one field or in two related fields. Completing a concentration is not a requirement for graduation; however, students often concentrate in a particular field (and have that fact appear on the official university transcript) by using their electives to fulfill the requirements for concentration sequences as determined by the faculty. Approved sequences, which are listed in the descriptions of the fields of study, are usually recommended for the student who has had little prior education in the field he or she selects. Other concentration sequences for students with prior advanced work or with specialized interests may be approved by the appropriate faculty through a petition to the full-time MBA, evening MBA, or weekend MBA office. To earn a concentration, a student must achieve an overall average of C in the approved sequence. Courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis may not be used to satisfy the requirements of a concentration. Because about half the student’s program consists of electives, it is possible to organize programs including one or two concentrations. If two concentrations are chosen, the fields can either be complementary, such as accounting and finance, or, if greater breadth is desired, distantly related, such as operations and marketing. Concentrations are offered in accounting, analytic finance, econometrics and statistics, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, human resource management, international business, managerial and organizational behavior, marketing management, operations management, and strategic management.

ACCOUNTING Courses in accounting are taught by Ball, Berger, Bockus, Dey, Engel, Erickson, Keating, Northcut, Piotroski, Ray, Rogers, Roulstone, Sapra, Skinner, Smith, Srinivasan, Van Buskirk, Venugopalan, Weil, Weiss, and Wong. The accounting curriculum focuses on developing informed users of accounting information outside and inside the firm. The financial accounting courses target external users and the managerial accounting courses target internal users. The courses prepare students for careers as corporate financial officers, management consultants, financial analysts, investment bankers, general managers, and public accountants. Selected courses provide analytic capabilities for students interested in careers as production managers, brand managers, government administrators and/or regulators, and financial planners. PhD-level courses prepare students for university-level research.

35

36

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Each student must take either Business 30000 or an approved substitute. Students who enter the school with previous studies in accounting are encouraged to substitute an advanced course for Business 30000. Approved substitutes for Business 30000 are Business 30116, 30117, 30118, and 30130. A concentration in accounting consists of four courses in accounting from the following list: Business 30000, 30001, 30105, 30116, 30117, 30118, and 30130. The Illinois Committee on Accountancy has approved the following courses as meeting the requirements for the State of Illinois CPA examination: Business 30000, 30001, 30116, 30117, 30118, 30130, and 42200. Courses in the field are listed below: 30000. Financial Accounting 30001. Managerial Accounting 30105. Advanced Managerial Accounting 30116. Accounting and Financial Analysis I 30117. Accounting and Financial Analysis II 30118. Taxes and Business Strategy 30130. Financial Statement Analysis 30600. Workshop in Accounting Research 30901. Topics in Accounting Research 30902. Empirical Research in Accounting 30903. Topics in Empirical Accounting Research 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level) Related courses: Business 35200. Corporation Finance Business 41202. Analysis of Financial Time Series Business 42200. Law and Business Law 42300. Corporation Law Law 42500. Corporate Finance Law 43200. Advanced Corporations Law 44200. Federal Taxation II Law 44500. International Taxation Psychology 27000. Judgment and Decision Making

COMMUNICATIONS Courses in communications are taught by McEnerney. The ability to communicate clearly is essential in all types of business and at all levels of management. The GSB offers a course that teaches established techniques for successful writing and provides tools for business students to manage the writing of others. This course is taught by faculty from the university’s writing programs. Courses in the field are listed below: 32101. Advanced Professional Writing

Programs of Education

ECONOMETRICS AND STATISTICS Courses in econometrics and statistics are taught by Bandi, Bester, Conley, Gilula, Hansen, Lopes, McCulloch, Polson, Rossi, Russell, and Tsay. In the modern world, a great deal of information is available to decision makers. Sometimes this information is quite complex. Econometrics and statistics provide tools to help us make sense of the information available to us. These tools range from simple graphic devices to sophisticated models based on theory and are widely applicable in nearly all kinds of business activities such as finance, marketing, quality improvement, accounting, and management. General goals include forecasting, decision making, and policy evaluation. For MBA students, either Business 41000 or Business 41100 fulfills the minimum econometrics/statistics requirement. A concentration in econometrics/statistics requires the completion of any three courses in the field. Information giving specific requirements for PhD students is available from the Office of Doctoral Programs. MBA and doctoral students concentrating in statistics are encouraged to attend the weekly econometrics and statistics colloquium (Business 41600). Courses in the field are listed below: 41000. Business Statistics 41100. Applied Regression Analysis 41201. Information Management and Data Mining for Business 41202. Analysis of Financial Time Series 41301. Statistical Insight in Marketing, Consulting, and Entrepreneurship 41600. Econometrics and Statistics Colloquium 41901. Probability and Statistics 41902. Statistical Inference 41903. Applied Econometrics 41910. Time Series Analysis for Forecasting and Model Building 41911. Advanced Econometrics 41912. Applied Multivariate Analysis 41913. Bayesian Econometrics 41914. Multiple Time Series Analysis 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level) Related courses: Business 37102. Quantitative Marketing Research Methods Business 38002. Managerial Decision Making Statistics 25100, 25200. Introduction to Math Probability Statistics 30100, 30200. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics Statistics 31200. Introduction to Stochastic Processes Statistics 34400, 34500. Statistical Methodology and Data Analysis Statistics 38100, 38200. Theoretic Probability Statistics 39000. Stochastic Calculus/Finance

37

38

Graduate School of Business Announcements

ECONOMICS Courses in economics are taught by Altig, Barker, Becker, Bleakley, Broda, Bulger, Carlton, Caselli, Cochrane, S. Davis, Fogel, Furfine, Garry, Gibbs, Goolsbee, Guiso, Guryan, Harris, Huizinga, Hurst, Ierulli, Kashyap, Kole, Kroszner, Mas, Mian, Mulligan, Murphy, Prendergast, Rayo, Romalis, Snyder, Stole, Topel, van Wijnbergen, Wildman, and Young. Economics develops the basic concepts necessary to understand the economic environment in which a firm operates, to organize data for decision-making purposes, and to engage in short- and long-range planning. It also examines the relationships useful in predicting the consequences of decisions and the effects of political and social changes on the behavior of the firm. The discipline focuses on the principles underlying consumer behavior, the role of firms, the functioning of markets, the organization of industry, and the macroeconomic system. Economics is a basic business discipline whose concepts and relationships are applied in the operational areas of accounting, finance, human resources, industrial relations, international business, marketing, and operations. Students who wish to declare a concentration in economics should take four courses chosen from Business 33031 (or 33032 or 33302), 33040, 33101 (or 33901), 33111, 33201, 33202, 33215, 33220, 33221, 33401, 33402, 33403, 33451, 33470, 33501 (or 33502 or 33504), and 42001. Business 33001 does not qualify toward a concentration. Courses in the field are listed below: 33001. Microeconomics 33031. The Employment Relationship 33032. Managing the Workplace 33040. Macroeconomics 33101. Advanced Microeconomic Analysis 33111. Economic Analysis of Major Policy Issues 33201. Industrial Organization 33202. Economics of Regulation and Deregulation 33215. The Business and Economics of the Sports Industry 33220. Business, Public Policy, and the New Economy 33221. Economics and Policy of the Telecom, Media, and Technology Industries 33302. International Comparative Organizations 33312. Public Policies Toward Business 33401. Money and Banking 33402. Understanding Central Banks 33403. Advanced Macroeconomics 33450. Real Estate Investment Analysis 33451. Real Estate Finance and Economics 33470. Population and the Economy 33501. International Commercial Policy 33502. International Financial Policy 33503. Managing the Firm in the Global Economy 33504. International Financial Markets and Institutions: Development, Performance, and Regulation 33610. Applied Economics Workshop 33620. Workshop in Economic and Legal Organization

Programs of Education

33650. Workshop in Macro/International Economics 33901. Advanced Price Theory 33911. The Economics of Information 33921, 33922, 33923. Advanced Industrial Organization I, II, III 33925. Economics of Organizations 42001. Competitive Strategy 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level) Related courses: Business 35000. Investments Business 35200. Corporation Finance Business 35901, 35902, 35903. Theory of Financial Decisions I, II, III Business 35904. Asset Pricing Business 38002. Managerial Decision Making Business 40000. Operations Management: Business Process Fundamentals Business 41202. Analysis of Financial Time Series Business 41910. Time Series Analysis for Forecasting and Model Building Business 41911. Advanced Econometrics Economics 30000, 30100, 30200. Price Theory I, II, III Economics 33000. Demand and Supply for Money and Other Financial Assets Economics 33100. Theory of Income, Employment, and the Price Level Economics 33200. Dynamic Models of Growth, Inflation, and Cycles Economics 36200. Monetary and Fiscal Policy

ENTREPRENEURSHIP Primary courses in entrepreneurship are taught by Darragh, Deutsch, Frenzen, Gertner, Hapak, Kaplan, Kooser, Lowitz, Meadow, Middlebrooks, Rudnick, Schrager, Weisbach, Zingales, and Zmijewski. Related courses are taught by Erickson, Gilula, Goolsbee, Kleinman, and Martin. The entrepreneurship curriculum is designed to develop practical skills and knowledge that can be applied by students whether they are involved in an entrepreneurial venture directly out of the GSB or much later in their careers. The curriculum combines traditional classroom sessions with experiential learning opportunities to enable the students to apply what they have learned to a real-world situation. The primary courses in the field are designed to expose students to the major issues of starting a business such as managing a business (e.g., BUS 34102 and 34103), financing a new venture (e.g., BUS 34101), structuring the business (from a legal and tax perspective) (LAW 71400), and commercializing technology (e.g., BUS 34106). Experiential learning courses such as New Venture and Small Enterprise Lab (BUS 34701), Private Equity/Venture Capital Lab course (BUS 34702), and the Edward L. Kaplan New Venture Challenge (BUS 34104), provide students with hands-on experience in developing a new venture, working closely with an existing startup, or assisting entrepreneurial investors. Students concentrating in entrepreneurship should take three courses from Business 30118, 33220, 33221, 34101, 34102, 34103, 34104, 34105, 34106, 34110, 34202, 34203, 34701, 34702, 34703, 36103, 37201, 37204, 37301, 37302, 37701, 39101, 41301, 42103, and Law 71401. Substitutions will be considered if students can make the case that they have a strong entrepreneurial component.

39

40

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Primary courses in the field are listed below: 34101. Entrepreneurial Finance and Private Equity 34102. New Venture Strategy 34103. Building a New Venture 34104. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship: Developing a Business Plan 34105. Entrepreneurial Internship Seminar 34106. Commercializing Innovation 34110. Social Entrepreneurship 34202. Internet and High-Technology Ventures 34701. New Venture and Small Enterprise Lab 34702. Private Equity/Venture Capital Lab 34703. International Entrepreneurship Lab—China 37201. Developing New Products and Services 37301. Internet Marketing Strategy 37302. Marketing Strategies in High-Technology Industries 37701. Laboratory in New Product and Strategy Development 39101. Technology Strategy Law 71400. Structuring Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Transactions Related courses: Business 30118. Taxes and Business Strategy Business 33220. Business, Public Policy, and the New Economy Business 33221. Economics and Policy of the Telecom, Media, and Technology Industries Business 36103. E-Business Technology Business 37204. Sales Force Management Business 38112. Leadership in the Evolutionary Economy Business 41301. Statistical Insight into Marketing Consulting and Entrepreneurship Business 42103. Applied Strategic Management/INTOPIA

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Courses in financial management are taught by Bandyopadhyay, Belton, Cochrane, Constantinides, Culp, Diamond, Fama, Frazzini, Galatti, Gregory, Hansen, Harris, Heaton, Kaplan, Kashyap, Leftwich, A. Marciano, Marshall, Mehra, Mian, Moskowitz, Novy-Marx, Pástor, Perez-Gonzalez, Piazzesi, Rajan, Rauh, Rock, Rosu, Sorenson, Stromberg, Sufi, Veronesi, Vishny, Zingales, and Zmijewski. The basic program in finance is designed to provide broad professional competence and skills for students preparing for executive positions in finance in corporations, investment banks and other financial institutions; consulting firms; governmental agencies; and for positions in teaching and research. It also is designed to provide a deep understanding of finance and financial products necessary for general managers to become intelligent customers and users of financial products. The faculty, long recognized as leaders of research in the modern theory of finance, bring to the classroom state-of-the-art knowledge and its applications in such key areas as: (1) the behavior and determinants of security returns with applications in portfolio

Programs of Education

management; (2) the financial management of corporations, including the choice and financing of investment projects, dividend policy, capital structure, financial reorganization, and the management of risk; (3) the pricing and hedging of options futures and other derivatives; and (4) the management and regulation of financial institutions. For a concentration in finance, a student should complete: Business 35000 (or one of 35120, 35150, 35151, 35901, or 35904) and 35200 (or one of 35201, 35902, or 35903) and at least two other courses among Business 30130, 33510, 34101, 35100, 35101, 35120, 35130, 35131, 35132, 35140, 35150, 35151, 35152, 35201, 35202, 35203, 35205, 35903, 35904, 35905, 35906, 35907, 35908, 35909, and 35910. Students taking Business 35000 and 35200 may count either Business 35901 or 35902 (but not both) as one of the two additional courses. The analytic concentration in finance requires that students take six courses from the following list: Business 34101, 35100, 35120, 35130, 35131, 35132, 35140, 35150, 35151, 35152, 35200, 35201, 35202, 35901, 35902, 35903, 35904, 35906, 35907,35908, and 35909. The student must also satisfy the finance requirements. Courses in the field are listed below: 35000. Investments 35100. Financial Instruments 35101. Futures, Forwards, Options, and Swaps: Theory and Practice 35120. Portfolio Management 35130. Fixed Income and Asset Pricing 35131. Financial Engineering: Cases in Financial Risk Management 35132. Financial Engineering: Mathematical Models of Option Pricing and Their Estimation 35140. Research Projects in Finance 35150. Advanced Investments 35151. Empirical Asset Pricing 35152. Structured Finance and Alternative Risk Transfer 35200. Corporation Finance 35201. Cases in Financial Management 35202. Financial Markets and Institutions 35203. The Corporation and Its Legal/Institutional Environment 35205. Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance 35600. Seminar: Finance 35601. Workshop in the Theory of Organizations 35901, 35902, 35903. Theory of Financial Decisions I, II, III 35904. Asset Pricing 35905. Topics in Empirical Finance 35906. Behavioral Finance 35907. Topics in Asset Pricing 35908. Research Projects: Finance 35909. Topics—Asset Pricing 35910. Asset Pricing and Macroeconomics 34101. Entrepreneurial Finance and Private Equity 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level)

41

42

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Related courses: Business 30116. Accounting and Financial Analysis I Business 30117. Accounting and Financial Analysis II Business 30130. Financial Statement Analysis Business 33510. Finance and Enterpreneurship in Emerging Markets Business 33401. Money and Banking Business 33502. International Financial Policy Business 33503. Managing the Firm in the Global Economy Business 33504. International Financial Markets and Institutions: Development, Performance, and Regulation Business 41202. Analysis of Financial Time Series Economics 36100. Public Finance in the American Economy Economics 36200. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Law 42300. Corporation Law Law 42500. Corporate Finance

GENERAL MANAGEMENT Courses in general management are taught by Batts, Bertrand, Bothner, Burt, H. Davis, Dessein, Dobrev, Epley, Fishbach, Fogel, Garicano, Gentzkow, Gertner, Ginzel, Gneezy, Gould, Haas, Hastie, Hsee, Klayman, Kleinman, Knez, Menon, S. Marciano, Petrin, Phillips, Picker, Safford, Thaler, Wittenbrink, Wu,Yakubovich, and Zonis. The general management curriculum focuses on the concepts and techniques needed to manage effectively. General management courses typically take the perspective of upper management, such as the head of an organization, a business unit, or a division. A distinguishing feature of general management problems is that they are often ambiguous and they often cut across functional-area boundaries. Examples include the formulation and implementation of business-level and corporate-level practices and strategy. An essential part of being an effective manager is a deep understanding of the management and behavior of people working in organizations. Our curriculum includes courses on organizational behavior, organization structure, market structure and coordination, managerial decision making, leadership, and ethics. General management courses are found in three curriculum areas, each representing a different perspective. These are managerial and organizational behavior, organizations and markets, and strategic management, described below. Faculty in the three areas work together in teaching and research to provide a unique, interdisciplinary, Chicago approach to studies in general management, drawing on economics, cognitive and social psychology, and sociology. In general management classes, students learn to apply the most recent social science research to important questions of application and implementation in realistic settings. The general management requirement is to complete one core course in each of two subsets: (A) 39001, 42001, or 42002; and (B) 38001, 38002, 38003, or 39002. A student receives a concentration in general management by completing a total of four courses in general management, as well as all six of the GSB’s breadth requirements (only four of six are required for graduation). Students interested in a concentration can select any combination of four courses from across the three curriculum areas. Courses applied to

Programs of Education

a general management concentration also can be counted toward additional concentrations in managerial and organizational behavior or strategic management, if desired (see below).

Managerial and Organizational Behavior (MOB) Courses in managerial and organizational behavior are taught by Epley, Fishbach, Fogel, Ginzel, Gneezy, Haas, Hastie, Hsee, Klayman, Menon, Phillips, Rottenstreich, Thaler, Wittenbrink, Wu,Yakubovich, and Zonis. Courses in MOB are designed to provide students with conceptual frameworks for understanding the human elements of working and managing in organizations. These courses draw heavily from the most recent research in psychology and other social sciences. Four MOB courses can be used to satisfy part of the general management requirement: 38001, 38002, 38003, and 39002. Any of them can be taken as a first course in MOB, to be followed by additional courses according to interests. Elective courses also are offered on such topics as strategies and processes of negotiation (38103), theory and practice of leadership (38110 and 38111), business ethics (38114 and 38115), groups and teams (38116), and organizational change (38117). A concentration in managerial and organizational behavior consists of any four of the following courses: 38001, 38002, 38003, 38103, 38110, 38111, 38116, 38117, 39002, and 31702, including the course used to satisfy the MOB component of the general management requirement. Students concentrating in MOB also are encouraged to attend the behavioral science workshops series. PhD students seeking to pursue studies in MOB should consult “Programs of Education: The PhD Program”or the PhD Student Handbook. (See also the area of Organizations and Markets.) Courses in the field are listed below: 38001. Managing in Organizations 38002. Managerial Decision Making 38003. Power and Influence in Organizations 38103. Strategies and Processes of Negotiation 38110. The Practice of Leadership in Business 38111. Theories of Leadership 38114. A Guide to Business Ethics 38115. Ethics of Business and Economic Activities 38116. Groups, Teams, and Leadership 38117. Organizational Change 38601. Workshop in Behavioral Science 38901, 38902, 38903. Current Topics in Behaviorial Science I, II, III 38911. Research Methods in Behavioral Science 38912. Behavioral Economics 38913. Cognitive Foundations of Judgment and Decision Making 39002. Network Structures of Effective Management 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level)

43

44

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Related courses: Business 33032. Managing the Workplace Business 33302. International Comparative Organizations Business 37000. Marketing Management Business 37101. Consumer Behavior Business 37203. Marketing Communications Business 39001. Strategy and Structure: Markets and Organizations Business 39600. Organizations and Markets Workshop Business 39901. Organizations and Environments Business 39902. Organizations in Emerging Markets: Social, Political, and Cultural Issues Business 42002. Business Policy Psychology 35600. Cognitive Psychology Psychology 37300. Experimental Design Sociology 33100. Organizational Analysis Sociology 35000. Organizational Decision Making

Organizations and Markets (O&M) Courses in organizations and markets are taught by Bothner, Burt, Dobrev, Knez, Phillips, Safford, and Yakubovich. O&M courses address the design of effective management structures and strategies, with particular emphasis on multi-business and technology-based companies. The central concern of the area is structuring and running organizations to create the greatest possible value. On the microanalytic side of organizations and markets, courses develop principles to help managers craft relationships with superiors, colleagues, and subordinates to achieve effective coordination within a broader organization structure. On the macroanalytic side of organizations and markets, courses develop principles that inform the optimal scope and structure of the multi-unit firm, and that examine strategy formulation and market structures in high technology firms and industries. Organizations and markets research at the GSB is anchored at the doctoral level in organization theory and organizational sociology. O&M PhD students also do coursework in other areas of the university, most notably the Department of Sociology (ranked as one of the best in the country for program and faculty quality). Students interested in PhD-level studies in organizations and markets are encouraged to attend the group’s weekly workshop. PhD students can pursue studies in organizations and markets either as their primary concentration or as a support area (see the PhD Student Handbook for curriculum details). Courses in the field are listed below: 39001. Strategy and Structure: Markets and Organizations 39002. Network Structures of Effective Management 39101. Technology Strategy 39200. Strategic Leadership in Uncertain Environments

Programs of Education

39600. Workshop in Organizations and Markets 39601. Argument and Evidence Workshop 39901. Organizations and Environments 39902. Organizations in Emerging Markets: Social, Political, and Cultural Issues 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level)

Strategic Management Courses in strategic management are taught by Batts, Bertrand, Bothner, H. Davis, Dessein, Dobrev, Garicano, Gentzkow, Gertner, Gould, Kleinman, Knez, S. Marciano, Petrin, Picker, and Safford. Strategic management courses focus on the choices, tradeoffs, and activities of general managers in achieving a strong competitive position. The study of a company’s external environment, strategic resources, and capabilities and the organization’s internal structure form the foundation for analyzing management decisions that have a fundamental impact on what the organization does and how it does it. Numerous elective courses build on foundation courses to explore specific issues in strategic management in depth and to develop additional tools to analyze strategic decision making. A concentration in strategic management requires four courses from 33503, 34102, 34103, 37400, 37701, 39001, 39101, 39220, 42001, 42002, 42102, 42103, 42104, 42105, 42107, 42108, 42109, 42110, 42113, and 42114. Students can only count one course toward both the entrepreneurship and strategic management concentrations. Courses in the field are listed below: 42001. Competitive Strategy 42002. Business Policy 42102. The Strategy Symposium 42103. Applied Strategic Management/INTOPIA 42104. The Practice of Strategy in Business 42105. Special Topics in Strategic Management 42107. Taking Charge 42108. Corporate Governance 42109. The Corporation and Public Policy 42110. Strategic Investment Decisions 42112. Management Strategies of Successful Firms 42113. Organizational Strategy 42114. Strategic Planning 42200. Law and Business 42201. The Legal Infrastructure of Business 42202. Law and Management 39001. Strategy and Structure: Markets and Organizations 39101. Technology Strategy 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level)

45

46

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Related courses: Business 33032. Managing the Workplace Business 33201. Industrial Organization Business 33202. Economics of Regulation and Deregulation Business 33302. International Comparative Organizations Business 33921, 33922, 33923. Advanced Industrial Organization I, II, III Business 34103. New Enterprise and Small Business Management Business 35203. The Corporation and Its Legal/Institutional Environment Business 33503. Managing the Firm in the Global Economy Business 37400. Marketing Strategy Business 37701, 37702. Laboratory in New Product and Strategy Development Business 38003. Power and Influence in Organizations Business 38110. The Practice of Leadership in Business Business 38111. Theories of Leadership Business 38601. Workshop in Behavioral Science Business 39001. Strategy and Structure: Markets and Organizations

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Courses in human resource management are taught by Bulger, Garry, Gibbs, Guryan, Kole, Prendergast, Rayo, and Wildman. Employee compensation accounts for nearly three-fourths of costs in the typical American firm, a proportion that has risen steadily during the recent past. Consequently, understanding the operation of labor markets is important for formulating and implementing management strategies. For example, creative compensation strategies can have a powerful impact on labor productivity and costs. Further, increased government regulation of employment relationships implies that managers must be aware of the legal consequences of various employment practices and know how to adapt profitably to changes in the regulatory environment. A concentration in human resource management will be valuable for students interested in general management and management consulting careers, as well as those who wish to specialize in managing employee relations for large organizations. Students may concentrate by taking any three of the following courses: 33031, 33032, 33301, 33302, and 33311. Courses in the field are listed below: 33031. The Employment Relationship 33032. Managing the Workplace 33301. Management, Unions, and Collective Bargaining 33302. International Comparative Organizations 33303. Strategic Human Resource Management 33311. Government Regulation and the Employment Relationship 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level)

Programs of Education

Related courses: Business 38001. Managing in Organizations Business 38103. Strategies and Processes of Negotiation Economics 34100. Labor Markets Economics 34200. Quantitative Labor Economics Law 43100, 43200. Labor Law I, II

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Courses in international business are taught by Broda, Kashyap, Kooser, Kroszner, Mian, Prendergast, Romalis, van Wijnbergen,Young, Zmijewski, and Zonis. The program in international business is designed to provide a broad background in understanding the international environment for economic policy and the impact of globalization on business decision making. The courses focus on the analytical problems of the international financial and commercial systems. The design, operation, and interaction of these systems are considered. The international environment is examined for its effect on the way firms finance, organize, plan, and conduct their activities. The international business concentration requires students to take three courses from Business 33302, 33402, 33501, 33502, 33503, 33510, 33520, 33521, 33522, 33523, and 34703. At least one must be 33501 or 33502. Courses that are taken through the International Business Exchange Program and are substantially similar to GSB courses will not be counted as substitutes. In no case can more than one IBEP course be used as a substitute, and students should petition for substitutions before going abroad. Students may elect courses from other departments of the university. Reading courses are available for students who wish to investigate more thoroughly subjects of particular interest. Courses in the field are listed below: 33302. International Comparative Organizations 33402. Understanding Central Banks 33501. International Commercial Policy 33502. International Financial Policy 33503. Managing the Firm in the Global Economy 33510. Emerging Financial Markets 33520, 33521, 33522. Special Topics in International Business I, II, III 33523. International Business Environment: Global Capitalism and International Governance 33650. Workshop in International Economics 34703. International Entrepreneurship Lab—China 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level) Related courses: Business 31201. Global Issues Seminar

47

48

Graduate School of Business Announcements

MARKETING MANAGEMENT Courses in marketing management are taught by Chintagunta, Dhar, Dube, Fogel, Frenzen, Hitsch, Hsee, Jeuland, Krohn, Labroo, Manchanda, McGill, Middlebrooks, Mitchell, Peck, Pennington, Ramanathan, Rossi, and Zeithammer. Broadly construed, the marketing function is responsible for matching the competitive skills of the organization with demands of the market to achieve the optimal return on assets and investments. The practice of marketing has grown more challenging in recent years due to the increased pace and intensity of competitive activity, the greater complexity, diversity, and volatility of consumer preferences, the increased rate of technological change and its impact on product and service development, and the greater availability of information. Marketing is not so much about tactics, such as creating ads or promotions, as it is about basic firm strategy. As a consequence, the curriculum at Chicago emphasizes rigorous, analytical, framework-based approaches to marketing decisions with a focus on sophisticated models of information integration and financial discipline. The core of the marketing curriculum is Marketing Strategy (Business 37000). The rest of the marketing electives can be divided into four groups: fundamental knowledge and tools, tactics, institutions and industries, and advanced strategy. The fundamental knowledge and tools courses (37101, 37102, 37103, and 37104) provide skills that may be applied across a wide range of decisions. The tactics courses (37201, 37202, 37203, 37204, and 37205) address the primary marketing control variables related to product and service design, pricing, communication, and logistics and channel management. The institutions and industry courses (37301, 37302, and 37303) apply knowledge in distinct environments, for example, in services, international, or high-tech markets. The capstone strategy course (37400) integrates prior marketing knowledge and ties the marketing function to the overall competitive strategy of the firm. Students who intend to go into careers with large marketing components (which include many consulting jobs) should plan on taking five or six courses in marketing and include at least one course from each of the four groups of electives. To obtain a concentration in marketing, students must take Business 37000 and at least three additional marketing electives; either Business 37701 or 37702 may count, but not both. In addition to the portfolio of traditional classroom-format courses, the marketing group sponsors the Laboratory in New Product and Strategy Development (NPL), Business 37701 and 37702. Students in the lab work on “live” industry projects that range from the development of new products to devising a marketing strategy for a new market. The NPL provides a unique exposure to the business world and to the implementation of marketing strategies. Business 37000 is required for the NPL. Courses in the field are listed below: 37000. Marketing Strategy 37101. Consumer Behavior 37102. Quantitative Marketing Research Methods 37103. Data-Driven Marketing 37104. Economics and Demography of Marketing 37201. Developing New Products and Services 37202. Pricing Strategies 37203. Integrated Marketing Communications

Programs of Education

37204. Sales Force Management 37205. Going to Market: Managing Channel Strategy 37302. Marketing Strategies for High Technology and the Internet 37303. Marketing of Services 37400. Advanced Marketing Strategy 37601. Marketing Workshop 37701, 37702. Laboratory in New Product and Strategy Development 37901. Advanced Marketing Theory (Proseminar) 37902. Advanced Marketing Theory: Quantitative Perspectives 37903. Advanced Marketing Theory: Behavioral Science Approach 37904. Marketing Topics 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level) Related courses: Business 41301. Statistical Insight in Marketing Consulting and Entrepreneurship

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT Courses in operations management are taught by Adelman, Afeche, Birge, DeHoratius, Eisenstein, Martin, Mersereau, and Zangwill. Operations management is concerned with the problems of developing, producing, and delivering goods and services. The focus is on how to combine concepts, models, and data to help managers develop better systems and make better decisions concerning operations. These skills are important to general managers and in many consulting assignments as well as to those who work directly in operations. Courses in operations management include Business 40000, 40101, 40104, and 40107. The breadth requirement in the curriculum can be satisfied by taking either 40000, 40101, 40104, or 40107. A concentration consists of taking at least three courses from the entire list. Courses in the field are listed below: 36101. Mathematics for Business Analysis 36102. Introduction to Computer-Based Models 36103. Information Technology for the Non-IT Executive 36600. Workshop in Operations Management/Management Science 36901. Stochastic Programming 36902. Dynamic Programming 36903. Ciombinatorial Optimization 40000. Operations Management: Business Process Fundamentals 40101. Supply Chain Strategy and Practice 40103. Operations Management and Strategy 40104. Managing Logistics/Distribution Systems 40107. Decision Models 40901, 40902, 40903. Special Topics in Operations Management and Management Science 31301. Individual Study in Business (MBA-level) 31901. Individual Study in Business (PhD-level)

49

50

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Related courses: Business 30115. Advanced Topics in Managerial Accounting: Performance Measurement, Decision Making, and Incentives Business 33032. Managing the Workplace Business 33301. Management, Unions, and Collective Bargaining Business 41302. Quality and Productivity Improvement

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS The following descriptions are intended to provide general information on course content. For any course, the recommended prior study may be expressed in general terms, as a Graduate School of Business course, or as an equivalent elsewhere. A faculty member may modify the prerequisites for a course that he or she is teaching; such modifications will be indicated in the extended course description prepared by the faculty member; printed in the Curriculum Guide, distributed to matriculated students just prior to autumn quarter registration; and listed in the online course descriptions available on the GSB Web site. The course unit is the measure of credit. One full unit (100) is equivalent to three semester hours or five quarter hours. Courses of greater or lesser value than one unit carry proportionately more or fewer quarter hours of credit. A quarter’s program of three courses is the equivalent of ten semester hours in institutions operating on the semester plan and fifteen quarter hours in institutions operating on the quarter plan. Abbreviations used in the course descriptions below include prereq for the word “prerequisite”and the symbol = for “identical with.” 30000. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. Provides a framework for understanding and interpreting the external accounting reports of corporations. Analyzes the correspondence between the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and economic events affecting firms. 30001. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. Focuses on firms’internal accounting information systems and their use in decision making, planning and control, and performance evaluation. The course adopts the perspective of a user of internal accounting information. Typical users include general managers, brand or production managers, management consultants, financial analysts, and investment bankers. Prereq: Bus 30000, 33001, and 41000, or equivalents. 30105. ADVANCED MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. Continues where 30001 left off, and treats these topics with greater depth and analysis. Can be taken in addition to or in place of 30001. The course mixes theory and practice by providing an economic framework and consistently applying this to practical business applications. The course achieves this through theoretical development in the lectures, occasional problem sets, and several case discussions. Prereq: Bus 33001 and 41000, or equivalents. 30116. ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS I. Deals with interpreting the impact on firms’ external accounting reports of economic events affecting asset valuation, revenue recognition, cost expiration, and capital contributions. Targets those

Programs of Education

interested in careers as financial analysts, corporate financial managers and planners, investment bankers, and management consultants. Prereq: Bus 30000. 30117. ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS II. Emphasizes interpretation of the impact on firms’ external accounting reports of economic events such as mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, bankruptcies, and foreign currency transactions. Specialized financial contracts, such as swaps, forward and futures contracts, and off-balance sheet financing also are analyzed. Targets those interested in careers as financial analysts, corporate financial managers and planners, investment bankers, and management consultants. Prereq: Bus 30000. 30118. TAXES AND BUSINESS STRATEGY. This course presents a framework for thinking about how taxes affect business strategy. The framework integrates concepts from finance, economics, and accounting to provide the student a more complete understanding of tax planning and strategy. Topics include tax planning for mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures; taxation of investments; tax arbitrage strategies; international tax planning; and others. Prereq: Bus 30000. 30130. FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS. Examines the role of financial statement analysis in the evaluation of a firm and in forecasts of its future profitability and financial viability. Targets those interested in careers as financial analysts, corporate financial managers and planners, investment bankers, and management consultants. Prereq: Bus 30000, 35000, and 41000. 30600. WORKSHOP IN ACCOUNTING RESEARCH. Discussion of papers prepared for the workshop by faculty, students, and others, dealing with current topics in accounting research. Prereq: admission to doctoral program and consent of instructor. 30901. TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING RESEARCH. A critical survey for PhD students of selected areas of accounting research. Topics include empirical and nonempirical work on compensation and the stewardship uses of accounting information, taxation, and accounting regulation. 30902. EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN ACCOUNTING. For PhD and advanced MBA students, more intensive and research-oriented treatment of topics studied in Bus 30130. Topics include time series properties of earnings, the association between stock returns and accounting earnings measures, and the economic consequences of accounting choice. Prereq: Bus 35901. 30903. TOPICS IN EMPIRICAL ACCOUNTING RESEARCH. An extension of the topics covered in Bus 30902, focusing on certain emerging issues and some well-known issues that remain controversial. 32101. ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL WRITING. An intensive and pragmatic course with two objectives: 1) to sharpen each student’s skills by teaching the techniques of clear, coherent, and efficient writing; and 2) to provide students with the tools they need to manage the writing of others.

51

52

Graduate School of Business Announcements

33001. MICROECONOMICS. A course in intermediate microeconomic analysis and its application to business decisions and strategy. Topics include the theory of demand and consumer behavior, production and the theory of supply, market equilibrium, market organization and imperfect competition, pricing strategies, behavior under uncertainty, and externalities. 33031. THE EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP. A broad survey of basic ideas, data, and problems in this field, including material about the labor force and labor market, management’s policy alternatives, unions, selected issues in the employment relationship, and some public policy problems. 33032. MANAGING THE WORKPLACE. A general managerial framework for understanding the internal workings of the firm. Topics include the hierarchical structure of employment, labor recruitment, work motivation and productivity, compensation policy, on-the-job learning, labor turnover, information networks, and the design of organizations. Relationship between human resource management and the overall operation of the firm. Prereq: Bus 33001. 33040. MACROECONOMICS. Analyzes determinants of the aggregate behavior of the economy, especially the level of national output (GNP) and its major components (consumption, investment, government spending, and net exports), the general level of prices (or the rate of price inflation), and the levels of nominal and real interest rates. Topics include factors affecting longer-term economic growth, influence of monetary and fiscal policy on the aggregate behavior of the economy, and macroeconomic interaction among national economies through trade and capital flows. Roughly equivalent to an intermediate-level course in macroeconomics taught in an outstanding undergraduate program. (Students who have recently taken such an undergraduate course should consider Bus 33401 as a substitute.) Prereq: Bus 33001 or equivalent. 33101. ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS. A selection of topics in applied price theory. The course explains issues in pricing policy, such as price discrimination, two-part tariffs, nonlinear pricing, and pricing over time. Other topics include vertical restrictions between firms, durable goods, auctions, insurance, and peak-load pricing. Prereq: Bus 33001 or its equivalent and a knowledge of calculus. 33111. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF MAJOR POLICY ISSUES. The basic premise of the course is that a sound understanding of a relatively small number of fundamental economic principles and methods can be of tremendous value in making sound judgments on policy issues. The course will cover the fundamental principles that guide the analysis and will use these concepts to analyze major public policy issues that are important to business such as (a) the public and private sector responses to terrorism; (b) the provision of health care; (c) the role of private antitrust enforcement in the U.S. economy; (d) the implications of modern digital technology for intellectual property; (e) environmental regulations; (e) discrimination and antidiscrimination regulations; and (f) deregulation of industries.

Programs of Education

33201. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION. The course examines the role of the firm structure of industries in the performance of industrial markets, including the effects of oligopoly and collusion on prices and output. Also explores the economics of advertising and information; the internal structure of the firm and vertical relationships between firms; and the firm’s response to legal restrictions on collusion, price discrimination, vertical integration, etc. Prereq: Bus 33001 or equivalent. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33202. ECONOMICS OF REGULATION AND DEREGULATION. Analysis of government regulation of markets. Economic theories of the causes of regulation, the behavior of regulators, and the adaptation of firms to regulation and deregulation. The effects of regulation and deregulation in utilities, transportation, the control of pollution, the quality of consumer goods and services, financial markets, etc. Prereq: Bus 33001 or equivalent. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33215. THE BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS OF THE SPORTS INDUSTRY. Examines the sports industry in order to exemplify many of the economics and business concepts taught at the MBA level. Topics include pay and performance, stadium financing, expansion and franchise movement, labor relations, and sports gambling. Guest speakers from the industry will appear at a few of the classes. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33220. BUSINESS, PUBLIC POLICY, AND THE NEW ECONOMY. Topics include the spread of broadband and the open access debate, taxation and the Internet; telecommunications pricing and access rules; the competition between cable and satellite and the implications for regulatory policy; antitrust policy in high-tech markets such as the Microsoft trial; policy toward online B2B exchange joint ventures between competitors; copyright and patent policy for the Internet; and efforts to close the digital divide. Prereq: Bus 33001. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33221. ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF THE TELECOM, MEDIA, AND TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIES. An applied economics course that analyzes the impact of public policy on various information-based businesses. 33301. MANAGEMENT, UNIONS, AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING. Concentrates first on a detailed examination of union organization, contract bargaining, and the exercise of power by unions. Also analyzes the current debate between “left”and “right” over the nature and effect of our structure of labor law in the United States. Next, the course makes an in-depth analysis of the implementation and enforcement of the labor contract with emphasis on the all-important process of labor arbitration. The class surveys more briefly: (a) the growth, decline, government, and philosophy of unions in the United States; (b) the unique problems of bargaining in the public sector; and (c) the economic consequences of collective bargaining in the United States. 33302. INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE ORGANIZATIONS. Analyzes differences in structure of organizations across countries. Topics include employment security, worker participation, skill collection, vertical integration, industry-government relations, and the financial structure of organizations. Prereq: Bus 33001 and a basic knowledge of calculus and probability.

53

54

Graduate School of Business Announcements

33303. STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. This course uses an analytic framework to examine how organizations can enhance their performance through appropriate compensation, employment, and other personnel management practices. Topics covered include: compensation and incentive systems, employee benefits, monitoring and performance evaluation, recruitment and selection, retention and turnover, job design, and training. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33311. GOVERNMENT REGULATION AND THE EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP. Examines the laws and mechanisms used by governments—federal, state, and local— to regulate relationships between employers and employees. Specific topics will include discussion of discrimination laws concerning race, gender, age, and disability; explanation of affirmative action regulations applied to employers; and summaries of the laws of collective bargaining and union-employer relationships, wage-hour laws, and laws pertaining to workplace safety. Emerging issues of privacy rights, especially electronic privacy rights, covenants not to compete, whistleblowing for violation of shareholder rights, and other nontraditional employment matters will be covered, as will issues of workplace harassment and retaliation. 33312. PUBLIC POLICIES TOWARD BUSINESS. Addresses public policy and philosophy in the United States with respect to business and entrepreneurial activity as manifested in statutes, court decisions, behavior of regulatory agencies, and the underlying cultural and attitudinal context. Topics include ideas and philosophy; the U.S. Constitution and the “control” of business; “private law” context; and the statutory business control structure in the United States including: (a) the “old”regulations and the “new” regulations (EPA, OSHA); (b) antitrust; and (c) advertising and the law. 33401. MONEY AND BANKING. Emphasis is placed on the linkages between the financial system and the economy. Topics discussed include operation of banks and the banking system; government regulation of the banking system and the control of the quantity of money by the central bank; and the influence of monetary policy (and fiscal policy) on economic activity, price level, exchange rates, and interest rates. Prereq: Bus 33001 and 33040, or equivalents. 33402. UNDERSTANDING CENTRAL BANKS. This course analyzes the role and performance of central banks (particularly the Federal Reserve, the Bank of Japan, and the European Central Bank). Emphasis is on the art of making (and interpreting) monetary policy, with a heavy emphasis on current events. Prereq: Bus 33040 or equivalent. 33403. ADVANCED MACROECONOMICS. Deals with contemporary problems in macroeconomic policy. Topics covered include (1) welfare states and European unemployment; (2) reforming Social Security; (3) optimal taxation; (4) monetary and fiscal causes of inflation and debt crises; and (5) credibility and macroeconomic policy. Studies classic principles for coordinating monetary and fiscal policies, and uses dramatic historical episodes of hyperinflation to shed light on monetary and fiscal dilemmas facing many developing countries today. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.)

Programs of Education

33450. REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT ANALYSIS. Provides an understanding of inherent risks and comparative returns of real estate as an investment alternative, as well as a practical working knowledge of real estate investment decision process. Explores various aspects of real estate process, including market analysis, development, cash flow projection/rate of return analysis, tax considerations, financing alternatives, and portfolio analysis. Prereq: Bus 35000. 33451. REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND ECONOMICS. Provides students with the quantitative skills for analyzing mortgages and real estate and develops a solid financial intuition for real estate decisions. The course takes the perspective of the financial manager of a real estate firm and develops concepts and techniques to evaluate mortgages and income-producing properties. We consider how the characteristics of the property, the local market, the participants, and the institutional environment influence real estate decisions. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33470. POPULATION AND THE ECONOMY (= Economics 32200). The effects of swings in population on the stability of the economy and on business opportunities. In both the short run and the medium run, shifts in demographic rates, including migration, are a more destabilizing influence than unwise macroeconomic policy or abrupt political realignments. Population change poses major challenges to policymakers in business and in government. Topics include the effects of demographic changes on markets for labor and capital, on savings rates and the structure of investment, on taxes and government expenditures, and on household behavior. Methods of planning for consequences of population changes, including forecasting techniques. Prereq: Bus 33001 or equivalent. 33501. INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL POLICY. Analysis of international allocation of resources, movements of factors of production, and determinants of trade flows and relative prices. Analysis of the instruments of international commercial policy (tariffs and quotas), optimal economic policies, trade and growth, and economic integration. Prereq: Bus 33001 or equivalent. 33502. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL POLICY. Analysis of the determinants of the behavior of the balance of payments, spot and forward exchange rates, international trade flows and capital movements, and related phenomena. The interaction between national governments and private economic agents in determining the behavior of key macroeconomic variables in the context of a multicountry world economy. Prereq: Bus 33001 and 33040, or equivalents. 33503. MANAGING THE FIRM IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY. Problems of firms engaged in international business, including motivations for production and foreign operations, strategy of foreign involvement, control of foreign operations, and financing of foreign activities. International tax management and international management contrasted with domestic operations of comparable firms. Students concentrating in international business should take this course at the end of the sequence of courses in this concentration. Prereq: substantial completion of MBA requirements.

55

56

Graduate School of Business Announcements

33510. FINANCE AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN EMERGING MARKETS. Covers topics pertaining to the evaluation and financing of potential business opportunities in emerging markets. Discusses how one can take advantage of the growth opportunities that emerging markets have to offer. Examines how to incorporate risks such as exchange rate fluctuations, political instability, and tax laws. The course also will include a discussion of different business models for investing in emerging markets, including outsourcing, project financing, and private equity. 33520, 33521, 33522. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. Recent topics include Europe and the U.S. dollar from the point of view of Europeans; key financial decisions of the firm; and managing in Latin America. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33523. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT: GLOBAL CAPITALISM AND INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE. The first part considers the political economy of the different“varieties of capitalism.”The second part of the course studies the governance of the international system considering both the global and regional institutions of governance. In the global governance section students study the trade and financial systems, and the role of global environmental, human rights, and other interest groups in the world system and their impact on business. In the regional governance section students study business and politics in the European Union and compare it to the two main other regional trading blocs, NAFTA and ASEAN. 33610. APPLIED ECONOMICS WORKSHOP. The workshop features presentations of new applied research in microeconomics and related fields by Chicago faculty and PhD students as well as invited speakers. 33620. WORKSHOP IN ECONOMIC AND LEGAL ORGANIZATION (= Economics 58000, Law 56100). A seminar for PhD students and faculty devoted to studies in the structure and behavior of industries with special emphasis on the role of government regulation. 33650. WORKSHOP IN MACRO/INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (= Economics 57000). A seminar for PhD students and faculty exploring the economics and politics of international trade and finance, exchange rates, trade and growth, economic integration, international financial crises, and globalization. 33901. ADVANCED PRICE THEORY. Focuses on providing students with an introduction to basic tools and techniques for building micro- and macroeconomic models so that students can read and participate in economic research. Prereq: completion of graduate-level microeconomics and knowledge of basic calculus. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33911. THE ECONOMICS OF INFORMATION. Introduces students to a range of economic tools used to study models explicitly involving strategic behavior, information transmission, and contracting in economics and finance. These tools include agency theory, signaling theory, and game theory. In addition, some applications of these tools are covered.

Programs of Education

33921, 33922, 33923. ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION I, II, and III. An advanced alternative to Bus 33101, 33201, and 33211 for PhD and advanced MBA students. Topics include theoretical and empirical discussions of competition, multiproduct firms, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly, empirical studies of profits and concentration, strategic behavior (e.g., predatory pricing, product design), R&D, patents, durability, market behavior when quality is unobservable, advertising, brand switching, and vertical restrictions (resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, exclusive territories). Prereq: solid background in price theory (e.g., Bus 33001 or 33101, or Economics 30000, 30100, 30200). 33925. ECONOMICS OF ORGANIZATIONS. A PhD-level course on the economics of organizations. Among the topics will be assignment of decision rights, incentives, communication, decision-making processes, resource allocation, organizational structure, boundaries of a firm, alliances, and power. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 33941. MONEY AND INFLATION. This is a second-year PhD course in the Money and Banking sequence. Topics include monetary theory, empirical evidence, and some interesting historical episodes. Theory will cover standard monetary models such as cash in advance and money in the utility function. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 34101. ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE AND PRIVATE EQUITY. Provides an understanding of the concepts and institutions involved in entrepreneurial finance and private equity markets. Explores private equity from the perspectives of the entrepreneur/issuer, the private equity partnership (i.e., venture capital and leveraged buyout partnership), and, finally, the investor in private equity partnerships. The course is largely taught through cases. Prereq: Bus 35000 and 35200. 34102. NEW VENTURE STRATEGY. Builds nonmathematical models of success in the world of entrepreneurial business through intensive case analyses of both archival and current situations. Emphasis on developing a framework in which to analyze business opportunities of all sizes. Topics include perspectives, tactics, acquisitions, turnarounds, finding money, small business strategy, and business plan presentation. Normally taken after completion of a substantial portion of the MBA program. 34103. BUILDING THE NEW VENTURE. For students interested in starting new businesses, managing small companies, or investing in these enterprises. Consideration of the development of new businesses and small company management from a strategic perspective emphasizing policy issues rather than technical details. Topics include the nature of the entrepreneurial function, stages of business development, and distinctions between small and large companies in relation to general management and various functional activities such as marketing, finance, accounting, and organization and personnel. Course content and emphasis vary over time. Guest speakers invited when possible and appropriate. Normally taken after completion of a substantial portion of the MBA program.

57

58

Graduate School of Business Announcements

34104. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP: DEVELOPING A BUSINESS PLAN. Allows students to develop an idea into a business plan. Students will work largely on their own to develop their business plans. The course meets to discuss plans and to discuss challenges students face. Meetings also will provide guidance/discussions on researching the potential market, putting together a team, getting financing, etc. Prereq: advancement to second round of the New Venture Challenge or permission of instructor. 34105. ENTREPRENEURIAL INTERNSHIP SEMINAR. This course will be available to all Kauffman Foundation interns or by permission of the instructor. It will provide a forum for students to present and interact with one another about the internship experience. Each intern will be required to prepare a case study/analysis about the summer internship project. The intern will have one-on-one meetings with a faculty advisor in the development of the case analysis and a limited number of group meetings with all the interns. The intern will be required to present the analysis to the other interns as well as to faculty in the entrepreneurship program. 34106. COMMERCIALIZING INNOVATION. Focuses on the strategy and tactics of forming or acquiring new ventures as well as increasing shareholder value for business ventures funded with private equity. This course is meant to aid those students who are considering being part of an entrepreneurial project or evaluating such enterprises from the position of a public investor, private investor, or any stakeholder serving these emerging companies. 34110. SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP. Covers the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management, applying ideas from the world of entrepreneurship and for-profits to social enterprises. Topics include governance of nonprofits, performance measurement, incentives, bureaucracy, financing growth of social enterprises, charitable giving, and the choice among profit, nonprofit, and public enterprise. 34202. INTERNET AND HIGH-TECHNOLOGY VENTURES. Designed to instruct students how to develop both the online and offline marketing and partnership strategies necessary to grow an early stage Web-based business venture into a viable, sustainable business. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 34701. NEW VENTURE AND SMALL ENTERPRISE LAB. Provides an opportunity for students to work on specific projects in start-up or entrepreneurial companies primarily related to defining marketing, financing, or general strategies. The students will work in teams of three to five under the supervision of the faculty adviser and the management of the new venture. The students will participate in weekly classroom sessions, meetings with the venture company, and team meetings. Interim and final presentations will be required both in the classroom and to venture management. 34702. PRIVATE EQUITY/VENTURE CAPITAL LAB. Students will work on a specific project assignment for a venture capital or other private equity firm. The projects will involve working with the financial firm on one of its portfolio companies, performing due diligence efforts for prospective investments, or researching a new opportunity. Students will work in small teams of two to three members under the supervision of the faculty

Programs of Education

adviser. The students will participate in weekly classroom sessions, team meetings, client meetings, and formal presentations. 34703. INTERNATIONAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP LAB—CHINA. This course is designed to provide a framework and the practical experience necessary to understand the nuances of starting or growing a business internationally. The course will consist of two major sections: 1) a series of lectures and case analyses that focus on developing a framework for evaluating an international business; and 2) a group project in which the students apply this framework to analyze a particular opportunity and create a business plan. Part of the analysis of this opportunity will include a short trip to China to gather information and test the basic business concept. 35000. INVESTMENTS. An introduction to the theory of investment valuation, including portfolio policies for individuals and institutions; expected rates of return and risk in financial markets; a review of empirical research on portfolio models; and the behavior of securities prices. Prereq: Bus 30000, 33001, and 41000. 35100. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS. The theory of the pricing of options, futures, and other derivatives and its applications in the management of risk, the pricing of claims to the firm, and the pricing of real options. This course is a prerequisite for a number of other electives and planning is recommended. Prereq: Bus 35000. 35101. FUTURES, FORWARDS, OPTIONS, AND SWAPS: THEORY AND PRACTICE. The pricing of commodity and financial futures and the uses of these instruments, including hedging, index arbitrage, and portfolio insurance. Prereq: Bus 35000. 35120. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT. An intermediate-level course in asset pricing that builds on the material covered in Bus 35000. Covers forecasting returns and asset allocation; multifactor models; mutual funds and the money management industry; business conditions, economic news, and asset returns; and performance evaluation and style analysis. Prereq: Bus 35000 and 41100. 35130. FIXED INCOME AND ASSET PRICING. Topics include contingent claims, stochastic calculus, models of the term structure, and applications to pricing of fixed income securities such as callable bonds, forwards, futures, mortgage backed securities, etc. Prereq: Bus 35100. 35131. FINANCIAL ENGINEERING: CASES IN FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT. A case-based course in corporate financial risk management. Topics include dynamic hedging and portfolio replication, value-at-risk, the management of exchange rate risk, interest rate risk, credit risk, and operation risk. Prereq: Bus 35100. 35132. FINANCIAL ENGINEERING: MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF OPTION PRICING AND THEIR ESTIMATION. An advanced course covering the numerical techniques currently used to price financial derivative securities. Prereq: Bus 35000 or 35901, 35100, 41100, 41202 or 41401.

59

60

Graduate School of Business Announcements

35150. ADVANCED INVESTMENTS. Surveys recent developments in investments, bridging the gap between 35000 and the activities of top financial institutions. Covers the modern discount factor approach to asset pricing theory, covering stocks, bonds, and options together. Also covers empirical methods, including how to evaluate asset pricing models and how to evaluate forecasting techniques. The course then explores a range of topics, including: 1) how stock and bond returns can be predicted over time; 2) understanding the volatility of stock and bond returns; 3) multi-factor models for understanding the cross-sectional pattern of average returns; 4) the size of the market return and its relation to fundamental risks; 5) optimal portfolios that reflect multifactor models, return predictability and hedging motives; 6) advanced trading strategies used by trading desks and hedge funds; 7) performance evaluation and benchmarks for funds; and 8) liquidity effects and “bubbles” in stock and bonds. Prereq: 35000 and 41100 or consent of instructor. 35151. EMPIRICAL ASSET PRICING. Develops and examines models for portfolio decisions by investors and the pricing of securities in capital markets. Prereq: Bus 33001 and 41100. 35152. STRUCTURED FINANCE AND ALTERNATIVE RISK TRANSFER. Securitized products, structured corporate financing solutions, structured credit market, alternative risk transfer. Prereq: Bus 35000. Bus 35100 recommended. 35200. CORPORATION FINANCE. Selected problem areas in financial management, including capital expenditure and capital structure policies; dividend policies, mergers, and consolidations; capital markets; and short-term asset management. Prereq: Bus 30000, 33001, 35000, and 41000. In some sections, the prerequisites may be taken concurrently; check the Curriculum Guide for specifics. 35201. CASES IN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. Cases and problems dealing with the corporation finance issues listed in Bus 35200. Does not introduce these topics, but applies the theories of finance to realistic situations. Covers financing decisions, investment decisions, acquisitions, restructuring, and risk management. Prereq: Bus 35200. 35202. FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS. Applications of the theory of finance to the analysis of the demands of individuals and corporations for the services of financial markets and institutions, and also to the design of new financial products and services. Covers the theories of lending, regulation, interest rates, and transacting and applies these theories to banks, stock exchanges, and investment companies. Prereq: Bus 35000 and 35200; Bus 35200 can be concurrent. 35203. THE CORPORATION AND ITS LEGAL/INSTITUTIONAL ENVIRONMENT. Uses tools from both law and financial economics to study corporate governance, security design and issuance, laws affecting security valuation, and rules governing the relationship between a corporation and its professional advisors. Targets students preparing for investment banking and consulting, and those planning entrepreneurial ventures that will interact with the public capital markets. Prereq: Bus 35000 and 35200. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.)

Programs of Education

35205. FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE. Financial mechanisms involved with the governing of the corporation—management, strategy, and business law integrated with corporate finance. Prereq: 35000 and 35200. Bus 35100 recommended. 35600. SEMINAR: FINANCE. Advanced topics in finance discussed in detail. Research topics presented. Faculty from other universities invited to talk at the seminar. Prereq: one year’s work in the PhD program or consent of instructor. 35601. WORKSHOP IN THE THEORY OF ORGANIZATIONS. Advanced research on problems dealing with decision making under uncertainty and with imperfect information. Applications to financial markets and institutions. Research papers presented by faculty and advanced PhD students as well as visiting speakers from other universities. Prereq: one year in PhD program and consent of instructor. 35901, 35902. THEORY OF FINANCIAL DECISIONS I, II. These courses analyze models for portfolio decisions by investors, the pricing of securities in capital markets, and investment and financing decisions by firms. A more rigorous treatment using economic and statistical analysis is given to the topics studied in Bus 35000 and 35200. Prereq for Bus 35901: Bus 33001; Bus 41100 strongly advised. Prereq for Bus 35902: Bus 35901. 35903. THEORY OF FINANCIAL DECISIONS III. A guide to the most recent literature on corporate finance, both theoretical and empirical. Topics include theory of the optimal ownership structure and allocation of voting rights; conflict between managers and shareholders; peaceful solutions and takeovers; leverage with emphasis on bankruptcy and reorganization. Prereq: Bus 35000 and 35200; Bus 33901 recommended. 35904. ASSET PRICING. The theory and econometrics of equilibrium asset pricing models (CAPM, ICAPM, APT, CCAPM) and the implications of the absence of arbitrage in terms of the equivalent martingale measure applied to the pricing of derivative securities. Prereq: Bus 35901 or consent of the instructor. 35905. TOPICS IN EMPIRICAL FINANCE. An advanced topics course with content that varies year by year, covering topics such as asset pricing models with heterogenous agents. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 35906. BEHAVIORAL FINANCE. Behavioral finance is based on the premise that some of the agents in the economy make decisions that deviate in systematic ways from rational economic choice. The consequences (if any) of these deviations depend on the limits of arbitrage in the markets in which the agents trade. Issues addressed include noise trader models, closed end funds, predictability (risk vs. mispricing), dividends, stock splits, the equity premium puzzle, and the money management industry. This is a research-oriented course aimed at PhD students. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 35907, 35909. TOPICS IN ASSET PRICING. Covers topics in the area of dynamic asset pricing, including standard complete market models, incomplete markets, portfolio constraints and transaction costs, learning and uncertainty, asymmetric information,

61

62

Graduate School of Business Announcements

and other recent developments such as non-time additive preferences. Also covers selected topics in the area of derivative pricing and term structure models. 35908. RESEARCH PROJECTS: FINANCE. This is a research course designed for MBA and PhD students. A research paper is required, along with weekly verbal progress reports and discussions. 35910. ASSET PRICING IN MACROECONOMICS. = ECON 39501. 36101. MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS ANALYSIS. Basic mathematical ideas useful in business, economics, and statistics. Topics include basic algebra, solving equations, matrices, calculus of functions of one and several variables, derivatives and partial derivatives, and (some) integration. Intended to provide basic tools and an overview of the role of mathematics in business and economic analysis. 36102. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-BASED MODELS. Introduction to the use of mathematical models for business decision making. Models discussed include both deterministic models as well as models involving uncertainty. Deterministic models include linear, integer, and nonlinear programming. Models with uncertainty include queuing, simulation, and decision trees. Focus on use of these models in various situations such as logistics; choosing staffing levels under dynamic demand; choosing production plans under demand uncertainty; purchase decisions in the face of quantity discounts and uncertainty; and choosing optimal portfolios with both risk and return criteria. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 36103. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE NON-IT EXECUTIVE. Provides the necessary technology background for conducting e-business in today’s environment. Topics include Internet technologies, electronic commerce, security, XML, multi-tier architectures, relational databases, and telecommunications. 36600. WORKSHOP IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT/MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. Faculty, students, and visitors present papers on current research. Students are encouraged to discuss their work both before and after their formal proposal presentations. 36901. STOCHASTIC PROGRAMMING. This course will provide an overview of the theory, solution algorithms, and applications of models for optimal decision-making under uncertainty. The course will emphasize models and methods that apply to discrete-time, high-dimensional decisions in a variety of domains including energy, finance, logistics, manufacturing, transportation, and services. Continuous-time models also will be presented for comparison. Topics will include characterization of optimality, stability, sensitivity, and robustness; approximation, statistical, and convergence properties; asymptotic and extremal distributions; and computational complexity. 36902. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING. Covers the fundamentals of deterministic and stochastic models for optimal sequential decision making. Topics will include multiple application areas; the principle of optimality; consistent model design; forward and backward recursion models; Markov and semi-Markov decision processes; infinite horizon models; value iteration, policy iteration and policy improvement methods; and approximate dynamic programming methods.

Programs of Education

36903. COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION. Covers the fundamentals of models for optimization with discrete decision choices. Topics will include efficient methods for problems include minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, maximum flows, minimum cost flows, matching; polyhedral combinatorics; complexity theory; branch-and-bound strategies; cutting plane and facet generation methods; and branch-and-cut methods. 37000. MARKETING STRATEGY. Marketing involves determining which customers your organization should serve, which products and services it should offer, and how. This course is intended to develop an analytical framework for these decisions that will maximize return on marketing expenditures. Emphasis will be placed on developing a marketplace position that provides value to customers that is not readily duplicated by competitors. The first half of the course will develop models for understanding customers, competitors, and collaborators. The second will examine the tools available to marketers to execute strategic decisions, including pricing, promotions, channels of distribution, and customer research. 37101. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR. From the design of a new product to the extension of a mature brand, effective marketing strategies depend on a thorough understanding of the motivation, learning, memory, and decision processes that influence what consumers buy. In this course, theories of consumer behavior are linked to managerial decisions involving development and launch of new products, segmentation, timing of market entry, and brand management. The course also familiarizes students with several practical tools for consumer needs assessment and segmentation analysis. Prereq: Bus 37000. 37102. QUANTITATIVE MARKETING RESEARCH METHODS. Introduction to concepts, tools, and analytical techniques (qualitative and quantitative) for market measurement and for guiding decisions on product development. This course will be beneficial for careers in consulting, product/brand management, general management, and strategic and tactical planning in marketing. Prereq: Bus 37000 or consent of instructor. 37103. DATA-DRIVEN MARKETING. Stresses the use of market demand data to drive marketing decisions and serve as a source of marketing opportunities. Topics include target marketing, direct marketing, data-based pricing, promotion analysis, retailing, scanner data, and Web-browsing data. Prereq: Bus 37000, 41000 or 41100 (41100 preferred). 37104. ECONOMICS AND DEMOGRAPHY OF MARKETING (= Economics 32400). Topics include the history of marketing, life cycles of products, demographic factors, and business-cycle factors. 37201. DEVELOPING NEW PRODUCTS AND SERVICES. New products and services are critical to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. This course covers state-of-the-art management techniques used to identify markets for new product development, define product market structure, develop new product ideas, measure consumer perceptions, select design features, forecast sales, and test market new products and services. Prereq: Bus 37000, 41000 or 41100.

63

64

Graduate School of Business Announcements

37202. PRICING STRATEGIES. Designed for students whose career plans involve strategic marketing planning, product/brand management, and management consulting. Course objectives are to (1) provide theoretical frameworks useful for conceptualizing pricing problems and (2) provide analytical tools used for creating and implementing an integrated pricing strategy. Specific topics include dynamic pricing over the product life cycle; product line pricing; pricing through marketing channels; price discrimination; nonlinear pricing; price bundling; perceived value pricing; and competitive pricing. The institutional and legal environments and their impact on the firm’s pricing decision also are emphasized. Development and integration of pricing strategy with other marketing mix elements are highlighted through case applications. Prereq: Bus 33001 and 37000. 37203. INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS. Develops an understanding of the process of creating and managing an integrated marketing communication campaign for a product or service. Although issues relating to planning and evaluating advertising strategy and sales promotion will receive the most attention, we also briefly discuss direct marketing and some current issues and trends in marketing communications such as the growth of Web-based advertising and emergence of adavoidance technologies. 37204. SALES FORCE MANAGEMENT. This course covers the basics of sales force management. Topics include hiring, training, territorial structure, compensation arrangements, performance evaluation, motivation, and automation. Prereq: Bus 37000. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 37205. GOING TO MARKET: MANAGING CHANNEL STRATEGY. How should a firm go to market? How do firms manage conflict and capture synergies between existing and emerging channels of distribution (e.g., Internet and bricks/mortar)? How should a firm manage channel partners and collaborators to capture a new business opportunity? Bus 37205 offers a framework to understand trade-offs firms face as they design and manage their distribution channels. This framework is applied to such topics as managing channel conflict, direct vs. indirect sales, strategic alliances, joint ventures, and franchising. Prereq: Bus 33001 and 37000. 37302. MARKET STRATEGIES FOR HIGH TECHNOLOGY AND THE INTERNET. High-technology markets are characterized by a high degree of technological innovation and increasingly short product/technology life cycles. A clear understanding of some unique features of these markets—network externalities, consumer lock-ins, technological compatibility and standards—are critical in developing successful marketing strategies. This course offers a comprehensive framework, integrating concepts from such disciplines as economics, business policy, and R&D to systematically analyze the strategic considerations underlying the different dimensions of marketing and technology strategies in these industries. Topics include product policy in an intergenerational setting, pricing strategies over technology life cycles, tools for the integration of R&D with manufacturing and marketing, and uncertainty about the technology and the marketplace. Prereq: Bus 37000. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.)

Programs of Education

37303. MARKETING OF SERVICES. Emphasizes the development of marketing strategies for firms that sell services either to consumers or to other firms. Deals with special problems related to the marketing of services. Topics include distinctive aspects of services, understanding service markets, special problems when marketing financial services, positioning services, service marketing mix, site selection decisions, exclusivity and services, and service pricing strategies. Prereq: Bus 37000. 37304. GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT. Designed for students who expect to undertake international marketing assignments as their career path to general management, and, more broadly, for all students planning careers in international corporations. The course aims to develop student skills in creating and implementing international marketing strategies and programs in diverse contexts. Students will develop a critical appreciation of the external forces that are shaping the international marketing manager’s job. Students will learn when to use different product-market entry and penetration strategies and when to standardize or localize elements of the marketing mix. Prereq: Bus 37000. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 37400. ADVANCED MARKETING STRATEGY. Deals with strategic aspects of marketing. Emphasis is on those marketing decisions that are relevant to establishing or maintaining an organization’s sustainable competitive advantage. Provides practical experience through (1) a business simulation, and (2) an actual marketing plan writeup. Prereq: Bus 37000 or equivalent. 37601. MARKETING WORKSHOP. A series of reports presented by faculty and students on contemporary problems. Emphasis on new developments in marketing and marketing research. Prereq: admission to doctoral program and consent of instructor. 37701, 37702. LABORATORY IN NEW PRODUCT AND STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT. Designed to supplement formal courses by providing a problem-solving experience for a select group of students over two academic quarters. Working directly with a major firm, students apply theories and research techniques to solve real marketing problems. Projects come in two varieties, depending on the mix of clients who sponsor lab classes in a given year. First, there are traditional new product development projects that require students to generate new product concepts, evaluate the concepts, develop and test prototypes, and develop a complete marketing plan for the product, including detailed financial analysis, distribution plan, packaging proposal, pricing strategy, and promotional strategy. The second variety of projects is more strategic in nature. In these projects, students may be asked to identify new markets for existing products and/or technologies, to reposition existing products in existing markets, or, in some cases, to identify whole new business ventures that leverage core competencies of the client firm. Students are required to prepare a business plan that encompasses all aspects of the marketing mix. Prereq: consent of instructor. Completion of one marketing course (such as Bus 37000 or 37400) is recommended before registering for Bus 37701, 37702. Students also must be available to attend a weekend retreat and two Saturday sessions during the two quarters they are registered.

65

66

Graduate School of Business Announcements

37901. ADVANCED MARKETING THEORY (PROSEMINAR). Specialized course introducing marketing PhD students to current research in marketing. Faculty presentations to students cover the full range of marketing theory, including behavioral science research and quantitative methods. May be taken by MBA students with consent of instructor. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 37902. ADVANCED MARKETING THEORY: QUANTITATIVE METHODS. An advanced seminar, designed for PhD students focusing on the role of mathematical models in marketing theory. Topics include theory and estimation of advertising-sales relationships, brand-choice models, diffusion of innovation, market structure and competitive analysis, pricing models, and channels of distribution models. Readings include classic and new articles. May be taken by MBA students with consent of instructor. 37903. ADVANCED MARKETING THEORY: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. Advanced seminar designed for PhD students, focusing on the role of behavioral science in marketing theory. Topics include communication and persuasion, attitude measurement and attitude change, information research and product experience, research methods and experimental design, consumer decision making, theories of choice, consumer information processing, and memory organization. Readings include classic and stateof-the-art articles. May be taken by MBA students with consent of instructor. 37904. MARKETING TOPICS. A comprehensive introduction to Bayesian inference with special emphasis on microdata and marketing applications. Topics include: Bayesian essentials, practical MCMC methods, hierarchical models, nonstandard priors, models for data with discrete components, Bayesian treatment of simultaneity, and decision theory. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 38001. MANAGING IN ORGANIZATIONS. Explores the nature of the actions and interactions of people who work together. Drawing on psychology and sociology, explores how people can more effectively manage both themselves and other people in achieving personal and organizational goals. Topics include managing one’s cognitive resources; group processes and teamwork; incentives and motivation; persuasion and influence; organizational structure; and organizational culture. 38002. MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING. Overview of psychological and normative principles of decision making and judgment. Discussion of how managers make decisions involving risk and uncertainty, conflicting objectives, and imperfect information; what errors they commonly make; and how they can improve their decisions. Prereq (some sections): Bus 33001 and 41000. 38003. POWER AND INFLUENCE IN ORGANIZATIONS. Designed to create an awareness of power and influence processes and to give students the tools to analyze these processes. Examines theories from sociology and social psychology to increase conceptual understanding of power and to develop clinical skills. 38103. STRATEGIES AND PROCESSES OF NEGOTIATION. Studies the process of reaching agreement in interpersonal relationships, markets, organizations, and communities. Draws from psychological and economic models of decision making and

Programs of Education

social interaction; focuses on both value creation and conflict resolution. Weekly roleplay exercises, followed by debriefing discussions and short lectures. Prereq: Bus 38001. 38110. THE PRACTICE OF LEADERSHIP IN BUSINESS. Examines the tools and processes of leadership in a business setting so students can evaluate themselves and their environment to identify areas of growth and skills development. A practical approach that links real-world business experiences and corporate performance with the scholarship and wisdom of leadership theorists. 38111. THEORIES OF LEADERSHIP. Examines business leadership in an attempt to establish the nature of leadership and the ways in which it differs from management. 38112. HIGH PERFORMANCE LEADERSHIP. Examines redefined roles and attributes of leaders necessary in the collapsed timeframe, global competition, and instant information of the new economy and especially e-business. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 38114. A GUIDE TO BUSINESS ETHICS (= Economics 32300). Effect of religious and political movements on the ethics of business, focusing on such current issues as the conflict between technical efficiency and morality; ethical status of property rights; politics of retirement and intergeneration equity, comparable worth, and other conflicts between ethical and economic standards for compensation; ethics of international trade and finance; and ex post redefinitions of the legal status of de facto business practices. Issues placed in historical perspective by relating them to long cycles in religiosity in America, to long-term factors influencing political images of business, and to factors influencing domestic conceptions of the proper economic relationships between the United States and the rest of the world. 38115. ETHICS OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES. Examines how economic and business ideas and actions are imbued with ethical considerations and focuses on the importance of identifying the relevant opportunity costs in weighing the costs and benefits of various decisions. Commonly accepted ethical standards have evolved over time; studying the evolution of key business issues involving agency problems will provide insights into today’s ethical issues. Prereq: Bus 33001. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 38116. GROUPS, TEAMS, AND LEADERSHIP. Guides students on how to be good members and effective leaders of teams, committees and other decision-making and problem-solving groups. 38117. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE. Connects psychological concepts with managerial practice to provide students with strategies for setting and maintaining the course of change in an organization, for overcoming resistance and maximizing learning and innovative thinking, and for anticipating and coping with the repercussions of change. 38601. WORKSHOP IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. Current research reports in decision making and judgment presented by invited guests, faculty, and students. Emphasis on behavioral implications of decision/judgment models.

67

68

Graduate School of Business Announcements

38901, 38902, 38903. CURRENT TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. PhD-level courses designed to introduce students to the process of conducting research in the behavioral sciences. Exposure to a variety of different research topics and methodologies so students can assess advantages and disadvantages of various approaches. Prereq: admission to the PhD Program or consent of instructor. 38911. RESEARCH METHODS IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE. A PhD-level seminar on various topics in cognitive and social psychological research methods such as (1) a tutorial on research methods from cognitive psychology and survey research that depend on the use of think-aloud, self-report, and questionnaire responses; and (2) a review of recent results from the application of Bayesian network models to empirically discover and conceptually elucidate causal relationships in data and in personal experience. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 38912. BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS. This is a research class aimed at PhD students in economics, psychology, or related disciplines. Traditional economic theory is based on standard working assumptions which include unlimited rationality and complete selfcontrol, and pure self-interest. Behavioral economics considers what happens in economics contexts when these working assumptions are modified to incorporate more realistic conceptions of human behavior. The role of markets is central to this study. We carefully consider when markets push individuals toward rationality, and when markets cater to behavioral tendencies and exacerbate them. However, financial markets are not covered in detail, and this is not a finance class. 38913. COGNITIVE FOUNDATIONS OF JUDGMENT AND DECISION MAKING. Introduces students to the empirical and theoretical analysis of cognitive processes such as deductive, inductive, and analogical reasoning; problem solving; and planning that underlie human judgment and decision-making abilities. Focuses on psychological analyses of behavior, but rational-economic, cross-cultural comparative, and evolutionary approaches also will be considered. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 39001. STRATEGY AND STRUCTURE: MARKETS AND ORGANIZATIONS. Introduces principles of organization structure and strategy from the perspective of the entrepreneurial manager at the top of the firm. Addresses the two key questions: “What should I do?”and “How can I make it happen?” Topics include industry analysis, competitive advantage, corporate governance, organization structure, coordination and control in organizations, the informal structure of organizations, corporate culture, diversification, vertical integration, and the role of the general manager. 39002. NETWORK STRUCTURES OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT. Focuses on the central managerial tasks of creating value through coordination and control. Provides an introduction to principles of social organization, which indicate how best to coordinate your personal contacts to diverse groups in an organization, coordinate employees within and between functional groups, and coordinate business activities across diverse markets. Applications to group and individual decision making, working with teams, power and persuasion, organization culture and trust, employee diversity, and managing change.

Programs of Education

39101. TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY. Develops a set of tools that are crucial for the formulation and implementation of a winning technology strategy. Focuses on the application of conceptual models that clarify the interactions between external competition, firm positioning, patterns of technological and market change, and the nature and development of internal firm capabilities. The course includes a module on strategic issues in managing entrepreneurial technology companies. Designed to appeal to students interested in pursuing a career in venture capital; consulting to high-tech companies; and starting, growing, or managing a company in a technology-intensive industry. Prereq: Bus 39001 or 42001. 39200. STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP IN UNCERTAIN ENVIRONMENTS. This casebased course will examine how leading companies succeeded in the face of volatility (and how a few once leading companies became has-beens by failing to). It will give you the tools to examine and interpret change on multiple levels—individual, organizational, industrial, technological, and societal—and ensure you are prepared to take action. Topics will include: managing through technological upheaval, contending with social instability (particularly in the context of emerging or transitional economies), managing the environment, and career survival under uncertainty. 39600. WORKSHOP IN ORGANIZATIONS AND MARKETS. Argument and recent research results presented by faculty and invited speakers on the structure of competition within and between organizations. Topics are catholic, including how organizations operate, why they differ, how they emerge from prior organizations, how future growth depends on position in a structure of other organizations, and how people survive and thrive as a function of their position in social organizations. 39901. ORGANIZATIONS AND ENVIRONMENTS. Critical review in seminar format of the frontiers of significant theoretical approaches to the social organization of competition. A close reading of primary works on market processes presumed to underlie formal organization; processes by which formal organizations offer advantages over markets; processes of institutionalization; and the organization life course. Goes beyond familiarizing students with the content of the discussed material to reach a more intimate feel for the style of thinking and research responsible for the material. 39902. ORGANIZATIONS IN EMERGING MARKETS: SOCIAL, POLITICAL, AND CULTURAL ISSUES. Applies classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives from economic sociology and organization theory to the analysis of organizations in new markets. Explores how social, political, and cultural institutions shape organizations and organizational forms in different countries and historical periods. The theoretical topics covered include institutional analysis, network theory, organizational ecology, path dependence theory, and rational choice theory. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 39903. SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS. Social network analysis is the study of how patterns of relations around people, groups, or organizations shape beliefs and behaviors. It is a set of methods for detecting and measuring the magnitude of the pressures. This is an introduction to gathering and analyzing network data. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.)

69

70

Graduate School of Business Announcements

39904. ORGANIZATIONAL ECOLOGY. This PhD course introduces students to the foundation theories of Organizational Ecology—a macrosociological approach to studying organizations that builds on general ecological and evolutionary models of change in populations and communities of organizations. We will learn how to use the analytical tools of organizational ecology to identify and model the forces that shape the structures of organizations over long time spans. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 40000. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT: BUSINESS PROCESS FUNDAMENTALS. Topics of interest to general managers and of crucial importance to the operations side of an organization. A typical selection of topics may include productivity, the definition and measurement of quality, inventory control, capacity planning, and logistics. This is not primarily a modeling course and is intended to give an introduction to several of the most important topics in the area. Prereq: Bus 41000 or equivalent. 40101. SUPPLY CHAIN STRATEGY AND PRACTICE. Studies how to examine and improve the flow of materials and information through the network of suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and retailers in order to help firms get the right product to the right customer in the right amount and at the right time. Key topics covered include the role of coordination within and across firms, the impact of incentives, and the use of information technology. Special emphasis is given to understanding how the business context shapes managerial decisions regarding the strategic design and management of the supply chain. Prereq: Bus 40000. 40103. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY. Explores how to run a firm effectively, efficiently, and profitably, stressing the senior management perspective. Presents key issues in production management and strategy, then encompasses nearly all of a firm’s operations, including operations of a services firm. The topics subsume manufacturing as well as product development and innovation, employee motivation and incentives, and how to establish the right organizational structure for maximum effectiveness. Covers both operations and strategy, not as independent approaches, but as mutually synergistic toward their goal of making the firm successful. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 40104. MANAGING LOGISTICS/DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS. The logistics function of a company deals with the planning, implementing, and controlling of efficient, costeffective flow and storage of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods, and related information from point of origin to point of consumption. Issues discussed include centralization vs. decentralization of inventories; impact of just-in-time delivery; effect of information/order batching; and approaches to integrate logistics and marketing systems. Efficient logistics systems aim toward coordination of transportation and inventory positioning to minimize time and cost to satisfy customer orders. Prereq: Bus 40000; 36102 recommended. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 40106. SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. Past topics have included operations strategy and value chain networks. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.)

Programs of Education

40107. DECISION MODELS. This course will examine the design, use, and analysis of mathematical models for business decisions. Applications and cases will include strategic asset allocations, operational planning, supply and distribution chain design, revenue management, and enterprise risk management. The focus will be on developing tools using spreadsheet software and interpreting results in a comprehensive framework. 40901, 40902, 40903. SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. Covers recent research and relevant background material on selected topics of interest in operations management and management science. Students will develop research skills and awareness of state-of-the-art results. 41000. BUSINESS STATISTICS. This course teaches the basic concepts and tools needed for business applications and the GSB curriculum. Covers sample statistics and plots that are used to summarize data and then covers the basic concepts in probability and inference that underlie much of statistical methodology. The remainder of the course covers the regression model: “simple”linear regression, in which one variable is related to another; multiple regression, in which a single variable is related to several others; and time series, in which current values of a variable are related to past values. 41100. APPLIED REGRESSION ANALYSIS. Regression analysis is one of the most widely used statistical techniques in data analysis to explore the relationship between variables. This course teaches the structure of the regression model and how to apply this model to real data sets. Topics include simple linear regression; prediction; multiple regression; F and T tests; detection of outliers; transformations; dummy variables; and an introduction to time series models. 41201. INFORMATION MANAGEMENT AND DATA MINING FOR BUSINESS. In the age of the Internet, businesses must process vast amounts of data. What can be learned from this data to help serve customers and customer relationships? This course familiarizes students with relevant and helpful statistical methods or “data mining” to help us deal with large and complex data. The course is not mathematical in nature. Attention is focused on interpretation of results and how to obtain them using software. 41202. ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL TIME SERIES. This course considers theory and methods of time series analysis that are useful in financial applications. The topics discussed include analysis of asset returns, volatility modeling, nonlinearities in financial data, continuous-time models, high-frequency data analysis, and multivariate series. Real examples are used throughout the course. 41301. STATISTICAL INSIGHT IN MARKETING CONSULTING AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP. Marketing data is often categorical in that the measurement indicates one of a set of possible states or categories obtained. For example, a consumer may indicate which product from a set is preferred. This course covers a variety of statistical tools for analyzing categorical data. These tools will then be used to analyze many empirical examples from the marketing world. Prereq: Bus 41000.

71

72

Graduate School of Business Announcements

41600. ECONOMETRICS AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM (= Economics 51400). Presentations by faculty and invited speakers on current research in econometrics and statistics with particular emphasis on methods and applications relating to business and economic problems. Colloquium meetings open to all interested faculty and MBA and PhD students. Prereq: consent of instructor. 41901. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS. Bus 41901 (in addition to 41902) provides a thorough introduction to classical and Bayesian statistical theory. The two-quarter sequence provides the necessary probability and statistical background for many of the advanced courses in the GSB curriculum. The central topic of Bus 41901 is probability. Basic concepts in probability are covered. An introduction to martingales is given. Prereq: one year of calculus or consent of instructor. 41902. STATISTICAL INFERENCE. This course is the second in a two-quarter sequence with Bus 41901. The central topic is statistical inference. The topics covered include estimation, decision theory, and hypothesis testing. The use of hierarchical models is a focus in applications. Prereq: Bus 41901. 41903. APPLIED ECONOMETRICS. This course covers topics in econometrics. Topics include basic asymptotic theory; the method of moments; maximum likelihood; the regression model using vector space concepts; generalized least squares; heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation in errors; Generalized Method of Moments; instrumental variables; logit and probit models; and systems of equations. 41910. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS FOR FORECASTING AND MODEL BUILDING (= Economics 41700). Analysis of economic and business time series data for application in operational forecasting and econometric model building. The theory of discrete linear stochastic processes, models of stationary and nonstationary time series, specification of parameters, derivation of optimal forecasts, adaptive forecasting, transfer function models, and the role of expectations and forecasts in specification and testing of econometric models. Prereq: Bus 41100 and 41400, or consent of instructor. 41911. ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS (= Economics 41400). This course provides an introduction to the large-sample (asymptotic) theory used by econometricians. The focus is on maximum likelihood estimation and Generalized Method of Moments estimation, two frameworks that encompass most of the estimation methods used in applied econometrics. Various microeconometric models, including discrete choice, panel data, and duration models, will be discussed. Other possible topics include specification testing, simulation-based estimators, bootstrapping, and kernel estimation. 41912. APPLIED MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS (= Statistics 32100). An introduction to methods of analyzing data obtained from jointly distributed random variables. Emphasis is on applications of the methodology in the social sciences. Topics include matrix algebra used in statistics, multivariate normal distribution, multiple and multivariate regression, control problems, multivariate analysis of variance, principal components, factor analysis, canonical correlations, classification problems, multivariate Bayesian methods, and clustering procedures. Prereq: Bus 41100 or consent of instructor; some computing experience.

Programs of Education

41913. BAYESIAN ECONOMETRICS. A fast track to serious Bayesian modeling for PhD-level students who have no (or limited) background in Bayesian work but have a solid general background in econometrics. Emphasis will be on computation, so familiarity with some sort of programmable computing environment (such as Matlab) is required. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 41914. APPLIED MULTIPLE TIME SERIES ANALYSIS. An introduction to the theory and methods of modeling dynamic relationships among several interrelated time series data from business, economics, environmental, and other scientific fields. Topics include vector autoregressive moving average models, transfer function, feedback, model building techniques, signal extraction theory, seasonal adjustment methods, and principal component and canonical correlation techniques. Prereq: Bus 41202 or 41910, or consent of instructor. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 42001. COMPETITIVE STRATEGY. Applies concepts from microeconomics and industrial organization to corporate product-market decisions. Topics include rivalry in concentrated markets, market leadership, strategy in competitive industries, entry-exit, product differentiation, research and development, preemption, and choice of standards. Prereq: Bus 33001. 42002. BUSINESS POLICY. Study of policy issues and development of strategy for the firm with emphasis on human and judgmental factors as well as on analytic approaches. Substantial reliance on case materials, reading, and occasional special assignments. Prereq: completion of six courses. 42102. THE STRATEGY SYMPOSIUM. Develops an understanding of methods and techniques of strategic thinking and explores the design, implementation, and evaluation of strategy. Develops tools and concepts for evaluating strategies both before and after the outcome is known and seeks insights that will improve the process of designing strategy. Prereq: completion of six courses. 42103. APPLIED STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT/INTOPIA. Study of business policy with primary reliance on the business game INTOP to develop an appreciation for the design and implementation of corporate strategy. In addition, a limited number of policy cases may be assigned for class discussion. Prereq: Bus 30000 or equivalent; completion of six courses. 42104. THE PRACTICE OF STRATEGY IN BUSINESS. Considers competitive strategies in real-world situations and analyzes the outcomes. Highlights the interrelationships and influences of various strategic processes, including industry structure, company position, company strategy, and pricing decisions. Active practitioners with extensive experience in strategy formulation and implementation will speak to the class. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 42105. SPECIAL TOPICS IN STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT. Topics relevant to current issues in general management taught by faculty with significant business leadership experience. Recent topics include environmental issues relevant to business managers, strategic issues for financial intermediaries, and great books in business. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.)

73

74

Graduate School of Business Announcements

42107. TAKING CHARGE. Focuses on the practical, current, key issues with which general managers must deal when taking over a new assignment. The goal is to help students apply theories and leadership concepts to analyzing situations, thinking through the actions or changes that are required, and then making those changes happen. 42108. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE. Introduces students to the functions and duties of directors and boards of directors and to the topics with which boards in the United States most commonly deal. Applicable to both public corporations and not-for-profit organizations. Topics covered include establishing a new board, planning for succession of the CEO, compensation of directors and officers, performing the fiduciary role, and dealing with external events. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 42109. THE CORPORATION AND PUBLIC POLICY. A broad overview of issues that managers of multinational corporations encounter in the public policy arena. Topics for discussion will include security issues, including fraud and terrorism; influencing government action; dealing with the media; corporate philanthropy; and personal strategies for surviving corporate trauma. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 42110. STRATEGIC INVESTMENT DECISIONS. Analysis of the processes and methods for making strategic investment decisions in organizations. Focuses on analytical techniques such as option pricing, dynamic programming, simple game theory, and scenario analysis to incorporate the value from flexibility, delay, strategic responses, and learning into decision-making models. The final quarter of the course focuses on organizational issues related to effective strategic decision making, such as the structure of internal capital allocation systems, incentive structures, and organizational forms. 42112. MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES OF SUCCESSFUL FIRMS. A study of actual firms to uncover what techniques they employed to make themselves successful. An examination of the plethora of new concepts that have emerged in the past few years, including reengineering, quality, benchmarking, time-based competition, and best practices. How these concepts interplay with the basic functions of a firm, such as marketing, product development, manufacturing, and finance to make a firm’s functions highly effective and efficient. Students form teams, and each team studies one or more successful firms in order to pinpoint how each became successful. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 42113. ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY. Studies the organizational underpinnings of successful strategies and introduces a set of tools and frameworks from organizational economics and agency theory in order to illuminate the key coordination and motivation problems that effective organizations must solve. The first part of the course deals mainly with organizational issues inside a single business unit. The second part then focuses on corporate strategy: how to coordinate multiple business units, both within and across firm boundaries (mergers, alliances).

Programs of Education

42114. STRATEGIC PLANNING. Develops and applies concepts and tools required for effective strategic planning, including basic framework for developing strategic plans that build on concepts developed in the Competitive Strategy course; business forecasting and scenario planning; relevant financial analysis techniques; and a framework for assessing the attractiveness of alternate strategies generated in response to opportunities or threats facing a company. 42200. LAW AND BUSINESS. An examination of legal methods: the legal process viewed as a mechanism for resolving conflict; establishing guidelines for conduct; and providing a basis for expectation. (Not scheduled in 2005–06.) 42201. THE LEGAL INFRASTRUCTURE OF BUSINESS. Provides a general introduction to law and business by using traditional legal analysis, supplemented by a substantial use of law and economics. Topics to be covered include choice of corporate form; capital markets laws, including venture capital and IPOs; antitrust; intellectual property; telecommunications and the regulation of natural monopoly; and ecommerce. 42202. LAW AND MANAGEMENT. A general management framework for identifying and understanding legal issues in various fields of business. Economic analysis of law as a factor interrelated to typical business practices, transactions, and organizational structures.

vvv

75

T HE G RADUATE S CHOOL of B USINESS F ACULTY Daniel Adelman, Professor of Operations Management. BIE, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1993; MSc, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1994; PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1997 Ray Ball, Sidney B. Davidson Professor of Accounting. BComm, University of NSW, 1965; MBA, Chicago, 1968; PhD, Chicago, 1972, Doctor Honoris Causa, Helsinki School of Economics, 1991; Doctor Honoris Causa, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 1994 Gary S. Becker, University Professor of Economics and of Sociology. PhD, Chicago, 1955 Philip G. Berger, Professor of Accounting and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow. BComm, University of Saskatchewan, 1984; MSc, University of Saskatchewan, 1987; MBA, Chicago, 1988; PhD, Chicago, 1992 Marianne Bertrand, Professor of Economics and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow. Licence, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1991; Maitrise, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1992; PhD, Harvard 1998 John R. Birge, Jerry E. and Carol Lee Levin Professor of Operations Management. AB (mathematics), Princeton University, 1977; MS (operations research), Stanford University, 1979; PhD (operations research), Stanford University, 1980 Ronald S. Burt, Hobart W. Williams Professor of Sociology and Strategy. AB, Johns Hopkins, 1971; AM, SUNY (Albany), 1973; PhD, Chicago, 1977 Dennis W. Carlton, Professor of Economics. AB, Harvard, 1972; SM, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1974; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1975 Francesco Caselli, Visiting Professor of Economics. Laurea, Bologne, 1991; PhD, Harvard, 1997 Pradeep K. Chintagunta, Robert Law Professor of Marketing. BTech, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, 1984; MS, Indian Institute of Management, 1986; PhD, Northwestern, 1990 John H. Cochrane, Myron S. Scholes Professor of Finance. SB, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1979; PhD, California (Berkeley), 1986 George M. Constantinides, Leo Melamed Professor of Finance. AB, Oxford, 1970; AM, Oxford, 1974; MBA, Indiana, 1972; DBA, Indiana, 1974 Harry L. Davis, Roger L. and Rachel M. Goetz Distinguished Service Professor of Creative Management. AB, Dartmouth, 1959; MBA, Dartmouth, 1960; AM, Northwestern, 1969; PhD, Northwestern, 1970 Steven J. Davis, William H. Abbott Professor of International Business and Economics. AB, Portland State, 1980; AM, Brown, 1981; PhD, Brown, 1986 Sanjay K. Dhar, Professor of Marketing. BTech, Indian Institute of Technology, 1984; PostGraduate Certificate, Indian Institute of Management, 1987; PhD, California (Los Angeles), 1992

76

Faculty

Douglas W. Diamond, Merton H. Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance. AB, Brown, 1975; AM,Yale, 1976; MPhil,Yale, 1977; PhD,Yale, 1980 Donald D. Eisenstein, Professor of Operations Management. SB, Southern Methodist, 1982; SM, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1983; PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1992 Merle Erickson, Professor of Accounting. BS, Rockhurst, 1987; MBA, Arizona State, 1989; PhD, Arizona, 1996 Eugene F. Fama, Robert R. McCormick Distinguished Service Professor of Finance. AB, Tufts, 1960; MBA, Chicago, 1963; PhD, Chicago, 1964; LLD, Rochester, 1987 Robert W. Fogel, Charles R. Walgreen Distinguished Service Professor of American Institutions. AB, Cornell, 1948; AM, Columbia, 1960; PhD, Johns Hopkins, 1963; AM, Cambridge, 1975; AM, Harvard, 1976; DrSci, Rochester, 1987 Robert H. Gertner, Wallace W. Booth Professor of Economics and Strategy. AB, Princeton, 1981; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1986 Austan D. Goolsbee, Robert P. Gwinn Professor of Economics. AB,Yale, 1991; MA,Yale, 1991; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995 John P. Gould, Steven G. Rothmeier Professor and Distinguished Service Professor of Economics. SB, Northwestern, 1960; MBA, Chicago, 1963; PhD, Chicago, 1966 Luigi Guiso, Visiting Professor of Economics. MSc (Economics), London School of Economics and Political Science, 1981; MPhil (Economics) University of Essex; 1983 Milton Harris, Chicago Board of Trade Professor of Finance and Economics. AB, Rice, 1968; AM, Chicago, 1973; PhD, Chicago, 1974 Reid Hastie, Professor of Behavioral Science. BA, Stanford, 1968; MA, California (San Diego), 1970; PhD,Yale, 1973 John C. Heaton, James H. Lorie Professor of Finance. Bcomm, Windsor, 1982; MA, Western Ontario, 1984; PhD, Chicago, 1989 Christopher K. Hsee, Theodore O. Yntema Professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing. AB, Hawaii, 1989; PhD,Yale, 1993 John Huizinga, Walter David “Bud” Fackler Distinguished Service Professor of Economics. AB, Pomona, 1976; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1980 Abel P. Jeuland, Charles H. Kellstadt Professor of Marketing. Licence, University of Paris, 1972; PhD, Purdue, 1975 Steven Neil Kaplan, Neubauer Family Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance. AB, Harvard, 1981; AM, Harvard, 1987; PhD, Harvard, 1988 Anil K. Kashyap, Edward Eagle Brown Professor of Economics and Finance. AB, California (Davis), 1982; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1989 Joshua Klayman, Professor of Behavioral Science. SB, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1974; PhD, Minnesota, 1982 Randall S. Kroszner, Professor of Economics. AB, Brown, 1984; SB, Brown, 1984; AM, Harvard, 1987; PhD, Harvard, 1990

77

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Richard Leftwich, Fuji Bank and Heller Professor of Accounting and Finance. BComm, Queensland, 1968; SM, Rochester, 1976; PhD, Rochester, 1980 R. Kipp Martin, Professor of Operations Research and Computing Technology. AB, Cincinnati, 1975; MBA, Cincinnati, 1979; PhD, Cincinnati, 1980 Robert E. McCulloch, Sigmund E. Edelstone Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. SB, Toronto, 1981; SM, Minnesota, 1984; PhD, Minnesota, 1985 Ann L. McGill, Sears Roebuck Professor of General Management, Marketing, and Behavioral Science. BBA, Michigan (Ann Arbor), 1979; MBA, Chicago, 1985; PhD, Chicago, 1986 Rajnish Mehra, Visiting Professor of Finance. BTech, Indian Institute of Technology, 1972; MS, Rice, 1973; MS, Carnegie Mellon, 1975; PhD, Carnegie Mellon, 1978 Tobias J. Moskowitz, Professor of Finance and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow. BS, Purdue, 1993; MS, Purdue, 1994; PhD, California (Los Angeles), 1998 Casey Mulligan, Professor in Economics and the College Kevin M. Murphy, George J. Stigler Distinguished Service Professor of Economics. AB, California (Los Angeles), 1981; PhD, Chicago, 1986 ^

^

78

Lubos Pástor, Professor of Finance. Bc, Comenius, 1995; BBA, Wichita State, 1995; Mgr., Comenius, 1997; MA, Pennsylvania, 1997; PhD, Pennsylvania, 1999 Randal C. Picker, Paul and Theo Leffmann Professor of Commercial Law. BA, Chicago, 1980; MA, Chicago, 1982; JD, Chicago, 1985 Nicholas G. Polson, Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. AM, Oxford, 1984; PhD, Nottingham, 1988 Canice Prendergast, W. Allen Wallis Professor of Economics. AB, Trinity College (Dublin), 1983; SM, London School of Economics, 1986; AM, Yale, 1986; MPhil, Yale, 1987; PhD, Yale, 1989 Raghuram G. Rajan, Joseph L. Gidwitz Distinguished Service Professor of Finance. BTech, Indian Institute of Technology, 1985; MBA, Indian Institute of Management, 1987; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1991 Peter E. Rossi, Joseph T. and Bernice S. Lewis Professor of Marketing. AB, Oberlin, 1976; MBA, Chicago, 1980; PhD, Chicago, 1984 Jeffrey R. Russell, Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. BS, BA, California (San Diego), 1991; MA, California (San Diego), 1993; PhD, California (San Diego), 1996 Douglas Skinner, Professor of Accounting and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow. BEc, Macquarie, 1985; MS, Rochester, 1988; PhD, Rochester, 1989 Abbie J. Smith, Boris and Irene Stern Professor of Accounting. SB, Cornell, 1975; MBA, Cornell, 1979; PhD, Cornell, 1980 Edward A. Snyder, George Pratt Shultz Professor of Economics. BA, Colby, 1975; MA, Chicago, 1978; PhD, Chicago, 1984 Lars Stole, Eli B. and Harriet B. Williams Professor of Economics. AB, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1985; SM, London School of Economics, 1986; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1991

Faculty

Richard Thaler, Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics. BA, Case Western, 1967; MA, Rochester, 1970; PhD, Rochester, 1974 Robert H. Topel, Isidore Brown and Gladys J. Brown Professor in Urban and Labor Economics. AB, California (Santa Barbara), 1974; CPhil, California (Los Angeles), 1978; PhD, California (Los Angeles), 1980 Ruey Tsay, H. G. B. Alexander Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. SB, National Tsing Hua University, 1974; PhD, Wisconsin, 1982 Pietro Veronesi, Professor of Finance. Laurea, Universitá Bocconi, 1992; MS, London School of Economics, 1993; PhD, Harvard, 1997 Robert W.Vishny, Eric J. Gleacher Distinguished Service Professor of Finance. AB, Michigan, 1981; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1985 Roman L. Weil, V. Duane Rath Professor of Accounting. AB,Yale, 1962; SM, Carnegie Mellon, 1965; PhD, Carnegie Mellon, 1966; CPA, State of Illinois, 1973; CMA, 1974 Michael S. Weisbach, Visiting Professor of Entrepreneurship. BS, Michigan, 1983; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1988 Bernd Wittenbrink, Professor of Behavioral Science. Diploma, Berufsakademie Stuttgart, 1983; MA, Michigan, 1991; PhD, Michigan, 1994 George Wu, Professor of Behavioral Science. AB, Harvard, 1985; SM, Harvard, 1987; PhD, Harvard, 1991 Alwyn Young, Joseph Sondheimer Professor of International Economics and Finance. BA, Cornell, 1981; MALD, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, 1983; MPhil, Columbia, 1988; PhD, Fletcher School, 1989; PhD, Columbia, 1990 Willard I. Zangwill, Professor of Management Science. AB, Columbia, 1959; MS, Stanford, 1963; PhD, Stanford, 1965 Luigi Zingales, Robert C. McCormack Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance. Laurea, Università Bocconi, 1987; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1992 Mark E. Zmijewski, Leon Carroll Marshall Professor of Accounting. SB, SUNY (Buffalo), 1976; MBA, SUNY (Buffalo), 1981; PhD, SUNY (Buffalo), 1983 Marvin Zonis, Professor Emeritus of Business Administration. AB, Yale, 1958; AB, Harvard, 1959; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1968 Federico Maria Bandi, Associate Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. Laurea, Università Bocconi, 1994; MA, Università Bocconi, 1995; MA, Yale, 1996; MPhil, Yale, 1998; PhD, Yale, 1999 Matthew S. Bothner, Associate Professor of Organizations and Strategy. BA, Boston, 1994; MA, MPhil, Columbia, 1998; PhD, Columbia, 2000 Timothy G. Conley, Associate Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. BA, Chicago, 1990; MA, Chicago, 1990; PhD, Chicago, 1996 Wouter Dessein, Associate Professor of Economics. BS, Catholic University of Leuven, 1997; PhD, Université Libre de Bruxelles and Université de Toulouse, 2000 Stanislav D. Dobrev, Associate Professor of Organizations and Strategy. BA, SUNY (Stony Brook), 1993; MA, Stanford, 1995; PhD, Stanford, 1997

79

80

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Jean-Pierre Dube, Associate Professor of Marketing. BSc, Toronto, 1995; MA, Northwestern, 1996; PhD, Northwestern, 2000 Ellen Engel, Associate Professor of Accounting. BS, Detroit, 1979; MBA, Chicago, 1991; PhD, Stanford, 1996; CPA, State of Michigan, 1985 Luis Garicano, Associate Professor of Economics and Strategy. Licence, Universidad de Valladolid, 1990; Licence, Universidad de Valladolid, 1991; MA, College of Europe, 1992; PhD, Chicago, 1998 Uri Gneezy, Associate Professor of Behavioral Science. BA, Tel Aviv, 1992; MA, Tilburg, 1994; PhD, Tilburg, 1997 Jonathan Guryan, Associate Professor of Economics. AB, Princeton, 1996; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2000 Guenter J. Hitsch, Associate Professor of Marketing. BA,Vienna, 1995; MA,Yale, 1997; PhD, Yale, 2001 Erik Hurst, Associate Professor of Economics and John Huizinga Faculty Fellow. BS, Clarkson, 1993; MA, Michigan, 1995; PhD, Michigan, 1998 Puneet Manchanda, Associate Professor of Marketing. BE, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, 1987; Diploma, Indian Institute of Management, 1990; MPhil, Columbia, 1997; PhD, Columbia, 1998 Tanya Menon, Associate Professor of Behavioral Science. BA, Harvard, 1995; PhD, Stanford, 2000 Atif Mian, Associate Professor of Finance. BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2001 Amil K. Petrin, Associate Professor of Economics and Statistics. BA, Pennsylvania, 1989; PhD, Michigan, 1998 Damon J. Phillips, Associate Professor of Organizations and Strategy and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow. BS, Morehouse, 1990; SM, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1992; MA, Stanford, 1997; PhD, Stanford, 1998 Monika Piazzesi, Associate Professor of Finance. Vordiplom, University of Heidelberg, 1991; Diplom, University of Bonn, 1994; PhD, Stanford, 2000 Joseph D. Piotroski, Associate Professor of Accounting and the Robert S. Hamada Faculty Fellow. BS, Illinois, 1989; MBA, Indiana, 1994; PhD, Michigan, 1999; CPA, State of Illinois, 1989 John Romalis, Associate Professor of Economics. BEc, Sydney, 1992; LLB, Sydney, 1994; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2001 Darren Roulstone, Associate Professor of Accounting. BS, Brigham Young, 1995; MAcc, Brigham Young, 1995; PhD, Michigan, 2000 Haresh Sapra, Associate Professor of Accounting. BBA, Houston, 1991; MS, Houston, 1995; PhD, Minnesota, 2000 Philipp Afeche, Visiting Assistant Professor of Operations Management. Lic. Oec., St. Gallen (Switzerland), 1989; MS, Stanford, 1995; PhD, Stanford, 1999 C. Alan Bester, Assistant Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. BS, Duke, 1999; PhD, Duke, 2004

Faculty

C. Hoyt Bleakley, Assistant Professor of Economics. SB, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2002 Christian Broda, Assistant Professor of Economics. BA, Universidad de San Andres, 1997; MA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1999; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2001 Nicole DeHoratius, Assistant Professor of Operations Management. AB, Harvard, 1990; MSc, Sussex, 1994; DBA, Harvard, 2002 Aiyesha Dey, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BSc, Calcutta, 1996; MBA, International Management Institute (New Delhi), 1999; PhD, Northwestern, 2005 Nicholas Epley, Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science. BA, Saint Olaf College, 1996; PhD, Cornell, 2001 Ayelet Fishbach, Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science. BA, Tel Aviv, 1992; MA, Tel Aviv, 1995; PhD, Tel Aviv, 1999 Andrea Frazzini, Assistant Professor of Finance. BS, Roma Tre, 2000; MSc, London School of Economics, 2001; PhD,Yale, 2005 Matthew Gentzkow, Assistant Professor of Economics. AB, Harvard, 1997; AM, Harvard, 2002; PhD, Harvard, 2004 Christian B. Hansen, Assistant Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. BA, Brigham Young, 2000; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2004 Aparna Labroo, Assistant Professor of Marketing. BA, St. Stephen’s College, 1990; MBA, Indian Institute of Management, 1993; PhD, Cornell University, 2003 Hedibert Freitas Lopes, Assistant Professor of Econometrics and Statistics. BS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, 1991; MS, UFRJ, 1994; MS, Duke, 1998; PhD, Duke, 2000 Adam Mersereau, Assistant Professor of Operations Management. BSE, Princeton, 1996; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003 Robert Novy-Marx, Assistant Professor of Finance. BA, Swarthmore, 1991; PhD, California (Berkeley), 2003 Joann Peck, Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing. BS, Michigan, 1981; MBA, Wisconsin (Madison), 1993; PhD, Minnesota, 1999 Ginger L. Pennington, Assistant Professor of Marketing. BA, Knox, 1997; MA, Northwestern, 2000; PhD, Northwestern, 2002 Francisco Perez-Gonzalez, Visiting Assistant Professor of Finance. BA, ITAM, 1994; AM, Harvard, 1999; PhD, Harvard 2001 Suresh Ramanathan, Assistant Professor of Marketing. BTech, Indian Institute of Technology, 1985; MBA, Indian Institute of Management, 1987; PhD, New York, 2002 Joshua D. Rauh, Assistant Professor of Finance. BA,Yale, 1996; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2004. Korok T. Ray, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BS, Chicago, 1999; PhD, Stanford, 2004 Luis Rayo, Assistant Professor of Economics. BA, MA, Instituto Tecnológica Autónomo de Mexico, 1998; PhD, Stanford University, 2002

81

82

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Jonathan L. Rogers, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BBA/BA, Texas (Austin), 1996; PhD, Pennsylvania, 2005 Iaonid Rosu, Assistant Professor of Finance. AB, Bucharest, 1994; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1999; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2004 Sean C. Safford, Assistant Professor of Organizations and Strategy. BS, Cornell, 1994; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2004 Morten Sorensen, Assistant Professor of Finance. BSc, Aarhus, 1997; MSc, Aarhus 1999; PhD, Stanford, 2005 Suraj Srinivasan, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BE, Birla Institute of Technology and Sciences, 1991; MSc, BITS, 1991; MBA, Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta, 1993, DBA, Harvard University, 2004 Amir Sufi, Assistant Professor of Finance. BS, Georgetown University, 1999; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2005 Andrew Van Buskirk, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BS, Delaware, 1995; PhD, Pennsylvania, 2005 Raghu Venugopalan, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BTech, India Institute of Technology, 1988; MBA, India Institute of Management, 1990; PhD, Minnesota, 2001 Ira Weiss, Visiting Assistant Professor of Accounting. BS, Illinois, 1992; MBA, Chicago, 1999; PhD, Chicago, 2000 M. H. Franco Wong, Assistant Professor of Accounting. BA, Lethbridge, 1991; MA, Simon Fraser, 1992; PhD, Pennsylvania, 1997 Valery Yakubovich, Assistant Professor of Organizations and Strategy. MS, Moscow, 1985; MA, Warwick, 1994; PhD, Stanford, 2001 Robert Zeithammer, Assistant Professor of Marketing. BA, MA, Pennsylvania, 1998; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003 David E. Altig, Adjunct Professor of Economics. BBA, Iowa, 1980; MA, Brown, 1982; PhD, Brown, 1987 David Barker, Adjunct Professor of Economics. BA, California (Berkeley), 1984; PhD, Chicago, 1991 Warren L. Batts, Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management. BEE, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1961; MBA, Harvard, 1963 Terrence M. Belton, Adjunct Professor of Finance. BA, Boston College, 1978; MA, Michigan, 1982; PhD, Michigan, 1983 Christopher L. Culp, Adjunct Professor of Finance. AB, Johns Hopkins, 1990; PhD, Chicago, 1997 Jonathan K. Frenzen, Clinical Professor of Marketing. AB, Chicago, 1978; MBA, Chicago, 1982; PhD, Chicago, 1988 Reto R. Gallati, Adjunct Professor of Finance. MA, St. Gall (Switzerland), 1990; PhD, Zurich, 1993

Faculty

Michael Gibbs, Clinical Professor of Economics. AB, AM, Chicago, 1984; PhD, Chicago, 1989 Zvi Gilula, Adjunct Professor of Statistics. AB, Hebrew University, 1970; AM, Hebrew University, 1974; PhD, Hebrew University, 1978 Linda E. Ginzel, Clinical Professor of Managerial Psychology. AB, Colorado, 1984; AM, Princeton, 1986; PhD, Princeton, 1989 Nathaniel A. Gregory, Adjunct Professor of Finance. BA, North Carolina, 1970; MA, Georgetown, 1975; MA, Chicago, 1979; PhD, Chicago, 1980 Howard G. Haas, Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management. BBA, Michigan, 1948 A. Scott Keating, Clinical Professor of Accounting. BSc, McGill, 1983; LLB, McGill, 1986; MBA, Dartmouth, 1988; DBA, Harvard, 1995 David C. Kleinman, Adjunct Professor of Strategic Management. SB, Chicago, 1959; PhD, Chicago, 1977 Marc Knez, Clinical Professor of Strategic Management. BA, Arizona, 1984; PhD, Pennsylvania, 1992 Stacey Kole, Clinical Professor of Economics. BA, Rochester, 1982; MA, Chicago, 1986; PhD, Chicago, 1992 Anthony M. Marciano, Clinical Professor of Finance. BA, Dartmouth College, 1983; MBA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1988 David Marshall, Adjunct Professor of Finance. BA, Yale, 1972; MS, Carnegie Mellon, 1985; PhD, Carnegie Mellon, 1988 Scott F. Meadow, Clinical Professor of Entrepreneurship. AB, Harvard, 1977; MBA, Harvard, 1980 Kevin F. Rock, Clinical Professor of Finance. BA, Harvard University, 1974; MBA, University of Chicago, 1980; MA, University of Chicago, 1981; PhD, University of Chicago, 1982 Ellen A. Rudnick, Clinical Professor of Entrepreneurship. AB, Vassar, 1972; MBA, Chicago, 1973 James E. Schrager, Clinical Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategic Management. AB, Oakland, 1971; MBA, Colorado, 1975; JD, DePaul, 1979 Per Stromberg, Adjunct Associate Professor of Finance. MBA, Stockholm School of Economics, 1991; MS, Carnegie Mellon, 1993; PhD, Carnegie Mellon, 1997 Phillip Swagel, Adjunct Professor of Economics. AB., Princeton, 1987; MA, Harvard, 1990; PhD, Harvard, 1993. Wesley A. Wildman, Adjunct Professor of Public Policy. AB, Chicago, 1951; JD, Chicago, 1954; AM, Chicago, 1955 Brian W. Bulger, Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics. AB cum laude, Georgetown University, 1972; JD, Georgetown University, 1977 Linda L. Darragh, Adjunct Associate Professor of Entrepreneurship. BA, Queens University, 1976; MSc, University of Toronto, 1978

83

84

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Paul R. Garry, Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics. BA, University of Wisconsin, 1974; JD, Cornell University, 1977 Susan Hapak, Adjunct Associate Professor of Entrepreneurship. AB, Duke, 1979; MBA, Chicago, 1989 William W. Kooser, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Management. BA, Yale, 1978; MBA, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 1980; MBA, Chicago, 1981 Joshua N. Lowitz, Adjunct Associate Professor of Entrepreneurship. BA, Brown, 1984; MBA, Harvard, 1987 Arthur Middlebrooks, Adjunct Associate Professor of Marketing. BS, Duke, 1984; MBA, Chicago, 1988 Deborah Mitchell, Adjunct Associate Professor of Marketing. BS, Ohio State University, 1980; MBA, Chicago, 1985; PhD, Chicago, 1991 W. Dana Northcut, Adjunct Associate Professor of Accounting. BS, Union, 1978; MBA, Vanderbilt, 1985; PhD, University of Southern California, 1994 Per Stromberg, Adjunct Associate Professor of Finance. MBA, Stockholm School of Economics, 1991; MS, Carnegie Mellon, 1993; PhD, Carnegie Mellon, 1997 John R. Sylla, Adjunct Associate Professor of Business Law. AB, Harvard, 1981; MBA, Chicago, 1985; JD, Chicago, 1985 Evelyn Williams, Clinical Associate Professor of Management. BA, California (Los Angeles), 1986; MA, Chicago, 1995 Akash Bandyopadhyay, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Finance. BSc, University of Calcutta, India, 1992; MS, Notre Dame, 1996; PhD, Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), 2001 Keith Bockus, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Accounting. BA, Johns Hopkins University, 1984; MBA, Chicago, 1995; PhD, Chicago, 1998 Waverly Deutsch, Clinical Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship. BS, Pittsburgh, 1985; MA, Tufts, 1989; PhD, Tufts, 1992 Craig H. Furfine, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics and Finance. BA, California (Berkeley), 1990; MA, Stanford, 1993; PhD, Stanford, 1995 Kathryn Ierulli, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics. BA, Chicago, 1987; MA, PhD, Chicago, 1995 Christopher Krohn, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Marketing. BA, Northwestern, 1991; MBA, Chicago, 1997 Sonia Marciano, Adjunct Assistant Professor in Strategic Management, BA, Chicago, 1986; MBA, Chicago, 1994, PhD, Chicago, in progress Christina van Wijnbergen, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Political Science. BA, Leiden, 1991; MA, College of Europe,1992; PhD, Northwestern University, 2002 Robert Z. Aliber, Professor Emeritus of International Economics and Finance. AB, Williams, 1952; AB, Cambridge, 1954; AM, Cambridge, 1958; PhD,Yale 1962 Robert L. Ashenhurst, Professor Emeritus of Applied Mathematics. AB, Harvard, 1950; SM, Harvard, 1954; PhD, Harvard, 1956

Faculty

Selwyn W. Becker, Professor Emeritus of Psychology. AB, Rochester, 1952; AM, Minnesota, 1953; PhD, Pennsylvania State, 1958 Sidney Davidson, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Accounting. AB, Michigan, 1941; MBA, Michigan, 1941; PhD, Michigan, 1950 Gary D. Eppen, Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Operations Management. SB Minnesota, 1958; SMIE, Minnesota, 1960; PhD, Cornell, 1964 Robert S. Hamada, Edward Eagle Brown Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Finance. BE, Yale, 1959; SM, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1969 John E. Jeuck, Robert Law Professor Emeritus of Business Administration. AB, Chicago, 1937; MBA, Chicago, 1938; PhD, Chicago, 1949 James H. Lorie, Eli B. and Harriet B. Williams Professor Emeritus of Business Administration. AB, Cornell, 1942; AM, Cornell, 1945; PhD, Chicago, 1947 Albert Madansky, H.G.B. Alexander Professor Emeritus of Business Administration. AB, Chicago, 1952; SM, Chicago, 1955; PhD, Chicago, 1958 Alex Orden, Professor Emeritus of Applied Mathematics. SB, Rochester, 1937; SM, Michigan, 1938; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1950 Sam Peltzman, Ralph and Dorothy Keller Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Economics. BBA, City College of New York, 1960; PhD, Chicago, 1965 Melvin W. Reder, Isidore Brown and Gladys J. Brown Professor Emeritus of Urban and Labor Economics. AB, California (Berkeley), 1939; PhD, Columbia, 1946 Linus E. Schrage, Professor Emeritus of Applied Mathematics and Operations Management. SB, St. Louis, 1962; SM, Cornell, 1965; PhD, Cornell, 1966 George C. Tiao, W. Allen Wallis Professor Emeritus of Econometrics and Statistics. AB, National Taiwan University, 1955; MBA, New York, 1958; PhD, Wisconsin, 1962 Thomas L. Whisler, Professor Emeritus of Business Policy. SBEd, Miami, 1941; MBA, Chicago, 1947; PhD, Chicago, 1953 H. Edward Wrapp, Professor Emeritus of Business Policy. SB, Notre Dame, 1938; MBA, Harvard, 1948; DCS, Harvard, 1952 Victor Zarnowitz, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Finance. AM, Heidelberg, 1949; PhD, Heidelberg, 1951 Arnold Zellner, H.G.B. Alexander Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Economics and Statistics. AB, Harvard, 1949; PhD, California (Berkeley), 1957; Doctor Honoris Causa, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 1986 vvv

85

C ENTERS , P ROGRAMS , AND I NSTITUTES CENTER FOR DECISION RESEARCH The Center for Decision Research is an interdisciplinary center devoted to research and teaching on how people make decisions and judgments. This field of study draws on cognitive and social psychology, economics, sociology, statistics, and other disciplines to understand how individuals and groups make decisions. Researchers at the center study the processes by which intuition, reasoning, and social interaction produce beliefs, judgments, and choices. These topics have important applications in a range of contexts, including management, marketing, finance, and public policy. The center’s activities include a weekly research workshop, the distribution of a research paper series, and the maintenance of the Decision Research Laboratory for the conduct of behavioral research studies.

CENTER FOR POPULATION ECONOMICS The Center for Population Economics was founded by Robert W. Fogel in 1981. Researchers at CPE apply economic, demographic, and epidemiological models to historical datasets, that add to our understanding of hot-button policy issues associated with health care, disability, aging, and mortality, and are valuable for forecasting national health care, retirement, and pension costs. Recent work published by CPE researchers covers such varied topics as the interaction of prices with seasonal birth patterns; the relationship between exposure to infectious disease and other physical insults in early life and the development of chronic conditions in aging; and the burden of disease in terms of disability, quality of life, and mortality. Much of this work is based on the CPE’s Union Army Lifecycle Dataset, which has been used in more than 50 publications on health, aging, and disability issues. Current center projects include: (a) lifetime and intergenerational changes in wealth and in economic mobility; (b) the economics of aging since 1840; (c) long-term changes in household savings and investments; (d) the impact of environmental changes on the decline in disabilities and the increasing lifespan over the course of the twentieth century; and (e) the impact of environmental factors on changes in human physiology and on the decline in disparities in health by differences in SES variables.

CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SECURITY PRICES (CRSP) Since its inception, CRSP has been a market leader in the creation and maintenance of comprehensive and accurate historical U.S. financial data. Data is collected from multiple sources; it is then collated, filtered, and researched to provide the most accurate data files for research and analysis. Subscribers include the financial and economic academic communities and the corporate investment community. CRSP originated in 1960 with the support of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner, and Smith, Inc. to accurately measure the returns from investing in common stocks listed on the NYSE for the period 1926 to 1960. Today, CRSP provides 10K SEC graphs for Edgar filing, numerous databases, and custom data extractions, in addition to cap-based reports. 86

Centers, Programs, and Institutes

JAMES M. KILTS CENTER FOR MARKETING Founded in 1999 by James M. Kilts, ’74 and the Nabisco Foundation, the James M. Kilts Center for Marketing sponsors basic research in marketing as well as innovation in the GSB marketing curriculum. The center sponsors a wide variety of research, ranging from basic research into the determinants of consumer behavior and analytical models of marketing activities to more applied research on current marketing practice and tactical issues. The common thread is a commitment to objective and rigorous scholarship with an agenda focused on research with the potential to make substantial long-run contributions. The center sponsors PhD and faculty fellows as well as the James M. Kilts Scholarship for MBA students concentrating in marketing.

MICHAEL P. POLSKY CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP The Entrepreneurship Program was organized in 1998 through a grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and became an endowed center in 2002 through the generous commitment of Michael P. Polsky, ’87, a successful entrepreneur and an inspiration to our students and alumni. The Polsky Center’s mission is to create entrepreneurial leaders through a broad range of experiences, including classroom learning, experiential learning, leading-edge research, and community outreach. One of the strengths of entrepreneurship education at Chicago GSB includes bridging the gap between classroom teachings and their real-world applications. Of the 14 entrepreneurship courses offered today at the GSB, five are experiential: students work on their own business ideas or with firms that are building or investing in entrepreneurial ventures. The center also creates opportunities to collaborate with other areas of the university, supports alumni with entrepreneurial pursuits, and works with the community, allowing current and future entrepreneurs to meet and interact.

GEORGE J. STIGLER CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF THE ECONOMY AND THE STATE The George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State was established at the University of Chicago in 1977 to study the reciprocal effects of economic life on political life. The Center was named in honor of Nobel laureate and former GSB faculty member George J. Stigler after his death in 1991. The Stigler Center embodies two attributes for which Chicago economics is world famous: first, economic theory is not an end in itself but a practical tool to apply in understanding real-world economic life and institutions; and second, such an approach has a lively admiration for the working of private markets. Each year, the Center has acted as host to visiting scholars from other institutions. The research of visitors and Center associates is customarily presented in the Center’s working paper series and at workshops on campus. The Center also sponsors debates, forums, and conferences aimed at audiences outside of academia to highlight the relevance of Center research to business people and policy makers.

87

88

Graduate School of Business Announcements

INITIATIVE ON CHICAGO PRICE THEORY The Initiative on Chicago Price Theory was founded in 2004 to sustain and strengthen a powerful methodology which emphasizes the role of prices in the fundamental functions of an economic system and which values the development of testable hypotheses, efficient modeling, and rigorous applications. It brings together scholars who share a passion for Chicago Price Theory; provides these scholars with a research infrastructure (research associates, databases, and forums) to conduct, present, and disseminate their work; and engages an array of business and government leaders in dialogue that is grounded in sound economic analysis on major issues facing our societies.

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LIBRARY SYSTEM The University of Chicago has nearly seven million volumes in its library system. The Joseph Regenstein Library, the graduate library for the social sciences and the humanities, contains about 3.8 million of these volumes. In the Science Quadrangle, a block from Regenstein, the John Crerar Library houses the science, medicine, and technology collections of more than one million volumes. Other libraries within the system include those for the general needs of undergraduates; law; social service administration; chemistry; and mathematics, computer science, and statistics. Materials in these collections, electronic resources, and library information are available from PCs throughout the library system, and over the library’s Web server at www.lib.uchicago.edu.

JOSEPH REGENSTEIN LIBRARY The Regenstein Library has seven floors. The basement level houses open-stack compact shelving that will hold 1.4 million volumes. Most upper floors house books and periodicals for several related disciplines and the facilities for their use so that a student can work in one concentrated field of study while drawing easily on sources from other disciplines. The upper floors offer book stacks, reading areas, reference collections, copiers, networked printers, and staff specialists. The Regenstein Library also contains seminar or group-study rooms, microform reading facilities, electronic workstations, and a small computing cluster operated by Networking Services & Information Technologies.

Business and Economics Resource Center Business and economics materials form one of the largest subject collections within the Regenstein Library. The Business and Economics Resource Center (BERC) is located on the A-Level of the Regenstein Library. These materials include electronic information products, books, reference works in the field, and more than 1,400 periodicals. Most of the books and bound journals are shelved in the book stacks located on the B-Level. Business and economics reference services are provided during normal business hours. Librarians at BERC can assist you by providing library and research instruction for individual classes or specialized guides to information resources. With its special indices, computerized information, and other bibliographic aids, BERC is the library home for students in the Graduate School of Business. For further information, please see www.lib. uchicago.edu/e/busecon.

vvv

R ESEARCH F ACILITIES RELATED FIELDS OF STUDY Students are encouraged to use their time here to study fields of knowledge outside the usual boundaries of business education. The school may list as part of its curriculum related courses in the social sciences and physical sciences divisions of the university and in the other professional schools. The humanities and biological sciences divisions also offer courses that may interest business students. Some of these academic relationships are described briefly below.

THE DIVISIONS In the Division of the Social Sciences, several departments and research centers offer courses related to the business school program. The Department of Anthropology offers specialized training in cultural and social anthropology to develop comparative understanding of the economic life, stratification, politics, religion, philosophy, and other aspects of human societies. The Department of Psychology offers areas of concentration in Developmental Psychology, the Perception Program, the Language Program, the Social Psychology Program, the Committee on Human Development, and the sub-area of Mental Health Research. In the Department of Sociology, business students may be interested in courses on population, human ecology, urban sociology, organizational theory, industrial and economic organization, the sociology of economic development, and survey research methodology. Area studies in the Division of the Social Sciences and the Division of the Humanities include East Asian languages and civilizations, Near Eastern languages and civilizations, South Asian languages and civilizations, Latin American studies, Middle Eastern studies, and Slavic languages and literatures. (See page 26,“Area Studies and Business,”for more information.) Close ties exist between the GSB and the Department of Economics. The economics department offers workshops for advanced students in agricultural economics, applications of economics, applied economics, applied price theory, demography, East Asian economics, econometrics and statistics, economic history, economic and legal organization, economic policy and public finance, economic theory, empirical economics, growth and development, health economics, money and banking, and public sector economics. A number of fields of study in the Graduate School of Business list courses from this department as electives. In the Physical Sciences Division, the Department of Statistics has for its main purposes research in the theory and application of statistics, instruction in statistics at all levels, and consultation on the statistical aspects of research throughout the university. Course offerings in the statistics department are a necessity for advanced business students in the field of statistics. The Department of Computer Science offers courses for students interested in computing systems; network design and applications; database systems and programming; Internet and network programming, including courses in Java, Python, etc; e-commerce; object-oriented and distributed-objectoriented programming methods; parallel computing for corporate applications; multi-

89

90

Graduate School of Business Announcements

media systems; data mining and document analysis; embedded systems; systems administration and large-scale computing management; encryption, cryptography, and data security and integrity; bioinformatics; and theoretical computer science. The Center for Urban Studies promotes the education of urban specialists through interdepartmental research, seminars, workshops, colloquia, and publications. The Center for Health Administration Studies (CHAS) conducts interdisciplinary studies of local, national, and international health services delivery with the mission of improving care delivery to vulnerable populations, particularly in urban settings. The center specializes in evaluation studies that combine elements of medical care delivery, social services, and public health. An affiliate of the School of Social Service Administration (SSA), CHAS draws on the university’s outstanding faculty in management, medicine, public policy, and the social sciences. CHAS also supports a substantial program of education, workshops and symposia, and dissemination of health services research.

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS The university’s professional schools offer joint MBA programs with the Graduate School of Business (described on page 24 in “Special Programs”). In addition to these formal relationships, there are other opportunities for study within the professional schools. The Law School’s program combines an emphasis on technical legal knowledge and professional skills with a concern for illuminating the connections between law and the social forces with which it interacts. Reflecting the second objective, a significant proportion of the faculty represent disciplines other than law, including economics, history, sociology, and political science. The curriculum devotes substantial attention to relevant aspects of economics, corporate finance, taxation, legal history, comparative law, psychiatry, statistics, and other social science methodology. Among the programs of study offered by the School of Social Service Administration are those on social welfare and services, their development, organization, and operation; the purpose and status of current programs; the influence of political, economic, and social factors; and the role of the social worker in assessment and change. Students also should refer to the SSA catalog for information and course descriptions regarding the health administration program. The Pritzker School of Medicine emphasizes the scientific basis of medicine and the skillful application of scientific principles to human problems. Graduate School of Business students with appropriate backgrounds or specific objectives may find courses of interest in areas such as population and environmental biology, social medicine, and social and ethical issues in medicine. The Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy’s academic program combines rigorous training in quantitative analysis with social science research and applies it to real policy problems. The faculty’s research is distinctly problem driven, striving to address some of our nation’s most urgent policy questions.

vvv

I NFORMATION for A PPLICANTS ADMISSION The Full-Time MBA Program matriculates approximately 550 students each autumn quarter. The admissions committee looks for evidence of an applicant’s potential to succeed in a demanding academic program and a professional career after graduation. In addition to previous educational experiences, test scores, and recommendation letters, we review essays and conduct interviews to learn about an applicant’s goals and understanding of the Chicago GSB MBA. In short, the admissions committee is trying to find a solid match between the applicant and Chicago GSB values.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS The prerequisite for admission is a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution.Visit our Web site, ChicagoGSB.edu, to learn about foreign degrees accepted as equivalents for a bachelor’s degree. • Components of the application include: • Completion of application essays and personal history • A comprehensive resume • Letters of recommendation (2) • Transcripts for all post-secondary education* • Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)* • The International English Language Testing System (IELTS)* exam or the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)* for all international applicants with a bachelor’s or graduate degree from a program where the language of instruction is not English. Additional details regarding Chicago GSB’s institution codes for the GMAT, IELTS, and TOEFL can be found on our Web site, ChicagoGSB.edu. *All test scores and transcripts for post-secondary education can be self-reported via our online application. Upon admission, all official transcripts and test results must be submitted for verification.

ADMISSIONS: HOW TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN THE APPLICATION PROCESS The Admissions Committee looks for people who have demonstrated the ability to succeed through work experience, academic endeavors, and extracurricular or community service involvement. Additionally, the committee seeks applicants with leadership skills and potential, successful work on teams, superior communication skills, and an understanding of the value of an MBA and why Chicago GSB is a good fit for their goals. Successful applicants are able to articulate their “story” throughout the application process, demonstrating a strong sense of self-awareness. Elements of self-awareness include future goals and a path to achieve those goals, as well as how past experiences play a part in future plans.

91

92

Graduate School of Business Announcements

The admissions committee evaluates each applicant on the basis of all the information provided in the application. We have no admissions quotas (i.e., required percentages of women, international students, underrepresented minorities, etc.) or arbitrary cut-offs with respect to grade point average, GMAT scores or work experience. This philosophy holds true for all our degree programs.

ADMISSIONS INTERVIEWS Interviews will be granted on an invitation-only basis after evaluation of a submitted application. An interview is an important part of the admissions process. It helps the admissions committee assess interpersonal skills, motivation and maturity. An interview also allows you to gain additional insight into Chicago GSB. Interviews are conducted by staff, students, or alumni. They are held on campus or in a location convenient to the prospective student. All interviews, regardless of who conducts them, receive equal weight in the evaluation process. Only one interview is conducted for each applicant.

APPLY TO THE FULL-TIME MBA PROGRAM Chicago GSB admits new students into the Full-Time MBA Program in the autumn quarter only. We use a system of three application deadlines, with early applicants rolled over for consideration at subsequent deadlines. Application deadlines for Autumn 2006 enrollment are: Round First Second Third

Deadline October 26, 2005; January 4, 2006; March 15, 2006;

Decision Released January 11, 2006 March 22, 2006 May 17, 2006

The application fee to apply for enrollment in autumn 2006 is $200 and must accompany each application. To apply or download the application, please visit our Web site, ChicagoGSB.edu. Requests also can be made to the Office of Admissions by phone at 773.834.8742 or by mail at 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637. In keeping with its long-standing traditions and policies, the University of Chicago, in admissions, employment, and access to programs, considers students on the basis of individual merit and without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, or other factors irrelevant to participation in the programs of the university. The Affirmative Action Officer (773.702.5671) is the university’s official responsible for coordinating its adherence to this policy and the related federal and state laws and regulations (including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended).

APPLY TO THE INTERNATIONAL MBA PROGRAM Students admitted to the Full-Time MBA Program can choose to pursue an International MBA degree—an option that requires completion of coursework in international business, study abroad for at least one academic term, and demonstration of an advanced proficiency in a foreign language. Individuals interested in pursuing an International MBA degree apply to the regular MBA program, and then declare their intent to join the program through a special process during their first year of study at Chicago GSB.

Information for Applicants

APPLY TO OUR DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS In cooperation with other schools and centers at the University of Chicago, Chicago GSB offers several joint degree programs. Students can pursue these joint degree options by applying to and simultaneously enrolling in two of the university’s professional schools. Business and Public Policy Studies (MBA/MPP) Business and Law (MBA/JD) Business and Social Services Administration (MBA/AM) Business and Medicine (MBA/MD) Candidates must apply and be accepted to both Chicago GSB and the second school (as above: Public Policy, Law, Social Services Administration, or Medicine). For these programs, applicants must submit the regular Full-Time MBA Program application and an application to the other professional school based on each program’s individual deadlines. MBA/AM degrees in international studies require only one application, as described below.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES/ JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS Students interested in international studies also can elect to pursue one of these joint MBA/AM programs. International Relations and Business Area Studies and Business in: Latin America and Caribbean East Asia East Europe/Russia Middle East South Asia Students in these programs anticipate that their careers will demand both a complete set of international business skills and a thorough knowledge of international issues and other cultures or regions. The interdisciplinary curriculum incorporates political, economic and cultural dynamics of nations. Requirements include mastery of other languages and a master’s thesis. These programs take two and one-half years to three years to complete, depending on the AM discipline, foreign language sequence placement, and length of time necessary to complete a required master’s thesis.

COSTS AND FINANCIAL AID The cost of attendance in the Full-Time MBA Program for the 2005–06 academic year is estimated to be $67,406. Each of the ten courses per year is $3,880; additional cost of living and student fees for incoming students is estimated at $28,606. Chicago GSB is committed to providing access to all students and therefore offers financial aid in the form of both merit-based scholarships and loans. Merit-based scholarships are awarded based on information in the admission application; there is no separate application and all applicants to the Full-Time MBA Program are considered for scholarship awards. Several loans options are available for all incoming students; these include federal loans for eligible U.S. citizens and permanent residents, as well as alternative, credit-based loans for all students. Chicago GSB has two private, credit-based alternative loan programs available for international students. One loan program requires a creditworthy cosigner who is a U.S.

93

94

Graduate School of Business Announcements

citizen or U.S. permanent resident currently living in the United States. The other loan program does not require a cosigner. Students borrowing from either loan program can borrow up to the standard cost of education (minus any scholarships or other financial assistance received.) For information on scholarships and financial aid questions, please visit our Web site, ChicagoGSB.edu.

Time of Entry Students enter the Full-Time MBA Program in the autumn quarter only; attendance at Core, the GSB orientation program, is required for enrollment. All students who matriculate at the University of Chicago agree to abide by the university’s rules and regulations. These rules and regulations include settlement of any account due the university. Details are available in the Student Information Manual provided to students upon matriculation.

Deferrals In general, deferrals are granted only in cases of extreme emergency. Admitted applicants with professional, military, or other related experience should plan to attend the program during the quarter and year for which they were offered admission. All requests for deferrals must be submitted in writing to the Associate Dean for Student Recruitment and Admissions. The Admissions Committee considers each request on its merits and retains the right to grant or deny a guaranteed admission for a future year. Deferrals in the Full-Time MBA Program are granted for one year only. Requests should specify the quarter and year the student anticipates entering the program and should give details of the individual’s plans for the period covered.

2005–06 TUITION AND FEES The tuition and fees listed below are for the Full-Time MBA Program, unless otherwise noted. For tuition and fees for the Executive MBA Program, contact the appropriate office listed in the directory at the end of this book. The university uses an advance-billing system. Tuition bills are sent to Full-Time MBA Program students approximately one month before the start of the quarter, and payment is due two weeks before the start of the quarter.

2005–06 TUITION Full-Time MBA Program tuition Evening and Weekend

$38,800 (10 courses, $3,880 per course) $3,880 per course

2005–06 FULL-TIME MBA PROGRAM HEALTH INSURANCE FEES University health insurance program—Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Basic Plan (student only) $1,689 annually ($552 per quarter) Advantage Plan (student only) $2,508 annually ($820 per quarter) Dependents (tied to Basic Plan only) $3,012 annually ($984 per quarter)

Information for Applicants

2005–06 FULL-TIME MBA PROGRAM ADDITIONAL REQUIRED FEES Lifetime Credentials Fee $35 (One time, first-year students only) Administrative Services Fee $650 (One time, first-year students only) Health Service Fee $459 (annually) Activity Fee $123 (annually)

FEES FOR SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES Late registration fee Late payment fee (early bill) Late payment fee (regular bill) Fee for change in registration after the fifth week of the quarter

$50 $50 $100 $25

REFUNDS Students who are given permission to cancel their registrations in whole or in part shall be granted a refund according to the schedule below. Written approval by the director of the Dean of Students Office of any cancellation, with the date it becomes effective, must be certified by the Dean of Students Office or the director of the Evening and Weekend MBA Programs office. The following table shows the scheduled tuition refund dates for each quarter presenting approved “Late Drop/Add”form to receive certain percentages of refund. Autumn Winter Spring Summer Qtr. ’05 Qtr. ’06 Qtr. ’06 Qtr. ’06 Quarter starts Sept. 22 Jan. 3 Mar. 27 June 19 Refund percent If courses dropped between 65% Monday, Week 2–Friday, Week 3 of each quarter 50% Monday, Week 4–Friday, Week 4 of each quarter 30% Monday, Week 5–Friday, Week 5 of each quarter no refund Monday, Week 6–Friday, Week 10 of each quarter • • • • •

Beginning Monday, Week 4 of each quarter, a grade of “W” (withdrawn) will be received and a $25 change of registration fee will be assessed. Beginning Monday, Week 8 of each quarter, written faculty consent is required for withdrawal from a GSB course. Friday, Week 10 (Week 9 in a ten-Week quarter) is the last day to withdraw from a course. No GSB classes can be added after Friday, Week 2 of each quarter. No university classes can be added after Friday, Week 3 of each quarter.

Exception: A student who is required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons shall not be entitled to any refund of tuition fees. In addition, according to the federal regulation and recalculation formula, students receiving any type of federal loan will have their funds reduced or cancelled if they drop below two courses during the first five weeks of the quarter.

95

96

Graduate School of Business Announcements

COST OF ATTENDANCE The cost of attendance is an estimate of what it will cost a single student to attend school for nine months. The cost of attendance is used to determine the maximum amount of financial aid a student can have. The cost includes tuition, fees, rent, utilities, food, books, transportation, and personal/miscellaneous expenses. If necessary, certain additional costs can be considered if a student appeals and submits documentation supporting the costs. Students can receive financial aid for the entire cost of attendance. However, a student’s total financial aid award cannot exceed the cost of attendance. 2005–06 tuition for students in the Full-Time MBA Program is $3,880 per course. Three Quarters (nine months) $38,800 (10 courses) 123 459 35

Tuition Activity Fee Health Service Fee Lifetime Credentials Fee (One time, first-year students only) Health Insurance 1,689 Basic (2,508 Advantage, 3,012 dependents) Administrative Service Fee 650 (One time, first-year students only) Books 1,650 Rent 11,700 (1,300 per month) Food 5,400 (600 per month) Personal 2,550 Transportation 1,350 Computer Allowance 3,000 (One time, first year only) Total $67,406

FINANCIAL AID The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business is committed to identifying financial resources for students who require assistance in meeting the cost of the MBA program. The school offers two types of financial assistance: scholarships and loans. Scholarships are awarded to students enrolled full time in the full-time division only. Loan application materials are automatically sent to admitted, full-time division U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents. Applications for continuing students are available in the financial aid office, and in room 330 in Gleacher Center. Admitted international students are given a Web site where they can request a loan application be sent to them.

SCHOLARSHIPS Merit-based scholarships are awarded to students who are entering the Full-Time MBA Program. Awards are granted to first-year Full-Time MBA Program students and are primarily for the first year of study. A limited number of scholarships are offered for the second year of study. No service to the university is required. All newly admitted

Information for Applicants

students are considered for a merit-based scholarship. Awards are based on superior academic excellence and demonstrated qualities of leadership. Approximately 20 percent of the entering class receives scholarships. Generally, the award amounts range from $10,000 to $30,000. Scholarship recipients receive notification in April.

STUDENT LOANS Typically, loans are the major part of financing the MBA degree. It is recommended that students utilize all of their personal resources first before borrowing any money. Educational loans are serious financial and legal obligations. All student loans are not alike. The interest rate, repayment periods, and repayment terms may differ. The following information describes the various loan programs available to MBA students.

Federal Loan Programs The two federal loan programs are the Federal Stafford Loan and the Federal Perkins Loan. Students must qualify for federal loans, based on specific guidelines. The Federal Stafford Loan program is divided into two types: subsidized and unsubsidized. The funds are provided by lending institutions. The University of Chicago is a lender in the Federal Stafford Loan program. The maximum amount a student can borrow in one academic year is $18,500. The maximum subsidized loan is $8,500. The maximum unsubsidized loan is $18,500 minus any subsidized amount (up to $8,500). The financial aid office will determine the amount of subsidized loan a student can borrow. This amount is based on financial need as determined by federal guidelines. If the student qualifies for the subsidized portion, the interest is paid by the federal government while the student is in school at least half time (two or more courses per quarter), and for six months before repayment begins. The unsubsidized portion is not based on financial need. The student is responsible for paying interest on the loan from the day of disbursement. The student can choose to make regular interest payments or have the interest capitalized at repayment. Students who do not qualify for any subsidized portion can still borrow the entire $18,500 in an unsubsidized loan. The total loan amount may be affected by any other financial aid a student may receive, such as scholarships or veteran’s benefits. The interest rate is variable, based on the 91 Day U.S. T-Bill plus 1.7 percent while in school. In repayment, the interest rate is variable, based on the 91 Day U.S. T-Bill plus 2.3 percent. The interest rate is capped at 8.25 percent. The interest rate changes every July 1. Repayment begins six months after graduation, leaving school, or dropping below half-time status (two or more courses per quarter). There is a ten-year repayment period. The total aggregate loan amount, including undergraduate borrowing, is $138,500. The University of Chicago does NOT charge any fees on the Federal Stafford Loan. The funds for the Federal Perkins Loan program are provided by the federal government. The financial aid office will determine the amount of Perkins Loan a student can borrow, up to $6,000 in one academic year. Perkins Loans are awarded to second-year Full-Time MBA Program students only. The amount is based on financial need as defined by federal guidelines and is designated for exceptionally needy students. The interest rate is 5 percent and the federal government pays the interest while the student is enrolled at least half time and for nine months before repayment begins. There are no fees charged on this loan. Repayment begins nine months after graduation, leaving

97

98

Graduate School of Business Announcements

school, or dropping below half time. The total aggregate loan amount, including undergraduate borrowing, is $30,000. There is a ten-year repayment period. Private Alternative Loans are not federal loans. Funds are provided by various lenders. The University of Chicago is a lender in the alternative loan program. This is a credit-based loan. The maximum loan amount per academic year is the cost of attendance minus all other financial aid (including any Stafford or Perkins loans, scholarships, etc.). Interest rates vary and are generally based on Prime or T-Bill plus points, are adjusted quarterly, and are higher than federal loan programs. The University of Chicago uses the 91 Day U.S. T-Bill plus 3.25 percent to calculate interest while in school, and the 91 Day U.S. T-Bill plus 3.4 percent in repayment. Interest accrues on these loans from the first date of disbursement and payment is the responsibility of the student. Interest can be capitalized or paid quarterly. Repayment begins six months after leaving school. The repayment period can be up to twenty years.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID To qualify for the federal loan programs students must meet certain eligibility requirements. These requirements are: be admitted to the Graduate School of Business; be a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident; be enrolled at least half time (two or more courses per quarter) in a program leading to a degree; maintain satisfactory academic progress toward a degree as defined by the educational program; be in compliance with selective service registration (if required); not be in default on any educational loan; not owe a refund on a federal grant or loan; and have a U.S. Social Security number.

APPLICATION PROCESS U.S. citizens and U.S. permanent residents who are admitted to the Full-Time MBA Program will receive a loan application packet in the mail. Packets are sent in late March. The packet contains a Graduate School of Business financial aid application, a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), a Federal Stafford Loan Master Promissory Note, and an alternative loan application. All students applying for any federal assistance have to complete and submit the FAFSA to the federal processing center. The Web site for more information on federal financial aid for students is www.studentaid.ed.gov. The Web site to complete the FAFSA online is www.fafsa.ed.gov. The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business Title IV school code is E00512. The Graduate School of Business financial aid application, Federal Stafford Loan Master Promissory Note, and alternative loan application are to be completed and returned to the Graduate School of Business financial aid office. There is no deadline to apply for loans. However, application processing takes about three to four weeks after all completed application materials are received. Students receiving financial assistance will get an award letter showing the amount of financial aid they have received.

Information for Applicants

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Admitted Full-Time MBA Program international students are considered for scholarships just like all other admitted full-time students. Students holding any type of visa are not eligible for any federal financial aid. Students are encouraged to investigate funding sources in their home countries. Many government ministries of education, employers, and banks may offer assistance in the form of grants or loans. Chicago GSB offers two credit-based loan programs to Full-Time MBA Program international students. One requires a cosigner and one does not. Both loan programs require a student to have a U.S. Social Security number in order to process the loan. Students using the loan requiring a cosigner can borrow up to the standard cost of attendance minus any scholarships. The cosigner must be a creditworthy U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident, currently living in the United States. The interest on this loan is variable and is the U.S. 91 Day T-Bill plus 3.25 percent while the student is in school and the U.S. 91 Day T-Bill plus 3.4 percent when the student is in repayment. The interest can be paid quarterly while the student is in school or capitalized before repayment. There are no fees charged. There is a twenty-year repayment period. Repayment begins six months after graduation or leaving school. Students using the loan not requiring a cosigner can borrow up to the standard cost of attendance minus any scholarships. This loan is available for Full-Time MBA Program students who are enrolled in the full-time division only. There is a 5 percent fee deducted from the total loan amount. The interest is variable and is the 91 day LIBOR rate plus 3.5 percent both in school and out of school. Interest can be paid quarterly while the student is in school or capitalized before repayment. Repayment begins one month after the student leaves school. There is a twenty-year repayment period. Students who do not have a credit record in the United States are eligible to receive this loan.

vvv

99

P OLICIES and R ESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO STUDENT HEALTH CARE STUDENT HEALTH FEE All registered students, other than those in programs explicitly excluded*, must pay the Student Health and Wellness Fee, which covers services at the Student Care Center and Student Counseling and Resource Services. The Student Health and Wellness Fee will be waived only for those students who live and study more than 100 miles from campus and who will not be on campus during the quarter. The Student Health and Wellness Fee will not be waived for participants of any other group or individual health plan.

HEALTH INSURANCE REQUIREMENT The university requires all students, other than those in programs explicitly excluded*, to carry adequate medical insurance to cover, among other costs, hospitalization and outpatient diagnostic and surgical procedures. If the student is a resident in Chicago, the insurance must cover medical care other than emergency care in the Chicago area. The insurance requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways: 1. Enroll in the Student Accident and Sickness Insurance plan offered by the university, or 2. Complete of the online insurance waiver application before the open enrollment deadline. The waiver application requires the student to certify that his or her insurance coverage is comparable to the Student Accident and Sickness Insurance plan.

Enrollment Deadline The enrollment deadline is 5 p.m. Friday of the second week of the first quarter of registration during the plan year. Students approved to register as a student after the insurance enrollment deadline must submit an insurance enrollment/waiver application at registration time. Failure to do so will result in automatic enrollment into the SASI basic plan.

Automatic Enrollment Students who fail to complete an insurance application/waiver form by the requisite deadline each year will be automatically enrolled in the university’s Student Accident and Sickness Basic Plan and will be billed quarterly for that enrollment. *Students in the following programs are not assessed the Student Health and Wellness Fee and are not entitled to services offered at the Student Care Center and Student Counseling and Resource Services: GSB Evening and Weekend, SSA Evening, and the MLA programs. Doctoral students in Extended Residence also are excluded.

100

Policies and Resources

Eligibility The Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan is available to all registered students, except for students in Extended Residence, in part-time Graduate School of Business programs, and the evening School of Social Service Administration program. Students may elect the Basic or Advantage Plan. The Basic Plan also is available at additional cost to a student’s spouse or registered same-sex domestic partner, and to any unmarried children age 19 or younger (children under 23 are eligible if they are full-time students).

Students on Leave of Absence Students participating in SASI who take an approved leave of absence may continue coverage under the continuation plan of SASI for up to 12 months. Application is required through the Chickering Insurance Coordinator. The SASI continuation plan premium is higher.

Students on Medical Leave of Absence Students participating in SASI who take an approved leave of absence for medical reasons may continue coverage in SASI at the registered student rate until the end of the plan year. At the end of the plan year, they may apply for the continuation plan of SASI up to 12 months at a higher premium.

Binding Coverage The decision to enroll (including automatic enrollment) or waive coverage is binding for the remaining plan year following the end of the second week of your first quarter of registration during the plan year. In a few special cases it may be necessary to change health insurance coverage during the middle of the plan year. Only one coverage change per year is allowed. Petitions will be granted only for one of the following reasons: • Life-change event (such as marriage, birth/adoption of a child, divorce) • Loss of health insurance coverage (for such reasons as becoming too old for dependent coverage under a parental plan or a parent/spouse/same-sex domestic partner starting or terminating a job) • Recent immigration of a dependent spouse, same-sex domestic partner, or children Approved mid-year petitions to add coverage become effective on the day the previous insurance terminates, or the day after the postmark date of the petition, whichever is later. Students will be responsible for the full premium for the quarter in which the changed coverage takes effect. The premium is not pro-rated. Mid-year petitions to add a spouse, same-sex partner, or child may result in payment for their coverage over the summer quarter.

Premiums Premiums are assessed in three installments during the academic year. These charges are added to autumn, winter, and spring tuition bills. Students and dependents who are eligible to begin enrollment in the winter or spring quarters, or who are eligible only in autumn and spring quarters but not in winter, will be charged a summer quarter premium.

101

102

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Immunization Requirements By State of Illinois law, generally all new students are required to present proof of immunity from German measles, measles (two shots required), mumps, and tetanus/diphtheria (three shots required for international students). The Student Care Center notifies all new students of the requirement and provides instructions for compliance. Forms will be mailed to all incoming students and are available to be downloaded from the Web. They must be returned by mail or in person and cannot be returned electronically. After the third Friday of the first quarter of enrollment, student who are not yet compliant will have their subsequent registrations restricted and will not have the restriction lifted until they have become compliant with the immunization requirement. A student who receives this notification is urged to call the Immunization Office at 773.702.9975 to resolve his or her immunization compliance status.

UNIVERSITY POLICIES Any conduct, on or off campus, of students as individuals and as members of campus groups, that threatens the security of the university community, the rights of its individual members, or its basic norms of academic integrity, is of concern to the university and may become a matter for action within the university’s system of student discipline.

STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION In keeping with its long-standing traditions and policies, the University of Chicago, in admissions, employment, and access to programs, considers students on the basis of individual merit and without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, or other factors irrelevant to participation in the programs of the university. The Affirmative Action Officer (Administration 501, 773.702.5671) is the university’s official responsible for coordinating its adherence to this policy and the related federal and state laws and regulations (including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended).

ASSISTANCE FOR DISABLED STUDENTS The University of Chicago is a community of scholars, researchers, educators, students, and staff members devoted to the pursuit of knowledge. In keeping with its traditions and long-standing policies and practices, the university, in admissions and access to programs, considers students on the basis of individual merit and without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, or other factors irrelevant to study at the university. The university does not have a comprehensive program oriented wholly towards educating students with disabilities, but strives to be supportive of the academic, personal, and work-related needs of each individual and is committed to helping those with disabilities become full participants in the life of the university. Students with disabilities should contact their area dean of students and a representative of the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University (Administration 234, 773.834.9710) in as timely a fashion as possible to initiate the process for requesting accommodations at the university.

Policies and Resources

Once the appropriate documentation is received, professionals will review it to clarify the nature and extent of the disability. Ordinarily a representative of the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University and area dean of students then will meet with the student to discuss the matter. If academic work is at issue, faculty also may become involved in these discussions. The student and the area dean of students will maintain contact as appropriate in ongoing efforts to accommodate the student. Assuming the documentation submitted is current and complete, this process may require up to ten weeks.

LEARNING DISABILITIES The university is committed to working with learning-disabled students who have been admitted to help them become full participants in academic programs. In all cases, the usual standards of judgment and assessment of students’overall academic performance apply. Neither the community nor the students concerned are well served by applying special or lesser standards of admission or of evaluation. The representative of the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University may make accommodations to assist learning disabled students. Such accommodations need to be reasonable and appropriate to the circumstances, should confer equal opportunity on students with learning disabilities, and must not infringe on the essential requirements of or fundamentally alter the program. As in the case of other disabilities, faculty and academic staff should instruct learning-disabled students to request assistance from their area dean of students and a representative of the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University. Assuming the documentation submitted is current and complete, this process may require up to ten weeks.

DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIP POLICY A domestic partnership is defined as two individuals of the same gender who live together in a long-term relationship of indefinite duration, with an exclusive mutual commitment in which the partners agree to be jointly responsible for each other’s common welfare and share financial responsibilities. The partners may not be related by blood to a degree of closeness which would prohibit legal marriage in the state in which they legally reside and may not be married to any other person. Privileges will be extended to a student’s domestic partner and partner’s child(ren) for the Student Accident and Sickness Insurance plan, housing, athletic facilities, and libraries. A student who wishes to enroll his or her domestic partner and/or his or her child(ren) for these privileges should contact the Benefits Office, 970 East 58th Street, 3rd floor, (773.702.9634) to request a Statement of Domestic Partnership form. Once approved by the Benefits Office, the statement will certify that the student’s partnership meets the university’s requirements. If a student wishes to enroll his or her domestic partner and/or partner’s child(ren) in the Student Accident and Sickness Insurance plan the student will need to complete new enrollment forms for the dependents and will need to present his or her approved Statement of Domestic Partnership. In order to obtain gym, library, and/or housing privileges, the student will need to present his or her approved Statement of Domestic Partnership at the appropriate office.

103

104

Graduate School of Business Announcements

• • • •

Student Accident and Sickness Insurance plan—Administration 231-2, 5801 South Ellis Avenue Athletic and Recreational Sports—Ratner Athletic Center, 5530 South Ellis Avenue, Front Desk Library—Regenstein Privileges Office, 1100 East 57th Street, 1st floor (bring partner) Housing—Graduate Students Assignment Office, 5316 South Dorchester Avenue

UNIVERSITY REPORTS At the beginning of each academic year, the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University sends all the students an e-mail with information regarding policies and reports on topics ranging from campus safety to equity in athletics to information regarding different offices that you may need or want to contact. The university’s campus safety report, Common Sense, is designed to help equip you to navigate the city successfully and offers information about the university offices that provide services related to security and safety.You can find this important report on the Web at www.uchicago.edu/commonsense. Common Sense includes: • information regarding transportation on and around campus • safety tips and information on security and crime prevention programs • campus policy regarding the sale, possession, and use of alcohol and illegal drugs • information regarding drug and alcohol education programs; crime statistics for the three most recent calendar years • campus programs to prevent sex offenses and procedures to follow when sex offenses occur; and • information regarding reporting of criminal activity • information regarding the location of a list of registered sex offenders residing in Chicago Common Sense is published annually and a hard copy is available upon request from the University of Chicago Police Department, 5555 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, (773.702.8190); and from the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University, 5801 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, (773.702.7770). If you are a U.S. citizen, it is of the utmost importance that you take advantage of your right to vote in upcoming elections. If you have not yet registered to vote, you can register through the following Web site: www.elections.state.il.us by October 5. Once at the site, on the left hand side of the page is a link titled Voter Registration Forms. As a student there are many university policies and regulations of which you should be aware. They can be found in the Student Manual of Policies and Regulations, which is on the Web at www.uchicago.edu/docs/studentmanual. Several policies in particular are highlighted below; however, you should review the manual to acquaint yourself with all the information. • Civil behavior in a university setting. Freedom of expression is vital to our shared goal of the pursuit of knowledge, as is the right of all members of the community to explore new ideas and learn from one another. Ideas will frequently conflict and we do not attempt to shield people from ideas that they

Policies and Resources

may find unwelcome, disagreeable, or even offensive. There are, however, circumstances in which behavior so violates our community’s standards that formal university intervention may be appropriate. The full statement can be found in the Manual. In addition, the Diversity, Civility, and Equity Resource Guide for Students at the university of may be found on the following Web site: dos.uchicago.edu/civility.html. • Privacy and student records. You should be aware of your rights as a student with respect to records maintained by the university. The university’s policy and procedures concerning privacy and the release of student records in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is published in the university’s Student Manual of Policies and Regulations. Hard copies of the Manual of Policies and Regulations are available upon request from the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University, 5801 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, (773.702.7770). • Recording of classes and lectures. In recent years, technology has advanced rapidly and many small and powerful recording devices are readily available. You should be aware that recording of classes and lectures (including public lectures) may be done only with the permission of the instructor or speaker. In addition, it is important to recognize that permissible recordings are exclusively for personal use to assist you in your studies at the university. The University of Chicago Department of Physical Education and Athletics’s report for the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act is available, upon request, from the Department at 5530 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, (773.702.7684). You may be interested in knowing student graduation rates, tuition and loan refunds, and withdrawals, as well as course offerings and administrative policies. The information is on the Web at registrar.uchicago.edu, under the section titled Time Schedules. A hard copy of the Time Schedules can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar, 5801 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, 773.702.7891. For information on financial aid programs, contact the following: Graduate School of Business Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 773.702.3964

Information on the university’s accreditation may be obtained from the Office of the Provost, 5801 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, (773.702.8806). The catalogs are a great resource as they describe the different degree programs, requirements, and the faculty, as well as a sampling of courses for the different Graduate Divisions, Professional Schools and Undergraduate College. The catalogs are available online at catalogs.uchicago.edu. The Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students in the University is comprised of several central offices that provide a variety of programs and services for all students. For information about the programs and services provided by this office, please see the Web site at dos.uchicago.edu. The Chicago GSB Dean of Students Office will provide everything from admissions to registration and financial aid to answering all your questions about navigating the university.

105

106

Graduate School of Business Announcements

MBA CAREER SERVICES MBA Career Services offers programs and services to enable students at the GSB to define and apply an effective job search strategy. Our approach with students and recruiters alike is one of partnership: students own their job searches, and we support them throughout that process. Employers are our corporate partners, and we work with them to develop appropriate recruiting approaches and strategies.

RECRUITING AT CHICAGO GSB Employers actively seek to hire University of Chicago MBAs throughout the year through a variety of venues. More than 250 companies visit campus each year to interview students, with internship interviews beginning late January of the first year and interviews for full-time positions beginning mid-October of the second year. Career fairs held in autumn and spring provide opportunities for company representatives and students to meet and build relationships in a career-fair setting. In addition, more than 3,000 job opportunities are posted online by firms that do not come to campus. MBA Career Services works closely with firms to help them develop a recruiting program that supports their hiring needs, providing students with a large variety of employment opportunities. For on-campus interviews, students can be invited by firms to interview, or they can sign up for interviews through a computerized bidding system. Each student is allocated points to bid for interviews, and the highest bidders secure interview opportunities with specific firms. This system gives students maximum control and flexibility to determine the companies with which they interview.

CAREER MANAGEMENT PROGRAMMING MBA Career Services offers numerous career management resources tailored and designed based on students’ interests and needs to help students achieve their career goals. Students get a head start during the summer with online resources available to assist with exploring business careers, preparing a strong resume, and cultivating one’s network. Students continue their exploration of career options at Industry Immersion during Core, where they have the opportunity to meet with alumni to learn about various career options and ask candid questions. Students also have ample opportunities to learn about companies, as more than 225 company presentations are made on campus during autumn and winter. With the many options available, students are encouraged to access a number of resources to help them focus their job search. One-on-one appointments with Career Management Coaches, the Career Research Librarian, and second-year Career Advisors can assist students in developing a customized job search strategy and personal marketing plan. For first-year students, MBA Career Services offers Career Essentials, a series of workshops throughout the year on various topics including developing a targeted resume for a specific function and/or industry, developing strong interviewing skills, and networking effectively. Students have the opportunity to learn from second-year students as they share their insights into all aspects of the recruiting process. Resume databases are an important recruiting tool for both first- and second-year students. Student resumes are compiled in online databases that are distributed to

Policies and Resources

companies throughout the world to assist in prescreening for on- and off-campus interviews. Additional programs support students in their off-campus job search, including numerous interactive workshops, a spring resume database, business resource training sessions, and articles in the Chicago Career Catalyst, a monthly newsletter providing useful information on all phases of the job search. Students also have the opportunity to travel to major industry hubs throughout the world with numerous student groups to gain an in-depth look at opportunities in those industries. This year, students are likely to travel to areas including the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, New York, London, and Hong Kong to meet with firms and alumni to gain additional insight into general management, high-tech, investment banking, brand management, and consulting careers. The Career Resource Center (CRC) is a key resource in every student’s career planning and job search. This specialized library provides comprehensive career intelligence on companies, industries, functions, and job search topics. A collection of books, periodicals, electronic databases, and Web sites is available on site and remotely. The CRC also delivers valuable information services, including industry- and functionspecific research workshops, one-on-one instruction with a professional librarian, and e-mail newsletters on a variety of industries. These resources are complemented by an extensive online roster of corporate and alumni contacts from all over the world. Chicago itself, one of the largest and most diversified business centers in the country, also is an invaluable practical resource. Through the school’s evening, weekend, and executive programs and its local alumni, the GSB has contacts in a wide range of industries who can help give students a real-world view of businesses and careers.

GRADUATE BUSINESS COUNCIL A focal point for student life is the Graduate Business Council, which coordinates student interest groups and serves as a forum for discussion with faculty and administration. All students are members, and GBC officers are elected by the general student body. Activities organized by the GBC include presentations with speakers from business and industry, formal and informal social events, and quality-improvement projects. At the Graduate School of Business, as in the business world, professional and social activities are often interrelated. Most of the professional interest groups on campus sponsor events where business leaders, many of whom are alumni, come to discuss their work. These groups serve as networking and collective learning vehicles to help students cultivate career planning and recreational interests. For a complete and current listing of full-time and part-time program student groups, please visit ChicagoGSB.edu/studentgroups.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYMENT FOR STUDENTS MBA Career Services and the university’s Office of Career and Placement Services assist students in obtaining part-time employment both within and outside the university. In general, it is not possible to discuss specific job opportunities with students until they are available for interviews and know what their class schedules will be. Students, particularly those in their first quarter, are advised against assuming any considerable burden of outside work.

107

108

Graduate School of Business Announcements

Positions range from the usual nonacademic jobs at a university to research assistantships to teaching posts at other institutions in the area. In addition, part-time work can be found in the Chicago business community.

EMPLOYMENT FOR SPOUSES OF STUDENTS The University of Chicago has a variety of positions across all professional arenas for which spouses, domestic partners, and others who are moving to Hyde Park with new students may request consideration. People moving to the area are invited to browse the university job listing at jobopportunities.uchicago.edu and begin applying for positions prior to arrival on campus. An application (“profile”) resume and cover letter indicating GSB spouse or partner status be submitted to the Employment Office via the university’s online system at jobopportunities.uchicago.edu. The university tries, whenever possible, to assist spouses and partners of students with employment opportunities. Additional assistance in conducting a job search at the university is available through GSB Human Resources. Contact either Marsha East (phone: 773.702.1344; e-mail: [email protected]) or Ellen Romberg (phone: 773.834.3059; e-mail: [email protected]).

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND SPOUSES After nine consecutive months of full-time study, F-1 students in the MBA program become eligible for up to twelve months of employment for “Optional Practical Training.”They must obtain a recommendation from the university’s Office of International Affairs (OIA) and then file an application for authorization with the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. Students who enroll in Business 31303, “Field Research,” may, as part of the requirements for that course, qualify for employment called “Curricular Practical Training.” In that case authorization comes directly from OIA rather than the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. J-1 students are eligible for study-related employment, called “Academic Training,” which may last for eighteen months or the length of the period of study, whichever is shorter. Authorization comes from the J-1 sponsor, who issued the student’s Certificate of Eligibility, Form DS-2019. F-1 practical training and J-1 academic training may occur during the program of study, part time while classes are in session, or full time during the annual vacation period, or immediately upon completion of the program. The F-2 spouses of F-1 students are not allowed to work in the United States. The J-2 spouses of J-1 exchange visitors may work in the United States, but only with authorization from the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. Since authorization is not available in advance, J-1 students may not use the spouse’s anticipated earnings in the United States to document funding in advance of arrival. This is a summary of an extremely complex set of regulations. For details about eligibility and applying for employment authorization, students should visit OIA at International House, 1414 East 59th Street, Room 291, or its Web site, internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu.

vvv

D IRECTORY of O FFICES For the Full-Time MBA Program ASSOCIATE DEAN, STUDENT RECRUITMENT AND ADMISSIONS The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 Telephone 773.702.7369; fax 773.702.9085 For the Evening MBA Program (part-time, evenings) DIRECTOR, EVENING MBA PROGRAM The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive Chicago, Illinois 60611 Telephone 312.464.8660; fax 312.464.8778 For the Weekend MBA Program (part-time, weekends) DIRECTOR, WEEKEND MBA PROGRAM The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive Chicago, Illinois 60611 Telephone 312.464.8660; fax 312.464.8778 For the Executive MBA Program North America DIRECTOR, EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM NORTH AMERICA The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive Chicago, Illinois 60611 Telephone 312.464.8750; fax 312.464.8755 For the Executive MBA Program Europe DIRECTOR, EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM EUROPE The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business Woolgate Exchange, 25 Basinghall Street London EC2V 5HA United Kingdom Telephone 011.44(0)20.7643.2210; fax 011.44(0)20.7643.2201

For the Executive MBA Program Asia DIRECTOR, EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM ASIA The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 101 Penang Road Singapore 238466 Telephone 011.65.6835.6482; fax 011.65.6835.6483 For the International Joint Degree Programs COMMITTEE ON JOINT MBA/AM PROGRAMS The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 Telephone 773.702-4499; fax 773.702.4177 For the PhD Program ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR PhD STUDIES The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 Telephone 773.702.7298; fax 773.702.5257 E-mail [email protected] When visiting campus, go to OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60637 For student housing OFFICE OF STUDENT HOUSING The University of Chicago 5525 South Ellis Avenue, Room 180 Chicago, Illinois 60637 Telephone 773.702.7366 fax 773.834.3685 NEIGHBORHOOD STUDENT APARTMENTS ASSIGNMENT OFFICE The University of Chicago 5316 South Dorchester Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60615 Telephone 773.753.2218; fax 773.753.8054

109

110

The University of Chicago Campus Map

The University of Chicago Campus Map

111

U NIVERSITY CALENDAR 2005–07 2005

AUTUMN QUARTER

2006

Sept. 22 Sept. 26 Nov. 24–25 Dec. 9 Dec. 10

GSB classes meet University classes meet Thanksgiving Day holiday Fall Convocation Fall quarter ends

Sept. 21 Sept. 25 Nov. 23–26 Dec. 8 Dec. 9

2006

WINTER QUARTER

2007

Jan. 2 Mar. 17 Mar. 18

Classes meet Winter Convocation Winter quarter ends

Jan. 2 Mar. 16 Mar. 17

2006

SPRING QUARTER

2007

Mar. 27 May 29 June 10 June 11

Classes meet Memorial Day holiday Spring quarter ends Spring Convocation (GSB)

Mar. 26 May 28 June 9 June 10

2006

SUMMER QUARTER

2007

June 17 July 4 Aug. 25 Aug. 26

Classes meet Independence Day holiday Summer Convocation Summer quarter ends

June 16 July 4 Aug. 24 Aug. 25

The provisions of these Announcements are for informational purposes only and are not intended to create a contract or agreement between the university and any applicant or student. The university reserves the right to make changes (including dates) in these Announcements at any time and without prior notice. Students and applicants who wish the most up-to-date information regarding courses and degree requirements should contact their department or the director of Dean of Students Office.

THE UNIVERSITY

T

H E

U

N I V E R S I T Y

O F

OF

CHICAGO

CHICAGO

T H E G R A D U AT E S C H O O L OF

BUSINESS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL of BUSINESS 2005 – 2006

ANNOUNCEMENTS

2005-2006

Loading...

Graduate School of Business.qxp - University Registrar - The

THE UNIVERSITY T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F OF CHICAGO CHICAGO T H E G R A D U AT E S C H O O L OF BUSINESS THE GRADUATE SCHOOL of BUSINES...

768KB Sizes 3 Downloads 20 Views

Recommend Documents

University - The Graduate School - Binghamton
Jun 12, 2017 - Binghamton University was one of the first schools in the U.S. to offer a university-wide Certificate of

School of Social Services Administration - University Registrar
Such faculty members as Charlotte. Towle and ...... cleaning, textbooks, incidentals, clothing, recreation, and commutin

PURDUE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL
20 Feb 2014 - Dr. Smith discussed a publication by Dan Ariely called The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty. He noted that

Graduate School | Clarkson University
3 days ago - We offer rigorous, sought-after graduate and professional degree programs at the advanced certificate, mast

DISSERTATION of the University of St. Gallen, Graduate School of
9 For a review of strategic management research see, for example, Hart (1992) or Hart and Bradbury (1994). 2.1 Strategy

School of Medicine Catalog - University Registrar - Vanderbilt University
Policies concerning noncurricular matters and concerning withdrawal for medical or emotional reasons can be found in the

the graduate school at andrews university
Please return one of your current research papers based on the requirements explained on the enclosed form. Financial St

Bunkyo University Graduate School of Human Sciences - Graduate
Psychoanalysis, psychiatric medicine: Researching the clinical and theoretical study of psychoanalysis and psychiatric m

Keller Graduate School Of Management - DeVry University
3. Message from the President. Dear Student,. Welcome to the Keller Graduate School of Management family, and congratula

The Pennsylvania State University The Graduate School College of
Abstract: The site of El Gigante, La Paz, Honduras is unique in Central America for its very well preserved organic rema