Graduate Education Graduate Education - Clarkson University

Loading...

Graduate Education

@

a c h e R

a

H i g h e

r

D

e

g r

e e

o f e l l e n E x c c e

2002-2003 Bulletin Union College Schenectady, New York

Contents General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Registration Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Graduate Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Academic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 College Facilities and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Educational Studies Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Engineering and Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Administration and Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

IMMUNIZATION

All students attending New York State colleges and universities, whose birthdates are on or after January 1, 1957, are required to show proof of immunity against measles, mumps, rubella, and tuberculosis. Proof of immunization must be submitted to the Health Services Office prior to registration. A form is available for this purpose. Students may also provide a physician’s written statement as proof of immunization but such documentation must provide all required information and be attached to our form. The Health Services Office will provide the student with a “Health Clearance” form indicating compliance with the law. This form must be presented in order to register. Students whose religious beliefs prohibit immunization, or for whom these immunizations would be detrimental to their health, will be required to submit documentation in support of their request for a waiver. Questions concerning immunization requirements should be directed to the Health Services Office at 388-6120. 1

Graduate Education

@

ABOUT UNION COLLEGE

Chartered in 1795, Union is an independent college for men and women of high academic promise and strong personal motivation. The College has strong commitments to certain fundamental assumptions about education— about its matter and its methods, but above all about its goals. The College believes that every student should learn to gather and evaluate information, to think coherently, to write succinctly, and to form aesthetic judgments. The College hopes that in acquiring these tools students will also discover a taste for the life of the mind, a respect for intellect, and a sense of the range of human possibilities—qualities that will enable them to construct their own lives and thoughts on a rational design. In the end, the success of the Union College program is measured less by what the College has done to its students than by what these students have done with the opportunities the College provides. GRADUATE EDUCATION

Union’s Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs develops and administers a variety of programs, including undergraduate and graduate degree programs for both full-time and part-time students and the College summer school. For almost half a century, both undergraduate and graduate courses have been available in the late afternoon and evening. Master’s degrees are available in engineering, computer science, business, health management, and educational studies. The master’s degree in business is available in a variety of concentrations. In addition, students may earn a joint J.D./M.B.A. degree through a cooperative program with Albany Law School. A combined PharmD./M.S. is offered in conjunction with the Albany College of Pharmacy.

2

ABOUT THIS CATALOG

The information in this catalog was prepared as of May 15, 2002. Provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and Union College. The College reserves the right to make changes in its course offerings, degree requirements, regulations and procedures, and fees and expenses as educational and financial considerations require. Union College does not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, race, color, religious belief, disability, sexual orientation, or national origin. The College’s policy of nondiscrimination extends to all areas of college operations, including but not limited to admissions, student aid, athletics, employment, and educational programs. Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs: Contact Information • Sue Lehrman, Ph.D., Dean (518) 388-6597 • Lloyd Tredwell, Associate Dean (518) 388-6239 • Mary D’Amelia, Director (518) 388-6085 • Rhonda Sheehan, (518) 388-6238 Coordinator of Admissions

General Information CALENDAR

The Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs processes registrations for all courses offered in this catalog. Regular Office Hours: Monday - Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. Fall Term 2002 Registration: (Late registration fee charged after August 30) August 19 - 30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Open House with Evening Advising: August 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Special Office Hours: August 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. September 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Classes Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 12 Classes End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 20 Exam Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 22 - 27 Winter Term 2003 Registration: (Late registration fee charged after November 15) November 4 - 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Evening Advising: November 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Special Office Hours: November 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. OFFICE CLOSED . . . . . . . . . . December 25 - January 1 Special Office Hours: January 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. January 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Classes Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . January 6 Classes End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 14 Exam Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 17 - 21 Spring Term 2003 Registration: (Late registration fee charged after March 14) March 3 - 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

PROGRAMS AND ADVISORS

Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs (518) 388-6288 FAX: (518) 388-6686 MBA @ Union (518) 388-6238

FAX: (518) 388-6754

Educational Studies (518) 388-6361

FAX: (518) 388-6686

M.S.

Telephone

Professor

• Bioethics

388-8045

R. Baker

• Clinical Leadership in 388-8045 Health Management

R. Baker

• Computer Science

388-6319

D. Hemmendinger

• Engineering: Electrical Mechanical

388-6272 388-6321

E. Hassib W. Keat

• Master of Arts in Teaching

388-6361 388-6361

P. Allen B. Hall

• Master of Science for Teachers

388-6361 388-6361

P. Allen B. Hall

• Master of Business Administration

388-6297

R.A. Bowman

• Health Systems Administration

388-6299

M. Strosberg

Educational Studies

M.B.A.

Evening Advising: March 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Combined Degree Programs

• J.D./M.B.A.

388-6302

D. Arnold

Special Office Hours: March 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. March 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.

• J.D./M.B.A. Health

388-6782

V. Manna

• MS in Clinical Leadership in Health Management and Pharmacy Doctorate

388-6782

V. Manna

• Accelerated Master of Business Administration

388-6782

V. Manna

Classes Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 31 Classes End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 6 Exam Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 9 - 12 Commencement: . . . . . . . . . . . Sunday, June 15, 2003

Snow Closing: Snow closing announcements will be broadcast on the following stations: WGY (810 AM), WYJB (95.5), WQBK (104), WPYX (106), WKLI (101), WFLY (92), WRVE (99.5) and WTRY (98) after 2:00 p.m. Religious Observances: Classes will be held; students observing holidays may request make-up sessions for exams.

• Accelerated 388-6447 Master of Health Systems Administration

M. Chudzik

3

Registration Procedures WHEN TO REGISTER

Students may register in person, by mail or fax prior to each term. Program advisors are available during the special evening advising held prior to each term and by appointment at other times. Registrations will be accepted through the last day of each registration period. A nonrefundable late registration fee of $50 will be assessed to all registrations received after the last day to register without a late fee (specific dates are listed in the catalog for each term) and the first day of class. This is in addition to the required $100 non-refundable deposit. A nonrefundable late registration fee of $150 will be assessed to all registrations received within seven days of the first class meeting. This is in addition to the required $100 non-refundable deposit. A non-refundable late registration fee of $300 will be assessed to all registrations received between seven and fourteen days of the first class meeting. This is in addition to the required $100 non-refundable deposit. HOW TO REGISTER

1. All registration materials are available from the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. Prospective students may pick up the materials in person Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 4:15 p.m., or may request that they be mailed to them. Materials are automatically mailed to currently enrolled students prior to the registration period. 2. All students must submit an application and proof of immunization before registering for courses. Applications for all graduate programs are to be submitted to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. Proof of immunization must be submitted to the Health Services Office, Silliman Hall. 3. Complete the registration form, including the appropriate faculty advisor’s signature, and return it either in person or by mail to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. A “Health Clearance” form must be presented along with the registration form. A deposit of $100 must accompany your registration. You may pay with a check or by MasterCard/Visa. 4. Full payment—either by check or charge card—is due by the first day of classes. 5. All students should check with the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs prior to registration for additions to or deletions from the course listings or changes in class times or locations. 6. Some courses have enrollment restrictions. It is the student’s responsibility to register early to reserve a space in such courses. 7. The College retains the right to cancel a course if the enrollment is insufficient. 4

ENROLLMENT IN DAY COURSES

Students who wish to enroll in day courses must consult with the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs and their academic advisor. Many day program courses have restricted enrollments. In cases where day course enrollment is limited, it is necessary to obtain a permission card from the academic department offering the course during the eighth week of the preceding term. Please consult the Registrar’s office in Silliman Hall, (518) 388-6109, for the exact dates AUDITING OF COURSES

Students may audit courses for one-half the tuition charged for a credit course. Auditors must have appropriate course prerequisites and obtain written permission from the instructor. Laboratory courses and independent studies are not open to auditors. Audit status is indicated by a “Z” on the student’s transcript and is not calculated in the student’s cumulative average. Students who wish to change from credit to audit may do so by notifying the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs in writing by the end of the sixth week of classes. No tuition refunds are available for changes from credit to audit. CROSS-REGISTRATION

As a member of the Hudson-Mohawk Association of Colleges and Universities, Union participates in a crossregistration agreement which enables full-time matriculated graduate students to take courses at other member colleges and receive credit at Union. At least one-half of a student’s term load must be taken at Union. Registration for each course must be approved by the student’s advisor and the host institution. Generally, cross registrations will be approved only for courses not offered at the home institution. Cross-registration forms with detailed instructions are available from the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs.

Graduate Information Course Registration/Matriculation Procedures STEP I:

Before registering for their first course, all students, degree or non-degree, must fill out a one-page application and complete an Immunization Record. A $50 application fee must accompany application. All applications and fees are received by the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. An Immunization Record can be obtained at the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. [email protected] students must submit an unofficial copy of their transcript. All students attending New York State colleges and universities, whose birthdates are on or after January 1, 1957, are required to show proof of immunity against measles, mumps, rubella, and tuberculosis. No student will be permitted to register for a first course unless an application/fee has been submitted. STEP II:

Before registering for a fourth graduate course, the final decision on the student’s application must be made. No student will be permitted to register for a fourth course unless already matriculated. NON-DEGREE STUDENTS:

Students who are not planning to work towards a degree must follow Step I only. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

Evidence of intellectual achievement, motivation and aptitude are required for admission to graduate programs. All students must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited college before applying for graduate degree status. A grade average of B (3.0 cumulative index) or better in undergraduate work is expected for admission. Students who wish to apply for degree status must consult with the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs and make an appointment to discuss their academic program with the appropriate Program Advisor. Applicants to programs offered by the [email protected] are required to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) as part of the admissions process. Once submitted, all application materials become the property of Union College and are not returnable.

WHEN TO APPLY

Applications for admission to graduate programs are processed on a rolling admissions basis. The student may therefore apply for admission to graduate degree status at any time of the year, except in the full-time programs administered by the M.A.T. program, which begins in the summer. Please refer to the section describing this programs for specific deadlines. ADMISSION FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

All international students requiring an I-20 or IAP-66 form are encouraged to submit their applications by March 1. Applicants must apply for full-time study, provide proof of financial responsibility, and submit an official score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants for graduate programs in Engineering and Computer Science must submit a TOEFL score of at least 550. [email protected] students must submit an official GMAT score. Candidates for all other graduate programs must submit a GRE score of at least 1650. TRANSFER CREDIT

With the approval of the program advisor, graduate work completed on a satisfactory level (minimum grade of B-) at other institutions may be counted toward a Union degree if it contributes to the completion of Union requirements. In programs of the MBA @ Union, a maximum of eight full courses may be transferred. Engineering, Computer Science and M.A.T. programs may allow one or two transfer courses. Matriculated students interested in receiving credit for courses taken elsewhere are advised to obtain a permission form at the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs and acquire the necessary approval prior to registration at another school. COMBINED UNDERGRADUATE AND MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

Union undergraduate students with excellent academic records may apply for a combined degree program leading to a Bachelor of Science in a science or engineering field and a Master of Science in engineering or computer science; a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and a Master of Business Administration in management, health systems administration or a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and a Master of Arts in Teaching. A cumulative average of 3.0 – 3.2 in undergraduate courses is expected. Acceptance into the program enables students to apply up to three graduate level courses for 5

credit (depending on the major) in fulfillment of both undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Students must apply for graduate admission no later than the end of their 10th term of undergraduate work. At the time of application the student must submit a complete program of study which has been approved by the academic advisor from the appropriate department. Students applying to the [email protected] with 3.4 grade point average are not required to take GMATs for admission. ACADEMIC STANDING

The maintenance of graduate status requires a B (3.0) grade average. Matriculated students whose grades fall below the required 3.0 cumulative index are put on academic probation and will be notified in writing. If permitted to continue, the student must raise his or her grade average to B. Failure to do so will lead to the termination of graduate status.

The M.S. and M.B.A. degrees offered by the [email protected] require considerably more course work (see [email protected] section of this catalog). For some degrees, candidates must pass an oral and/or written comprehensive examination given by a committee selected by their major department. The committee will be composed of three faculty members and, usually, one member from outside the college faculty. The oral or written examination will relate to the student’s course work and thesis research. A student who fails the examination may be given one more opportunity for examination upon recommendation of the Examining Committee. The reexamination must take place during the following year.

Academic Information ACCREDITATION

A grade of F in one course or a grade of C in two graduate level Engineering, Computer Science, or Educational Studies courses or three [email protected] courses may indicate that the student is not of graduate caliber. Matriculated students will be dropped from the program. A grade of B- is considered to be substandard performance for a graduate level course. SUBCOUNCIL ON GRADUATE STUDIES

The Subcouncil on Graduate Education of the Academic Affairs Council is responsible for recommending graduate policy for the admission and academic performance of students. The Subcouncil consists of faculty representatives, student representatives, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Dean of Engineering and Dean of the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. The Subcouncil approves students accepted to degree status and reviews petitions submitted by students with academic considerations. Students who wish to petition the Subcouncil with regard to grades, graduate status, or other matters must do so in writing.

Union College is fully accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the American Chemical Society. The civil, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET). The Health Systems Administration program is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). Union’s M.B.A. program is accredited by AACSB-International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), the world’s leading business school accrediting body. Union’s program is unique in being the smallest of all AACSB accredited business programs and one of only 28 accredited programs—along with such institutions as Harvard University, Stanford University, and Dartmouth College—that focus solely on graduate degrees. Less than 30 percent of all business programs are accredited nationwide. ADVISORY SERVICE

Graduation Requirements A student who intends to graduate in June must send a letter of intent to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs by December 1 of the preceding year. This obligation rests with the student. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of one academic year of course and thesis work is required for the master’s degree in most programs. This is equivalent to 9 or 10 full courses or 7 or 8 full courses plus 2 thesis courses. Students must finish their degree requirements within six years of matriculating at Union. 6

Questions regarding admission to graduate programs should be directed to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. Faculty members are available by appointment and during special advisement evenings preceding each term. All students must consult with an academic advisor before enrolling in courses. Engineering students in particular need to be advised of changing requirements.

Grading Policies and Procedures COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

Union College uses a course numbering system with four levels. Courses numbered 010-099 are those for which only undergraduate credit is given. Courses numbered 100-199 may be taken for upper-level undergraduate or for graduate credit, although some programs may limit the number of 100-level courses which may be taken for graduate credit. Courses numbered 200-399 are graduate courses. Academic credit is computed using a system which counts the number of course units completed. Most courses are for full credit (1 course unit) which is equivalent to 3.3 semester credit hours or 5 quarter hours. All courses listed in this catalog are full credit courses unless designated otherwise. GRADING

Grades are awarded according to the following system: A 4.0 B+ 3.3 C 2.0 A- 3.7 B 3.0 F 0.0 B- 2.7 A student who receives a grade of “F” may request approval to repeat the course. Both the “F” and the new grade appear on the transcript and are included in the cumulative index.

Withdrawal after the sixth week will appear as an “F.” Any student who stops attending a course without written notification to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs will also receive an “F.” Please note: Students will not be permitted to withdraw if there is an outstanding balance on their bill. REPEAT POLICY

Students who repeat a course they have previously failed will have both grades listed on the transcript. All credits attempted and total quality points earned will be used in calculating the cumulative grade point average. Students who repeat a course they have previously passed (with a grade of “D” or better) will have both grades listed on the transcript, but neither the quality points associated with the second grade nor the credits attempted or earned will be factored into their GPA. TRANSCRIPTS

Official transcripts from Union College must be requested in writing. They cannot be sent to students but will be mailed to other educational institutions, employers, prospective employers, etc. This insures the privacy of the student’s academic records. Unofficial transcripts, without the college seal, are available for the student’s personal records. A fee of $3.00 must be paid for each transcript.

INCOMPLETE COURSE WORK

Students must complete the appropriate form to be filed with the Registrar. When an “Incomplete” is granted, the incomplete grade may not extend beyond one term. All grade changes must be received in writing from the professor responsible for the student’s work and co-signed by the chair or the director of that department. Final grades are mailed to students. No grade reports are given by telephone. WITHDRAWALS

To withdraw from a course, a student must notify the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs in writing. Withdrawals prior to the first class meeting will receive a full tuition refund, less the $100 deposit. Students may withdraw from a course up until the end of the sixth week of classes.

FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT

Students have access to their education records with certain limited exceptions. The Registrar’s files are maintained at the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. Advisors’ files are maintained by each advisor. Students’ requests to inspect their files will be honored within 45 days. Any unsuccessful attempt should be reported to the Chair of the Graduate Subcouncil. Access to student files is denied to outside persons unless the student gives written permission. Exceptions are directory information (name, major, telephone number, degree and date awarded, academic honors, and attendance dates), release of information required by government statute to government representatives, and release of information required by court order. All recommendations are destroyed as soon as the specific use for which they were intended is complete.

SEE FEES FOR WITHDRAWALS

7

STUDENT CONDUCT AND ACADEMIC HONESTY

Your first responsibility as a student is academic honesty. The College assumes that students will not resort to plagiarism, theft and mutilation of library books and periodicals, or any other form of academic dishonesty. Any student found guilty of academic dishonesty will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. Additional information is found in the booklets Plagiarism: A Cautionary Word to Students and the Student Handbook, which are available at the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. All members of the College community are bound together by respect for the individual and the collective rights of others. Any student who violates the safety and security of the College community is subject to disciplinary action by the College as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct. Any member of the College community or a guest/visitor may initiate charges of misconduct against a student currently enrolled at the College. Allegations of misconduct against a student enrolled in graduate programs must be submitted in writing to the Dean of Arts and Sciences. Responsibility for adjudicating violations and imposing disciplinary actions rests with the Dean of Arts and Sciences according to the procedures stated in the Student Conduct Code. Union College has always had a central concern for establishing and maintaining a community in which work and learning proceed in a humane and caring atmosphere for all its members. Sexual harassment is a violation of law and will not be tolerated in any form at Union College. Sexual harassment, according to the definition developed by N.O.W., is any repeated or unwanted verbal or physical sexual advance, sexually explicit derogatory statements or sexually discriminatory remarks made by someone in the classroom or workplace which is offensive or which causes the recipient discomfort or humiliation or which interferes with the recipient’s education or job performance. Should students feel they have been the victims of any form of the behavior noted above, they may initiate informal discussion or more formal procedures through any of the following administrators: Dean of Engineering; Dean of Arts & Sciences; Director of Affirmative Action. A sexual harassment brochure outlines appropriate actions students may take. It is periodically distributed to new students.

Union College’s policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of age, sex, race, religion, disability, sexual orientation or national origin extends to all areas of college operations including, but not limited to, admissions, student aid, athletics, employment and educational programs.

8

Financial Information Tuition and Fees Full tuition payments are due at the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs before the first class meeting. Students who pay after the first class meeting will be charged a late payment fee. Tuition for graduate courses is listed below with an accompanying schedule of fees for withdrawal from courses. No refund of tuition will be given more than fourteen days after the first class meeting. FEES FOR WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES

Type of Course

Tuition

Within 7 Days of 1st Class Meeting

Within 14 Days of 1st Class Meeting

Graduate Engineering

$2036

$150

$300

[email protected]

$1716

$150

$300

Educational Studies

$1382

$150

$300

SENIOR CITIZENS

Persons over 65 are eligible for a tuition waiver for one credit course per year on a space-available basis, and with the permission of the instructor. FEES (Other than Course Withdrawal)

Registration Deposit . . . . . . $100 (non-refundable) All registrations must be accompanied by a registration deposit that is applicable to tuition. The deposit must be paid before a registration will be processed. The fee is non-refundable unless the College must cancel all courses for which a student has registered. Late Registration . . . . . . . . . $50 (non-refundable) (Before Classes Begin) Charged to students registering after the last day of the registration period listed in the calendar for each term. Late Registration . . . . . . . . . $150 (non-refundable) (Within 7 Days of the First Class) Charged to students registering within seven and fourteen days of the first class meeting. Late Registration . . . . . . . . . $300 (non-refundable) (Between 7 and 14 Days of the First Class) Charged to students registering between seven and fourteen days of the first class meeting.

Late Tuition Payment . . . . . . . $50 (non-refundable) Tuition Deposit . . . . . . . . . . . $100 (non-refundable) (M.B.A. students only) After being admitted to [email protected], all first-year full-time M.B.A. students must submit a $100 tuition deposit to reserve a place in the entering class. This deposit is applied to tuition and is not refundable should the student ultimately decide not to matriculate at Union. GENERAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS

Diploma and transcripts will be withheld from a student who has not met all financial obligations to the College. Failure to satisfy all financial obligations will result in the account being sent to an agency for collection; the student will be responsible for all collection and/or legal fees that are assessed.

TUITION WAIVER POLICY

Students with waivers must pay all fees other than course tuition. MASTERCARD AND VISA

Tuition and fees may be charged on MasterCard and/or VISA accounts. The authorization section of the registration form must be completed. COMPANY BILLING

Some companies and government agencies pay their employees’ tuition directly to the College. If your tuition will be paid in this manner, please supply authorizing forms or letters from your employer. If your employer intends to pay 100 percent of your tuition at the start of the term, your registration deposit will be waived.

FEE FOR CHECKS RETURNED TO THE COLLEGE

First Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10 Second Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15 Proficiency Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250 Proficiency examinations for course credit are provided to students with previous experience or study. Applications should be made with the department chair. Registration and fee payment must be made at the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs prior to taking the examination. Application for Degree Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50

COMPANY REIMBURSEMENT

Some companies and government agencies pay their employees’ tuition once grades are received. If your tuition will be paid in this manner, you will be responsible to pay tuition in full the first term you register. For subsequent, consecutive terms, providing the same number of classes are taken, you may register with a deposit of $100 with the balance to be paid when the previous term’s reimbursement is received. Please note: If payment is not received in our office by the fifth week of the current term, whether reimbursement has been received or not, a late payment fee of $50 will be assessed.

Status Continuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100 Graduate students who are degree candidates and are working on their thesis must pay a continuation fee for any term in which they are not formally enrolled in one of the required research and thesis courses. Summer term not applicable. Student Resource Fee (M.B.A. students only) $150 All full-time M.B.A. students must pay an annual student resource fee that is used to support student-organized events, and expenses related to operation of the graduate student computer lab. Part-time students pay this fee only once, at matriculation. OTHER FEES

Master’s Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15 Diploma Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30 Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3 Parking Decal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15

9

Financial Aid The Office of Financial Aid at Union College, located in Grant Hall, is responsible for financial aid services to Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs students. Questions concerning eligibility for state and federal programs should be directed to the Office of Financial Aid (388-6123). Students may qualify for one or more of the programs listed below. FEDERAL SUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOANS

Matriculated graduate students who are United States citizens or permanent residents may borrow up to $8,500 per year, aggregate maximum of $65,500 (including undergraduate loans). Loans carry a variable interest rate capped at 8.25%, that is deferred until six months after completion of studies or a drop in enrollment below half time. Students have up to ten years to repay. Eligibility is determined by completing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and a loan application, and submitting federal tax returns and other supporting documentation to the Financial Aid Office. Allow twelve weeks from start of the application process to receipt of the loan check. Loans are disbursed in at least two payments. FEDERAL UNSUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOANS

Matriculated graduate students are eligible for up to $10,000 per year up to a total of $73,000. Note: If the loan originally covers a term in which you do not enroll at least half time, a portion of the amount received must be returned to the bank. Students who withdraw from Union College must visit the Financial Aid Office for exit information regarding their loan. Upon graduation, this information session is required. SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN PROGRAMS

Available to students attending graduate or certificate programs on a full or part-time basis. Loan approval is based on the review of credit worthiness and ability to repay the loan, not on financial need. Applications are available at the Financial Aid Office located in Grant Hall. TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (TAP)

Full-time matriculated graduate students who are residents of New York may apply for TAP. Eligibility is based on New York State net taxable income. Graduate students may receive up to $550 per year. Applications are available at the Offices of Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs and Financial Aid.

10

LEO A. AROIAN FELLOWSHIP

The Aroian Fellowship is awarded annually to an M.B.A. student with superior achievement and a strong interest in quantitative analysis. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS

Students who are eligible to receive educational benefits under the various chapters administered by the V.A. may obtain more information by contacting the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. Entitlement will vary depending on the education program. Students claiming veterans benefits are required to submit written monthly statements attesting to the fact that they are attending class. The following statement must be submitted in person or by mail to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs, Attn: Registrar’s Office:

The undersigned attests that he/she continued to regularly attend classes for those courses in which he/she is currently enrolled. Signed statements are due on the following dates and should be so dated: Fall Term 2002 September 27 October 25 November 8

Winter Term 2003 January 24 February 21 March 7

Spring Term 2003 April 25 May 23 June 6

Any veteran not forwarding this statement will be decertified, resulting in the termination of benefits. Students pay tuition and fees upon registering and subsequently receive benefit checks from the V.A. on a timely basis.

College Facilities and Services ATHLETIC FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6284

The Alumni Gymnasium offers an eight-lane swimming pool with seating and a diving area, a multi-use gym, five racquetball and three squash courts, as well as an exercise room, new locker rooms, and offices. Alumni Gym has two weight rooms, one with fifteen Cybex machines and the other with first-rate free-weight equipment. The Memorial Field House contains a one-tenth mile indoor track, two basketball courts, and a multi-station universal gym. The all-weather, artificial turf field is the main outdoor facility for a very active intramural program. CAMPUS SAFETY

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6911

The Campus Safety Department is located in the Campus Operations Building on the north side of campus, between the Science and Engineering Building and the Field House. The Department provides a 24 hour, 7 day per week Operations Control Center and preventive patrol. The Control Center monitors fire alarms and receives emergency calls and requests for service (6911). During business hours, the Department handles vehicle registrations, lost and found, and parking tickets. Emergency telephones are strategically placed around the campus. “Hotline” phones are activated simply by removing the handset from the cradle. Outdoor emergency phones housed in red telephone boxes can be found at the following locations: 27 North Terrace Lane; the southeast corner of the Arts Building; the East Side of Achilles Rink near Whipple Bridge; the East Side of Bailey Hall; at the corner of South College (South Terrace Lane & South Lane); the northeast corner of Davidson; the southwest corner of Humanities; the northeast corner of Social Science; and behind 17 South Lane. “Interior Hotline” and courtesy phones are located in most campus buildings. A student operated escort service is available between 8:00 p.m. and 1:00 a.m. This service is to provide personal security and is not intended to be a shuttle service. Please contact Campus Safety for further information. CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER . . . . . . . . 388-6176

The Career Development Center, located in Becker Hall offers a variety of services for matriculated graduate students. Persons who are interested in exploring career options may request individual appointments with a career counselor and/or use the career information materials in the Career Development Center library. Students may also

sign up for group workshops designed to help with the career planning process, resume writing and interviewing skills. The Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and certain evenings. Call the Center for evening hours. On-campus recruiting sign-ups begin in September for the fall term and in January for the winter term. Interested students should contact the Career Development Center at the beginning of fall term to get additional information. The dates and times for group workshops and on-campus recruiting are printed in the monthly newsletter published by the Career Development Center. The newsletter is available at both the Center and the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs. COMPUTER FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6293

The Peschel Computer Center in Steinmetz Hall houses the College’s shared central computers and servers (running NT and Unix), public personal computer labs and related facilities. Students who wish to use the central computers must have a computer account, which they may obtain by completing an Application for Computer Access (AFCA). The forms are available at the Computer Center. Public access personal computers (IBM and Apple Macintosh) are available in three computer labs 24 hours a day in labs in Steinmetz Hall. Scanners and printers are also available in these labs. The College is connected to the Internet, which may be accessed via the central computers or personal computers in labs. Graduate Education and Special Programs students with central computer accounts may take advantage of 33.6 Kbps dial-in lines (12 lines). The phone number is 388-6836. A Computer Lab located in the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs is operated and opened for M.B.A., Educational Studies students. The lab is located in the basement of Lamont House and students have access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All required software for these graduate programs is loaded onto the computers and printing is available. You must obtain a validated ID card from Campus Safety to access the lab. While the Lamont House Lab is available for users on a round-the-clock basis, technical assistance and other hardware/software support provided by graduate assistants is less frequent. Check the lab bulletin boards lab assistant’s hours.

11

DINING FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6050

Dutch Hollow, located in the Reamer Campus Center, features fast food and much more. Beverages, pizza, ice cream, submarine sandwiches, and “broiled to order” items are readily available before and after evening classes, from 7:30 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. Specials are served from 11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., and 5:00 to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Another popular spot is the Rathskellar, opened by students in the 1950s and located in the basement of Old Chapel. HEALTH AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE . . . . . 388-6642

Full-time students may purchase a health and accident insurance policy at affordable cost through the College. LIBRARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6277

The newly renovated Schaffer Library houses over 515,000 volumes and 1500+ current periodical subscriptions. It is a government depository library and also has substantial microform collections. Special Collections houses the College archives and collections of rare books and manuscripts. Several online services provide access to additional bibliographic databases and full text sources. The building, which was completed in the fall of 1998, contains group study rooms, a fully wired classroom, faculty study spaces and general seating areas. It operates on an open stack plan and offers interlibrary loan, mediated online searches and document delivery services. Students in good standing are permitted to borrow materials from the library once they are registered with the library. Students may also obtain a direct access card through the circulation department which permits direct borrowing from many libraries in the area. The library’s web page (http://www.union.edu/PUBLIC/LIBRARY) describes much more about the library’s services, policies and collections. PARKING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6178

Parking on the College campus is restricted. Students who wish to park on campus must purchase a decal for $15 and park in designated areas. There is absolutely no parking on any campus roadways as they are fire lanes. Decals, parking regulations, and campus maps may be obtained from the Campus Safety Office. Cars parked on campus without decals will be ticketed and may be towed at their owner’s expense. All roadways are considered fire lanes. A vehicle parked in a fire lane, creating a hazard, blocking access to others, blocking dumpsters or loading zones or parked in an improper designated lot, will be subject to a $25 fine and towing. 12

REAMER CAMPUS CENTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388-6118

The Reamer Campus Center with its multi-story atrium serves as the crossroads for the campus. The atrium is framed by the Auditorium, the Dutch Hollow Restaurant and Upperclass Dining Hall, Chet’s Pub, the College Bookstore, the Convenience Store, the student mailroom, and exterior terraces overlooking Jackson’s Garden. The Center also offers meeting facilities, music rehearsal rooms, games, commuter student lockers, and the offices of the Dean of Students, Dining Services, Telecommunications, Concordiensis (college newspaper), The Sentinel (opinion), The Garnet (yearbook), Inner View (video club), and WRUC.

Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership Location . . . . . . . . . . Humanities Building, Room 020 Telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-8045 Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-8046 E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.bioethics.union.edu Director: Robert Baker Assistant to the Director: Ann Nolte Technical Support: Lloyd Tredwell Professors: Arnold, Baker, Lambrinos, Strosberg, Schmee Associate Professors: Lehrman, Nydegger Assistant Professors: Ashman, Neidermeyer Adjunct Professors: Jacoby, Kaplan, Moriarity, Otto, Pratt, Shelton, Sorum, Steinbock, Thompson Visiting Lecturers: Greenlaw, Lederer, McCullough, Veatch Degrees Offered:

• Master of Science in Bioethics (Joint Degree with Albany Medical College) • Master of Science in Clinical Leadership and Health Management • Pharmacy Doctorate and Master of Science Clinical Leadership in Health Management

The M.S. in Bioethics This distance and campus-based MS in Bioethics is offered jointly by the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership, Union College and by the Center for Medical Ethics, Albany Medical College. It provides advanced bioethics and clinical education for doctors, healthcare administrators, lawyers, nurses, pharmacists, philosophers, researchers and students enrolled in professional and graduate degree programs. The hybrid format of short on-campus summer sessions and distance learning courses has been specially designed to meet the needs of working healthcare professionals. There are 12 required courses in the program: an intensive Summer Seminar in Health and Human Values; four required courses; three practica; a two-course thesis and two elective courses. APPLICATION PROCESS

The Masters of Science in Bioethics will be pursued through on-campus and distance learning courses. On-campus courses are offered at Albany Medical College, Union College, and through programs in the Northeast Bioethics Consortium.

To be considered for matriculated student status, applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree and have submitted a complete application (including an essay, three letters of recommendation, official transcripts from the institution offering the highest degree attained, the New York State immunization form, and an application fee of $50). The Admissions committee may also require a standardized test. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. Applicants are notified of the committee’s decision within 4 weeks of completed application. Tuition is assessed on a per course basis. A one time non-refundable deposit of $250 is required upon acceptance: $100 will be credited towards tuition; the remaining portion of the deposit ($150) is applied towards the student resource fee. COURSE WAIVER POLICY

Up to three courses or practica may be waived by the admissions committee. To secure a waiver, the student must complete a “Course Waiver” form and submit all applicable transcripts and other relevant documentation. A separate form must be completed for each waiver requested. COURSE SCHEDULE (Listed in recommended order)

MED 246. Proseminar in Health and Human Values Summer Session (2-weeks in August) MED 281. Health Care Policy Fall, Distance Learning MED 274. Biomedical Ethics Winter, Distance Learning (or Spring, Evenings, Union) MED 202. Clinical Ethics Spring, Distance Learning MED 301. Practicum I in Clinical Ethics Summer Session I, On-site (various venues) MED 205. Reproductive Ethics Summer Session II, Distance Learning (Elective) MED 284. Bioethics and the Law Fall, Distance Learning MED 206. Research Ethics-Discussions in Scientific Integrity Winter, Distance Learning (Elective) MED 207. Empirical Research Methods in Bioethics Spring, Distance Learning (Elective) MED 302. On-Line Clinical Practicum Fall, Distance Learning MED 391. Masters Project I Winter, Distance Learning MED 392. Masters Project II Spring, Distance Learning MED 399. Capstone Clinical Ethics Summer Session I, AMC and Union-on-campus

13

COURSES

MED 246. Proseminar in Health and Human Values Summer (First -2 weeks of August), On-Site, Day, Albany Medical College and Union College; Baker, Greenlaw, Lederer, McCullough, Shelton, Veatch

An intensive two-week introduction to current topics in clinical ethics and bioethics, taught seminar style at Albany Medical College and Union College.This overview of current issues in bioethics humanities involves four special pro-seminars, case conferences and ethics rounds. There will also be extensive training in the computer skills (demonstrations, workshops) essential to mastering distance learning. Must be in the first fifteen months of enrollment. MED 281. Health Care Policy Fall Distance Learning; Strosberg

This course provides an understanding of the public policy making process and the political and regulatory environment in which health care organizations function. It also provides an understanding of managerial processes, politics, and structure of the health care organizations where ethical policies and practices are implemented and carried out on an ongoing basis. Policies for consideration include resource allocation, end-of-life decision making, accountability and performance measurement, and conflict-of-interest.

MED 284. Bioethics and the Law Fall Distance Learning; Pratt

This course is designed to familiarize students with major legal issues and legal concepts relevant to bioethics. MED 206. Research Ethics—Discussions in Scientific Integrity Winter Distance Learning

A course in research ethics including a discussion of the IRB process. Elective course MED 207. Research Ethics: Empirical Research Methods in Bioethics Spring Distance Learning

A course in empirical research methodology designed to teach how to conduct empirical research in the field, and how to analyze the empirical bioethics literature. Elective course MED 391 & MED 392. Masters Project Winter and Spring, Distance Learning

The masters project in bioethics or clinical ethics, will involve two terms of research culminating in a written document addressing some aspect of clinical ethics or bioethical policy, such as a proposal to revise or reform practices at a medical institution or managed care organization, or a proposal to change bioethical policy. Strongly recommended: MED 207

MED 274. Biomedical Ethics

MED 399. Capstone Clinical Ethics

Winter Distance Learning; Baker

Summer, On-Site, Albany Medical College and Union College

An advanced historically based introduction to bioethics and clinical ethics focusing on such formalizations of medical morality as the Hippocratic Oath, the AMA codes, the Belmont Report and Beauchamp and Childress Principles, and the idea of casuistry. Major cases in bioethics will also be reviewed and the evolution of the core concepts and infrastructure of medical ethics and bioethics will be examined. MED 202. Clinical Ethics Spring Distance Learning; Shelton

This course deals with the practical applications of clinical ethics, including clinical ethics consulting and its recording and documentation, the work of ethics committees and IRBs, and other practical ethics of clinical ethics. MED 301. Practicum I in Clinical Ethics Summer, On-Site, Various locations

A supervised practical experience in clinical ethics designed to teach skills in clinical ethics consultation. Prerequisite: MED 202 MED 205. Reproductive Ethics

Capstone practicum in which students demonstrate their mastery of clinical ethics consultation.

The Master of Science Clinical Leadership in Health Management and 5-Year Pharmacy Doctorate and Master of Science Clinical Leadership in Health Management APPLICATION PROCESS

The Master of Science Clinical Leadership in Health Management program is a full-time, 12-month, program. Students start coursework in mid-June. This curriculum focuses on helping future physicians acquire management skills that will differentiate them in the medical school application process and, ultimately, help them succeed in the “business” of medicine. To broaden their exposure to science and build on completed undergraduate coursework, students may optionally take up to four advanced science courses offered through Union College and Albany Medical College.

Summer Distance Learning; Steinbock

An investigation of the ethical and legal problems associated with new reproductive technologies and genetics. Taught by distance learning. Elective course 14

To be considered for matriculated student status, applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree and have submitted a complete application packet (including application essay, MCAT or Graduate Management Admissions Test

[GMAT] score, three letters of recommendation, and official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts) by April 1. Admission decisions are made by April 15 and students are notified immediately thereafter. The Pharmacy Doctorate and Master of Science Clinical Leadership in Health Management program is limited to students from the Albany College of Pharmacy (ACP). The program is designed to give future pharmacists and understanding of the complex business environment in which they will ultimately practice. The program is typically completed on a part-time basis over three years. Students start coursework in the fall of their third year at ACP. To be considered for matriculated student status, applicants must be enrolled at ACP and have submitted a complete application packet (including application essay, official Graduate Management Admissions Test [GMAT] score, three letters of recommendation, and official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts). Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis, but students are encouraged to apply before May 1st for the fall. Non-U.S. applicants who have not studied for at least two years in an English-speaking program must have submitted an official score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Once submitted, all application materials become the property of Union College and are not returnable. Tuition is assessed on a per-course basis. A non-refundable deposit of $250 is required upon acceptance to full-time degree status in order to reserve a place in the entering class. A portion of the deposit ($150) is applied toward a mandatory annual student resource fee; the remaining portion of the deposit ($100) is credited to the student’s account and applied toward future tuition charges. Part-time students pay a one-time student resource fee of $150. The “Registration Procedures” section of this Bulletin provides further information on registration procedures and deadlines. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE M.S. CLINICAL LEADERSHIP IN HEALTH MANAGEMENT

The M.S. Clinical Leadership in Health Management degree is designed for future clinicians who wish to better understand the health care industry and the environment in which it exists or who aspire to clinically-related leadership roles. There are twelve required courses in the program. Students in the Pharmacy Doctorate/M.S. Clinical Leadership in Health Management Program automatically waive three of these courses (MED 253, HSS 256, and STA 201). Additionally, one GMI course (GMI 210) can substitute for an ACP elective. Courses, including optional science courses for future physicians indicated by an asterisk (*), are listed above:

First Summer Term (starts Mid-June) • GMI 210: Financial Accounting • BIO 46: Intro to the Neurosciences Second Summer Term (starts Late-July) • GMI 212: Financial Analysis and Decision Making Fall Term • MED 200: Introduction to Health Systems • MED 271: Clinical Leadership Practicum • An Approved Statistics Course • Advanced Science Course* Winter Term • MED 201: Health Systems Management • MED 280: Health Policy and Information Systems • HSS 256: Group Practice Management • Advanced Science Course* Spring Term • PHL 287: Biomedical Ethics • MED 253: Economies of Health • HSS 217: Health Care Finance • HSS 274: Legal Aspects of Health Care • Advanced Science Course* COURSE WAIVER POLICY

Students may waive up to three of the following courses without replacement based on comparable undergraduate or graduate course work (completed within the last five years, with a grade of a “B-“ or better): GMI 210, GMI 212, STA 201, MED 253, or MED 200. To secure a waiver, the student must complete the required “Course Waiver” form and submit all applicable transcripts and any other documentation requested by the professor. A separate form must be completed for each waiver requested. COURSE SCHEDULE (Listed in recommended order)

KEY TO TERMINOLOGY Time of Course Offering: D (Day) LA (Late Afternoon) E (Evening) GMI 210. Financial Accounting Summer Session I - E; Staff

A study of the accounting cycle, including preparation and analysis of income statement and balance sheets, price level problems, ratio analysis, and funds flow-case flow; a critical study of generally-accepted accounting principles.

15

GMI 212. Managerial Accounting and Finance Summer Session II - E; Staff

An introduction to the tools and techniques of financial analysis and decision making. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, cost classification and behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, incremental cost analysis, time value of money, capital budgeting, risk and return, capital structure and the cost of capital, international finance, financial modeling and planning, and working capital management. Spreadsheet programs are used extensively in this course. Prerequisite: GMI 210. PHL 287. Biomedical Ethics Spring E; Staff

MED 280. Health Policy and Information Systems Winter E; Manna and Smith

This course covers two main topics. The first (focusing on public policy formulation and implementation) is designed to provide an understanding of the political and regulatory environment of health care organizations. The second focuses on the role of information systems in the management and operation of health services organizations and how data derived from these systems can be utilized to assess and improve the health of defined populations.

An advanced historically based introduction to bioethics and clinical ethics focusing on such formalizations of medical morality as the Hippocratic Oath, the AMA codes, the Belmont Report and Beauchamp and Childress Principles, and the idea of casuistry. Major cases in bioethics will also be reviewed and the evolution of the core concepts and infrastructure of medical ethics and bioethics will be examined.

MED 253. Economics of Health

MED 200. Introduction to Health Systems

This course examines the determinants of health, illness, and medical care utilization, institutional arrangements and settings for the delivery of acute and chronic care, the doctor-patient relationship, resource allocation, and the measuring and evaluating system performance.

This course covers financial management in a regulated health care environment. Topics include cost-finding and third-party reimbursement, contemporary issues in health care financing, sources of capital, capital budgeting, financial planning and analysis, cost accounting, and managed care issues. Prerequisites: STA 201, GMI 210, GMI 212, MED 200.

MED 271. Clinical Leadership Practicum

HSS 274. Legal Aspects of Health Care

Fall D; Lehrman

Spring E; Staff

Fall D; Weiner

Students will work in the field with a preceptor in a clinical leadership role. Students may be placed in a variety of health care settings including: hospitals, physician offices, health maintenance organizations, etc. Classes meet every other week to discuss students’ field experiences and selected readings. STA 201. Introduction to Probability and Statistics Winter D; Bowman

This course studies the fundamentals of applied probability, most important distributions, acceptance sampling, confidence intervals, point estimation, and testing of hypotheses. HSS 256. Group Practice Administration Winter E; Staff

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the organization and management of private physician group practice through seminar and practical experience HSS 201. Health Systems Management Winter E; Strosberg

This course examines managerial roles and processes within health service organizations—organization design, managerial epidemiology, governance, total quality 16

management, human resource management, labor relations, and ethics. Prerequisite: MED 200.

Spring D; Lambrinos

Examination of demand and supply for medical personnel; analysis of hospital cost, inflation, and health insurance. Discussion of issues in cost benefit analysis of public health and regulation of health care markets. HSS 217. Health Care Finance Spring E; Ashman

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic legal issues involved in managing health care systems. Antitrust, consent, labor law, malpractice, professional rights and other problems are explored using actual and hypothetical case studies. Prerequisite: MED 200. OPTIONAL ADVANCED SCIENCE COURSES

(See Union Undergraduate Catalog for descriptions): BIO 130. Animal Physiology BIO 180. Biochemistry BIO 154. Developmental Biology BIO 170. Endocrinology BIO 160. Histology BIO 136. Mechanisms of Cell Regulation BIO 25. Molecular Biology BIO 140. Molecular Genetics BIO 165. Neural Circuits and Behavior CHM 30. Organic Chemistry CHM 150. Physical Chemistry BIO 46. Introduction to the Neurosciences

Educational Studies Programs Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lamont House Telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-6361 Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-6686 Director: Patrick F. Allen Assistant Directors: Beatrice Hall, Ken Blom Degrees Offered: • Master of Arts in Teaching • Master of Science for Teachers of Mathematics and Science

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) The M.A.T. degree is designed for individuals who have completed a baccalaureate degree in a liberal arts discipline and who would like to teach subjects such as English, languages, mathematics, science, or social studies in secondary schools. This program provides the pedagogical course work and experience necessary for New York State provisional certification, grades 7-12. It also provides the opportunity to extend and deepen knowledge in the subject area of certification and the Master’s degree necessary for permanent certification. M.A.T. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The M.A.T. program requires at least 12 courses: 5-6 in pedagogy and 5-6 in the subject area for which certification is sought. Core requirements are: EDS 209, EDS 220 & EDS 230 (three field experiences. Taken together these three written experiences comprise one course credit); EDS 240 (Psychology of Teaching), EDS 240L (Psychology of Teaching Lab), one of the EDS 211-216 courses (Curriculum and Methods of Teaching English, languages, mathematics, science, social studies or technology), and EDS 250A (Seminar in Special Needs Populations), 250B and C (Seminars in Instruction and Evaluation), and EDS 241 (Literacy for Secondary Teachers). The program requires a teaching internship, Master’s research (either a two-term thesis in the discipline, or a classroom-based project plus three or four electives.) ADMISSION TO THE M.A.T.

Applicants to the program must have completed a B.S. or B.A. from an accredited institution with the equivalent of at least 30 semester hours (9 courses at Union College) in the liberal arts major area (English, language, mathematics, science, social sciences) in which they will seek certification. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in undergraduate or previous graduate work is normally

expected in this discipline, and overall. An interview, an essay, and at least three references are required, two of which must be academic. Evidence of intellectual achievement, motivation, and aptitude are necessary for admission. Union College undergraduates are also eligible for a B.A./M.A.T. or B.S./M.A.T. combined degree program (see below). Students may begin the combined degree program during any term, but must complete the intensive summer program prior to the beginning of their internship. Students expecting to begin the program in the summer must submit application materials no later than March 1 of the preceding spring. Students who plan to complete the course work and internship over a two or three-year period may apply at any time in the academic year, but they must apply no later than March 1 of the year in which they intend to enroll in the special summer program. Interested students must see a program advisor before registering and may register for only two elective courses before matriculation. In addition to the admission requirements above, students are expected, before the special summer program, to have completed: 1) an undergraduate educational psychology course or the equivalent competency examination, and 2) two weeks of structured field experiences as defined in Educational Studies Program literature. All students must complete one year of a foreign language at the college level,or its equivalent before the college can recommend certification. THE TEACHING INTERNSHIP

Most M.A.T. candidates will complete a half-day, year-long internship in a secondary school, taking full responsibility for at least two classes. Students will be interviewed at the site(s) where they expect to intern. Entrance into the internship portion of the program is contingent upon completion of Psychology of Teaching and the appropriate Curriculum and Methods course with minimum grades of B. MASTER’S RESEARCH AND THESIS

The thesis generally comprises two of the 4-6 courses in the discipline. For students attempting to complete the program in one calendar year, the thesis is generally undertaken in the fall and winter terms. The thesis advisor is normally a faculty member in an academic discipline directly related to the student’s area of certification.

17

THE M.A.T. PROJECT

In lieu of a thesis, students may enroll in EDS 280, which involves carrying out classroom-based research in pedagogy as it relates to an academic discipline. Students who write an M.A.T. Project normally undertake it during the winter term with an Educational Studies faculty member. Opting to complete a project usually means enrolling in one more elective course in the discipline than those who undertake an M.A.T. thesis. COMPUTER LITERACY

Each student in the M.A.T. program is expected to leave the program with much greater computer literacy than the degree of literacy with which s/he entered. Students are expected to select as an elective one of the courses from among CST 265, 270, 271, or 277 unless s/he can demonstrate existing computer competence. ELECTIVE COURSE WORK

Students in the M.A.T. program are normally required to take at least three elective courses selected with the approval of their advisor. If the student chooses to undertake an M.A.T. Project in lieu of an M.A.T. Thesis, then the student must select an additional elective for a total of four graduate electives; three of those electives must be related to the area of certification. Courses are offered in the late afternoons and evenings during the academic year. With the approval of an advisor, up to two graduatelevel courses may be transferred into the M.A.T.

B.A. OR B.S./M.A.T. COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAM

To be eligible for the combined undergraduate/graduate degree program a student must be a Union undergraduate and must normally have a grade point average of at least 3.25. Students must apply to the program no earlier than their 8th term and no later than the end of their 10th term. Students will complete the usual requirements for the baccalaureate degree, including PSY 50 (Educational Psychology) and the structured field experiences (EDS 209, EDS 220 and EDS 230). In the summer prior to their last year (in most cases between the senior year and their graduate year), students will complete the graduate 8-week summer term of EDS 240 (Psychology of Teaching), EDS 240L (Psychology of Teaching Lab), the appropriate Curriculum and Methods course, EDS 211-216, and EDS 241 (Literacy for Secondary Teachers). In the fall students will complete a two-week field observation, EDS 230. They will take EDS 250A, B, and C concurrently with the year-long teaching internship. In addition to the education courses required for certification, combined degree students must enroll in either a two-term thesis in the discipline or a one-term master’s degree project. Students who undertake a thesis must enroll in one additional elective; students who undertake a project must enroll in two additional electives. For undergraduate and graduate work, students in the combined degree program will complete a minimum of 46 courses, allowing them to apply two of their courses to both the undergraduate and graduate degrees. NEW YORK STATE CERTIFICATION

POST-GRADUATE TEACHING CORE

For some individuals already holding an advanced degree in a discipline related to their prospective teaching area, it may be unnecessary to complete the entire M.A.T. degree program in order to qualify for permanent certification. Selected students will be accepted into the PostGraduate Degree Teaching CORE. The CORE consists of seven graduate courses in pedagogy and a year-long internship. A full-time, eight-week summer term is required. Students who complete only the CORE are not normally recommended for certification by the Educational Studies program. Each CORE student must apply for certification on her/his own. That means each CORE student must meet the letter of New York State certification standards as defined by the Office of Teaching Certification.

18

Those students requesting New York State Certification through Union College should complete the “blue” certification form and attach a fifty dollar postal money order. These documents should be sent to the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs in Lamont Graduate Center. Official transcripts should be requested from all colleges/universities attended and sent to the Office of Graduate Studies in sealed envelopes. The deadline for receiving this information is July 1 following graduation from the M.A.T. program. Anyone who has not completed this process by that date will be required to seek certification on his/her own.

OUTLINE OF M.A.T. PROGRAM

Prerequisites: PSY 050 or equivalent, EDS 210, EDS 220 (two weeks), or equivalent, EDS 030. Summer Session: An 8-week intensive summer session is required of all students immediately prior to their internship comprised of EDS 240, EDS 240L, and EDS 211-216 (depending on major).

Typical M.A.T. Full-time Program, One Year Summer EDS 211-216 EDS 240 (internship) EDS 240L EDS 241 Fall EDS 250A EDS 251 (internship) EDS 298 (Thesis) OR Elective EDS 230 Winter EDS 250B EDS 252 (internship) EDS 299 (Thesis) OR EDS 280 (MAT Project) Elective Spring EDS 250C EDS 253 (internship) Elective

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION FOR THE M.A.T.

PSY 050. Educational Psychology Winter, Spring; Burns

Principles of psychology applied to teaching, with emphasis on cognitive abilities of students, classroom management procedures, and motivational techniques. Field Observations are conducted at a variety of local schools. Prerequisite: PSY 010 EDS 211. Curriculum and Methods in Teaching English Summer; Della Sala

Curricular planning and instruction for the teaching of English at the secondary school level. The course will include an analysis of secondary language arts curricula including New York State Frameworks for language arts, instructional techniques and strategies, designing and locating instructional materials, planning, implementing, and evaluating lessons and units. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course.

EDS 212. Curriculum and Methods in Teaching Mathematics Summer; Kavanaugh

Curricular planning and instruction for the teaching of mathematics at the secondary school level. The course will include an analysis of classic and current secondary mathematics curricula including New York State Frameworks for mathematics, instructional techniques and strategies, designing and locating instructional materials, planning, implementing, and evaluating lessons and units. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 213. Curriculum and Methods in Teaching Languages Summer; Martinez

Curricular planning and instruction for the teaching of modern and classical languages at the secondary school level. The course will include an analysis of secondary language curricula including New York State Frameworks for languages; instructional techniques; the teaching of speaking, listening, reading, and writing; designing and locating instructional materials; planning, implementing, and evaluating lessons and units. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 214. Curriculum and Methods in Teaching Sciences Summer; Scott

Curricular planning and instruction for the teaching of science at the secondary school level. The course will include an analysis of secondary science curricula including New York State Frameworks for sciences; instructional techniques and strategies for teaching scientific concepts; laboratory methods and safety, designing and locating instructional materials; planning, implementing, and evaluating lessons and units. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 215. Curriculum and Methods in Teaching Social Sciences Summer; Reynolds

Curricular planning and instruction for the teaching of social sciences at the secondary school level. The course will include an analysis of secondary social studies curricula including the New York State Frameworks for social studies; models and techniques for teaching and integrating the various social sciences; designing and locating instructional materials; planning, implementing, and evaluating lessons and units. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course.

19

EDS 216. Curriculum and Methods in Teaching Technology Summer; Venezio

Designed for those with a technology or engineering background, this course will help prepare technology educators to promote students’ learning by the use of multiple instructional models. The course builds teacher skills in lesson planning, content organization, and hard and software evaluation and use. New York State Standards for technology and evolving approaches to integration of technology in the teaching/learning process will also be explored. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 240. Psychology of Teaching Summer; Allen, Blom, Hall

Theories of learning and memory applied to instruction; models and research on teaching in secondary schools. This course will include a laboratory component with micro-teaching experiences and will be taken in the summer preceding the teaching internship. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. (Co-requisite: EDS 240 Lab) EDS 240L. Microteaching Laboratory Summer; Keeley, Kennedy, Merriman,

Students prepare and present several 5-30 minute lessons using a variety of instructional models. Lessons are video-taped and critiqued by peer-coaches and laboratory faculty. This laboratory must be taken concurrently with EDS 240 and a course in Curriculum Methods in Teaching (EDS 211-215). Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 241. Teaching Literacy for Secondary Teachers Summer; Kennedy,

EGL 210. Writing and Teaching: a Process Approach Summer; C. Reynolds

This writing workshop includes the discussion and application of current theory in composition. Students will read and discuss critical issues in rhetoric and composition, will apply theory to classroom teaching situations in a variety of disciplines, and will participate in small writing groups to critique their own and classmates’ personal writing. This course is required of all M.A.T. interns as the second of their required literacy courses. EDS 250A. Special Needs Seminar: Drug, Alcohol, Child Abuse Fall; Kelley, Kennedy

This seminar is required of all M.A.T. candidates and is to be taken concurrently with their internship. This course explores major aspects of special needs populations in schools including State mandates; laws dealing with the handicapped; gifted and talented students; the instruction required for teachers in drug, alcohol, and child abuse; and projects to increase teachers’ competence in 20

working with special needs populations. Only matriculated M.A.T. students engaged in an internship may enroll in this course. EDS 250B. Seminar in Instruction and Evaluation Winter; Blom, Staff

This seminar is required of all M.A.T. candidates and is to be taken concurrently with their internship. Topics include: application of instructional theory and research, reflective teaching and self-evaluation, traditional and alternate/performance assessments. Each student will produce a professional portfolio and a teaching videotape in this course. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 250C. Seminar in Instruction and Evaluation Spring; Blom, Hall

This seminar is required of all M.A.T. candidates and is to be taken concurrently with their internship. Topics include: application of instructional theory and research, reflective teaching and self-evaluation, exposure to major school reform movements/proposals, and the relationship of new teachers to the reform movement. Only matriculated M.A.T. students may enroll in this course. EDS 251, 252, 253. Teaching Internship (No Fee) Fall, Winter, Spring; Allen

Graduate interns teach a minimum of two courses in a local secondary school under the direction of an experienced school mentor and a college supervisor. Students meet several times a semester on campus in addition to their teaching responsibilities. Only matriculated MAT students may be enrolled in an internship. EDS 254. Full Day Internship September – January; Allen

A full-day, September through the end of January, this alternative internship is available for selected students with special circumstances. Advisor approval required. EDS 270. Growing Up in America: Issues of Diversity Fall, Spring; Hanifan

Childhood and coming of age will be examined through the works of a diverse group of American writers. The class will read and respond to biographies, autobiographies, fiction, and personal essays that grapple with building, personal, cultural, or social identities. Discussions will include such issues as the role of education for immigrants and disadvantaged populations, racism, affirmative action, bilingual instruction, and cultural diversity.

EDS 280. M.A.T./M.S. For Teachers Project Winter; Hall, Hanifan, Kennedy

Individual and group projects relating to the classroom teaching of a particular discipline. Typical projects are: systematic applications of an instructional model of a major segment of curriculum in a teaching subject area; classroom action research; addressing curricular or instructional questions/issues within one’s teaching subject area. EDS 190. EDS 290. Independent Study in Educational Studies EDS 298. EDS 299. Research and Thesis in the Discipline Fall, Winter

EDS 300. Status Continuation ($100) Graduate students who are degree candidates and are working on their thesis must pay a continuation fee for any term in which they are not formally enrolled in any other course counting toward the completion of their degree.

The Master of Science for Teachers of Mathematics and Science This graduate program is designed for individuals who already hold provisional certification with the State of New York and wish to gain the Master’s degree necessary for permanent certification. The program offers courses in topics of contemporary importance in the life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and computer fields. Courses are designed to provide information in specific subject areas and their integration into the classroom. The program enables teachers to enhance their subject matter competence, to develop further competence in their present teaching assignments, to move from one subject area or teaching level to another, or to meet additional certification requirements. A different selection of courses is offered each academic year. The M.S. degree in science or mathematics is awarded for the completion of ten courses (33 credits). Normally, five courses are taken in one of three general subject areas: Life Science (biology. chemistry, geology), the Physical Sciences (chemistry, geology, physics), or the Mathematics/Computer field. Students interested in the degree must consult an academic advisor in planning their program of study and should matriculate no later than the end of their second course. One or two graduate level courses from other institutions may be transferred into the program, as determined by a faculty advisor.

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM

Applicants to the program must have completed a B.A. or a B.S. from an accredited institution. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in undergraduate and/or previous graduate work is normally expected. An interview, an essay, and at least three references are required, two of which must be academic. Evidence of intellectual achievement, motivation, and aptitude are necessary for admission. Students may complete the degree on a parttime or full-time basis and may apply at any time during the year. MASTER’S RESEARCH AND THESIS

The thesis generally comprises two of the five courses in the discipline area of concentration. The thesis advisor is normally a faculty member in the academic discipline. THE M.S. FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE PROJECT

In lieu of a thesis, students may enroll in EDS 280, which involves carrying out classroom-based research in pedagogy as it relates to the discipline of the student’s academic concentration. Students who write an M.S. for Teachers of Mathematics and Science Project normally complete it during the winter term with an Educational Studies faculty member. Electing to complete a project usually means completing one more required elective in the discipline than those who complete an M.S. for Teachers thesis. ELECTIVE COURSE WORK

M.S. for Teachers students are normally required to take five elective courses beyond the five courses required in their discipline area selected with the approval of an advisor. Graduate courses in the subject area of certification and in education-related subjects are offered in the late afternoons and evenings of the academic year. With the approval of an advisor up to two graduate-level electives may be transferred into the M.S. for Teachers. COMPUTER LITERACY

Each student in the M.S. for Teachers program is expected to leave the program with a much greater degree of computer literacy than the degree with which s/he entered. Students who enter with less than basic computer knowledge, must take CST 265. Students who are admitted with a greater level of computer literacy/facility than CST 265 are expected to include as an elective one of the courses selected from among 270, 271, 277, 278, 279 or demonstrate competence in one of these areas.

21

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN COMPUTER EDUCATION

CST 265. Introduction to Computers in the Classroom Fall; Wilkinson

This core course is required of all students specializing in computers who have not had a similar course in their previous study. It is strongly recommended for all students in any education program who have had little or no exposure and/or knowledge of computers, computer systems, and their basic applications: word processing, data bases, and spread sheets. Emphasis will be placed on what computers do, how they can be used, an understanding of the various parts of the hardware, loading programs, running programs, the primary and secondary storage capabilities and their functions. All students will become familiar with word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and their applications. A basic introduction to E-mail, the Internet, and some of their basic uses in the classroom will also be included along with an elementary explanation of programming through the use of Quick Basic or another introductory programming language. CST 270. Computers in the Language Arts Classroom Fall; Reynolds

Investigates the potential of microcomputer technology to improve reading, writing, study, communication, and second language skills. During the first five weeks, many tools, techniques, and materials will be presented through demonstrations, readings, lectures, and lab sections. Class members will further explore one or more of these areas and develop an implementation plan during the second portion of the course. Students should have an acquaintance with computers but do not need to be programmers. Some Logo or Carol the Robot is helpful. CST 271. Computers in the Math and Science Classroom Spring; Wilkinson

Investigates the potential of new technology for improving the teaching of math and science. Special attention is given to the advanced uses of spreadsheet and database software in the secondary curriculum. Course discussions will emphasize the educational applications of computer technology rather than development of software. Advanced use of E-mail, the Internet and World Wide Web will be taught as well.

22

CST 277. Hypermedia, Hypercard and Other Multi-Media Applications ($1105) Not offered in 2002-2003; Staff

Working with simple authoring languages, this course will also develop each student’s capacity to work with graphics and Multi-Media in the classroom to create presentations and/or classroom demonstrations. Developing the capacity to work with drawing and desktop publishing, this course will be an asset for teachers in any discipline. CST 278. Programming in C++ for the Classroom Not offered in 2002-2003

Since all secondary Advanced Placement courses in computer science will use C++ as the programming language as of the Fall of 1999 , this course serves as an introduction to C++ as a programming language along with some of its classroom applications. CST 279. Teaching with C++ in the Classroom Not offered in 2002-2003

Once teachers have learned to program with C++ and how to use basic applications, developing their facility to create sophisticated classroom applications and create advanced learning situations for students will enhance their ability to work productively with advanced students of the subject. Prerequisite: CST 278.

Engineering and Computer Science Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steinmetz Hall Telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-6530 Dean of Engineering and Computer Science: Robert T. Balmer Chair of Computer Science: David Hemmendinger Chair of Electrical Engineering: Ekram Hassib Chair of Mechanical Engineering: Ann Anderson Professors: Chang, Fatic, Gajjar, Hannay, Rudko, Traver, Wilk, Williams Associate Professors: Anderson, Bucinell, Hassib, Hemmendinger, Keat, Spinelli, Wicks

Students who have extensive software experience may petition to take graduate computer science courses instead of the thesis/project requirement. The following are additional required courses beyond the minimum nine: CSc 75 for students without discrete mathematics and logic design; CSc 76 for students who do not know C++ or computer organization; and CSc 77 for students without a background in data structures. All students entering the master’s program must pass candidacy exams that cover the material in CSc 75, 76, and 77 unless they have passed these or similar courses with grades of B or better.

Assistant Professors: Bruno, Fernandes, Krouglicof Distinguished GE Research Professor of Engineering: Philip G. Kosky Instructor: Spallholz Lecturer: Almstead Visiting Lecturer: Marten Degrees Offered: • Master of Science in Computer Science • Master of Science in Electrical Engineering • Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

The programs described in this section lead to Master of Science degrees in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Master of Science in Computer Science requires a minimum of nine computer science courses including CSc 136, three 200-level courses numbered below 290, and two courses as a thesis or project. The nine courses must include a course from each of the areas: computational theory, programming languages, software systems, and hardware systems. The courses in each area: • Computational theory CSc 140, CSc 242 • Programming languages CSc 144, CSc 231, CSc 250 • Software systems CSc 135, CSc 160, CSc 233, CSc 248 • Hardware systems CSc 118, CSc 152, CSc 154, CSc 237 Each candidate must successfully complete a master’s comprehensive examination on the major areas of computer science.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

The electrical engineering profession involves the design and/or manufacture of electrical products and devices. Typical applications include digital computers, digital and analog control systems, communication systems, electric machinery and power systems, solid-state electronics, and electromagnetics. A minimum of ten graduate courses is required. Each student’s program should include at least seven electrical engineering courses and three technical electives. At least six of the electrical engineering courses should be at the 200 level. Each student should, in conference with the graduate advisor, plan a complete graduate program prior to taking any courses for graduate credit. Technical electives should normally be chosen from graduate level courses in electrical engineering, computer science, mechanical engineering, mathematics and physics. Every course taken for graduate credit must be approved by the advisor. A thesis could be considered as one or two technical electives. Students with weak backgrounds may need to take more than ten courses. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

The mechanical engineering profession involves the use of the fundamentals of mechanics, materials, thermodynamics, and systems analysis as they apply to the design and/or manufacture of engineering devices and systems. Graduates of this program may be prepared to enter any of the major branches of mechanical engineering, including solid mechanics, thermal fluid science, control instrumentation, energy systems, thermal and nuclear power generation. 23

MSEE AND MSME DEGREES SUMMARY

MS Program

Elective MS Thesis Elective MS Project Core Program Required? Remaining Program Master’s Exam Required?

Electrical Engineering (10 Courses Required) Not required, but counts as 2 technical electives if completed. Not required, but counts as 1 technical elective if completed. No. Seven EE courses (six at the 200 level) plus three technical electives.* No.

Mechanical Engineering (10 courses Required) Not required, but counts as 2 technical electives if completed. Not required, but counts as 1 technical elective if completed. Three courses in the areas of eng. analysis, elasticity, and transport phenomena. Five ME courses at the 200 level plus two technical electives.* No.

* Technical electives are normally chosen from graduate level courses in engineering, computer science, mathematics, or physics with the consent and approval of the student’s advisor.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

The M.S.M.E. requires a total of ten courses. Three of the courses will form a core in mechanical engineering and must be taken by all students at the start of their program: MER 202 Engineering Analysis, MER 200 Elasticity, and MER 201 Transport Phenomena. Of the remaining seven courses, five must be in the mechanical engineering major at the 200 level. The remaining two courses are selected from engineering (mechanical or electrical), computer science, and mathematics. One of these two courses may be selected from the M.B.A. at Union program. Not all courses from these areas are satisfactory selections; therefore all course selections must be approved by the graduate advisor before course registration. Each student must submit a program plan of study (to be approved by the advisor) before completion of the first course taken for graduate credit. For students who wish to concentrate in a specific area, the department offers course selections in the thermalfluids and solid mechanics areas. Students wishing to focus on the thermal-fluids area may choose from among the following courses: MER 232, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 240, 250, 252, 254, 260, 339. Students wishing to focus on the mechanics area may choose from among the following courses: MER 208, 110, 212, 214, 216 (currently 116), 222, 225, 132, 301, 319, 329. Full-time degree candidates are required to do Research and Thesis for two courses. Part time students can complete the degree by taking 10 courses. They also have the option of replacing one or two courses with independent research conducted in the form of a Master’s Project (one course) or a thesis (2 courses) with departmental approval. All students, either part-time or full-time, intending to do Research and Thesis must consult the department for appropriate guidance.

24

CSc 75. Topics in Computer Logic and Mathematics Spring; Staff.

Introductory logic, set theory, and Boolean algebra; number systems, computer organization, and elementary combinational and sequential circuits; data representation, propositional calculus. Prerequisites: Calculus and programming experience. Not normally open to undergraduates or to students with credit for Math 99 or EEr 18. CSc 76. Structured Programming and Computer Organization Fall; Staff

Structured programming and design techniques through the development of software tools. Algorithms will be implemented in C++ and assembly language. Prerequisite: Previous programming experience. Not normally open to undergraduates or to students with credit for CSc 37 or 40. CSc 77. Data Structures Winter, Spring; Fernandes

Basic concepts of data organization and abstraction, software design, stacks, queues, trees, and their implementation with linked structures. Sorting and searching techniques. Prerequisites: CSc 37 or Esc 14 or CSc 76. CSc 118. Digital Design Winter

(See EEr 118). CSc 135. Operating Systems Spring; Williams

Batch, interactive, real-time, and distributed operating systems; multiprogramming, multiprocessing, multiplexing, multitasking; concurrent programming; elementary queuing theory; memory management; resource allocation, sharing and protection. Prerequisites: CSc 40 and 77, and either Math 99 or CSc 75.

CSc 136. Advanced Programming Techniques

CSc 160. Software Engineering

Fall, Winter; Williams

Spring; Almstead

Fundamental algorithms used in a variety of applications. Includes algorithms on list processing, string processing, geometric algorithms, and graph algorithms. Includes a laboratory. Prerequisites: CSc 77 and either Math 99 or CSc 75.

Strategies for the design, production, and support of computer programs, software development models and phases, programming team structures, test structures, documentation, and maintenance. Prerequisite: CSc 136. CSc 181, 182. Programming Project

CSc 137. Data Communications and Networks

Fall, Winter, Spring; Staff

Fall; Staff

An introduction to protocols, communication hardware, networks, error detection and handling, and software. Prerequisite: EEr 18 or CSc 75. A knowledge of statistics is helpful.

Individual or team projects designed in conjunction with the instructor. Special application form must be completed to register for this course. Prerequisites: At least three computer science courses beyond CSc 77 and permission of the instructor. CSc 181 is a prerequisite for CSc 182.

CSc 140. Theory of Computing

CSc 183. Selected Topics in Computer Science

Fall; Hannay

Staff

A discussion of the fundamental ideas and models underlying computing—properties of formal languages, finite automata, regular expressions, pushdown automata, context-free languages, Turing machines, and undecidability. Prerequisites: CSc 77, and either Math 99 or CSc 75.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CSc 144. Functional, Logic, Object-oriented Languages

CSc 231. Computer Language Translators Spring; offered 2002-2003

The modules of a compiler and their functions. Lexical processor, syntax analyzer. Symbol table access methods, scanning arithmetic expressions, error recovery, code generation. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CSc 140.

Winter; Hemmendinger

An introduction to issues in programming language design and implementation. Major programming language paradigms: functional, logic, and object-oriented, and their use. Prerequisites: CSc 77 and either Math 99 or CSc 75; recommended: CSc 136. CSc 146. Computer Graphics Winter, Staff

Algorithms for handling two-dimensional and threedimensional objects. Interactive graphics hardware and systems. X windows, engineering workstations. Includes a laboratory. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: CSc 77 and Math 15, C programming experience. CSc 148. File Structures and Processing In Information Systems Fall; Fernandes

Introduction to database systems. Methods of organizing and processing data in an efficient manner. Procedures for creating and updating sequential, indexed and relative files; sorting and merging files. A suitable high-level language will be used as a vehicle for this material. Prerequisite: CSc 77. CSc 152. Microprocessors and Microcomputer: Architecture, Programming, and Applications Spring; Staff

CSc 233. Software Tools For Systems Programming Spring; Williams

Seminar on software tools for system programming. Software for the personal computer—interface for windows, keyboard, sound, and mouse events—which promote direct user interaction in the computational process. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: CSc 135 and permission of instructor. CSc 236. Computer Network Protocols Spring; Spinelli

See EEr 236. CSc 237. Comparative Computer Architecture Fall; offered 2002-2003

Study of computer architectures, with an emphasis on RISC processors, performance metrics, datapath and control, pipelines, cache design, and parallel instruction execution. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: CSc 135 and either EEr 18 or CSc 75. CSc 238. Data Base Organization and Management Winter; offered 2002-2003

Introduction to data base system architecture; relational, hierarchical, fourth generation language, and network approaches to data base design are studied. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CSc 148.

(See EEr 152) CSc 154. VLSI System Design Fall, Traver

(See EEr 154) 25

CSc 242. Analysis and Design of Computer Algorithms

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Winter; Williams

EER-100. Electrical Engineering History

The analysis of time and space requirements of algorithms; the design of efficient algorithms using techniques such as divide and conquer, and dynamic programming; efficient algorithms for graph problems, matrix multiplication, fast Fourier transforms, polynomial multiplication, pattern matching; introduction to complexity theory. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CSc 136.

Not offered 2002-2003

A survey of major developments in electricity and electrical engineering technology, from the experiments of Benjamin Franklin through the development of the internet. Understanding technology within the cultural and societal contents in which it is developed. Prerequisite: Esc 25. Gen. Ed.: AM-CS; Eu-CS; WAC.

CSc 244. Artificial Intelligence

EER-110. Electronic Devices

Winter; Staff

Not offered 2002-2003

Fundamental concepts used in creating “intelligent” computer systems; semantic representation, logical deduction, natural language processing, and game playing; expert systems, knowledge-based systems, and elementary robotics. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CSc 136.

Terminal characteristics and theory of electronic devices; band theory, photo and electronic effects, PN junctions; bipolar and field effect transistors, discrete and integrated electronics. Prerequisite: EE 48.

CSc 248. Concurrent Programming

Electronic processing of signals; properties of linear and hybrid integrated circuits; design of linear, nonlinear and hybrid electronic systems, active filter networks. Design projects required. Prerequisite: EE 63, 66, or permission of instructor.

Winter; offered 2002-2003

Survey of synchronization and communication in concurrent programs; introduction to concurrent programming languages and systems such as Java and MPI; computation in distributed and multi-processor systems. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CSc 136; Recommended: CSc 135. CSc 250. Programming Languages Fall, Hemmendinger

Advanced issues in programming languages design; descriptions of syntax and semantics, types, binding time, run-time systems. Projects will include implementations of small programming-language interpreters. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: CSc 136 and 144. CSc 255. GMI 255 Seminar in Computer Management Systems Spring; see GMI 255

CSc 290-293. Independent Study Fall, Winter, Spring; Staff

Prerequisite: At least two CSc courses numbered between 200 and 289. CSc 294-295. Two-Term Programming Project Fall, Winter, Spring; Staff

Prerequisite: At least two CSc courses numbered between 200 and 289.

EER-112. Application of Integrated Circuits Not offered 2002-2003

EER-118. Digital Design Winter; Traver

The design of digital hardware systems at the module level using modern approaches. Datapath and control unit design, hardware description languages, minimization, pipeline. Laboratory exercise and a design project are required. Prerequisite: EE 18. EER-129. Neural Networks Spring; Rudko

Topics include the biological basic of artificial neural networks, neuron models and architectures, backpropagation, associative and competitive learning. Weekly computer laboratories and a final project required. Prerequisite: Linear Algebra and Differential Equations, CSc 77 for CS students. EER-130. Fuzzy Logic Not offered 2002-2003

Topics include fuzzy sets and relations, membership functions, defuzzification, classical logic and fuzzy logic, fuzzy rule-based systems, nonlinear simulation, decision making, pattern recognition and control systems. Prerequisite: Calculus and Linear Algebra, CSc 77 for computer science students.

CSc 296-298. Research and Thesis

26

Fall, Winter, Spring; Staff

EER-133. Communication Circuits

Prerequisite: At least two CSc courses numbered between 200 and 289.

Winter; Hassib

Communication circuits, including coupling networks, electrical noise, high-frequency amplifiers, mixers, phaselock loops, high efficiency and broadband amplifiers, modulators and demodulators, pulse modulation tech-

niques. Each week:Three lab hours. Design projects required. Prerequisite: EE 50, 63, or permission of the instructor.

EER-160. Power System Analysis I Fall; Fatic

An introduction to protocols, communication hardware, networks, error detection and handling, and software. Prerequisite: EEr 18 or CSc 75. A knowledge of statistics is helpful.

Power and energy in AC circuits. Single phase, three-phase and polyphase circuits in balanced and unbalanced regimes. Measurement of three-phase power. Determination of three-phase sequence. Single-line diagrams. Per-unit method of representation and computations. Transformers and synchronous machines in power systems. Parameters of transmission lines. Prerequisite: EEc 25.

EER-141. Energy Conversion

EER-161. Power System Analysis II

Not offered 2002-2003

Winter; Fatic

EER-137. Data Communications and Networks Fall; Staff

Theory of electromechanical energy conversion; characteristics of transformers and DC induction, and synchronous machines. Prerequisite: ESc 25. EER-142. Power Electronics

Wave-propagation in transmission lines. Analysis of power networks, load-flow solutions and control. Threephase faults and symmetrical components. Power system protection. Stability of power systems. Prerequisites: ESc 25.

Not offered 2002-2003

EER-163. Fundamentals of Wireless Electronics

Rectifying devices and rectifier circuits: device characteristics, waveforms, harmonic content filtering. Controlled rectifiers (thyristors, triacs): device characteristics, single phase and multiphase systems. Snubber circuits and device limitations. DC-DC converters: design, application, topologies. Energy storage element selection and design: capacitors and inductors. Prerequisites: EE 40, 48.

Fall; Chang

EER-143. Introduction to Electromagnetic Engineering I

Sinusoidal waves, transmission line theory, two-port networks, scattering matrix, matchip networks, signal flow graphs, power gain, stability, microwave transfer circuit design. Prerequisite: EE 48. EER-190-196. Independent Study Fall, Winter, Spring

EER-197, 198, 199. Capstone Design Project

Winter; Chang

An introduction to basic concepts in electromagnetic engineering including: Maxwell’s equation, wave propagation, polarization, power flow, guided waves, radiation, and the method of movements. Prerequisites: Math 17, Physics 18, or EE 40. EER-148. Digital Circuits

EER-202. Advanced Circuit Analysis Not offered 2002-2003

General network theory, graph topology. Topological methods applied to loop, node, node-pair, mixed variable, and state equations. Linear, nonreciprocal, and active networks. Prerequisite: EE 60 or equivalent.

Not offered 2002-2003

EER-210. Semiconductor Device Theory

Special circuitry of digital systems; transistors as switches, logic gate types (RTL, DTL, TPL, ECL, MOS, CMOS, etc.), digital ICs semiconductor memories. Design projects required. Prerequisite: EE 18, 48, or permission of the instructor.

Not offered 2002-2003

EER-152. Microprocessors and Microcomputers: Architecture, Programming, and Applications

In-depth examination of the physical operation of basic semiconductor devices such as diodes, bipolar transistors, junction and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. Determination of internal parameters that contribute to device performance. Prerequisite: EE 110 or permission of the instructor.

Spring; Gajjar

Hardware and architecture with emphasis on Motorola 68HC11; programming in assembly and higher-level languages, microcomputer applications, and interfacing. Design projects required. Prerequisites: Knowledge of computer programming and EE 18. EER-154. VLSI System Design

EER-220. State Space Analysis Not offered 2002-2003

Formulations of state equations, Matrices and determinants. Main concepts of linear algebra. Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors. Solutions of state equations by EV-EVR methods. Prerequisites: EEr 40, 60.

Not offered 2002-2003

EER-221. Modern System Theory

Design of very large scale integrated systems including structured design, stick diagrams, delay time estimation. Design from logic to physical levels; CAD tools for layout and simulation. Design projects required. Prerequisites: EE 18 and 48.

Not offered 2002-2003

Continuation of EE 220. Functions of matrices; CayleyHamilton’s theory. Time-varying systems, controllability and observability. Nonlinear systems and Lyapunov’s stability. Prerequisites: EE 66, 220. 27

EER-224. Random Processes

EER-244. Digital Communications

Not offered 2002-2003

Fall; Rudko

Review of discrete probability, Random processes. Markov chains and Queuing Theory. Applications to communication systems, and computer networks. Prerequisite: Some probability knowledge desirable.

Elements of a digital communication system, digital source coding, error correction, introduction to information theory, channel models, signaling waveforms, optimum reception and detection. Prerequisites: EE 50, 124.

EER-225. Non-Linear Optimization

EER-246. Digital Signal Processing

Fall; Fatic

Winter; Rudko

Extremization of objective functions (cost, performance, etc.) subject to constraints in the form of equalities and inequalities. Method of Lagrangian Multipliers. Kuhn Tucker conditions. Gradient search algorithm. Penalty functions. Direct methods of variational calculus and their application to approximate solutions of problems in electric circuit theory. Economics of electric power networks. Prerequisite: Undergraduate math and linear algebra.

Discrete sequences, sampling, z-transform, discrete and fast-Fourier transforms, discrete filter realizations, filter design based on analog, Butterworth, Chebyshev, Elliptic low pass filters, windowing and quantization effects. Prerequisite: EE 60.

EER-226. Optimal Control Systems Winter; Fatic

Introduction to the theory and applications of optimal control. Development of Bellman’s dynamic programming, variational methods and Pontryagin’s maximum principle. Applications to the synthesis of optimal regulators and trackers. Solution of control problems with minimum time, energy or fuel consumption. Prerequisites: Background in control theory and better than average mathematical ability. EE 220 helpful, but not necessary.

EER-250. Opto Electronics Not offered 2002-2003

Wave propagation in a homogeneous medium, guidance conditions and mode determination of dielectric waveguides, radiation modes, prism coupling, evanescent field coupling, integrated optic guides, graded index materials, mode coupling, loss and attenuation mechanisms. Prerequisite: EE 163 or equivalent. EER-256. Detection, Estimation and Filtering Not offered 2002-2003

Decision criteria, estimation of their parameters, Wiener and Kalman filters. Prerequisites: EE 50 and some knowledge of probability or EE 51.

EER-228. Computer Based Control Systems Not offered 2002-2003

Sampling and reconstruction of analog signals, sampled data, z-transform, the computer as a control element, state-space representation of digital control systems, quantization effects, controllability; observability, stability. Prerequisite: ME 120 or EE 66 or equivalent. EER-236. Computer Network Protocols Not offered 2002-2003

Design, analysis, and operation of communication protocols for computer networks; the Internet, TCP/IP, addressing, switching, routing, congestion control, application protocols. Prerequisites: EE 18, programming ability. EER-237. Comparative Computer Architecture Fall; Staff

Study of Computer architectures, with an emphasis on RISC processors, performance metrics, datapath and control, pipelines, cache design, and parallel instruction execution. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: CSc 135 and either EER 18 or CSc 75. EER-243. Introduction to Antenna Theory Spring; Chang

Propagation of electromagnetic waves, antenna parameters, arrays, wire antennas, aperture antennas, receiving antennas. Prerequisites: EE 143 or equivalent. 28

EER-181, 182, 183, 281, 282, 283. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Topics chosen from the current literature according to faculty and student interest. Possible topics include new developments in the major areas of electrical engineering such as electromagnetic fields, communications, controls, circuits, power, devices, electronics, and computer design. Topics may include but not be limited to image processing, machine vision, speech synthesis, integrated optics, antenna systems, adaptive filtering, variational methods, stochastic processes, optical communications, space and satellite communications, superconducting alternators, numerical methods, fault tolerant design, and computer networks. Each of these special topics courses has a variable content addressing specific current areas of interest to students. They will be offered whenever the need arises. EER-290. Independent Study EER-296-298. Research and Thesis Fall, Winter, Spring

EER-300. Status Continuation

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Key: D (Day) E (Evening)

MER 215. Processing and Selection of Engineering Materials Fall E

MER 200. Elasticity Winter E

The behavior of substances which possess the property of recovering their size and shape when forces producing deformation are removed. Review of stress and strain; study of two dimensional problems in rectangular, polar, and curvilinear coordinates; introduction to three dimensional problems; torsion and bending. Prerequisites: Math 17, 19, 31, MER 43 or equivalent.

A comprehensive examination of processing technologies for engineering materials, and the effects of selected processing routes and materials to meet and satisfy design and applications criteria. Prerequisites: ESC022 or equivalent. MER 290-291. Independent Study Fall, Winter, Spring

MER 292a. Masters Project

MER 201. Transport Phenomena

Fall, Winter

Spring E

The preparation and writing of an extensive report on a topic of interest between the student and a department faculty member. A single course presented over two terms; a grade will be given for two terms of work only. Enrollment recommended no earlier than the last year of study. See MER 292b.

The fundamentals of momentum, energy, and mass transfer and their analogous transport mechanisms. One dimensional transport, transport properties, transport with internal generation, transfer coefficients, convective and turbulent transport. Prerequisites: Math 31, MER 50, or equivalent.

MER 292b. Masters Project

MER 202. Engineering Analysis

Winter, Spring

Fall E

Continuation from MER 292a. Completed writing of the report and its oral presentation. Students must register for ME 292b even though they have previously registered for MER 292a. Open only to part-time graduate students.

Topics in applied mathematics needed to analyze and model engineering problems by constructing mathematical models for a physical situation and the reduction of the ensuing mathematical problems to numerical procedures. Matrices, linear algebra, vector and tensor calculus, partial differential equations, calculus of variations, finite element and difference techniques, Fourier series and integrals. Prerequisites: Math 17, 19, 31, or equivalent.

MER 296-298. Research and Thesis (As arranged by department)

MER 208. Mechanics of Material Failure Winter E

Modern theory of fracture in design. Subjects treated include occurrence of fracture, fracture toughness, fracture resistance, and fatigue. Applications to pressure vessels and rotors. Prerequisites: ESC023, MER043. MER 110. Advanced Dynamics Fall E

Analytical dynamics with engineering applications to particles and rigid bodies. Topics include three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics, Lagrangian dynamics and an introduction to robotics. Prerequisites: ESC020, MER045 or equivalent. MER 240. Advanced Thermodynamics Spring E

Consideration of various particulate and continuum bases for structuring thermodynamic principles and their application to the solution of current and prospective engineering problems. Prerequisites: MER201, MER062 or equivalent.

29

MBA @ Union Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lamont House Telephone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-6235 Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (518) 388-6754 Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mba.union.edu Director: Sue Lehrman Associate Directors: Lloyd Tredwell, Mel Chudzik Co-Chairs, M.B.A.: R. Alan Bowman, Bradley Lewis Chair, M.B.A.–Health Systems Administration Program: Martin A. Strosberg Professors: Arnold, Lambrinos, Schmee, Strosberg Associate Professors: Bowman, Lehrman, Nydegger, Neidermeyer Visiting Assistant Professor: Ashman Clinical Assistant Professor: Manna Affiliated Professors: Dvorak, Schmidt, Motahar, Baker Degrees Offered: • Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) • Master of Business Administration—Health Systems Administration (M.B.A.-H.S.A.) MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of [email protected] is to provide outstanding masters-level management education. [email protected]’s programs complement areas of undergraduate study at the College and are designed to meet the needs of Union undergraduates—as well as a diverse mix of other students—seeking graduate management education that builds on a strong liberal arts foundation and benefits from Union’s intimate environment. [email protected] imparts to graduates the critical thinking, communication, and other contemporary business skills necessary to meet immediate and long-term career goals, while instilling the desire and capacity for life-long learning. [email protected] is committed to faculty research and service that enriches the educational process and that links the faculty with the changing needs of the business, academic, and professional communities. AACSB—INTERNATIONAL ACCREDITATION

Union’s M.B.A. program is accredited by AACSB— International (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), the worlds leading business school accrediting body. Union’s program is unique in being the smallest of all AACSB-International accredited business programs and one of only 28 accredited programs—along with such institutions as Harvard University, Stanford University, and Dartmouth College—that focus solely on graduate 30

degrees. Less than 30 percent of all business programs are accredited nationwide. FULL-TIME STUDY

To be considered for full-time matriculated student status, M.B.A. applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree and have submitted a complete application including application essay, an official Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) score, official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. Non-U.S. applicants who have not studied for at least two years in an English-speaking program must have submitted an official score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Once submitted, all application materials become the property of Union College and are not returnable. Tuition is assessed on a per-course basis. A non-refundable deposit of $250 is required upon acceptance to degree status in order to reserve a place in the entering full-time class. A portion of the deposit ($150) is applied toward an annual, mandatory, student resource fee; the remaining portion of the deposit ($100) is credited to the student account and applied toward future tuition charges. Full-time students typically take two years to complete their M.B.A.s. However, as described below, in some instances it is possible to complete the program at an accelerated rate. The “Registration Procedures” section of this Bulletin provides further information on registration procedures and deadlines. PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students may begin course work on a nonmatriculated basis during any academic term. Students must hold a bachelors degree and have an undergraduate grade point average of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale—or be reviewed by the M.B.A. Admissions Committee—to begin course work as non-matriculates. Up to three Core M.B.A. courses may be completed on a non-matriculated basis. Non-matriculated students may not take Advanced M.B.A. courses. To take more than three courses students must apply and be formally admitted to a M.B.A. degree program. To be considered for part-time matriculated student status, M.B.A. applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree and have submitted a complete application including application essay, an official Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) score, official copies of all undergraduate

and graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. Non-U.S. applicants who have not studied for at least two years in an English-speaking program must have submitted an official score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Once submitted, all application materials become the property of Union College and are not returnable. Tuition is assessed on a per-course basis. Upon matriculation, part-time students are assessed a one-time resource fee of $150. A part-time student taking three or more courses per term is considered full-time and must comply with all regulations governing full-time students. Part-time students typically take four to five courses a year and complete the program in four years or less. The “Registration Procedures” section of this Bulletin provides further information on registration procedures and deadlines. COURSE WAIVER/TRANSFER/REPLACEMENT POLICY

Students generally may be granted a course waiver for most core courses based on graduate or undergraduate level courses. Waivers reduce the total courses required by one. Students may be granted a transfer for any course (Core or Advanced) based upon completion of a comparable graduate level course with a grade of B- or better, provided that the course has not been used to earn another graduate degree. Transfers reduce the total courses required by one. Credits transfer in, but grades do not. Students may be granted a replacement for any course based on undergraduate level courses and/or experience. Replacements do not reduce the total courses required. A minimum of 12 courses must be completed at the [email protected] In addition, for the M.B.A.-Health Systems Adinistration program only, the sum of courses taken at the [email protected] plus transfers must total at least 18. If course waivers and transfers reduce the number of remaining courses below the minimum, students may take additional electives/designated replacement to reach the required minimum. To facilitate planning of each student’s schedule, students are encouraged to submit all waiver, transfer, and replacement requests to the Curriculum Board (c/o Rhonda Sheehan) as soon as possible. All requests must be submitted by the end of the first term (Fall, Winter, or Spring) during which the student takes a course as a matriculated student. Each request must be submitted on the appropriate form and accompanied, at minimum, by a copy of the transcript showing the relevant course(s). Students are encouraged to attach a catalog description, course syllabi and/or other materials that will help the Curriculum Board rule on the request(s). The Board may request such materials as well.

REQUIREMENTS FOR OBTAINING AN M.B.A. AFTER AN M.S.

Students who received one of [email protected]’s previously offered M.S. degrees may obtain an M.B.A. by taking nine additional courses beyond those taken to satisfy their M.S. degree requirement, assuming that all MS courses fit within the degree requirements of their desired M.B.A. program. In order to count toward the M.B.A., an M.S. course must have been completed within the past five years and the students must have received a grade of at least a “B-“.

The Management Program Co-Chairs: R. Alan Bowman . . . . . . (518) 388-6297 [email protected] Bradley Lewis . . . . . . . . (518) 388-6089 [email protected] M.B.A. MANAGEMENT PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The M.B.A. Management program prepares students for analytical, managerial, and executive-level positions in a variety of enterprises. The design and delivery of the curriculum emphasize broad exposure to core business disciplines; the building of analytical, computer, communication, and human management skills; and the development of an ethical, systems-oriented, cross-functional perspective for decision making. M.B.A. MANAGEMENT COURSEWORK

As shown below, the M.B.A. program includes 10 required Core Courses and 10 Advanced Courses (two required; eight elective). After waivers and transfers, a minimum of 12 courses must be completed at the [email protected] For more details, see the waiver policy above. At least one advanced level course is required in each of the seven categories shown. Students must complete at least eight Core Courses before taking any Advanced Courses. Students must take all Core Courses (except GMI 270) within each category before taking an advanced course in that category. The capstone course (GMI 381) is typically the last course taken. Full-time students take Core Courses in their first year and Advanced Courses in their second year. An internship or relevant business experience is required for the degree. By taking up to four courses in a given category, students can create their own unique programmatic focus. Finance M.B.A. Core Courses: GMI 210, 212 M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: GMI 217, 229, 261, 310, 313, 319 Economics and Environment M.B.A. Core Courses: GMI 220, 270 M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: ECO 225, 244, 263, GMI 221

31

Marketing and Operations M.B.A. Core Courses: GMI 225, 231 M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: GMI 226, 227, 232, 241, 263, 265, 282 Management Science M.B.A. Core Courses: GMI 201/2, 206 M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: GMI 232, 241, 282 Management M.B.A. Core Course: GMI 251 M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: GMI 245, 250, 252, 253, 257, 260 Global M.B.A. Core Course: GMI 200 M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: GMI 260, 261, 262, 265, 310, 313, ECO 244, 263 Capstone M.B.A. Core Courses: None M.B.A. Advanced Required Courses: GMI 381

Students must take either GMI 217 or GMI 261, and GMI 381. Note that several courses can count in more than one category. COMPLETING THE M.B.A. PROGRAM IN TWELVE MONTHS

Students who waive at least six courses may be able to complete the M.B.A. program in one year by starting in the summer term. Four courses can be taken during the summer in two terms and twelve courses can be taken in the three terms during the regular academic year. Students interested in this option must meet with an academic advisor during the previous academic year..

The M.B.A.—Health Systems Administration Program Chair: Martin Strosberg . . . . . . . . . . .(518) 388-6299 [email protected] M.B.A. HEALTH SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW

The M.B.A. in Health Systems Administration prepares graduates for careers as administrators and analysts in health care, governmental, and private sector organizations with strong health care interests. Typical organizations hiring health systems graduates include hospitals, clinics, health maintenance organizations, consulting firms, planning and regulatory agencies, and research firms. The curriculum is designed to help students understand the complexities of the health care system and to provide the skills necessary to allocate resources, execute programs, and manage health and health-related facilities more effectively. 32

A.C.E.H.S.A. ACCREDITATION

The M.B.A. in Health Systems Administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Service Administration (ACEHSA) and AACSB-International. The program has been continuously accredited since 1981 and was most recently re-accredited in 2000. The M.B.A. in Health Systems Administration program is one of only 21 programs nationwide—including institutions such as the University of California at Berkeley, Duke University, and Boston University—that are dually accredited by both ACEHSA and AACSB. M.B.A.—HEALTH SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION COURSEWORK

As shown below, the M.B.A.—Health Systems Administration program includes 10 required Core Courses and 10 Advanced Courses (seven required; three elective). Note that at least two electives must be GMI (versus HSS) courses. After waivers and transfers, a minimum of 12 courses must be completed at the [email protected] For more details, see the waiver policy above. Students must complete at least eight of the Core Courses before taking any Advanced Course. Students must take all Core Courses within each category before taking an advanced course in that category. The capstone course (HSS 381) is typically the last course taken. Full-time students take Core Courses in their first year and Advanced Courses in their second year. An internship or relevant business experience is required for the degree. REQUIRED COURSES

Finance M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: GMI 210, 212 M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: HSS 217 Economics M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: GMI 220 M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: HSS 220 Marketing and Operations M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: GMI 225, 231 M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: HSS 225 Management Science M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: GMI 201/2, 206 M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: None Management M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: GMI 200, HSS 201 M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: HSS 250 Health Environment M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: HSS 200 M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: HSS 274, 280 Capstone M.B.A.–H.S.A. Core Courses: None M.B.A.–H.S.A. Advanced Required Courses: HSS 381

Joint Degree and Other Programs ACCELERATED B.A. OR B.S. AND M.B.A. PROGRAM

Union undergraduate students considering entrance into the accelerated bachelor’s/M.B.A. program should consult with an M.B.A. program advisor and apply for admission during the sophomore, junior, or first term of the senior year. Joint degree students must complete twenty graduate courses, three of which may count toward bachelors degree requirements. Graduate courses may not be taken until the junior year and are typically completed during the senior and fifth years. FOUR-YEAR J.D./M.B.A. PROGRAM

This program is designed to meet the management development needs of students enrolled at the Albany Law School. Students spend their first year in law studies, their second year in management studies, and year three and four in law and management studies. Four designated law courses double count for the M.B.A. CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS IN HEALTH SYSTEMS AND FINANCE

These programs—which include six courses—are designed for individuals who already have a graduate degree but would like to expand their expertise in either health care or finance. The curriculum is tailored to the needs of each student.

MBA @ Union Courses KEY TO TERMINOLOGY

Time of Course Offering:

D (Day) LA (Late Afternoon) E (Evening) * = Advanced M.B.A. or M.B.A.-H.S.A. Course Prerequisite Discussion and Terminology: “Pre” = Prerequisite. Student must have finished this course prior to beginning the listed course. “Rec” = Recommended. It is recommended (but not required) that this course be completed prior to the course listed.

If “prerequisites” have not been fulfilled, then written permission forms, signed by the instructor or [email protected] Director, must accompany the registration form. Students must take 80% of all Core Courses, including GMI 201/202 and GMI 206, prior to taking any Advanced Course. With the exception of GMI 270, students must take all Core Courses in each subject category prior to taking any Advanced Course in that category. Health students must take HSS 200 and HSS 201 before taking any Advanced Course. Additional prerequisite requirements are listed below. CROSS-LISTED COURSES

APPLICATION MATERIALS INCLUDE:

• Application front page • Application fee • All college transcripts • Interview required • Graduate testing results, if taken

ECO 225. Efficient Management of Technology* Winter D; Schmidt

Economic models of the firm; production and cost functions; concepts of efficiency and efficiency measurement; factors affecting efficiency; empirical applications to specific industries. Pre: ECO 41 and ECO 43, or permission of instructor. ECO 244. International Economics* Spring D; Motahar

Foreign trade and international finance, protectionism, international migration of capital and labor, political economy of trade policy, strategic trade policy, international coordination of macroeconomic policies. Familiarity with fundamental concepts of microeconomics, macroeconomics, and regression analysis is expected. If uncertain about the adequacy of prior course work, the instructor should be consulted prior to registration. Pre: ECO 41, ECO 42, and ECO 43, or permission of instructor. ECO 263. Seminar in International Finance Fall D; Dvorak

Topics in foreign economic policy and international finance. Exchange rates and international trade, currency crisis, monetary integration, global macro-economic institutions. Pre: ECO 41 and 42. 33

PHL 287. Seminar in Biomedical Ethics

GMI 212. Managerial Accounting and Finance

Spring E; Pedroni

Fall E, Winter D, E, Spring E, Summer E; Neidermeyer

A philosophical examination of moral problems in biomedicine, in particular those relating to physicians and patients, researchers and subjects, birth and death.

An introduction to the tools and techniques of financial analysis and decision making. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, cost classification and behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, incremental cost analysis, time value of money, capital budgeting, and financial planning. Spreadsheet programs are used in this course. Pre: GMI 210.

MBA @ UNION COURSES

GMI 200. Managing Ethically in a Global Environment Fall D,E, Winter E, Spring E, Summer E; Manna

This course examines issues of team functioning, ethics, and managing differences, all in an increasingly global business environment. Students work individually and in groups to improve written and verbal communication skills. GMI 201 (Half Course). Mathematics of Management Fall D, Winter E; Bowman

This course focuses on mathematics useful in modeling management processes. Fundamental concepts of differential and integral calculus and their applications to management are addressed. Students must register separately for GMI 201 and GMI 202. GMI 202 (Half Course). Introduction to Probability Fall D, Winter E; Bowman

This course covers marginal, joint and conditional probability; random variables, expected value and variance; selected probability distributions and their uses in management; and sampling distributions and the Central Limit Theorem. Students must register separately for GMI 201 and GMI 202. Pre: GMI 201. GMI 206. Statistical Models for Management Winter E, Spring E; Schmee, Staff

This course emphasizes statistical approaches (confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, chisquare tables) that support managerial decision making. Examples of such decisions include determining the best of several suppliers or appropriate salary levels based on education and required skill. Examples from quality management, such as capability analysis and control charting will also be included. Emphasis will be placed on problem statement formation, translation of problem statements into quantitative terms, and finding appropriate data to reach supportable conclusions. Analysis will be performed using statistical and other software. Pre: GMI 201/2 or a qualified course in probability or statistics. GMI 210. Financial Accounting Fall D, E, Winter E, Spring E, Summer E; Arnold and Neidermeyer

A study of the accounting cycle, including preparation and analysis of income statement and balance sheets, price level problems, ratio analysis, and funds flow-cash flow; a critical study of generally-accepted accounting principles. 34

ACC 283. Accounting Internship No fee Fall, Winter, Spring

GMI 216. Security Analysis * Not offered in 2002-2003

An introduction to the institutional structure and practice of the securities industry, and an analysis of key features and valuation techniques for stocks, bonds, convertibles, options, futures, commodities, and mutual funds. GMI 217. Advanced Corporate Finance * Fall E, Spring E; Ashman

This course covers advanced topics in corporate financial management. The analytical skills necessary to evaluate complex financial problems are developed through case studies. Topics covered include: advanced capital budgeting, agency theory, option theory and applications, measuring and hedging financial risk, merger, and acquisition analysis, corporate financial analysis and planning models, and short-term financial management. GMI 218. Cost Accounting * Not offered 2002-2003

The course covers specific aspects of managerial accounting concerned with the accumulation and allocation of costs. While the major emphasis is on manufacturing industries, other situations are also covered. Topics include process and job order costing, controlling materials, labor and overhead costs, and developing standard costs and analyzing variances. GMI 220. Principles of Economics Fall E, Winter LA; Lambrinos

This course covers the basic microeconomic model of price determination; the impact of market structure on price and output decisions by firms; the role of the public sector in an economy; the basic macroeconomic model of national income determination; the impact of fiscal an monetary policies on employment levels, price stability and economic growth; and international economic relationships. GMI 221. Managerial Economics * Winter E; Staff

The course applies principles of micro-economic theory to managerial decision making. Micro topics include demand theory, estimation and forecasting, production

and cost theory, estimation, market structure, forecasting with econometric, time series and exponential smoothing models. Other topics include the role of government in decision making, risk analysis, and pricing practice. GMI 223. Labor Economics * Not offered in 2002-2003

This course considers the theoretical foundations of labor demand and labor supply. The course also covers wage and employment discrimination, compensating wage differentials, disability and worker safety, workers compensation, impact of trade unions, and the impact of the global economy on wages. GMI 225. Marketing Management and Strategy Fall E, Winter E, Spring E, Summer E; Barth

GMI 232. Quality Systems Management * Fall E; Schmee

The course looks at quality improvement approaches in the context of overall organizational objectives. The course discusses the contents and impact of important government and industry standards such as ISO 9000. The course covers Six Sigma including the MeasureAnalyze-Improve-Control model (MAIC) and Design for Six Sigma (DFSS). It discusses extensions to benchmarking and quality functional deployment and offers advanced tools such as systems reliability and maintainability, and life data analysis. GMI 233. Quality Control * Not offered in 20021-2003

This course presents readings and case studies in strategic market planning, a discussion of the product life cycle, marketing mix, product policy, pricing strategies, channels of distribution, promotion, international marketing, and marketing organization with special emphasis on longterm implications.

Probability plots; formal test design for continuous and discrete variables; process mean control charts; operating characteristics for all tests; lot rectification—AOQ and ATI; minimum-cost plans; process variance control; tolerance limits, parametric and non-parametric; double and sequential sampling; sub-lot testing; Analysis of Means; Bulk Sampling; CSP-l plans, with AFI; Mil. Standards.

GMI 226. Marketing Research Techniques *

GMI 234. Inventory Management *

Not offered in 2002-2003

Not offered in 2002-2003

The objective of this course is to provide comprehensive exposure to marketing research methods. The course is designed for the manager with ultimate responsibility for identifying the scope of and implementing particular market research activities. The course explores the application of scientific investigation to the identification and solution of marketing problems.

Introduction to the management of inventory systems. Topics range from single-item, single-facility systems to large-scale, multi-item, multi-facility systems. Deterministic and probabilistic models are introduced and used as a basis for analysis. Emphasis is placed on understanding and using operations research models.

GMI 227. Industrial Marketing *

GMI 235. Project Management and Design of Experiments *

Winter E; Barth

Not offered in 2002-2003

This course examines the process of product development from the stage of market identification through rollout of the new product. Subjects considered include: market research techniques, using primary and secondary data, idea generation, designing for quality, marketing strategy and launch. The primary focus will be on products to service the industrial or business market, but techniques from consumer marketing will be incorporated. GMI 229. Money, Markets and Banking * Fall E; Ashman

The course covers the nature and functions of money and finance in the economy. Commercial and central banking, monetary theory, and monetary policy are also considered. Rec: GMI 217. GMI 231. Operations Management Fall E, Winter D, Spring E; Bowman

This course covers two separate topics: project management and design of experiments. Project management considers the fundamentals for successfully managing individual or multiple projects. Topics covered include planning, scheduling, budgeting, resource leveling, monitoring, and control. Development of mathematical software, administrative, and human management skills necessary for increasing productivity and successfully completing projects on time and within budget are also addressed. Design of experiments addresses topics like underspecified and overspecified models, experimental design (including complete and incomplete block designs), factorial designs, fractional factorial designs, and response surface designs, classical analysis of variance and its relationship to regression analysis, simultaneous inference, randomization and practical constraints, random effect and mixed models, and nested and split plot data arrangements.

This course covers Six Sigma quality concepts and tools, capacity planning, facility location, and inventory management, with an emphasis on supply chain design and management. Management science tools are used throughout. 35

GMI 236. Industrial Management Systems * Not offered in 2002-2003

A series of related cases are analyzed in an experiential learning environment that develops and integrates the topics of transportation, warehousing, distribution, inventory management, manufacturing, production planning, scheduling and control. The course objective is to learn how to develop and implement market-driven strategies for transforming an organization’s industrial management systems to enable it to become a world class competitor.

GMI 251. Managing People and Teams in Organizations Fall E, Winter LA, Spring E, Summer E; Nydegger

This course approaches management issues from the “human” side. By relying on text materials related to basic theory and research in management, and by integrating activities and “hands-on” learning opportunities, students have a broad range of techniques that equip them to function as effective managers in modern organizations. Particular emphasis is given to skills and activities associated with Total Quality Management.

GMI 241. Systems Analysis and Simulation * Winter E; Bowman

In this course students build and utilize computer simulation models to analyze a wide range of systems. Applications include restaurants, doctors’ offices, customer call centers, and many others. Both dynamic and static simulation software and tools are discussed and utilized. Pre: GMI 206. GMI 245. Management for Information Systems * Winter E; Staff

The course considers the use of management information systems within the organization, specifically addressing what an information system is, the underlying technologies, and how current and future computing and telecommunications technologies will contribute to the daily operation and competitiveness of the organization. Particular emphasis is placed on use of information systems to gain competitive advantage. GMI 250. Competing by Design * Spring E; Belasen

Design often signals a shift in strategic emphasis and patterns of organizational performance. Design can also be used to shape an organization’s tone or operating style. Dramatic and lasting restructuring or reengineering plans often fail without the mindset of change architects who share the new strategic vision and corporate values. The ultimate goal of design is to use organizational structures, systems, and processes creatively as a sustainable source of competitive advantage. This course focuses on examining how successful corporations leverage competitive advantages through restructuring and external alliances. Students will apply theoretical knowledge and conceptual models to analyze organizational structures, diagnose organizational design, and evaluate a range of design options and implementation strategies available for transitioning organizations. Topics include corporate downsizing, strategic control systems, horizontal structures, outsourcing, partnerships, virtual forms, and global design.

GMI 252. High Performance Leadership: A Competency Approach * Fall E; Belasen

This course emphasizes cognitive skills and experiential/ practicum learning applied to ongoing leadership and organizational problems. Students learn about leadership roles and competencies essential for building and supporting organizational capabilities and business strategies in global markets. The course also enables students to learn a method to diagnose their strengths and weaknesses in leadership capacities and measure their proficiencies against benchmarked models of high performance leadership. GMI 253. Organizational Development and Transformation * Fall E, Nydegger

This course considers the theory and practice of planned organizational change. Students are exposed to a variety of intervention techniques applicable in a wide range of organizational settings. Lectures are complemented with participatory exercises and interactive discussions. GMI 254. Labor Relations * Not offered in 2002-2003

Analysis and evaluation of the policies, procedures, theories, and problems of labor unions and employers, including origins of craft, industrial, and public employee unions, as well as practices peculiar to each. GMI 255. Seminar in Computer Management Systems Not offered in 2002-2003.

The course addresses management issues such as job satisfaction and motivation, leadership, communication, evaluation, and feedback. These topics are presented from the point of view of computer management systems, and in the context of situations and tasks relevant to the computer science management professional. GMI 257. Human Resources Management * Fall E; Paludi

An introduction to the theory and practice of human resource management, this course examines the economic, political, legal, and managerial aspects of the recruitment and selection, retrenchment, performance evaluation, compensation, motivation, job design, organizational 36

change, and labor relations functions. The focus of the course includes profit, non-profit, and governmental organizations with particular emphasis on health care delivery firms. GMI 260. Executive Decision Processes in Global Environments * Summer E;

Along with information technology, international management is the major challenge facing organizations in the hypercompetitive global marketplace. Companies that once served a specific geographic area or serviced a specific need have learned to compete with Anybody, Anywhere, Anytime. Needing to diversify in order to compete effectively, an increasing number of multinational companies are finding it essential to anticipate changes and innovate continually to become world-class organizations. Global management requires visionary leaders and strategic thinkers who are driven by a customer focus and continuous improvement, supported by a fluid virtual organization and sustained by creative human capital and extensive information technology. These leaders must also recognize the existence of cognitive barriers to decision making and how to overcome decision traps and make better choices for their multinational companies. Using Internet-based search engines, cases, and small group projects, students will have hands-on experiences and acquire the skills necessary to become successful decision makers for their multinational companies. GMI 261. International Finance * Winter E; Ashman

An analysis of international financial markets and the special problems and opportunities associated with the financial management of multinational firms. The international monetary and banking system, balance of payments, and economic parity relationships are also examined. Foreign exchange risk management, international financing activities, multinational capital budgeting, political risk, international taxation issues and diversity of financial reporting are considered. Rec: ECO 244. GMI 262. International Business and Competitive Theory*

GMI 263. e-Commerce * Winter E; Chudzik

This course provides an exposure to important concepts and major issues of e-commerce. Several Case Studies of the leading companies in Internet business will be analyzed. This course aims: a) to evaluate the new economies of information and the strategies for new and existing businesses on the web, b) to study the aspects of framing a market opportunity on the web, c) to understand the seven major business models on the web, Online Retailers, Online Content Providers, Internet Access providers, Online Market Makers, Online portals, Online Brokers and Application Service Providers d) to provide an overview of the network infrastructure and web technologies, e) to study the marketing opportunities on the web and what is an effective web site, f) to review the global impact of e-commerce and an insight into the legal and security issues, g) to understand managing risk in e-business and to understand the critical success factors, h) to examine the last two years of e-commerce and to look at what worked and what did not work on the web and to look at the future of e-commerce. GMI 264. Entrepreneurship Summer E; Sinopoli, Schwartz

Course held off campus, 8 Airport Park Blvd, Latham, NY (http://www.shggroup.com.contactus.htm) for directions. The primary objective of this course is to develop an awareness of the process of new venture creation, whether it is an intrapreneurial or entrepreneurial event. The skills, knowledge and attitudes important for creating new ventures, and the complex tasks faced by individuals who start and manage new and growing businesses as well as corporate ventures and franchises will be addressed. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of management, and financial issues. We will pay particular attention to: entrepreneurial decision making, techniques entrepreneurs and investors use for evaluating and testing the feasibility of business opportunities, understanding the impact of market and industry forces on start up, performance and survival of new ventures, financing a business opportunity, etc.

Spring E; Chudzik

This course examines international business management as influenced by the important economic, political and cultural environment within which businesses must conduct international trade and investment. The problems and issues confronting international managers are evaluated related to a firm’s strategy, organizational structure, manufacturing, material management, marketing, R&D, human resources and finance. Competitive strategies are examined that have been successful in leading international companies. Case studies are used extensively to illustrate the relevance of these topics in the practice of international business.

GMI 265. International Marketing Management* Spring E; Staff

This course examines development of international marketing strategies, from determining objectives and evaluating international market opportunities through coordinating strategies in world markets. Particular emphasis is placed on application of marketing principles in the multinational environment.

37

GMI 270. Legal Principles of Business Fall E; Winter E; Suprunowicz, Valle

The objectives of the course are to enable the business manager to identify situations with legal implications and to interact effectively with professional legal counsel. Particular areas of the law examined during the course are contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, negligence, product liability, secured transactions, and ethical considerations. Not open to JD/M.B.A. students. GMI 282. Lean Production Management * Spring E; Bowman

This course covers just-in-time and lean production concepts and tools, process technology, facility layout, design for manufacturing, production scheduling, designing and managing global supply chains. In-class exercises and software tools are used to allow students to explore these topics in an interactive manner. GMI 283. Management Internship (No fee) Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

GMI 284. International Management Internship (No fee)

taxation; and various business taxation topics such as transfer pricing and tax arbitrage. Pre: GMI 210. GMI 315. Topics in Finance: Venture Capital to Mergers and Acquisitions* Not offered in 2002-2003

This course traces the expectations of investors and the financing and management decisions of firms from the inception of new ventures through public ownership to possible LBO or merger. Emphasis is placed on risk and reward, the role of various classes of investors, and management’s responsibilities to its constituencies. GMI 319. Investments* Winter E; Ashman

This course provides an in-depth analysis of modern investment analysis and portfolio management techniques. Current theory, empirical evidence, and institutional practices are considered. Topics covered include portfolio theory and asset pricing models, market efficiency, fixedincome portfolio management and immunization, equity valuation models, the valuation of options, futures and other derivative securities, portfolio management and performance evaluation, and international diversification. Rec: GMI 217.

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

GMI 381. Strategic Management and Leadership* GMI 290, 291. Independent Study in Accounting Written permission of the instructor and M.B.A. director is required. GMI 292, 293. Independent Study in Finance/Economics Written permission of the instructor and M.B.A. director is required. GMI 294, 295. Independent Study in Management Systems Written permission of the instructor and M.B.A. director is required. GMI 310. Advanced Topics in Domestic and International Financial Accounting* Spring E: Arnold

Examination of financial statement reporting practices for selected advanced business activities including income recognition of complex business transactions, business financing decisions, mergers/acquisitions, international subsidiaries and international business transactions and related hedges. Pre: GMI 210. GMI 313. Domestic and International Taxation* Fall E; Neidermeyer

An examination of the various tax requirements for personal and business activities in a multinational working environment including discussion of U.S. tax liability from an individual perspective when working in the U.S. and abroad; partnership taxation; and various business 38

Winter E, Spring E; Chudzik and Schmee

This course addresses the integration and practical applications of quantitative and qualitative methods to management problems and policy formulation in the public and private sectors. The course strives to integrate all prior core courses. Students must have three or fewer courses left to complete after taking GMI 381. Students may not receive credit for both GMI 382 and GMI 381. GMI 382. Business and Marketing Policy* Not offered in 2002-2003

This course addresses the principles of marketing and distribution systems and the integration of these principles, along with those of the other business disciplines, in the interest of formulating thoughtful strategic planning and policy development. Students may not receive credit for both GMI 382 and GMI 381.

HEALTH SYSTEMS

HSS 200. Introduction to Health Systems Winter E; Strosberg

This course examines the determinants of health, illness, and medical care utilization, institutional arrangements and settings for the delivery of acute and chronic care, the doctor-patient relationship, resource allocation and financing, and measuring and evaluating system performance. HSS 201. Health Systems Management Spring E; Nydegger

This course examines managerial roles and processes within health service organizations—organization design, managerial epidemiology, governance, total quality management, human resource management, labor relations, and ethics. Pre: HSS 200. HSS 202. Medical Aspects of Health Care Administration* Not offered in 2002-2003

This course is designed for students with little or no formal education in human physiology. Course objectives include providing a basis for enhanced communication with health professionals, achieving a general understanding of basic biologic organization and function of the healthy individual, introducing issues of patient education, disease management, physician incentives, physician and health plan report cards, and using real patient episodes to illustrate the principles of managed care. HSS 205. Method and Measurement in Health Services Research* Not offered in 2002-2003

This course provides a description of the major principles, concepts, and current methodologies in evaluation research, social epidemiology, organization, and social research. The course makes extensive use of current cases and health services research findings. HSS 217. Health Care Finance* Spring E, Summer E; Ashman

This course covers financial management in a regulated health care environment. Topics include cost-finding and third-party reimbursement, contemporary issues in health care financing, sources of capital, capital budgeting, financial planning and analysis, cost accounting, and managed care issues. HSS 220. Health Economics* Winter E; Lambrinos

This course is intended for students entering the health field and investigates economic approaches to problems and solutions. Students obtain an understanding of how economics contributes to public and private decision making in health care, and learn to properly interpret economic research results and apply them to work performed by health planners and administrators. Rec: GMI 210, GMI 212.

HSS 225. Health Systems Marketing and Managerial Epidemiology* Fall E; Manna and Stephens

This course covers two main topical areas. The first builds on GMI 225, Marketing Management and Strategy, focusing specifically on the unique challenges and approaches associated with healthcare marketing. Consumer behavior, the development of the marketing mix, product policy, business-to-business marketing, and market strategy appropriate to specific situations of various health care institutions are addressed. The second focus is on understanding and applying basic epidemiological methodologies to the health care management arena. HSS 250. Structural Dynamics in Health Care Systems Fall E; Stosberg

Application of organization theory to health care organizations and systems for the purpose of improving performance. Topics include: organizational structure and design, coordination and control, power and politics, organizational culture, organizational ethics, organizational change. HSS 256. Group Practice Administration: Seminar and Practicum* Winter E; Kleinbauer

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the organization and management of private group practice through seminar and practical experience. It is intended that this course will prepare students for employment in private group practices and/or other ambulatory care organizations. HSS 258. Issues and Management of Long-Term Care* Not offered in 2002-2003

This course examines the organization and management of nursing facilities, retirement communities, assisted living facilities, and organizations for other populations requiring long-term specialty treatment. Emphasis is placed on the personal and professional skills necessary to provide a range of services and quality care within these dynamic environments. HSS 274. Legal Aspects of Health Care* Spring E; Staff

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic legal issues involved in managing health care systems. Antitrust, consent, labor law, malpractice, professional rights and other problems are explored using actual and hypothetical case studies. Not open to JD/M.B.A. students.

39

HSS 280. Health Policy and Information Systems* Winter E; Manna and Smith

This course covers two main topics. The first (focusing on public policy formulation and implementation) is designed to provide an understanding of the political and regulatory environment of health care organizations. The second focuses on the role of information systems in the management and operation of health services organizations and how data derived from these systems can be utilized to assess and improve the health of defined populations. HSR 283. Health Residency Internship (No fee) Summer

HSS 290-295. Independent Study in Health Systems Students pursue programs of independent study in a particular area of health systems under the supervision of a faculty member. Written permission of the instructor and M.B.A. director is required. HSS 381. Strategic Issues for Health Care Organizations* Spring E; Manna and Smith

This course is designed to integrate the concepts and skills associated with managerial problem-solving learned throughout the M.B.A. in Health Systems Administration program. Students analyze case studies addressing the strategic realignment of health service organizations in today’s turbulent environment. A variety of expert practitioners present their views on this topic. Students must have three or fewer courses left to complete after taking HSS 381.

STATISTICS

STA 201. Introduction to Probability and Statistics Winter D; Bowman

This course studies the fundamentals of applied probability, most important distributions, acceptance sampling, confidence intervals, point estimation, and tests of hypotheses. STA 290-295. Independent Study in Statistics Written permission of the instructor and M.B.A. director is required.

40

Administration and Faculty ADMINISTRATION

Roger H. Hull, President; A.B. 1964, Dartmouth College; LL.B. 1967, Yale Law School; LL.M. 1972, J.D. 1974, University of Virginia Christina E. Sorum, Vice President for Academic Affairs/ Dean of the Faculty and Frank Bailey Professor of Classics; B.A. 1967, Wellesley College; Ph.D. 1975, Brown University Patrick F. Allen, Director of Educational Studies; B.A. 1963, University of California; M.A. 1967, Ph.D. 1974, Indiana University Robert T. Balmer, Dean of Engineering; B.S.E. 1961 University of Michigan; B.S.E. 1964 University of Michigan; M.S.E. 1963, S.C.D. 1968, University of Virginia Susan Lehrman, Dean of the Center for Graduate Education and Special Programs, Director of [email protected]; B.A. 1972, Oregon State University; M.P.H. 1980, Ph.D. 1993, University of California, Berkeley FACULTY Patrick F. Allen, Director of Educational Studies; B.A. 1963, University of California; M.A. 1967, Ph.D. 1974, Indiana University Linda G. Almstead, Lecturer, Computer Science; B.A. 1970, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 1985, Union College Ann M. Anderson, Associate Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1984, Tufts University; M.S. 1985, Ph.D. 1990, Stanford University Donald F. Arnold, Professor of Management; B.S. 1966, State University of New York at Albany; M.B.A. 1968, Ph.D. 1972, State University of New York at Buffalo Thomas D. Ashman, Assistant Professor of Management; B.A. 1972, Williams College; M.B.A. 1989, Loyola College in Maryland; Ph.D. 1998, State University of New York at Buffalo Robert B. Baker, Professor of Philosophy; B.A. 1959, City College of New York; Ph.D. 1967, University of Minnesota Robert Barth, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. University of Florida, M.B.A. Oklahoma City University Alan T. Belasen, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.A. 1979, M.P.A. 1981, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Ph.D. 1987, State University of New York at Albany

Ken Blom, Adjunct Associate Professor of Educational Studies; B.S. l968, Ph.D. l988, State University of New York at Albany R. Alan Bowman, Associate Professor of Management; B.S. 1980, M.B.A. 1986, Arizona State University; M.S. 1989, Ph.D. 1990, Cornell University Bradford A. Bruno, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1990, Penn State University; M.S. 1992, University of Michigan; Ph.D. 2000, Penn State University Ronald B. Bucinell, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1981, Rochester Institute of Technology; M.S. 1983, Ph.D. 1987, Drexel University Palma Catravas, Visiting Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; B.M. in Music 1991; B.S.E.E. 1991 University of Maryland at College Park; M.S. 1994, Ph.D. 1998, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Yu Chang, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.S. 1961, Cheng Kung University; M.S. 1971, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. 1974, Syracuse University Melvin W. Chudzik, Associate Director of [email protected], Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S.E.E. 1957, University of Buffalo; M.S. 1970, Long Island University Vuk Fatic, Professor of Electrical Engineering/Computer Science; Dipl. Ing. 1960, Belgrade University; M.S. 1973, Ph.D. 1976, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Chris S. T. Fernandes, Assistant Professor of Computer Science; B.A.1991, M.S. 1993, Ph.D. 2000, Northwestern University Jagdish T. Gajjar, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.E. in Elec. 1960, B.E. in Mech. 1961, Bombay University; M.E. 1963, University of Oklahoma; Ph.D. 1970, University of Houston Beatrice Hall, Assistant Director of Educational Studies; B.A. 1973, State University of New York; M.A. 1983, University of Massachusetts Jill E. Hanifan, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Educational Studies; B.A. 1977, M.A. 1979, State University of New York at Fredonia; D.A. 1987, State University of New York at Albany

41

David G. Hannay, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.S. 1966, Wheaton College; M.A. 1967, State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.S. 1970, State University of New York at Albany; Ph.D. 1973, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Ekram I. Hassib, Associate Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.S. 1964, Cairo University; M.A. 1968, Al-Azhar University, Cairo; Ph.D. 1971, Warsaw Polytechnics Institute. David Hemmendinger, Associate Professor and Chair of Computer Science; B.A. 1962, Harvard University; M.S. 1963, Stanford University; M.A. 1966, Ph.D. 1973, Yale University; M.S. 1982, Wright State University Amy Hsaio, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; BS.1996, MIT; M.S. 1998, Carnegie Mellon University, Ph.D. 2001, Carnegie Mellon University Liva Herz Jacoby, Associate Professor, Center for Medical Ethics, AMC. M.P.H. 1974, University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D. 1983, University of Pittsburgh John E. Kaplan, Professor of Cardiovascular Sciences, AMC. B.S. 1972, University of Illinois; Ph.D. 1976, Albany Medical College William D. Keat, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1976, M.S. 1983, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D. 1989, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Karen Kelley, Adjunct Associate Professor of Educational Studies; B.S. 1966, State University College at Oneonta; M.Ed. 1970, University of Utah; Ed.D. 1991, State University of New York at Albany Patricia Kennedy, Adjunct Associate Professor of Educational Studies Program; A.B., State University of New York at Albany; M.S. 1980, College of Saint Rose Robert Kleinbauer, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Management; B.P.S. State University of New York College of Technology; M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Post Graduate, State University of New York Nicholas Krouglicof, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.Eng. ME 1979, Ph.D. 1991, Concordia University James Lambrinos, Professor of Management; B.A. 1975, Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.A. 1977, Ph.D. 1979, Rutgers University Claudine Lecoca, Visiting Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; Engineering Diploma, EUDIL 1985, Ph.D. 1991, University de Lille

42

Susan Lehrman, Dean of the Center for Graduate Education & Special Programs , Director of [email protected] ; B.A. 1972, Oregon State University; M.P.H. 1980, Ph.D. 1993, University of California, Berkeley James MacLain, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Management; B.S. 1995 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Valerie Manna, Clinical Assistant Professor of Management; B.S. 1989, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.B.A. 1991, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D. 1997, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Victoria Martinez, Associate Professor of Spanish, Chair of Modern Languages, and Associate Professor of Educational Studies; B.A. 1971, M.A. 1986, University of Kentucky; Ph.D. 1992, Arizona State University Kenneth W. Moore, Adjunct Associate Professor of Management; B.A. 1971, Nasson College; M.S. 1975, University of Southern California; 1995, US Army Command and General Staff College Daniel Moriarty, Professor, B.S.F.S. 1964 Georgetown University; J.D. 1967 Georgetown University. William J. Nealon, Adjunct Associate Professor of Management; B.A. 1968, Siena College; M.B.A. 1980, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Presha E. Neidermeyer, Assistant Professor of Management; B.S. and B.A. 1990, West Virginia University; M.Ac. 1991, Miami University; C.P.A., Ph.D. 1997, Virginia Commonwealth University Rudy V. Nydegger, Associate Professor of Management; B.A. 1966, M.A. 1969, Wichita State University; Ph.D. 1970, Washington University Jane E. Oppenlander, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. and B.A. 1979, M.S. 1981, University of Vermont; Ph.D. 1986 Union College Sheila Otto, Nurse Ethicist & Instructor, AMC. B.A. 1969, Trinity College; A.S.N. 1985 Maria College; B.S.N. 1989, University of New York; M.A. 1998, Empire State College Michele Paludi, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. 1976, Union College; M.A. 1978, Ph.D. 1980, University of Cincinnati Julia A. Pedroni, Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Ethics; B.A. 1986, Wells College; Ph.D. 1999, Georgetown University

Martin L. Pollack, Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1972, M.S. 1973, Ph.D. 1975, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn

Thomas R. Sinopoli, Adjunct Associate Professor of Management; B.B.A., Adelphi University

David Pratt, Adjunct Associate Professor of Bioethics, ALS; B.A. in Jurisprudence;1970, Oxford University

Robert Smith, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Management; B.S. 1973, Brooklyn College; M.S. 1980, C.W. Post College; M.S. 1987, New School For Social Research

Matthew Rafferty, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics; B.A. 1992, College of William and Mary; M.A. 1995, Ph.D. 1997, University of California at Davis

Catherine Snyder, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Educational Studies; B.A. 1988, Smith College; M.B.A. 1993, Union College; M.A.T. 1996, Union College

Richard Reynolds, Adjunct Associate Professor of Educational Studies; B.A. 1972, M.S. 1975, State University of New York at Oneonta.

Harvey D. Solomon, Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1963, New York University; Ph.D. 1968, University of Pennsylvania

Kathleen Roman, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Educational Studies, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology; B.S. 1973, State University of New York at Oneonta; M.S. 1991, Union College

Paul Sorum, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics; A.B.1965, Stanford University; Ph.D. 1972, Harvard University; M.D.1980, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Philip Rosenberg, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. 1982, Cornell University; J.D. 1986, Yeshiva University, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

Lance O. Spallholz, Instructor of Computer Science and Director of the Computer Science Laboratory; B.S. 1969, Union College; M.S. 1974, College of St. Rose; M.S.C.S. 1985, Union College

Michael Rudko, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.S.E.E. 1965, M.S.E.E. 1969, Ph.D. 1974, Syracuse University William St. John, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. Siena College; M.S. Union College; Ph.D. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Josef Schmee, Kenneth B. Sharpe Professor of Management; Magister 1968, University of Vienna; M.S. 1970, Ph.D. 1974, Union College

Dean T. Spaulding, Instructor of Educational Studies; B.A. 1997, State University of New York at Plattsburgh; M.S. 1998, State University of New York at Albany; Ph.D. 2001, State University of New York at Albany John M. Spinelli, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.E. (E.E.) 1983, The Cooper Union; M.S. 1985, Ph.D. 1989, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Robert W. Schwartz, Adjunct Associate Professor of Management; B.A., Cornell University

Bonnie Steinbock, Professor, Philosophy, SUNYA; B.A. 1967, Tufts University; Ph.D. 1974, University of California, Berkeley

Gerald R. Shaye, Adjunct Associate Professor of Management; B.A., Dartmouth College; M.B.A., Columbia University

Punkin C. Stephens, Adjunct Associate Professor of Management; P.A. 1977, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles

Mehmet Fuat Sener, Assistant Professor of Economics; B.S. 1993, Middle East Technical University, Turkey; M.S. 1995, London School of Economics; Ph.D. 1999 University of Florida

Michael R. Suprunowicz, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. 1977, M.B.A. 1978, State University of New York at Albany; J.D. 1981 Albany Law School

Wayne Shelton, Associate Professor of Medicine, AMC. B.A. 1972, University of North Carolina at Asheville; M.A. 1979, University of Tennessee; Ph.D. 1987, University of Tennessee; M.A. 1994, University of Chicago; Certificate, 1994, University of Chicago; Fellow, 1994, University of Chicago

Martin Strosberg, Professor of Management; B.A. 1968, Union College; M.A. 1969, M.P.H. 1971, University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. 1976, Syracuse University Charles D. Thompson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.A. 1962, Oberlin College; M.S. 1968, Ph.D. 1971, American University

43

Dan R. Thompson, Associate Professor of Surgery, AMC. B.S. Ferris State University; M.D. 1979, Wayne State University; Cherrice Traver, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; B.S. 1982, State University of New York at Albany; Ph.D. 1988, University of Virginia Karen Martino Valle, Adjunct Professor of Management; B.S. 1973, St. John’s University, College of Business Administration; J.D. 1976, St. Johns University, School of Law; L.L.M. 1980, New York University, School of Law Frank E. Wicks, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1961, State University of New York Maritime College; M.S. 1966, Union College; Ph.D. 1976, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; P.E. Richard D. Wilk, Professor of Mechanical Engineering; B.S. 1980, M.S. 1982, Ph.D. 1986, Drexel University George H. Williams, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; A.B., B.E.E. 1965, Union College; M.S. 1966, M. Phil. 1968, Ph.D. 1970, Yale University Suthathip Yaisawarng, Associate Professor of Economics; B.B.A. 1977, Thammasat University, Thailand; M.B.A. 1983, Howard University; Ph.D. 1989, Southern Illinois University

44

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED

Bioethics Business Administration Clinical Leadership in Health Management Computer Science Educational Studies Electrical Engineering Financial Management Health Systems Administration Mechanical Engineering Science

Degrees M.S.

HEGIS Code 0499

M.B.A.

0506

M.S. M.S. M.A.T. M.S. Adv. Cert.

1202 0701 0803 0909 0504

M.B.A., Adv. Cert. 1202 M.S. 0910 M.S. 4902

Joint Programs Offered in Conjunction with Other Institutions Law and Business Administration (with Albany Law School) M.B.A.

0506

Law and Business Administration/ Health Systems Administration (with Albany Law School)

1202

M.B.A.

Clinical Leadership in Health Management Pharmacy Doctorate (with Albany College of Pharmacy) M.S.

1202

UNION Graduate Education Lamont House Schenectady, New York 12308 Telephone: 518.388.6148 Fax: 518.388.6686 http://www.union.edu

Loading...

Graduate Education Graduate Education - Clarkson University

Graduate Education @ a c h e R a H i g h e r D e g r e e o f e l l e n E x c c e 2002-2003 Bulletin Union College Schenectady, New York C...

689KB Sizes 2 Downloads 23 Views

Recommend Documents

Graduate School | Clarkson University
3 days ago - We offer rigorous, sought-after graduate and professional degree programs at the advanced certificate, mast

graduate education project - USAID
Iwould like to extend this note of appreciation to those persons who made by stay in Indonesia productive, comfortable,

Graduate Education : navy - Reddit
I might be more interested in actually finishing the NKOs if I knew there was real life credit for it....Sorry to hijack

Army grADuATe meDICAl eDuCATIon
the Graduate Medical Education (GME) programs offered by the U.S. Army ... Team has to offer in this important area of e

graduate education project - USAID
Mundy, an editor at Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan. He discussed editing at Indonesian ..... Cara beru

graduate medical education - acgme
Choosing a Medical Specialty–Rebecca Gierhahn, AMA Medical Stu- dent Section. Succeeding from Medical School to Practi

Education Graduate Programs - Nicholls State University
These include concentrations in early childhood, high incidence disabilities, reading specialist, elementary education a

Christian Education - UWA's Graduate School of Education
Singapura dan Indonesia. IN HEFNER, R. W. (Ed.) Politik .... (2003) Model Pelatihan Dan Pengembangan Sylabus - Pelayanan

Graduate Aircraft Design Education - IJEE
design of an entry-level executive jet, as an example of the group design project. The paper also .... and reports produ

Bursar : Graduate School of Education | Touro College
Bursar. We don't just send the bills. We help you manage your accounts, stay on top of your payments, and—most importa