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GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Ajman Campus Tel.: 971-6-7466666 Fax: 971-6-7468888 P.O. Box: 346 United Arab Emirates

Toll Free: 800 2878 ajman.ac.ae E-mail: [email protected]

Disclaimer:

The information concerning academic requirements, courses, programs, regulations and fees contained in this publication does not constitute a binding legal document or other legal agreement with proposed students, accepted students or any other person. The University reserves the right to change, discontinue, or add academic requirements, courses, programs, regulations, fees without prior notice.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahayan President of the United Arab Emirates

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His Highness Sheikh Humaid Bin Rashid Al Nuaimi Member of the Supreme Council Ruler of Ajman Patron of Ajman University

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Table of Contents 1.Organization Chart ................................................................................................................................................. 6 2. AU’s History .......................................................................................................................................................... 8 3. AU Vision .............................................................................................................................................................. 9 4. AU Mission .......................................................................................................................................................... 10 5. AU Goals............................................................................................................................................................. 11 6. Admissions and Registration .............................................................................................................................. 13 7. Student Records ................................................................................................................................................. 25 8. Confidentiality of the records .............................................................................................................................. 25 9. Student Rights .................................................................................................................................................... 25 10. Academic Advising and Mentoring.................................................................................................................... 25 11. Information Technology and Learning Resources ............................................................................................ 29 12. Student Affairs .................................................................................................................................................. 36 13. Student Services ............................................................................................................................................... 44 14. Cafeterias & Restaurants .................................................................................................................................. 46 15. Bookshops ........................................................................................................................................................ 46 16. Mosques ........................................................................................................................................................... 46 17 Shops ................................................................................................................................................................. 46 18. The Career Counseling Center ......................................................................................................................... 46 19. Training Center ................................................................................................................................................. 48 20. Student ID Card ................................................................................................................................................ 49 21. Student Rights and Responsipilitioes ............................................................................................................... 49 22. Student Behavior Code ..................................................................................................................................... 51 23. Student Academic Integrity Policy .................................................................................................................... 52 23.14. Disciplinary Policy ........................................................................................................................................ 61 24. Student Grievance and Appeal Policy .............................................................................................................. 61 25. Tuition Fees & Financial Regulations ............................................................................................................... 64 Master of Business Administration .......................................................................................................................... 67 Master of Science in Ground Water Engineering and Management ..................................................................... 77 Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry ............................................................................................................. 95 Master of Science in Pharmacy .............................................................................................................................. 109

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1.Organization Chart Board of Trustees

Legal Advisor Mr. Ammar Akch

Executive Committee

Internal Audit Office Mr. Abdul Raheem Jaber

Chancellor Dr. Karim Seghir

Documentation Center Mr. Mohammed Assad Project Management Office Mr. Mohammed Salman

Vice Chancellor for Advancement and Communication

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Chief Operating Officer

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Vice - Chancellor for Advancement and Communication Dr. Abdulhaq Al-Nuaimi

Office of Alumni Mr. Hussam Steitieh Office of Community Service Mrs. Noor AlChaghouri

Mr. Rabi Al Khofash

Office of University Facilities Dr. Muhammed Sherzad Office of Procurement Mr. Muhammed Barakat

Office of IT

Office of External Relations Mrs. Rula Talal

Mrs. Inas Abousharkh

Office of Public Relations Mr. Shadi Abou Khaled

Office of Human Resources Mr. Khalid Al Awadhi

Office of Media & Marketing Mrs. Salha Al Mahri

Office of Medical Services Dr. Fetta Djessas

Office of Development Dr. Farah Sarraj

Office of Finance Mrs. Amal Al Alami

Office of Scholarship & Financial Aid Mrs. Heba Al Khatib

Office of Budget and Planning Mr. Jamel Sulaiman, Acting

Sheikh Zayed Center for Exhibitions & Conferences Mr. Hisham Al Metnawy

Vice - Chancellor for Academic Affairs Dr. Khaled Assaleh

Chief Operating Officer

Council for Academic Affairs

Colleges

Deanship of Graduate Studies & Research Prof. Mustahsan Mir Office of Admissions & Registration Mr. Essam Abdou Library Mr. Abdalla Ahmed El Tahir Innovation Center Ajman Dr. Abdullah Ismail

Deanship of Student Affairs Dr. Nahla Alqassimi Office of Student Affairs Mrs. Asma Al Shamsi Asma Al Housing Shamsi Students Mrs. Leena Taifour

Office of Career and Placement Services Mr. Mohammad Ismail Counseling Unit Dr. Rasha Abdullah

Office of Institutional Research and Planning Dr. Sayed Abbas

Unit Institutional Research

Unit of Academic Assessment and Accreditation

Continuing Education Center Mr. Rami Abu El Haija Office of International Academic Affairs Mrs. Tazeen Sharif

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2. AU’s History Ajman University of Science and Technology was founded in 1988 as a non-conventional private institution of higher education. The university was established by His Highness Sheikh Humaid Bin Rashid Al-Nuaimi, Member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Ajman. On June 17, 1988 he issued an Emiri Decree establishing Ajman University College of Science and Technology (AUCST), as AUST was then called, and the first intake of students took place on September 15 that year. In accordance with the Ministry of Higher Education and Research decree No 54 of 1997, AUCST became Ajman University of Science and Technology (AUST). The name of the university has been changed from Ajman University of Science and Technology (AUST) to Ajman University (AU) starting from 26th of Oct. 2016. AU offers 28 accredited undergraduate programs and 11 accredited graduate programs. The aim of these programs is to provide the community with competent graduates capable of using technology and its applications for the development of UAE society.

Accreditation and Licensure Ajman University is licensed and its programs are accredited by the Commission for Academic Accreditation (CAA) of the Ministry of Education in the United Arab Emirates.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

3. AU Vision Ajman University aims to be internationally recognized as one of the leading universities in the Arab world in terms of cutting-edge learning, impactful research and responsible outreach and community engagement.

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4. AU Mission Ajman University (AU) is a multicultural academic institution that offers a broad range of high quality and relevant academic programs. The University strives to fulfil the needs of students, alumni, employers, and society through quality education, scholarship and community engagement. AU develops well-rounded graduates who are professionally competent, socially responsible, innovative and active contributors to sustainable development of the UAE and beyond.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

5. AU Goals AU strive to achieve the following goals: 1. Ensuring excellence in teaching and learning 2. Enhancing the quality, relevance, and impact of research and intellectual contribution 3. Recruiting, supporting and fostering the development of a bright anddiverse student body 4. Enhancing the visibility and the positioning of the University 5. Building impactful and long-lasting ties with the external communities 6. Promoting cutting-edge and innovative support services

Core Values 

Excellence: All AU activities are conducted with strong emphasis on international quality standards.



Integrity: AU adheres to the principles of honesty, trustworthiness, reliability, transparency and accountability.



Inclusiveness: AU embraces shared governance, inspires tolerance, and promotes diversity.



Social Responsibility: AU promotes community engagement, environmental sustainability and



global citizenship. It also promotes awareness of, and support for, the needs and challenges of the local and global communities.



Innovation: AU supports creative activities that approach challenges and issues from multiple perspectives in order to find solutions and advance knowledge.

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6. WHERE IS AU? The United Arab Emirates The United Arab Emirates is the federation of seven Arab Emirates: Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Ajman, Ras Al-Khaimah, Fujairah and Umm Al Quwain. The Federal State, which was formed in December 1971, is located on the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. It covers an area of about 77,700 square kilometers situated between latitudes 220 and 26.50 North and longitudes 510 and 56.50 East. Some 86.6 percent of the land is accounted for by Abu Dhabi. The country is bordered by the Arabian Gulf to the North, Saudi Arabia and Qatar to the West, Saudi Arabia and Oman to the South East, and Oman and the Gulf of Oman to the East. The terrain of the U.A.E. is characterized by sand desert, barren mountains, and salt flats. However, a number of green valleys and oases are scattered all over the country. Furthermore, an afforestation campaign and a land reclamation drive has turned hundreds of thousands of hectares of previously barren land into green areas. The country’s total population is approximately six millions people including nationals, foreign Arabs, and other expatriate residents. The weather can be extreme during the summer months, from May to October, with interior temperatures reaching 49oC and coastal temperatures slightly lower but combined with high humidity. Pleasant weather prevails during the rest of the year with temperatures between 20oC and 35oC. The main natural resource is oil with reserves up to almost one tenth of the world’s total.

Ajman: The Emirate of Ajman is centrally located on the western coast of the U.A.E., a short distance from Sharjah, representing the northern flank of the (Dubai - Sharjah - Ajman) metropolitan area. Ajman was the birthplace of the University in 1988.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

7. Admissions and Registration 7.1. System of Education and Graduate Programs Offered The university utilizes the credit hour system. This system requires that students earn a total number of credit hours, as determined by the university, to complete their program of study. The required number of credit hours is distributed over a certain number of semesters, depending on the program (see Table 1 for details). All AU Graduate programs are accredited by the Commission of Academic Accreditation (CAA) of the Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific Research, UAE.

Table 1: Accredited graduate degree programs offered College Institute of Environment, Water, and Energy

Degree

Total Credit Hours

MSc in Groundwater Engineering & Management

36

MBA ( Human Resource Management)

36

MBA ( Financial Management)

36

MBA ( Marketing)

36

MSc. in Urban Design

36

Master of Law (Private Law)

33

Master of Law ( Public Law)

33

Dentistry

MSc. in Restorative Dentistry

57

Pharmacy & Health Sciences

MSc in Pharmacy /Pharmaceutical Technology

36

Pharmacy & Health Sciences

MSc in Pharmacy / Clinical Pharmacy

36

Education and Basic Sciences

Professional Diploma in Teaching

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Business Administration

Engineering Law

7.2. Admission of new applicants to AU graduate programs Applications for admission should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Registration prior to the beginning of each semester. To be eligible for admission to a Graduate program, a student must be holder of a Bachelor Degree issued in the UAE, or its equivalent as approved by the UAE Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific Research, UAE. The AU Council of Academic and Scientific Affairs determines the number of students to be admitted to each graduate degree program each semester, according to the university’s available resources.

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7.2.1. General Admission Conditions to Master Programs In accordance with the University requirements for graduate programs, holders of a Bachelor degree may apply for full or conditional admission to a Master program if they fulfill the following minimum general requirements :

a. Full admission To be eligible for Full admission, the applicant must satisfy the following: i. He/she is holder of a Bachelor degree in the same field as that of the program applied for ii. His/.her Bachelor degree was completed with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3 on a scale of 4.0, or its equivalent iii. His/her Bachelor degree was issued from an accredited university by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE iv. He/she has attained at least 550 score in TOEFL or its equivalent ( if the program is taught in English)

b. Conditional admission requirements for Master programs Subject to availability of seats, a conditional admission may be offered if the applicant fulfils the above listed general conditions of full admission but his/her GPA is between 2.0 and 2.99 or his/her TOEFL score is between 530 and 550 or its equivalent ( if the program is taught in English).

b.1. Conditional admission due to non fulfillment of GPA requirement An applicant may be offered a conditional admission due to non fulfillment of GPA condition, if he/she satisfies the following: i.

He/she is holder of a Bachelor degree in the same field as that of the program applied for

ii.

His/.her Bachelor degree was completed with a minimum cumulative GPA between 2.00 and 2.99 on a scale of 4.0, or its equivalent

iii.

His/her Bachelor degree was issued from an accredited university by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE

iv.

He/she has attained at least 550 score in TOEFL or its equivalent ( if the program is taught in English)

Important:

Admitted students, under this category, will be allowed to continue in the Master program only if they meet the following requirements during the period of conditional admission or be subject to dismissal: a. may take a maximum of nine credit hours in the first semester of study; b. must achieve an overall grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale, or its established equivalent, in the first nine credit hours of credit-bearing courses studied for the Master’s program.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

b.2. Conditional admission due to non fulfillment of English Proficiency requirement An applicant may be offered a conditional admission due to non fulfillment of English Proficiency requirement , if he/she satisfies the following: i. He/she is holder of a Bachelor degree in the same field as that of the program applied for ii. His/.her Bachelor degree was completed with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3 on a scale of 4.0, or its equivalent iii. His/her Bachelor degree was issued from an accredited university by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE iv. He/she has attained a score between 530 and 550 in TOEFL or its equivalent ( if the program is taught in English)

Important:

Admitted students, under this category, will be requested to register in the Advanced level of the IEP program , and 6 credit hours during their first semester of studies. They must meet the following requirements during the period of conditional admission or be subject to dismissal: a. must achieve a TOEFL score of 550, or equivalent, by the end of the student’s first semester of study; c. must achieve an overall grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale, in the first nine credit hours of credit-bearing courses studied for the Master’s program.

Important:

1. The number of seats for this category is limited to 25% of the number of students who are admitted to the program 2. The selection of the candidates will be based on the GPA obtained in the Bachelor degree

c. Exemption from English Language Proficiency Applicants for an AU graduate program may be exempted from the English Proficiency requirement (minimum score of 550 in TOEFL or its equivalent) if :

Case 1. 1. The medium of instruction is English for the Bachelor degree of the applicant , 2. The applicant was admitted to the Bachelor program after having obtained at least 500 score in TOEFL or its equivalent, 3. The applicant has applied for an AU Graduate program in less than two years after his/her graduation.

Case 2. 1. If English is the native Language of the applicant,

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2. The applicant had completed his/her Bachelor degree in his/her home country or in a country where English is the native Language.

Case 3. The Medium of Instruction of the Master program is Arabic Language.

d. Foundation Program (Bridge Program) A program intended to ―bridge the gap between a student’s prior work and the background required for the program he/she is entering. Typically such a program would be needed by students entering graduate business education where the student’s undergraduate major was in an area other than business, or graduate of engineering programs where the student’s major was in a different engineering specialty. The courses in a bridge program typically do not carry degree credit.

7.2.2. General Admission Conditions to the Professional Graduate Diploma in Teaching program An applicant is eligible for the admission into the Professional Graduate Diploma in Teaching if : i. He/she is holder of a four year Bachelor degree in one of the following fields: a. Arabic Language Literature, b. Islamic studies, c. English Language & Translation, or English Literature d. Mathematics, e. Biology, Physics, or Chemistry. f. Information Technology ii. His/her Bachelor degree was issued from an accredited university by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE

7.2.3 Transfer students from accredited institutions

a. Eligibility for Transfer to AU A Graduate student from an institution of higher education may apply for admission to an AU Graduate program in the same field of study if: i. He/she satisfies the conditions of AU general full admission or he/she had satisfied requirements of conditional admission which are similar to AU conditions . ii. He/she had been in good academic standing, i.e.: his/her Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is a least 3.0, on a scale of 4.0 or its equivalent, iii. He/she had not been the subject of disciplinary dismissal. iv. He/she was enrolled in a graduate program which is recognized /accredited by the Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific Research, UAE.

Important:

If the student was admitted at his/her previous university based on the Institutional TOEFL, he/she will be requested to re-take the TOEFL test at AU, and obtain at least 550 score .

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

b. Conditions for Transfer of credit hours earned outside AU The transfer of credited courses is considered for graduate students who are transferring to a similar program to one studied previously if: i.

their cumulative grade point average was at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0, or the equivalent,

ii.

the course is not a course of the Pre- Master foundation Program,

iii.

the number of credit hours for the graduate course is not less than that of the AU equivalent graduate course

iv.

the grade obtained on the previous course must have been at least B (3.0 on 4.0 scale or the grade that corresponds to “Merit/ very Good” for institutions using a different grading scale)

v.

the course content at the institution previously attended should be similar to that of the corresponding course offered at AU

Important: i.

Only grades obtained from courses taken at AU will be taken into account in the calculation of a student’s CGPA, i.e., grades obtained from transferred courses at the institution will not be taken into account in the computation of the CGPA.

ii.

AU does not grant transfer students a graduate degree unless they successfully complete at least 50 percent of the credit hours of the graduate program at AU.

iii.

Transfer credit hours will be reported on AU Transcript only when the Office of Admissions & Registration receives the authenticity certificate of the transcript from the former institution of the student.

7.2.4 Admission to Master Foundation Program

The program coordinator may consider admission applications to the foundation program from students who satisfy the admission conditions of the program but they are holders of a Bachelor degree in another area of specialization. If the application is accepted, the student will have to: 

pass all the undergraduate courses ( up to 15 credit hours), specified by the program coordinator, with a GPA of 3.0



obtain at least 550 score in TOEFL or its equivalent

Important:

Applicants to the Foundation program must be holder of 500 score in TOEFL before registering their foundation courses.

7.2.5 Documents Required for Admission to Graduate programs An application is considered complete if the applicant submits to the Admission & Registration the following documents:

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Application form, which may be obtained from the Admission and Registration, to be filled in by the applicant



Certified copy of UAE Secondary School Certificate, or its equivalent (recommended)



Certified copy of the Bachelor degree certificate or its equivalent. (If the Bachelor degree is obtained abroad, the equivalency certificate issued from UAE Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific must also be submitted)



Certified copy of the grade transcript



Certificate of proficiency in English language, e.g. TOEFL with a minimum score 550 in TOEFL or its equivalent



Photocopy of valid passport



A copy of UAE ID card for UAE residents



Health certificate, issued by AU doctor



Certificate of good conduct, issued by an official body



Six recent passport-size photographs



2 reference letters

 A written commitment signed by the applicant that he/she will observe AU rules and regulations.

Notes : 1. AU does not take into consideration Institutional TOEFL scores obtained in another institution 2. Applications for admission are processed only after payment of the non-refundable Application & Registration Fee for Graduate programs which is AED 2000. This fee is reduced to AED 1300 for applicants to Professional Graduate Diploma in Teaching. 3. Transfer students are also requested to pay AED 500 for the evaluation of the credits that may be transferred to them.

7.2.6 Certification of Documents Newly-admitted students are requested to have their documents certified before the end of the first semester of study, otherwise their registration will be cancelled. i. Bachelor degree Certificate ,and Grade Transcript obtained in the UAE must be certificated by the UAE Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research , UAE. ii. Bachelor degrees and Grade Transcript obtained abroad must be certificated by:  the Ministry of Higher Education, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the country of origin, and the UAE embassy in that country, or  the embassy of the country which issued the certificate, and the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

7.2.7. Admission Validity Admission to a Graduate program is valid only for the semester which is indicated in the admission letter offer. If an admitted student does not join the program during that semester, the admission offer will be cancelled with no refund of the application fee. However, an admitted student, who did not join his/her program, could re-apply for admission to the same program or another program, subject to payment of the re-admission fee of AED 300.

7.2.8 Seat reservation fee Students admitted to a graduate program may be requested to pay a seat reservation fee of AED 4,000. This fee is non-refundable and non-transferable and must be paid before the deadline stated on the offer letter of admission. This deposit is deductible from the tuition fees once the applicant joins AU. If the student asks to defer admission to the following semester and the request is approved, the seat reservation fee will be applied to the following semester.

7.3. Right to withdraw registration The university reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission if the applicant fails to satisfy all requirements, or it is found that admission was obtained through the use of incomplete, falsified, altered or embellished information. In the case of withdrawal of registration from a matriculated student, credit earned at AU will be withheld and no transcript will be issued to the student.

7.4. Re-Admission of Former Students Students who have missed more than two consecutive semesters of enrollment (excluding the summer semester) at the university may apply for re-admission by completing the re-enrollment form which is available at the Office of Admissions and Registration. To be eligible for readmission, the applicant must meet the following conditions: 1.

The applicant was not subject to behavioral dismissal from AU

2. The applicant must satisfy admission requirements in effect at the time of re-admission 3. If the applicant transferred from AU to another accredited institution, he/she must apply as a transfer student. No student will be re-admitted until all fees, charges and dues owed to the university have been paid. A non-refundable re-admission fee of AED 300 is charged.

7.5. Study Load for Graduate students a. Study load for Master students The normal study load for Full Time Master students is 4 courses (12 credit hours) per semester . However, the study load of academically warned students may be reduced to 2

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courses to enable the student to focus on only two subjects to increase his/her chances to raise the CGPA to 3.0 or more.

b. Study load for Professional Diploma in Teaching The normal study load for Full Time students, who are enrolled in the Professional Diploma in Teaching, is 6 courses (18 credit hours) per semester . However, the study load of academically warned students may be reduced to 3 or 4 courses to enable the student to focus on only few subjects to increase his/her chances to raise the CGPA to 3.0 or more.

c. Study load of Part-time Graduate students The normal study load of Part-time Master students is 6 credit hours per semester, where it is 9 credit hours for students who are enrolled in the Professional Diploma in teaching program.

7.6. Maximum Time allowed to complete a Graduate program The maximum time allowed for a student in which he/she may complete a graduate degree program is a maximum of double the regular number of required semesters. (e.g. A two-year master degree must be completed in a maximum of 8 regular semesters of enrolment in the program). The maximum number of semesters of enrolment for transfer students is determined after the deduction of the number of earned/transferred semesters from from the above limits. Suspended semesters are not counted in the time allowed for students to complete their degree.

7.7. Academic Evaluation and Assessment 7.7.1. Course Assessment In each registered course, a student’s performance is assessed according to a procedure established by the college concerned, and explained in the course plan. The overall score is normally distributed as follows: 1. Semester tests and activities: 50 percent 2. Final examination:

50 percent

The score for semester tests and activities includes marks for tests, assignments, research project, and laboratory work. The pass mark in each course is sixty percent.

7.7.2. Grading System The university adopts the following grading system for graduate programs : Mark

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Grade

Merit for Graduate Program

Letter

Point

From 90 to 100

A

4.0

Excellent

From 85 to 89

B+

3.5

Very Good (High)

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

From 80 to 84

B

3.0

Good

From 75 to 79

C+

2.5

Pass (High)

From 70 to 74

C

2.0

Pass

From 65 to 69

D+

1.5

Pass

From 60 to 64

D

1.0

Pass

Less than 60

F

0

Fail

7.7.3. Semester Grade Point Average The semester GPA indicates the student’s performance during the semester, and is calculated as follows: the total of the grade point of each course taken in the semester multiplied by its credit hours, divided by the total number of credit hours registered in the semester.

7.7.4. Cumulative Grade Point Average The CGPA indicates the student’s average performance over all semesters up to the final or current semester. It is calculated as follows: the total of the point grade of each course taken to date, multiplied by its credit hours, divided by the total number of credit hours taken. If a student repeats a course in which he/she obtained an “F” grade, or does so in order to improve his/her CGPA, the last grade obtained will be considered in the calculation of the CGPA regardless of whether the last grade is higher than the original one or not. However, the original grade will continue to appear in the academic record without affecting the calculation of the CGPA. The CGPA is also used for academic probation as follows: starting from the end of the first semester of study, if the student’s CGPA is less than 3.0, he/she will be regarded as an “academically-warned” student and will be requested to improve his/her academic performance to raise the CGPA to 3.0 or higher. (See Section 11 for the policy regulating the study load of warned students). A student will not be allowed to graduate unless his/her CGPA is at least 3.0, even if he/she has passed all required courses of the program of study. In this case, in consultation with the academic advisor, the student must repeat a number of courses of the study plan in order to raise his/her CGPA to at least 3.0.

7.7.5. Incomplete Grade Attendance at final examinations is compulsory. Failure to attend means failure in the course. However, if a student does not attend the final examination for urgent reasons and he/she scored at least a total of 30 out of 50 in coursework, the course may be considered as “incomplete.” Acceptable evidence for failure to attend a final examination consists of the following: 1. illness certified in a medical report approved by the university doctor 2. death certificate of a first or second degree relative 3. arrest or summons before a court or other legal body

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In these cases the student must complete and submit a request form within three days of the examination date. He/she also must present the relevant documents to the Office of Admissions and Registration. The application will be processed only if the student has no financial obligation to the university and has paid the fee for an “incomplete request.” The application will not be accepted if the student has a 25 percent absence warning. A student who has been deemed to be “incomplete” in a course must take the final examination before the end of the second week of the following semester in which he/she registers.

7.7.6. Examination Re-sits If a student passes all courses except one, required for graduation or for starting the thesis work, which he/she failed in the last semester, he/she will be allowed to re- take the final exam for that course before the beginning of the following semester. In this case, there is a charge of 50 percent of the course fee.

7.7.7. Complaints about Grades Complaints regarding final examination results must be lodged within a period of two weeks following the announcement of the examination results. The student should complete and submit a Complaint Form to the Office of Admissions and Registration. The form will be transferred to the college concerned where an appropriate decision will be made. The Office of Admissions and Registration notifies the student of the decision.

7.8. Academic Standing for Graduate Students A graduate student is considered in good academic standing only if his/her CGPA is at least 3.0. Otherwise, he will be put on academic probation. If an academically warned student does not raise his/her CGPA to 3.0 in the following semester, he/she will be placed on a second probation. If a student who is on second probation fails to raise his/her CGPA to 3.0 in the following semester, the student will be dismissed from the program. The Graduate program coordinator may advise an academically warned student to repeat one or more than one course to increase his/her chances to raise his/her CGPA to 3.0.

7.9. Graduation Requirements A student will be awarded the degree of the graduate program, in which he is registered in, upon meeting the following requirements: 

Completion of the required courses of the study plan

 Achievement of a CGPA of not less than 3.0  Completion of the thesis/dissertation ( when applicable)

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

The merit of the graduate degree is determined according to the following scale: Cumulative GPA

Merit

From 3.8 to 4.0

Excellent with Honors

From 3.6 to less than 3.8

Excellent

From 3.3 to less than 3.6

Very Good

From 3.0 to less than 3.3

Good

7.10. Attendance Policy a. Attendance to lectures Attending classes is compulsory for all courses. A student will not be allowed to take the final examination if he/she has missed more than 25 percent of the classes during the semester. Absence warning policies are set out below: 

If a student is absent for 10 percent of theoretical and practical class hours, the lecturer will issue a 10 percent absence warning.



If a student is absent for 20 percent of theoretical and practical class hours, the lecturer will issue a 20 percent absence warning.



If a student is absent for 25 percent of theoretical and practical class hours, the lecturer will issue a 25 percent absence warning and the student will receive the F grade.

The Council of Academic and Scientific Affairs may consider a student’s withdrawal from the course if sufficient and convincing reason for the absence is submitted to it by the Office of Admissions and Registration, after approval of the program coordinator.

b. Attendance to meetings with thesis supervisor Every student who is preparing his/her thesis is expected to meet his/her supervisor on regular bases ( at least one meeting in every two weeks). 

If a student does not attend two consecutive planned meetings without prior approval of the supervisor, the latter will issue a 10 percent absence warning.



If a student was issued a 10% warning , and he/she does not attend another two planned meetings without prior approval of the supervisor, the latter will issue a 20 percent absence warning.



If a student did not attend more than 6 planned meetings without approval of his/her supervisor, the latter writes a report to the program coordinator who could recommend to the College Council to take one the following decisions: a. suspend the student for one semester if he/she has made a good progress in his/her research work,

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b. suspend the student for one semester , and change the research subject and the supervisor c. dismiss the student from the program

Student ID Card Students will receive a university ID card containing their photograph, name, date of birth and AU ID number. The ID card should be carried at all times. It provides access to certain academic buildings and hostels. In addition, the card is required for admission to sports facilities, to sit university exams and to make use of computer facilities. The loss of an ID card should be reported immediately to the Office of Admissions and Registration. Fraudulent use of an ID card shall result in a disciplinary action.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

8. Student Records Student records are kept at the Office of Admissions and Registration contain the following documents: 

all the documents that were submitted for admission



the undertakings which were signed by the student during his/her studies



a copy of the updated transcript at the end of each semester



request for suspension of studies (if any)



clearance sheet for graduates or students that have withdrawn from the university



The transcript delivered by any other institution from which courses were transferred along with the course description, and the approval of the College for the transfer of the course. Also, authentication certificate of the transcript, which was issued from the former university, is kept in the file.



The decision of completion of graduation requirements signed by the Dean of the College when the student completes his studies

9. Confidentiality of the records a)

AU considers that all personal and academic information is confidential and therefore cannot be given to individuals other than the parents of the student.

b)

The Office of Admissions and Registration assists institutions when they request information on the authenticity of a copy of transcript or a graduation certificate.

c) Transcripts and official documents are not issued following the request of another person who does not present a procurement signed by the student along with a copy of the ID card of the student.

Student Rights Students have the right to: a) Inspect and review information contained in their education records. b) Request change or update of their personal data c) Check AU Rules and Policies

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10. Academic Advising and Mentoring 10.1 Introduction As part of its dedication to academic success AU is committed to offering high quality advising and mentoring for its graduate students to ensure their success in the development and pursuit of academic objectives consistent with their life goals. For the purpose of this policy, a mentor is someone who is attentive to the professional future of the student, while an advisor is someone who directs the student on what steps are needed to graduate. One person can serve both roles. Programs’ models for mentoring and advising may vary widely. In academics, mentor is often used synonymously with faculty adviser. A fundamental difference between mentoring and advising is more than advising; mentoring is a personal, as well as, professional relationship. An adviser might or might not be a mentor, depending on the quality of the relationship.

10.2 Definitions

i. Advising Advising is a developmental process which assists students in the clarification of their life/career goals and in the development of educational plans for the realization of these goals. The advisor is a facilitator of communication, a coordinator of learning experiences through course and career planning and academic progress review, and an agent of referral to other campus agencies as necessary.

ii. Mentoring A “mentoring” relationship is designed to facilitate both the personal and academic development of the student. Mentoring, viewed as mature advisement, is seen as an ongoing process that provides students with a significant and trusted guide or consultant to assist them in achieving maximum benefit from the higher-education experience. Mentoring encompasses the roles of consultant, referral agent, teacher, counselor, administrator, researcher, evaluator, and liaison with other people and services of the institution. More significantly, the mentor is a significant and concerned person who effectively facilitates self-responsibility, self-directedness, and developmental task achievement in students. Mentoring as a function of educational institutions can be defined as a one-to-one learning relationship between an older person and a younger person that is based on modeling behavior and extended dialogue between them. Mentoring is a way of individualizing a student’s education by allowing or encouraging the student to connect with a college staff member who is experienced in a particular field or set of skills. The mentor may be a teacher or an advisor who has been assigned to work with the student and has prescribed responsibilities for overseeing academic work. The relationship has formal and informal aspects. What seems to confirm a mentoring relationship is its informal dimensions, which give greater significance to the contact between the two persons involved. The student must have respect for the mentor as a professional and as a human being

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

who is living a life worth of that respect. The mentor must care enough about the student to take time to teach, to show, to challenge, and to support.

10.3 AU Advising and Mentoring Policy

i.

AU advising policy It is the responsibility of each graduate program to advise and monitor the academic progress of each student in their program. 1. All regular students shall be assigned an advisor at the time of first enrollment. 2. Advisors review student progress every semester via a review of grades and available information. 3. Advisors must have a minimum of one meeting in person per semester with each student to assess his/her progress. 4. Advisors must meet at least twice in person per semester with students who are not making satisfactory progress. 5. Assessment of advising shall be done every semester as a part of the whole program assessment; 6. Academic department advising shall be assessed and reviewed every year; 7. Funding and resources shall be made available to all units to ensure effective and efficient advising at all levels; 8. Training shall be provided for all advisors; 9. Accurate information shall be posted and maintained on the university’s website;

ii.

AU mentoring policy

It is the responsibility of each graduate program to ensure that each academic student receives mentoring. 1. All students must be aware of mentoring standards. Develop a graduate student handbook, made available to graduate students upon arrival to campus. This should be updated annually. 2. Hold an orientation session for all new graduate students, where program requirements, including normal time to degree, are clearly outlined and provided in writing. These requirements will be included in the graduate student handbook. 3. All regular students shall be assigned a mentorr at the time of first enrollment. 4. A mentor must have a minimum of one meeting in person per semester with each student. 5. Assessment of mentoring shall be done every semester as part of the whole program assessment; 6. Academic departments mentoring shall be assessed and reviewed every year;

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7. Funding and resources shall be made available to all units to ensure effective and efficient mentoring; 8. Training shall be provided for all mentors;

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

11. Information Technology and Learning Resources 11.1 Information Technology Introduction Ajman University (AU) provides computing, networking, information and telecommunication resources to the university community to support teaching, research, and efficient administrative processes. Access to Information Technology resources is granted to members of the university community who are enrolled students, employees, or academic staff members. The authorized Office for running these resources is the Office of IT.

Mission Providing efficient and current IT services to all university users (faculty, students, and staff) in order to fully support their teaching, research, and administrative activities.

Objectives The objectives of the Office of IT are to: 

Provide robust IT physical and logical infrastructure, maintain WAN and LAN nodes, and perform administrative operations to keep IT services 24*7 available to users.



Provide prompt and accurate technical assistance from knowledgeable staff, and to listen carefully to users’ requests and feedback.



Develop database systems, maintain university-wide database applications, and give full support to the application users.



Create, maintain and enhance university and related websites, and develop integrated application to enhance user’s web browsing experience.



Perform RND to recommend new technologies.



Protect the I.T. assets of AU.



Ensure that the use of I.T. resources is primarily for university purposes and universityrelated activities.



Maintain the integrity and security of the university's computing facilities

Services 

Help Desk



Network Account



Email



Internet



WiFi

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Online Registration



E-Learning Management System



Maintenance and Replacement of Computing and Network Resources for Educational facilities and to AU’s Staff.

AUST IT Facilities IT facilities at AU are maintained by the Office of Information Technology, located at the ground floor, Block A, Jurf 2. It is the responsibility of all users of the computer system to notify the Office of IT about violations of laws and university policies in connection with the use of the computers, as well as about potential loopholes in the security of the computer system. Any concerns, complaints, or reports of misconduct with regard to the computer system should be reported to the director of I.T. at 7056500 or email [email protected]

Network Accounts Accounts are intended to be personal. The individual to whom the account has been created is responsible for ensuring that his/her username and password remain confidential. No one is allowed to use another person's username and password.  User Account : 1. All freshmen students should receive an identification letter by email with their password/user account details and how to use it after two (2) working days before the Registration starting date or one (1) working day from the admission approval in case the student has been admitted during the registration period. 2. All registered students should have passwords/user account. 3. The password/user account will remain active during the whole study period only. The email account will remain active for life. 4. Students who, for a reason or another, lose their passwords must pay a fifteendirham fine in return of having it back. 5. The student may use the user account to access all the below AU web services: a. Computer labs. b. WiFi c. Email d. E-Learning Management System (Moodle) e. Online Registration System (ORS)

Electronic Communications:  Email AU has established e-mail as a primary vehicle for official communication with students. All university communications via email will be sent to this address. Faculty members will use the official university e-mail address to communicate with a student registered in their classes and administrative units will correspond with students via this address. The university expects that students will receive and read e-mails in a timely manner. Students are expected to maintain their accounts and check their e-mail. A student is obliged to check university e-mails and act upon content.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

E-Learning Management System: AU adopts an E-Learning Management System (Moodle) to enhance the teaching and learning process. It is a web-based application that allow instructors to deliver content and resources to students and manage their delivery. It provides easy ways for instructors to create and deliver their course content, communicate with students, and assess their performance. The student will be enrolled in all the registered courses automatically as the moodle system is integrated with the registration system.

Improper use of the computer system is prohibited: The Office of Information Technology (IT) is neither an investigative nor a disciplinary entity in its primary responsibilities. However, in cases where university resources and privileges are abused or otherwise threatened, the Office may be asked to take appropriate steps. Immediate revocation of access and subsequent prosecution by the authorities, for example, might be directed. Such revocation may be appealed to the IT committee. To summarize, access to university computing and communications equipment and facilities may be revoked for reasons including, but not limited to: 

Attacking the security of the system;

 Modifying or divulging private information such as file or mail contents of other users without their consent;

 Misusing or abusing Internet/Network by using Internet tools or software that may affect the performance of the Internet/Network  Modifying or destroying university data.  Using the networks/Internet in a manner contrary to the established guidelines; Finally, users may not read sensitive information simply because it is accessible to them because of accidental exposure and/or through the malice of others who have broken into a system or are misusing their access privileges. When sensitive information is recognized as such, it should not be examined further, but reported to the keeper of the materials, if known, or reported to management, if not.

Computer Labs Computer labs operated by the Office of IT are a shared university resource available on a first-come, first-served basis. Food and beverages are prohibited in these labs. Labs may be reserved for exclusive use by a class or group. Some labs are provided by colleges, not the Office of IT; contact those colleges for their additional usage guidelines.

Terms and Conditions of using IT services 

The Office of IT considers all temporary and permanent connections via the university network to be subject to the provisions of this policy.

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Computing resources not owned or approved by AU may not be connected to the university's network.



The Office of IT has the right to monitor the traffic of all transmissions on networks maintained by the Office at all times.



Operating systems currently supported (for the desktop) include Windows OS (Windows 8 and above) and Apple OS (7 and above). There are special requirements for Unix workstations in the College of Engineering. Upgrading will take place in a controlled manner.



Software and hardware to be installed should be requested by the Dean or director, otherwise it may not be installed or connected to the university systems without the approval of the IT Committee. This includes the data and telephone networks.



All university affiliates (faculty, staff & students) are permitted to use the university network and selected computing resources at all times while the network is available.



IDF/MDF rooms are under the authority and responsibility of the Office of IT. Everyone within the AU community who uses university computing and communications facilities has the responsibility to use them in an ethical, professional and legal manner.



Violations of information technology policies & procedures typically result in university disciplinary action, which may have serious consequences, and in some cases, may result in a legal action.

Data Backup It is the responsibility of students to have a backup of their data and coursework on a personal data storage medium (such as External Hard Disks, USB flash drives or CD/DVD disks). Though, the student may do backup on the cloud using the provided storage with the email service (50 GB on OneDrive).

Internet Services. Students may access the Internet through computers in university computer labs, through personal laptops connected to the university’s Wi-Fi provided in designated locations. Student access to the Internet conforms to the laws of the United Arab Emirates, including the monitoring and filtering of Internet content. Any attempt to circumvent or disable Internet access controls set by the university or the government of the U.A.E. is a violation of university policy and will result in a disciplinary action.

11.2 Library & Learning Resources Center The literature relating to library and information science states that the effectiveness of the organization and its various activities cannot be determined without a statement of goals and objectives because, by definition, effectiveness is the degree to which a library accomplishes its stated objectives. The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Standards, published in June 2004, anticipates that the mission, goals and objectives of a college library should support the mission of the parent institution and should be spelled out clearly so as to serve as a framework

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

for its activities. Outcome assessment measures take into consideration the library dependence on technology, its increasing use of online services, its provision of information literacy skills and the budgetary split between print and electronic resources. The ACRL Standards require goals to be compatible and consistent with those developed by the institution. Assessment of the quality and effectiveness of the library should be linked closely with the specific mission and goals of the institution. The Information Resources Center should be involved in the overall planning process. These planning methods require input from a broad spectrum of the institution's community. Strategic planning that includes evaluation, updating, and refinement, provides an overall direction that helps to guide day-to-day activities and decisions.

Mission The mission of AUs Library and Learning Resources Center is to support the university mission in identifying, organizing, preserving and offering accessible resources which serve the needs of college members, students and the community at large. In addition, the library seeks to locate, acquire, organize and select the most appropriate material and make it accessible to users. It is also the mission of the library to build a comprehensive, balanced library collection and provide a good environment for reading, learning and research. The upgrading and preserving of the library’s information technology infrastructure to ensure prompt access to information and information services are also among the AUST library mission priorities.

Goals and Objectives The goals and objectives of AU’s library and LRC are to: 

Provide current library materials and databases that support the academic curricula



Provide access to information resources, regardless of location



Collect library materials in all formats, broaden and update all collections to meet the needs of AU’s programs and support the various aspects of the institution: teaching, training, research and services



Educate and assist faculty, students and staff in the identification and effective use of information resources



Continue to strengthen and update all collections to meet the needs of AU’s programs



Preserve AU’s collections and materials, and maintain and upgrade physical and technological infrastructure to enhance the quality of services



Recognize that a minimum expectable standard is one resource per topic per student



Meet accreditation standards



Provide access to library resources and servers via web pages and online recourses



Ensure that resources available are current, appropriate and accessible 24/7



Work closely with users; know their needs and interests



Put into practice the motto that building library resources is a continuous process

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Enhance information literacy, especially in the student community, by developing effective plans aiming at improving student ability to: -

Access information effectively and efficiently

-

Evaluate information and its sources critically

-

Understand economic, legal and social issues when using information

-

Access and use information critically and legally

1. Health Clinics Mission The University Health Clinics seek to complement the academic mission of AU and are dedicated to providing educational, supportive, consultative healthcare services to students, staff, faculty and eligible dependants. In doing so the Health Clinics strive to make the campus a healthy and safe place to study, work and live.

Objectives The objectives of the University Health Clinics are to: 

Provide primary healthcare to students, faculty, staff and eligible dependants



Provide emergency healthcare to Residential Halls and campus residents after working hours and at weekends and on holidays



Support the integration of university services and provide a healthy atmosphere to accomplish the university objective of a disease-free community



Provide high quality integrated health services in a timely manner to generate complete customer satisfaction

Services The Medical Services Administration provides the following primary healthcare, within available capabilities, through its clinics:

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Round-the-clock services for males and females



General Clinics: primary healthcare, treatment, preventative medicine and health education on common diseases through the general practitioners to the university community



Nursing: comprehensive nursing care and services, including routine and emergency cases, recording patient details and providing treatment



Reception: receiving patients, preparing the patient files and records, recording personal data, preparing daily, monthly and annual statistics



Medical Lab: carrying out medical tests and running tests referred from university physicians for nominal fees



Referral System: referring urgent cases to hospital specialists

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018



Following up chronic cases and coordinating referrals to hospital specialists if necessary



Carrying out medical checkups for new students

2. Safety The university has taken measures to ensure the safety of all present on its campus. Although it has appointed a safety officer and safety coordinators throughout its units and Offices and has established a policy on safety and health hazards, it expects all its personnel and students to act in a safe and proper manner to minimize risks. All students are asked to:      

observe all relevant safety rules and instructions issued by the university; follow all the instructions and rules related to the safe use of space, such as labs, classes, workshops, sport facilities, halls of residence, etc; familiarize themselves with procedures, emergency exits, and emergency contacts; avoid any improper action or behavior which could be hazardous; report any accident or a near accident experienced on campus; report any significant hazard you discover on campus;

Safety notices, contact emergency numbers and first aid boxes are located in appropriate locations. Notices are also displayed for emergency exit routes and assembly points in the event of fire. Students are required not to tamper with these. In case of fire or emergency evacuation everyone is expected to act responsibly and not to endanger the lives of others. All should adhere to announced procedures. Any person who, for whatever reason, because of impairment for example requiring assistance to evacuate a building during an emergency situation should inform the relevant safety personnel or the Office of student Affairs of his/her needs at the beginning of his/her enrolment. Safety Procedures for Labs Students are expected to manipulate instruments, equipment and materials that are potentially hazardous. Students are required to read safety lab manuals (posted in all labs). Students shall not be allowed to participate in a lab unless they have demonstrated a clear understanding of the safety procedures involved. Students should not work alone in a lab in case of an accident or medical emergency. Inattention or disruptive behavior will not be tolerated in any lab. Repeated cases will be referred for a disciplinary action. Equipment, tools and materials must be handled in a manner that is safe for the student as well as for other students and the instructor. Safety arrangements are reviewed on a regular basis. Suggestions for improving these procedures are welcome. Students should contact the following numbers in an emergency. 1. 2.

Jerf1 067056204 Jerf2 067056530

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12. Student Affairs The Deanship of Student Affairs (DSA) is responsible for those aspects of student life which extend beyond the classroom. The DSA is committed to encouraging the personal development and growth of students through the organization of a variety of co-and extra-curricular activities, which include cultural, social, sport and entertainment programs. In addition, the DSA is responsible for the provision of a variety of services.

12.1 Student Counseling Unit Student Counseling is dedicated to helping students address personal or emotional problems that hinder them from achieving a fully beneficial experience at AU and realizing their full academic and personal potential. Student Counseling Services utilize a service system that emphasizes trust, respect, confidentiality, and compassion. Its overall goal is to maximize student success by attending to any emotional or personal needs which may impede learning. Through personal counseling, students learn to take charge of their lives, acquire skills necessary for adjusting to the demands of university life, and overcome difficulties that may prevent them from meeting their academic and career goals.

Student Counseling Policy

Purpose: The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for student counseling. Policy: AU offers quality services to students to maintain high standards and fully address the personal growth, psychological needs, and emotional wellbeing of students, AU provides student counseling services. The Student Counselor makes assessment and provides individuals, and groups, experiencing personal problems with support and guidance and assists them in overcoming obstacles to their educational success.

Personal Counseling: • Refers to one-to-one counseling with each student in weekly bases. Students are seen for a

multitude of reasons that range from typical developmental challenges to more serious adjustment and mental health issues. • Listening to student complaints, working to find solutions, and informing parents about the

academic status of their sons and daughters.

Group Counseling Group interventions entail working with a small number of students who share similar concerns and treatment goals. Group counseling addresses either general or specific issues. This form of counseling facilitates the healthy exchange of experiences, provision of sympathy and support and the development of skills necessary for effective coping and problem solving.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Procedures Eligibility Counseling services are available to all currently enrolled, full, part-time, graduate, and undergraduate students. There is no fee required from students to utilize this one-to-one counseling service provided by the Student Counseling Service.

Confidentiality Any communication between a student and a counselor is considered confidential. The confidentiality of the counseling sessions is protected. No student records are released to others (even within the university community) without the written consent of the student. If it becomes clear in the counseling session that there is a real danger to oneself or to others, the counselor is required to inform the Dean of Student Affairs, a parent or someone close to the student. The confidentiality rule does not apply in this case, but should go no further than the persons mentioned.

Access Students are encouraged to make an appointment with a personal counselor to discuss their concerns. A personal counselor is available on campus. Working hours are posted publicly.

Referrals The student counselor provides referrals to qualified psychologists, psychiatrists and therapists equipped to aid students with psychological problems, learning disabilities, and/or other serious issues. If the referred student would like to maintain the involvement of the personal counselor, the counselor may request a copy of the report of the external visit and may follow-up with the therapist regarding the student’s treatment.

12.2 Student Activities Unit Under the sponsorship of the DSA, this unit organizes many activities that span a wide range of interests, covering social issues, culture, art and sport. It also acts as the central support for the numerous student societies. This unit provides and organizes the following social, cultural, art and athletics activities:

1. Social Activities These activities aim at widening and promoting the social aspects of the students’ personality, thus activating and developing their role in building society and its social institutions. These activities also aim at training students in group and voluntary work. Moreover, there are several

37

other social services and activities offered by the social division throughout the academic year such as:  Receiving new students and their parents and finding solutions for the difficulties students may face at the beginning of their academic life  Arranging and supervising meetings at which students are able to get to know each other, thus breaking down the psychological barriers between senior and new students and familiarizing them with the university atmosphere  Promoting social awareness among students is done through a number of activities which include raising money for a variety of charitable causes and visiting institutions, such as orphanages  Organizing activities during the holy month of Ramadan, which include Iftar, conferences, religious lectures, competitions, financial donations and other charitable deeds. Competitions in the recitation and memorization of the Holy Quran are also arranged  Arranging social and educational activities, for example visits to cultural landmarks, scientific exhibitions and entertainment centers, and exchanging visits with scientific, teaching and social institutions  Cooperating with UAE institutions and authorities in health- awareness campaigns on subjects such as illegal drugs and smoking  Organizing blood donation campaigns in cooperation with the Ministry of Health, and taking part in campaigns and celebrations organized by formal authorities, such as the Civil Defense and Traffic Week Festivals  Running training courses, for example on first-aid and personality development  Supporting social activities that aim to develop students’ personalities and consolidate their relationship with local values and morals

2. Cultural Activities The DSA organizes a series of intellectual and cultural activities throughout the academic year. These activities aim at stimulating and enriching both intellectual and cultural aspects of students’ personalities. They also contribute positively to building a solid intellectual and cultural background, and help students distinguish between constructive and destructive thinking in their campus life. Cultural activities organized by this division include the following:  Organizing intellectual and cultural lectures and conferences conducted by experts from  within and outside the university  Running cultural, intellectual, literary and scientific competitions, and awarding prizes and certificates for distinguished projects such as short stories, literary articles, scientific research and poetry competitions, with the aim of promoting student creativity  Organizing poetry readings, seminars, discussion forums and exhibitions of student works  Encouraging students to write articles for publication in the University Magazine

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

 Participating in cultural, intellectual and scientific competitions organized by educational, literary and scientific institutions in the UAE

3. Art Activities The DSA is keen to promote the aesthetic and artistic aspects of student life and seeks to further develop them. Throughout the year this unit arranges participation in the following activities: 

Presentation of student work, such as drawings, sculpture, calligraphy, art, zincography and photography in magazines. Exhibitions of student artwork, which provides excellent motivation for talented students



Art competitions among talented students in a variety of fields



Art competitions held in the UAE



The design of wall magazines featuring students’ written and artistic work, exhibited in



university halls and on corridors

4. Sport Activities Sport activities play an important role in promoting the physical and intellectual development of students. Sport enables participants to build their physical wellbeing through exercise and is an important element in the development of personal and psychological balance. As an important part of the strategy and vision of AU, the university has a wide range of sport facilities. These include playing fields for football, handball, basketball and volleyball. In addition, the gymnasium is well equipped with facilities. The division also organizes sporting events and participates in many indoor and outdoor athletic championships, such as: 

Inter-college teams



Forming university sport teams and regular training sessions



Participating with universities and colleges from across the UAE in championships and sporting competitions organized by the Higher Education Sports Federation



Promoting health and fitness through body-fitness programs and courses in track and field sports, games and swimming



Ensuring that the university sport facilities and equipment are updated



Ensuring that safety standards are upheld

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12.3 Students Role in Institutional Decision Making Ajman University considers its students to be an important element of its operations and events and treasure their opinions and suggestions pertinent to the university. Both parties collaborate in order for the students to enhance their sense of belonging to their university and work together to create a conducive environment and to further develop and boost its image. Also, students have the right to submit their written concerns and suggestions related to any matters concerning the university’s operations to the Dean of Student Affairs, the Vice Chancellor for Student and Community Affairs or the Chancellor via the right channels.

12.4 Student Council In coordination with the Office of Students Affairs. Student Councils have been organized to serve as liaison between faculty, staff, and students. Student Councils represents the voice of the students and provide leadership in assisting and organizing activities for all students. There are opportunities for you to serve as member of the Council. If you are interested in being considered for membership on the Student Council, you should apply to the Office of Students Affairs. AU recognizes two single-gender student councils for men and women students. Each student council consists of 15 members, where (10) members nominated by schools and colleges while the rest (5) members are chosen through campus-wide elections. The student council mission is to represent the students and give them the opportunity to communicate their views and concerns. It provides resources for the various student organizations and clubs, offering guidance and support in an attempt to build a generation that is established on the notions of teamwork, dedication and responsibility.

Council Election

Article 1: One-third of Student Council members (i.e. five members) shall be elected through a direct general election by means of a secret ballot.

Article 2:

Any candidate running for Student Council (SC) membership shall satisfy the

following conditions: 

To be a regular student of AU;



To be 18 years of age or over;



To be of good conduct and sound reputation;



Must not have been convicted of any felony or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude or dishonesty, unless he/she has been rehabilitated.

Article 3: The DSA Student Council Elections committee shall be formed and charged with the following responsibilities:

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Set a timeframe for submitting candidatures;



Receive candidatures from interested students;



Review candidatures to ensure that all conditions are satisfied;

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018



Consider and adjudicate appeals filed by or against any candidates;



Publicize the list of candidates and post it on the announcement boards of each college;



Receive and adjudicate objections lodged against any candidates;



Establish rules and procedures for constituting the electorate;



Fix the election date and announce the method of voting;



Oversee the election process.

Article 4: - The Student Council Campaigns and Elections are being held electronically. The Voter needs to visit e-vote link on the day of the election to select the nominee of her/his choice. The results are then generated also electronically and announced by the DSA Officials on the second day. After that, two councils are formed; one for male while the other for female students which consist of 15 members each, meet to decide on their positions in the presence of the DSA representatives.

Article 5:

Candidates shall have the right to conduct pre-election campaigns in accordance with the regulations promulgated by the Committee.

Article 6: The rules and procedures of Student Council election shall be as follows: 

Voting shall start at 8:00 a.m. on the day of election;



Voter shall insert his/ her user name and password in the e-vote link one time only to select his/ her candidate.

Article 7: Supplementary elections shall be held on the second day in case of parity of votes between two or more candidates, which raises the number of winners above five.

Article 8:

In all cases, if the supplementary elections results in another parity of votes, the Committee shall resort to a drawing of lots among the tied candidates to fill in the required seats.

Article 9: - In case any of the nominated candidate is unable to join the SC, the priority will be given to the nominated candidate over five according to the rank.

Article 10:

The Committee shall receive election appeals within 48 hours of the

announcement of results. The Committee shall consider and adjudicate such appeals within a period that shall not exceed 48 hours from the date of receipt of each appeal, and the Committee’s decision on this matter shall be final.

Article 11: In its first session, the Student Council shall elect by an absolute majority of its members the Council Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson from among the members of the Council who are nationals of the United Arab Emirates. The session shall be chaired by the oldest member of the Council.

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12.5 Student Societies A student society is a body elected by AU students; society activities are supported by the DSA. There are also academic societies in each college. The goals of these societies are to: 

Encourage student participation in a variety of activities



Promote the spirit of cooperation among students, and encourage them to take on responsibility



Provide support to new students by advising them and helping them in their new academic life



Obtain student input regarding needs and wishes, and pass the information obtained to the DSA



Act as a liaison between students and DSA supervisors



Meet with DSA members on a regular basis



Arrange for “acquaintance” meetings among students in order to break down the barrier between new students and the new academic society



Promote study ethics among students and encourage them to abide by the rules and regulations of the university



Urge students to abide by the morals, principles and doctrines required by Islam



In line with the vision and philosophy of AU. The DSA arranges a series of developmental, educational and cultural courses for student leaders, with the aim of improving their performance and developing their leadership skills.

Student societies supported by the DSA

1. Social Society :

The Social Society is concerned with the social and human aspects of

student life. It seeks to develop the relationship between students, the university and the community. The Social Society supports morality and promotes welfare work. The society also participates in social activities organized by the DSA.

2. Cultural Society:

The Cultural Society is concerned with the intellectual, cultural, and

literary life of students. It aims to promote students’ talents through performances, exhibitions and participation in cultural activities, for example reading intellectual and literary publications and writing.

3. Arts Society:

This society seeks to develop the talents of students who are artistically

inclined (e.g., in drawing, photography, art, etc.). It also arranges art exhibitions and conducts training courses in drawing and other forms of creative activities. Members of the society also participate in external exhibitions.

4. Athletic Society:

This society seeks to improve students’ athletic skills. It participates in

organizing competitions, encourages students to take part in athletic activities and conducts training courses to improve stamina. The society also supports the DSA in athletic activities.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

17.6 Student Media The university has varied media channels which reflect its noble mission and ensure effective communication with its population. Also these channels are used for training its students in a professional and credible manner. This is actually done under the supervision of highly qualified faculty who are members of the college of Mass Communication and Humanities. Among these important channels are the following.

1. Television: The university possesses a cutting-edge and well-equipped television studio for training the media students in the different stages of television journalism. At the same time, it is used for internal transmission within the university.

2. Radio:

This channel is also available to AU students through which they transmit its

programs via the Internet under the supervision of the college of Mass Communication and Humanities.

3. Publications: AU students issue a number of publications such as the university magazine, the newspaper, Afaq in addition to news bulletins related to the university colleges. Some of these are periodic and others to celebrate certain events.

4. Social Media :

The university webpage is very informative on matters related to the

university and students. Moreover, the university has a device related to homepage and dynamic pages on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Utube. Colleges have their own homepages.

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13. Student Services The DSA is responsible for monitoring the student services offered by AU and service providers working within it – for example accommodation, transportation and health care services. It seeks feedback from students regarding the effectiveness of these services and uses it to take decisions regarding the improvement of these services.

13.1. Accommodation In line with its vision, AU is eager to ensure the success of the education it provides. Student accommodation is therefore given high priority as it plays a key role in student wellbeing and can have a positive impact on academic performance. For this reason, an independent organization has been founded which is concerned with every aspect of life in the student accommodation, for example matters of comfort, the provision of three meals daily, the mini- market, health club, internet, etc. These services are offered at very low prices. In addition, the organization offers additional free facilities, for example electricity and water, study rooms, libraries and newspapers. 

Well-designed rooms equipped with appropriate facilities such as furniture, refrigerators, AC, etc.



Continuous supervision (day and night) by qualified supervisors (both men and women)



Comfortable transportation between the accommodation and the university. Transportation is also provided for shopping trips and visits

Student conduct in Residential Halls is subject to certain regulations

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Security - all residential halls are protected by security staff patrols



Curfew - staff monitor attendance records regularly for absences. Repeated violation of attendance regulations may result in dismissal from the residential hall for one or more semesters.



Smoking - male students are allowed to smoke out of doors and in their rooms. However, smoking in common areas is strictly prohibited



Littering - all students are expected to maintain cleanliness inside the halls. Rooms are inspected periodically for cleanliness.



Alcohol/Illegal Drugs – the use of alcohol or illegal drugs is strictly prohibited on campus. Students found in violation of this regulation will face severe disciplinary consequences



Housekeeping – student rooms are cleaned at least once a week, and all common areas are cleaned daily



Dorm Leave - all resident students are expected to sleep in their residential hall every night, except during official dorm closing periods or upon verification with residential hall staff by parents/guardians

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

To conclude, the DSA is eager to promote the quality of life in the residential halls. The Director pays regular visits, meeting students and listening to their suggestions and complaints. The DSA also receives regular reports from advisors concerning conditions in the halls and takes action as necessary.

13.2. Transportation The transportation Unit is responsible for ferrying students between the residential halls and the university. The Unit has many buses which make more than fifty trips daily. This Unit also provides students with transport to activities outside the university, such as visits to scientific and entertainment venues, lectures or conferences. Two buses are kept on standby round the clock to cover emergency requirements. The transportation Unit has defined the regulations governing the use of its buses and the fees student pay in order to ensure the systematic and good quality services. These regulations are distributed to students who opt for making use of this facility.

The DSA’s role in student transportation is to: 

Coordinate the transportation of students to participate in various activities



Elicit student views concerning the transportation services offered



Solve student problems with the cooperation of advisors, who keep the DSA informed of recent developments



Improve the organizational performance in order to achieve high standards of services

13.3. SMART Superstore Retail outlets on all campuses meet student needs for stationery, books in Arabic and other languages, software facilities, photocopying, printing and binding. Students may also purchase prescribed textbooks for all fields of specialization at low prices. The DSA monitors the services and coordinates with the supervisors of SMART Superstore to solve any problems that may arise. The Unit makes every effort to ensure that books are delivered promptly.

13.4. Other Services The Office of University Facilities is responsible for examining the standard of other student services, for example restaurants, mosques, maintenance, cleanliness and security on campuses. With regards to restaurants, the DSA ensures that they are operating in accordance with required health standards. Mosques are kept clean and safe. The Office of University Facilities also checks the cleanliness and maintenance of lecture halls and deals with any problems that may arise. It also coordinates with the university’s security staff to ensure appropriate handling of any problems. Finally, the Office of University Facilities designs questionnaires to assess the standard of services provided and recommends improvements.

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14. Cafeterias & Restaurants The university provides cafeterias and restaurants on each campus, offering a variety of meals and beverages. Separate areas are provided for men and women students. Women students living in university hostels have a private cafeteria in the hostel building. Prices are set according to the choice of meals and are kept at a reasonable level.

15. Bookshops A bookshop on each campus sells books and stationery and provides photocopying services.

16. Mosques The university has conveniently-located mosques and prayer rooms with facilities for men and women students on each campus.

17 Shops There are shops on each campus and in student hostels to supply everyday items. Weekday and weekend opening hours are displayed on the shop fronts.

18. The Career Counseling Center Mission The Career Counseling Center endeavors to serve AU students and alumni by educating them to successfully identify, plan and pursue their career goals. The center supports the mission of the university in its three dimensions - education, information and investment - by providing quality services which will enhance clients’ employment potential, and by liaising with prospective employers. To achieve its mission, the center is assisted by the AU Alumni Association, a nonprofit organization which aims to enhance interaction between alumni, students, the university and the community.

Objectives The Career Counseling Center aims to:

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Help new students to select courses appropriate to their career interests and aspirations



Help students and graduates in decision-making, goal setting and planning for their careers

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018



Offer guidance to students and graduates regarding the skills necessary to meet evolving job requirements



Help students and graduates acquire effective job search skills



Signpost students and graduates to job search resources



Provide AU with job-market information to aid academic planning



Seek recruitment, internship and voluntary or part-time opportunities for students and graduates through liaison with businesses, governmental bodies and organizations



Establish a plan for assessing the performance of career services and activities



Establish and foster lifelong professional and personal relationships between the university and its alumni



Promote communication between alumni, and between alumni and the university



Promote the Alumni Association within the university and engender goodwill, understanding and support for the university in the wider community



Offer alumni opportunity to contribute to and participate in the university’s decisionmaking processes



Establish fundraising mechanisms for the Alumni Association

Services The work of the Career Counseling Center includes: Organizing: • Career days • Social and cultural events • Alumni clubs and forums

Providing services • Career guidance • Group and individual counseling • Employability skills development • Psychometric tests

Informing: • Posting job advertisements electronically and on campus notice boards • Employer portal • Job seeker portal • Classified jobs

Registration Process: students must register with the CCC in order to receive job notifications and event invitations.

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19. Training Center Mission The Training Center seeks to support the strategic vision of the university by bridging the gap between the academic realm, the community and the employment market. It strives to achieve this aim through three strategies: student training, staff training and community training. In doing so the center applies scientific criteria in the selection of trainers, programs and performance assessment.

Objectives The Training Center short-term objectives:  Student Training: to seek suitable credited-hour training opportunities for students in various public and private organizations, as part of their study plan

The Training Center long-term objectives 

Continuing learning, training and rehabilitation: to lead training development programs for college members and staff in areas such as teaching and learning methodology, computer skills, research methods, languages, management and technical skills



Community training: to play an active role in developing community programs through symposia and seminars on rehabilitation, development and the upgrade of worker skills and capacities



Promoting training and learning through the use of modern technology

Continuing Education Center The Continuing Education Center (CEC) was founded in response to the market’s mounting need for excellence. We specialize in preparing both men and women for rewarding careers in various businesses and environments. We are well aware that students come to CEC with a variety of academic experiences and backgrounds; hence, every effort is made by the administration and staff to integrate these experiences with the requirements of the work requisite. The long-term growth and success of our Center relies heavily on its aptitude to attract and retain qualified and keen staff and to maintain being a zenith in what it does best: continuing education. The CEC also prepares students to work effectively by developing essential competencies in a reflective, learner-centered teaching milieu. This method is implemented through an academic curriculum that incorporates field-based practice, reflection and application.

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Courses offered TOEFL Courses TOEIC Courses ICDL Courses CCNA Courses



Business English Courses, English Level I Courses, English Level II Courses, Management Courses, etc.



IT Courses



Web Design and Graphics Courses



Soft Skills Courses (Customer Service, Leadership, Business Etiquette, Communication Skills)

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

20. Student ID Card Students will receive a university ID card containing their photograph, name, date of birth and AU ID number. The ID card should be carried at all times. It provides access to certain academic buildings and hostels. In addition, the card is required for admission to sports facilities, to sit university exams and to make use of computer facilities. The loss of an ID card should be reported immediately to the Office of Admissions and Registration. Fraudulent use of an ID card shall result in disciplinary action.

21. Student Rights and Responsipilitioes Student Rights: 1. Every student enjoys all rights and freedoms recognized within the university by the Laws of the United Arab Emirates as long as this does not violate the code of student conduct. 2. Every student has the right to fair equal treatment by the University. A student has a right to be free from discrimination based on ethnicity, color, religion, gender, marital status, nationality, language, or personal handicap. However, a distinction, exclusion, or preference based on relevant academic or physical aptitudes required and made in good faith is considered to be non-discriminatory. 3. Every student has the right to have an environment supportive of the university’s mission and their own educational goals. 4. Students can function in their daily activities safely and easily. 5. The university is committed to ensuring that adequate measures are taken to protect the security of students on the university campus. 6. AU respects the student’s right to privacy of personal information. This implies that information disclosed by the student and for the student is considered to be personal; this information will not be disclosed to third parties without the sudent’s consent. A permanent record for each student enrolled in the university is maintained by the Office of of Admissions and Registration. The written consent of the student is officially required to disclose his/her academic record. Exceptions are made for parents, sponsors, authorized AU officials and in compliance with a judicial order. 7. AU shall make sure that students know their rights and responsibilities, as well as applicable university policies and procedures. The university obligation under this section is fulfilled when the university makes copies (hard or on the university website) of the Student Handbook available to every student upon being admitted to and entering the university. 8. Students have access to help them in managing their own affairs, increasing self-awarness, career planning and personal decision making; 9. Students have access to established grievance procedures. 10. Students have access to various activities beyond the classroom, which support intellectual and personal development.

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11. Students have access to excellent faculty, academic technology, classrooms, libraries, presentations and other resources necessary for the learning process. 12. Students have the right to get prompt and appropriate responses from the University Academic and Administrative offices. 13. Every student has the right to quality education. 14. Every student has the right to a fair and impartial assessment of his performance as a student. 15. AU shall furnish students with relevant course information to enable them to make informed course selection. 16. A student who is accused of a disciplinary offence has the right to present appropriate defence.

Student Responsibilities: Along with rights come certain responsibilities among them is the respect of the rights of all in AU’s community. Students must behave in a manner that is civil and compatible with the university's function as an educational institution. Students are required to obey the rules and regulations of AU as laid out in the Student Handbook and University Catalog. In particular, students are expected to abide by all rules and regulations expressed in the Code of Student Conduct. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with these codes and their obligations and responsibilities toward the university, its faculty and staff, other students and visitors to the university. It is imperative in AU’scommunity of learning, disruption of the educational process, destruction of property, and interference with the orderly process of the university, or with the rights of other members of the community cannot be accepted. In order to acieve its objetives and function properly, AU has the authority mandate to maintain law and order and to discipline those who are disruptive of the educational process.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

22. Student Behavior Code All members of AU are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the regulations of the university, and the laws of the UAE. In particular, AU students are requested to play an exemplary and positive role in enhancing the reputation of the university by: 1. demonstrating a clear commitment to their own learning 2. conforming themselves to all specified time requirements for registration, class schedules, examinations and completion of assignments 3. ensuring that work presented is their own personal work 4. ensuring that all information presented to faculty members and administrative staff is accurate and true 5. conducting themselves in a courteous and proper manner in their dealings with faculty members, employees or other students 6. meeting their academic advisors regularly 7. respecting the property of others and of the university 8. reporting grievances to their academic advisor or the Dean of the College 9. not engaging in cheating, plagiarism, disruptive behavior or improper conduct which could damage the reputation of the university 10. not using AU facilities for other than learning purposes without prior authorization 11. not falsifying documents or using falsified documents for any purpose related to the university 12. not distributing leaflets or collecting signatures on university premises or in hostels without prior authorization 13. abiding by AU rules and regulations, and the directives of the academic and administrative staff 14. acting in a way that will not cause offence to the culture of the UAE

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23. Student Academic Integrity Policy 23.1. PLAGIARISM 

The rich learning resources that are available at AU are expected to be used for reading to help you to understand and to find out the work of others in the topic of your essays or projects only.



Students are requested to submit their own work to be used for evaluating the level of achievement of a specific learning outcome.



Each faculty should explain to his/her students that he/she is interested in evaluating their own work and not the work of others.



It is not forbidden to reproduce an idea or sentences from a book or an article as long as the student uses quotation marks and gives its source.



There is no usage in reproducing sentences if the student does not refer to them in his/her sentences. Every submitted project is expected to contain a reference section in which the student lists all the materials that he/she consulted or used in the project.



Plagiarism is strictly forbidden at AU which has acquired specialized software that detects plagiarism.



If plagiarism is proven, a zero mark may be given to the project which subsequently induces a failure in the course.

Examples of Academic Integrity Violations The following list includes, but is not limited to, examples of violations under the Academic Integrity policy.

Plagiarism

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Test and Exam Rules

Other violations

Failing to acknowledge sources through the use of proper citations when using another’s works and/or failing to use quotation marks.

Attempting to read other students’ exam papers.

Co-operation or collaboration on an academic assignment, in whole or in part, when the instructor has indicated that the assignment is to be completed on an individual basis.

Submitting any work written, in whole or in part, by someone else.

Speaking to another student (even if the subject matter is irrelevant to the test).

Disruption of classroom activities or periods of instruction.

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Submitting a computer program developed in whole or in part by someone else, with or without modifications, as one’s own.

Leaving answer papers exposed to view.

Improper access to confidential information such as exams or test questions.

Using ideas or material without appropriate acknowledgment in any academic assignment.

Writing an examination or part of it, or consulting any person or materials outside the confines of the examination room without permission to do so.

Misrepresentation of facts for any academic purpose.

Using another’s data or research findings.

Using material not authorized by the examiner.

23.2. Procedures Regulating Irregular Behaviors during Sit-in Exams All cases of cheating or trying to cheat, disturbing the peace and calm of the examination room, disrespecting one of the invigilators, impersonating an examinee or engaging someone else to take the exam by-proxy shall be reported to the College Examination Committee by all the invigilators. 

The invigilator shall notify the student who is caught cheating or trying to cheat to see the chair of the College Examination Committee by means of a form designed by the Central Examination Committee and by which he/she will be informed of the place and time of his/her appearance before the Central Examination Committee.



The College Examination Committee shall refer the report to the Central Examination Committee which in turn submits it to the University Disiplinary Committee.



The the University Disiplinary Committee shall conduct the investigation with the cheater (or trying to cheat) and report all available witnesses within no more than 48 hours, then a report shall be submitted. In case the student does not attend in the assigned time, he/she will be subject to an investigation that will be conducted in absentia.



The University Disiplinary Committee shall be entitled to take the decision to keep the report in case the infraction is not supported by any evidence; the decision is deemed definite and the student may be allowed to re-sit the examinations.



The Chair of the Central Examination Committee shall refer the report to the University Disciplinary Committee to take the appropriate decision with regard to the infraction the examinee is accused of.



Once asked by the invigilator, the examinee who is caught cheating or trying to cheat shall quit the examination room.

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23.3. Disciplinary Penalties The examinee who is proven to have cheated or tried to cheat at the end of semester exams shall be deemed to have failed the course. The examinee who is caught cheating shall be deemed to have failed all the courses of the end semester exams. The examinee who shall be considered to have failed all courses he/she registered in the semester and suspended from registration in the following semester is he/she who: 1. cheats a second time in the final semester exams. 2. is caught cheating or trying to cheat in the final semester exams and proven to have disrespected the invigilators, deliberately tried to disturb the peace or calm of the examination room, or call examinees to rebel. The registration fees shall not be reimbursable in the above mentioned cases. Any student who introduces a research paper or any measurable academic activity and proven to have plagiarized shall be deemed to have failed the course and shall not be reimbursed. In case a student from the university is caught impersonating an examinee or engaging someone else to take the exam by proxy, they shall be both subject to expulsion for no less than two successive semesters. If a person from outside the university is caught impersonating an examinee, the university shall be entitled to bring legal action against him/her, and the student shall be subject to irrevocable expulsion. The decisions shall be considered definite after approval by the President of the University.

23.4. Exam Policies Article 1 Only students who fulfill the following conditions will be allowed to sit for university examinations: 1. Students who arrive at the examination room in good time. If they are more than 30 minutes late they will not be admitted. Going out of the examination room shall be allowed only 40 minutes after the time starts. 2. If students are not suspended from classes. 3. Students should introduce the University Card and the No Liabilities Certificate.

Article 2 The examination regulations and procedures shall apply to the student during the period of exams, in examination rooms. The possession of mobile phones or other electronic means of communication is strictly prohibited and will be confiscated by invigilators, if any.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Article 3 1. In case the student is absent from an examination with a valid excuse, they will be allowed to have the incomplete exam within no more than two weeks from the start of the following semester. The student is deemed informed of the date of the complete exam. 2. Any excuse shall be introduced in no more than one week from the exam provided that this excuse is ratified by the authorized parties in the university. 3. The acceptable excuse shall be one of the following: 

A medical report that is approved by the university doctor on the same campus.



Death certificate of one of the first and second degree relatives.



Suspension or appearance before a court.



A perfectly valid excuse.

4. The student shall pay the fees of the incomplete.

Article 4 The student who is absent from an examination without a valid excuse shall be deemed to have failed the examination.

Article 5 1. An excuse shall be deemed valid if the examination timetable allows the student to take more than two exams at the same day. 2. The student shall be given an additional time if he/she has to take more than one exam at the same time.

Article 6

1. Cheating: Any student who is caught in possession of written information relevant to the course, messages by mobile phone, or transmitting written or verbal information to his/her classmates shall be considered a cheater. This includes also the following: 

Using a book, magazine, research, computer or Internet file.



Using scraps, slips or copies.



Using signs to convey information.



Sending or receiving information through the mobile phone.



Writing on wall, ground, chair, clothes or body.



Using every other means of information not allowed by the university regulations.

2. Trying to cheat: Any student who is caught in possession of written information, messages sent by mobile phones, or transmitting written or verbal information to his/her classmates shall be considered trying to cheat. This also includes what follows:

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Looking at the answer sheet of another student.



Talking with classmates in the examination room.



Possessing a mobile phone.



Possessing papers or any other means that comprises information relevant to the subject of exam, but not shown up.

Article 7 1. The examinee shall be entitled the right for grievance with regard to the score he obtained in the exam within no more than two weeks from the announcement of results. 2. The Dean shall designate an ad-hoc committee to study the grievance cases on the exam results; the decision of this committee shall be final. 3. The grievance cases shall be subject to fees estimated in accordance with the university bylaws and policies. 4. The request for grievance shall be processed before the end of the first week of the following academic semester. 5. Any grievance request shall be identical to the form provided by the Office of Admissions and Registration.

Disciplinary Penalties Article 8 1. The examinee who is proven to have cheated or tried to cheat at the end of semester exams shall be deemed to have failed the course. 2. The examinee who is caught cheating or trying to cheat shall be deemed to have failed all the courses of the end semester exams.

Article 9 The examinee who shall be considered to have failed all courses he/she registered in the semester and suspended from registration in the following semester is he/she who: 1. cheats a second time in the final semester exams. 2. is caught cheating or trying to cheat in the final semester exams and proven to have disrespected the invigilators, deliberately tried to disturb the peace or calm of the examination room, or call examinees to rebel. The registration fees shall not be reimbursable in the above mentioned cases.

Article 10 1. In case a student from the university is caught impersonating an examinee or engaging someone else to take the exam by proxy, they shall be both subject to expulsion for no less than two successive semesters; the penalty may be aggravated to the final semester if the Disciplinary Committee justifies the feasibility of such a decision.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

2. If a person from outside the university is caught impersonating an examinee, the university shall be entitled to bring legal action against him/her, and the student shall be subject to irrevocable expulsion.

23.5. Policy on Smoking Smoking is not permitted all campus buildings at AU. All students and staff members of AU are responsible for abiding by this policy.

23.6. Policy on Drug and Alcohol Abuse AU prohibits the possession, use, sale or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol by students and employees on its property and at any university activity. Any violation of these policies shall result in appropriate disciplinary actions including dismissal in the case of students and termination of contract in the case of employees, even if it is a first offense.

23.7. Policy on Dress Code Students, faculty, and staff of AU are expected to dress appropriately and to respect the cultural and religious foundations of the United Arab Emirates. Inappropriate dress for both males and females is prohibited. This means dressing in respectful and modest way. Furthermore, obscene or offensive pictures or slogans should not be displayed on clothing. Dress code violations should be reported to the Dean of Student Affairs. Students who do not abide by the AU dress code are subject to a disciplinary action.

23.8. Policy on Use of Email as Official Communication AU communicates with its students via email. All entities at AU use email to convoy important messages including time-sensetive ones. Students are allocated email addresses and they should check their email every day. Students shall not be excused for not being aware of announcement or deadlines whatever the reason may be.

23.9. Policy on Disruptive Conduct a) Purpose: To ensure students maintain good conduct and refrain from disturbing AU community members. b) Prohibitions i.

Intentional obstruction or disruption of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings or other university activities, including public service functions and other authorized activities on university premises.

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ii.

This also includes making or causing noise, regardless of the means that disturbs authorized university activities or functions.

iii.

Cursing in a public setting, using unacceptable language or making an offensive speech that includes, but is not limited to name-calling, insulting, profanity, vulgarity or in a way violating the UAE code of mutual respect.

iv.

Persistent serious acts of disobedience.

23.10. Policy on Theft, Property Damage and Vandalism a) Purpose: To protect AU community property and prevent misbehavior. b) Prohibitions:

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Theft or unauthorized taking of university property or property of an AU student, faculty member, staff member or visitor on university premises. This includes knowingly possessing such stolen property.



Vandalism, willful wanton or reckless damage to university premises or property.

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Class-Size Policy AU is committed for implementing efficient class-size policy. Selection of class size depends on the nature of the course and insures effective course delivery. This policy sets the guidelines for selection of appropriate class size for each course in different colleges. All AU colleges have guidelines regarding maximum class size, the rationale for such guidelines, demonstrates that the AU adheres to its own policies and the guidelines issued by the CAA. Table : Class size of courses in some graduate programs offered by AU. Table 2. Class size of courses in some graduate programs offered by AU. Programs Colleges

Business Administration

MBA 1

MSIS 2

MOL 3

GWEM 4

MSc Pharm MSc /Dent 5

6

25

Information technology

10

Law

15

Institute of Environment

10

Pharmacy

20

Dentistry Class Size

12 25

10

1

= Master of Business Administration

2

= Master of Science in Information Systems

3= 4

15

10

20

12

Master of Law

= Master of Science in Groundwater Engineering and Management

5 = 6 =

Master of Science in Pharmacy Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry

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The maximum class size does not mean the optimal class size. The maximum class size reflects the level of the course, course-learning objectives, degree of facultystudent interaction and instructional methods used.



Deterioration of the learning experience is generally experienced if the class size goes above the maximum level.



In accordance with the CAA and AU standards, the class size depends on the size of lecture hall, effective teaching and availability of modern educational resources.



A feasibility study conducted by the College of Information Technology revealed a minimum of five students is feasible for initiating a graduate program at AU.



Rules and regulations governing supervised studies are outlined and published in the student handbook.

23.11. Policy on Classroom Misbehavior a) Purpose: To ensure that the rights of instructors teaching students are protected in the labs, offices and other campus learning environments. b) Prohibitions: i.

Persistent speaking without permission; engaging in activities that are not related to the class; inappropriate use of electronic devices, cell phones or laptops; sleeping in class; habitually class late or leaving early; eating/drinking in class without permission; showing disrespect for and arguing with faculty and their studyfollows in class.

ii.

Threatening; verbal abuse, including but not limited to, using obscene language denoting the instructor or being argumentative; using admonitory or mocking gestures; defaming; harassment; physical altercations; destruction of property; or any action that might jeopardize the security of a faculty or a student.

23.12. Policy on Use of Mobile Phones Students are expected to respect their fellow students and faculty with regard to the use of mobile phones. Students should turn off their mobile phones when they are in class, or attending a university function, lecture, or meeting.

23.13. Policy on Ethical behavior for the media Ajman University welcomes participation through our social media channels and often encourages interaction. This creates a platform for constructive dialogue among AU community members. However, posts that violate the community ethics such as personal insults, profane behavior, illegal materials, etc. are strictly prohibited. AU shall exercise its right to remove posts that are displayed for commercial purposes or any other posts that do not adhere to its rules and regulations. Needless to say that the content of posts displayed by AU is its property and is subject to copyright laws.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

23.14. Disciplinary Policy Any violation of university regulations or directives, or improper behavior (as set out in Section 17), is considered as misconduct and will render the student liable to a disciplinary action which may range from a verbal warning to dismissal from the university. In addition, if a student violates any rule or instruction during an examination, or is caught cheating, he/she will be asked to leave the examination room. In this event, the campus examination committee will interview the student on the day following that in which the incident occurred and will as a result submit a detailed report to the President of the University, in which the level of punishment is recommended. The level of punishment may range from the giving of an “F” grade for the course concerned, or failure in all courses for which the student is registered that semester. A copy of the decision of the President will be kept in the student’s file, and the Office of Admissions and Registration will also inform the sponsor as appropriate.

24. Student Grievance and Appeal Policy POLICY STATEMENT On occasions, a student may disagree with the academic decision of a faculty member. The university provides an appeal process for the student to request reconsideration of an academic decision. Academic Appeal is petition to change a decision related to a student. The decision may be either that the academic judgment was unfair in the view of the student or that the department academic decision i s applied incorrectly in the view of the student.

PURPOSE OF THE POLICY The student appeal policy guides the student through steps of filing an appeal for reconsidering or changing an academic grade or decision.

DETAILED POLICY STATEMENT The Dean of Student Affairs forwards the student grievance to the Chairman of the Student Grievance Committee who will arrange a meeting to hear both parties and witnesses, as appropriate. The committee will then deliberate upon its findings and make a recommendation to the University President who will take the final decision, to be communicated to both parties.

Preliminary Steps: To initiate or pursue a grievance, the following steps must be observed no later than three weeks following the occurrence of the faculty member decision. 

Step 1. The student should first discuss the matter with the person or persons directly involved, in an attempt to resolve the issue through informal discussion.

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Step 2. If there is no resolution in step 1, the student should discuss the matter with the Head of Department to whom those directly involved report (or if the Head of department is directly involved, with the College Dean. If the College Dean is directly involved, with a senior management staff who shall attempt to mediate an informal resolution).



Step 3. If reconciliation has still not been achieved, the student shall submit a written statement of his grievance to the Appeal Committee through the Dean of Student Affairs. The statement shall contain: 

a brief narrative of the condition giving rise to the issue;



a designation of the parties involved; and



a statement of remedy requested.

Formation of the Student Appeal Committee: 

At the beginning of each academic year the University President shall appoint five faculty members to form the Student Appeal Committee. The President also appoints the Head of the committee.

Committee Action: Upon receipt of a written statement of an academic grievance request, the Head of Student Appeal Committee (SAC):

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Determines prior to considering the case whether discussion between the persons directly involved, Head of department, and College Dean have been exhausted in attempting to resolve the issue.



Notifies the parties named in the statement of receipt of a complaint naming them, and sends a copy of the statement to the named parties and to all committee members.



Meets within two weeks after receiving the written statement to review the written statement and renders a decision as to whether sufficient ground is present to warrant a hearing.



Notifies the grievanceant and the named parties of its decision in writing.



If a hearing will be held, t h e SAC notifies in writing all parties involved, including witnesses, of the date, time and place of the hearing at least one week prior to the date set.



Informs the parties that the providing of proof rests with the grievant.



Requests in writing from all parties involved any pertained material deemed necessary for review by the committee prior to the hearing. These materials, plus any additional materials either party chooses to submit must be made available to the committee no later than four days prior to the hearing. Any person named in the grievance may submit a written statement to the committee outlining issues from their perspective.



All communication among the committee, the grievant(s) and person(s) named in the statement of complaint will be confidential.

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Hearing Process: All hearing conducted by the Student Appeal Committee shall be conducted confidentially in the following manner: 

The Grievant(s) and respondent must be present during the information gathering portion of the hearing. Witnesses will be available, and called when needed. The committee reserves the right to allow the presence of a secretary.



All statements during the information exchange phase of the hearing will be written.



Any committee members may question any of the participants at the hearing, at any time during the proceedings.



The grievant will present his/her statements and/or witnesses to the committee.



The respondent will have the opportunity to question the grievant(s) and witnesses about their statements.



After all information is exchanged, all persons, other than the committee members and the secretary will leave the committee room. The grievant(s), respondent(s) and witnesses will continue to be available to the committee should further information be needed.

Decision 

The University President shall approve or reject the committee recommendation(s) within two weeks after it is received, unless the President feels that more information is necessary, In this event the case will be referred back to the committee for further findings prior to decision. If the decision of the President is not in accordance with the committee’s recommendation(s), he shall state the reason for that decision, in writing, to the committee. The President shall then take appropriate action to implement his decision. The grievant(s) and respondent(s) will be informed in writing of the President’s decision.

Appeal: 

The grievant(s) or respondent(s) may petition a grievance within two weeks of the President’s decision.



The President or the Student Appeal Committee will determine the Appeal viability based upon evidence not available at the original hearing.



If an Appeal is deemed viable, the President will ask for rehearing.



The President may deny the request of an appeal and affirm the earlier decision.

A rehearing will be conducted on the appeal. A decision rendered by the President will be final.

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25. Tuition Fees & Financial Regulations Application and Registration Fees

Tuition fees for the graduate programs offered at the university are as follows: Application and registration fees of AED 2,000 should be paid in cash in one installment upon registration. This is not part of the tuition. The application and registration fee is non-refundable, except when the application is rejected in which case an amount of AED 1,700 will be refunded to the student.

Tuition fees for the Graduate programs The tuition fees of the graduate programs offered at the University are as follows: College/Institute

Major

Fee per one credit hour

Institute of Environment, Water and Energy

M. Sc. in Groundwater Engineering & Management

AED 2,000

College of Engineering

M.Sc. in Urban Design

AED 2,500

MBA: Human Resources Management College of Business Administration

MBA: Financial Management

AED 2,000

MBA: Marketing College of Information Technology College of Law College of Education and Basic Sciences College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

College of Dentistry *

M. Sc. in Information Systems Master of Law (Public Law) Master of Law (Private Law) Professional Diploma in Teaching

AED 2,000 AED 2,200

AED 1,000

M. Sc. in Pharmacy (Clinical Pharmacy) M. Sc. in Pharmacy (Pharmaceutical Technology) M. Sc. in Restorative Dentistry

AED 3,125

AED 420,000 per program (3 years)

* The average annual tuition cost for M.Sc. in Restorative Dentistry is AED 140,000 per academic year.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Additional Fees 

student service fee per semester: AED 300



application fee for an incomplete course: AED 200



reference letter: AED 30



extra copy of the academic transcript: AED 100



grade grievance application: AED 100



ID card, per academic year: AED 25



Additional fee of AED 500 per each registered course taken as independent studies.

The University may and reserves the right to increase the fees up to 10% per academic year when deemed necessary. Payment Terms A student should pay AED 4,000 in advance as a deposit in order to register in fall/spring semesters (AED 2,000 in summer semester). The student should pay the tuition fees in full for all courses upon registration so that he/she can add/drop courses and receive the “Student Timetable” that shows the details of registered courses. The Office of Finance has the right to take the necessary action against any student who has not settled the due balance of tuition fees. The student has an option to settle tuition fees in 4 monthly installments (for spring/fall semesters only). To get this privilege, the student should obtain the Office of Finance approval after filling the required form. Only then can he/she add/drop provided that he/she pays 25% or more of semester tuition fees. Students registering for Master Thesis will pay 50% of the applicable fee upon registration and 50% in the following semester. Tuition fees for summer semester should be paid in one installment upon registration.

Refund Policy

a. Add/Drop Period During the add/drop period students may add or drop courses without incurring a charge. If a student adds one or more courses during the add/drop period, he/she must pay additional fees for the added course(s) at the time of submitting the application or the application will be rejected. If a student withdraws from one or more courses during the add/drop period, the fees of the dropped course(s) will be credited to his/her balance for the following semester. A student may withdraw from one or more course(s) after the end of the add/drop period, provided he/she remains registered in at least two courses (6 credit hours) that semester. In this case the student does not have the right to claim any refund for the fees of the dropped courses.

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b. Suspension of Registration During the add/drop period a student may submit an application for suspension of registration for one or a maximum of two consecutive semesters. The application should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Registration. In this case the tution fees shall be credited in full to the student’s balance for the following semester, or refunded two weeks after the submission of the application for refund to the Student Account Officer at the Office of Finance. If the student submits an application for suspension of registration for one or two semesters during the two weeks following the end of add/drop period, he/she shall be entitled to only 50 percent of the tuition fees of the semester in which he/she submits the application for suspension. If the student submits an application for suspension of registration after the end of the two weeks following the add/drop period, he/she will not be entitled to claim a refund of any part of the tuition fees of the semester in which he/she submits the application for suspension.

c. Withdrawal from the University During the add/drop period the student may submit an application for suspension of registration and withdrawal from the university. The application should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Registration. In this case the student is entitled to a full refund of tuition fees of the semester in which he/she submits the application for withdrawal. The refund will be made two weeks after the submission of the application for refund to the Student Accounts Office at the Office of Finance. If the student makes an application for suspension of registration and withdrawal from the university within the two weeks following the end of the add/drop period, he/she is entitled to a refund of only 50 percent of the tuition fees of the semester in which he/she submits the application. The student shall not be entitled to claim a refund of any part of the tuition fees if the application for suspension of registration and withdrawal from the university is made more than two weeks after the end of the add/drop period.

d. Disciplinary Dismissal A students who is dismissed from the university for disciplinary reasons is not entitled to any refund of tuition fees paid for the semester of dismissal..

Books The university will supply course textbooks/ebooks to students at reasonable prices. It should be noted, however, that a student in receipt of a fee exemption as listed above will not be provided with textbooks without charge.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Master of Business Administration Program with 3 tracks:

-

Human Resources Management Financial Management Marketing

Offered by the College of Business Administration

Mission of the College of Business Administration The college adheres to the fulfillment of AU’s overall mission, which seeks to meet the educational needs of local, regional and international students. As such the college philosophy is grounded in finding practical and scientific solutions to contemporary organizational and business problems through the BSc degree programs offered in four areas of specialization: Management, Accounting, Marketing, and Finance and the Master of Business Administration degree program in three areas of specialization: HR Management, Financial Management and Marketing. Stemming from this underlying philosophy, the college’s strategic focus is to enhance the intellectual, professional and behavioral development of its students to meet the managerial challenges of the 21st century.

Degree Programs offered by the College of Business Administration The college offers four bachelor programs and three MBA tracks, providing students with the theoretical and practical backgrounds that form an excellent foundation for satisfying career requirements or for further study.

The four bachelor degree programs are: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Bachelor of Science in Management Bachelor of Science in Accounting Bachelor of Science in Marketing Bachelor of Science in Finance

The Master of Business Administration program The MBA program has the following three Tracks: 1. Human Resource Management 2. Financial Management 3. Marketing.

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Facilities The college’s current physical facilities, which include offices, labs and teaching rooms are equipped to meet its needs and are regularly upgraded. The library is regularly updated with the latest books in the field for the benefit of students and college members. IT facilities include: 

wireless internet connection, available on the university campus



Internet labs available 14 hours per day



multimedia facilities provided in all labs



more than 12 business programs installed in the labs



college computers connected through local and wide area networks

The Program of Master of Business Administration (MBA) Ajman University has always endeavored to provide academic programs that not only meet the employment demands of UAE and the GCC but are also developing individuals who can contribute to the economic and social progress of the UAE and the GCC. The present MBA program that is offered by the College of Business Administration is of national and international quality that can meet the students’ need to harness them into capable individuals who can meet the current employment needs and can visualize the future business trends, competition, planning and strategy. After successfully completing the MBA program, the graduates will be able to operate in national and multinational organizations by offering solutions of professional relevance and contribute to the advancement of business and economy.

Distinguishing Features The AU MBA program seeks to satisfy the quality assurance standards set by world-class business programs accreditation organizations such as AACSB and the Association of MBAs.

Objectives of the MBA program

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Develop students’ critical thinking skills enabling them to discern weaknesses in the arguments of others, to see beyond consultants’ inputs, and to ask searching questions



Develop in students a cutting edge knowledge and understanding across a broad range of vital business and management subjects including entrepreneurship, strategy, marketing, accounting and finance, human resources, international business, operations and quality management , and cross-cultural and organizational development



Prepare students for careers in management, consultancy and new business start-ups and development. The flexible program design enables students to choose a portfolio of electives to match their preferred career route, thus keeping their options open



Enhance the students’ ability to translate theory into practice in order to be confident and purposeful when faced with complex problems



Have an international orientation



Promote team work in the analysis of case studies

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018



Deliver courses using state-of-the-art technology



Offer study visits within the Arabian Gulf region to provide students with international business exposure

Learning Outcomes Knowledge Upon successful completion of the MBA, graduates will be able to: 1. Acquire knowledge in the core business functions including accounting, marketing, finance, information systems, and operations management. 2. Understand the practical aspects of the core business functions. 3. Use the relevant techniques and strategic tools to recognize and analyze the various dimensions of business environment. 4. Learn scholarly research inter alia for finding solutions for real-life business problems for the benefit of academia, business organizations, community and the nation. 5. Analyze contemporary and pedagogical issues in the business environment. 6. Learn about ethical issues and multicultural diversity. 7. Make professional judgment in all areas of business.

Skills 1. Demonstrate oral and written communication and team building skills. 2. Acquire leadership and problem-solving skills. 3. An analytical and logical approach to problem solving in all areas of business. 4. Demonstrate proficiency in finding scientific solutions for business- related problems and be able to evaluate the business environment in a systematic manner and utilize the decision-making technique/s relevant to a given situation. 5. Practice ethical and professional standards.

Competence (Autonomy and Responsibility) 1. Conduct case studies and research projects independently. 2. Taking responsibility for writing their research findings according to the guidelines that are stipulated by the College of Business Administration. 3. Independent oral presentation of their case studies/projects.

Self-development 1. Engage in a life-long learning cycle and respond in a positive and responsible manner to criticism. 2. Attend seminars and workshops that are conducted by the College of Business Administration or outside businesses.

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Role in Context 1. Demonstrate Professionalism and respect their fellow students and faculty members. 2. Demonstrate leadership. 3. Moral and ethical obligations for their conducts.

At the completion of the MBA program, students will be able to Knowledge K1

Demonstrate broad knowledge in the field of business Administration Use the relevant techniques and strategic tools to recognize and analyze the various

K2

dimensions of business environment according to their specific field of studies (Financial Management, Human Resource Management and Marketing)

K3

K4

Demonstrate in-depth theoretical and applied knowledge in one of the subject area tracks such as Marketing, Financial Management and Human Resource Management. Learn scholarly research inter alia for finding solutions for real-life business problems for the benefit of academia, business organizations, community and the nation.

K5

Analyze contemporary and pedagogical issues in the business environment.

K6

Learn about ethical issues and multicultural diversity.

K7

To make professional judgment in all areas of business.

Skills S1 S2

Leadership and problem-solving skills. Demonstrate communication and team building skills.

S3

Demonstrate proficiency in finding scientific solutions for business- related problems.

S4

Practice ethical and professional standards.

S5

Analytical and logical approach to problem solving in all areas of business.

Competencies Autonomy and Responsibility

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CA1

Working on case studies and research projects independently.

CA2

Independent oral presentation of their case studies/projects.

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

CA3

Taking responsibility for writing their research reports.

Role in Context CR1

Demonstrate Professionalism and respect their fellow students and faculty members.

CR2

Moral and ethical obligations for their conducts

Self-development Engage in a life-long learning cycle and respond in a positive and responsible manner to

CS1

criticism. Attend seminars and workshops that are conducted by the College of Business

CS2

Administration or outside businesses.

Admission Requirements In accordance with the university requirements for graduate degrees, a candidate to be admitted into the MBA program must fulfill the following minimum requirements: 1. Hold a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration or a related field from a UAErecognized university with a minimum cumulative CGPA of 3 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent. 2. Students with a CGPA between 2.0 and 2.99 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent or with TOEFL 530 and a CGPA of a minimum 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent may be admitted conditionally. 3. A minimum score of 550 on paper based TOEFL or 6 on IELTS (or its equivalent).

NB: Refer to section 2.2. general admission condition for Graduate program for more detail Graduation Requirements A student will be awarded the degree of Master of Business Administration upon meeting the following requirements:  

Completion of the required MBA courses : 7 core courses, the capstone course, and 4 courses from the 5 courses of a chosen track Achievement of a CGPA of not less than 3.0

Curriculum Core Courses (21 Credits) The seven compulsory courses (3-credit hours each) provide an essential grounding for the MBA program. They provide essential knowledge and skills in areas which may be entirely new, or act as a welcome refresher.

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Course No.

Course Name

Credit Hours

Prerequisite

471004

Operations Management

3

-

471005

Business Research Methods

3

-

471006

International Business

3

-

472002

Financial and Management Accounting

3

-

472003

Financial Planning and Control

3

-

473001

Marketing Management

3

-

474001

Human Resource Management

3

-

Total

21

Capstone Course (3 credit hours) 471007: Strategic Management (3 credit hours) Pre-requisites: for the HRM track: 474001, 474005; for the Financial Management track: 472004, 472006; for Marketing track: 473003, 473004.

Concentrations (12 Credit hours)

Track Marketing The courses in this track/concentration offer knowledge of marketing and help students to develop a wide array of practical skills in the area of marketing management. The student must complete 4 courses among the following courses Course No.

Course Name

Credit Hours

473002

Service Marketing

3

473001

473003

International Marketing

3

473001

473004

Marketing Strategy

3

473001

473005

Retail Marketing

3

473001

473006

Promotional Strategy Management

3

473001

Total

Prerequisite

15

Financial Management The courses in this concentration provide students with knowledge of concepts, techniques and theories of financial management. The courses aim to teach students how to apply the theoretical knowledge of finance in business effectively and ethically. The student must complete 4 courses among the following courses

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Course No.

Course Name

Credit Hours

Prerequisite

472004

Corporate Finance & Policy

3

472003

472005

Islamic Finance

3

472004

472006

Working Capital Management

3

472003

472007

International Finance

3

472003

472008

Project Finance

3

472004

Total

15

Human Resource Management The courses in this concentration provide students with knowledge and skills relating to all aspects of Human Resource Management. A strategic perspective of the Human Resource Management area is highlighted. The student must complete 4 courses among the following courses Course No.

Course Name

Credit Hours

Prerequisite

474002

Entrepreneurship Development

3

474001

474003

Management of Change

3

471006

474004

Training & Development of HR

3

474001

474005

Cross-Cultural HR Management

3

474001

474006

Organization Development

3

471006

Total

15

Brief course description of Master of Business Administration program 472003 Financial Planning and Control The modern business enterprise is increasingly large, often selling variety of goods and services in many different markets and economies. Many critical factors are causing change in accounting and finance practice, profession, application and conceptualization in developed and developing countries alike. The most critical factors could be summarized into: a) globalization and liberalization, b) trends of mergers and acquisition and creation of large enterprises and emergence of giant multinational companies, c) islamization and introduction of Islamic financing product at micro and macro levels d) advances in technology.

471006 International Business The course focuses on the problems and opportunities of business in a global context. It examines economic, institutional, cultural, and legal issues faced by companies involved in international business and analyzes their effect on business decisions including: product design,

73

production and marketing, human resources strategy, investment analysis, financial strategy and risk management.

474003 Management of Change The process of managing organizational change is very dynamic, diffused and complex. Even well crafted plans developed to manage change may disintegrate during an period of rapid environmental change. The objective of this course is to help students understand the main principles and techniques required to lead effective and lasting organizational change. The course will cover the conceptual, process and practical aspects of implementing organizational change, including the various facets and challenges associated with the transition period. Emerging research findings will be used to emphasize the day-to-day micro-level managerial actions, as well as, its strategic aspects. Various theories and concepts of change, together with experiences and dilemmas encountered in practices will be explored using various case studies.

474006

Organization Development

OD is a conscious, planned process of developing organizations’ capabilities to attain and sustain optimum performance levels, measured by efficiency, effectiveness, and health. OD processes bring about successful change efforts in individuals, groups/teams, inter-groups, and organizations. OD tries to answer these questions: 

Where are we?



Where do we want to be?



How do we get there?

474004 Training and Development The purpose of this course is to provide the student with information and insight into the training and development function in organizations. The training and development function will be viewed from a systems approach, such that we will examine the entire cycle of training and development, from the assessment of training needs to the evaluation of a training program, within the context of today’s organizations and the global market. Course activities will include group discussions and individual and team problem-solving activities in addition to classroom activities.

472002 Financial and Management Accounting The course introduces the basic concepts of financial and managerial accounting. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations, which are essential to accounting as an information system for management. Major topics include the accounting process, income determination, financial reporting, foundations of managerial accounting, operations planning and control, and performance evaluations

474001 Human Resource Management The course deals with different approaches to HR planning and development in global environment. It focuses on main functions of HRM such as Job Analysis and Design, Recruitment, Selection, Appraising and Managing Performance, and Compensation. Issues of Career Planning

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

and Development, Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining, justice, and work safety are also covered.

473001 Introduction to Marketing Management The aim of the course is to make the students understand the concepts of marketing of an advanced level which are of both contemporary & of international standards. There is an in depth analysis of comprehension of product & brand strategies, pricing, promotion, distribution & supply chain management.

471004 Operations Management The Operations Management course will provide students with skills required in identifying the important factors in the operations management sector. The main purpose of the course is to equip students with the tools and expertise necessary to resolve operations management issues and formulate approaches for analysis and solution of problems in operational situations. These skills will be gained majorly through this course as it is unique and of great importance for giving the entire picture of understanding in the full-blown graduate management program.

471007 Strategic Management Strategic Management course covers strategy analysis, formulation, implementation, management and evaluation. SM will also provide a broad overview of both strategic management theories and concepts, and their application within a dynamic competitive environment that surround today’s organizations. Students develop critical thinking/reasoning skills through various case studies and class discussions.

472004 Corporate Finance and Policy This course focuses on financial decision making in the modern corporation. The basic issues include: capital budgeting/corporate investment, capital structure, corporate sources of funding, dividend policy and corporate contingent claims, international finance, and financial risk management. Some areas of corporate finance that are covered in electives - leasing, mergers and acquisitions, working capital management - will be omitted or covered in less detail than they merit. Course concepts are integrated into the standard theories of risk and return, valuation of assets and market structure (i.e., the concepts developed in the finance core course, Foundations of Finance, will be heavily utilized).

472007 International Finance The course will cover multinational companies and the importance of international financial management; international monetary system; balance of payments; foreign exchange markets; foreign exchange futures and foreign exchange options markets; basic parity conditions in international finance; exposure to foreign exchange risk, and foreign exchange risk; management of foreign exchange risk; forecasting of foreign exchange rates; international money and capital markets; international banking; interest rate and foreign currency credit swaps; financing of

75

international trade; direct foreign investment; multinational capital budgeting; international working capital management

474005 Cross – Cultural Human Resource Management The purpose of the course is to learn international aspects of the main functions of HRM, and the place and role of the HR function within organizations. Important themes of international human resource management will be discussed, such as international career, special issues of expatriation, international recruitment and selection, training and development, international aspects of performance appraisal and compensation.

471005 Business Research Methods The Business Research Methods course provides an introduction to research methods in social sciences in general and business administration in particular. The primary aim of the course is to equip the students with essential research techniques they would use in advanced specialized courses such as Marketing Research, Feasibility Studies and Project Planning, and Graduation Project. The course will cover a range of topics, including in particular, research design, sampling theory, data collection tools, questionnaire development, and program evaluation methodology. The course will also cover statistical data analysis procedures involving both exploratory and hypotheses testing techniques.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Master of Science in Ground Water Engineering and Management Offered by Institute of Environment, Water and Energy Mission of the Institute The mission of the Institute of Environment, Water and Energy (IEWE) at Ajman University of Science & Technology (AU) is to make use of the capabilities of the university’s laboratory facilities, virtual environment, intranet and internet, in addition to extensive field investigations, to provide innovative solutions to environmental, water and energy resource problems.

Vision of the Institute In the viewpoint of AU, the environment has two dimensions; the virtual dimension which encompasses human innovation, intellect, thought, ambitions and dreams, and the physical environment which includes human and his surroundings of the atmosphere, hydrosphere lithosphere and biosphere. This vision is behind the initiation of the IEWE that addresses the environment as a whole, placing special emphasis on the environment, water and energy resource challenges. Therefore, the vision of the IEWE at AU arises from the vision of the institution as a whole.

Goals of the Institute The goals of the Institute of Environment, Water and Energy are to: 1. Monitor, diagnose and analyze the problems facing the environment, water and energy resource in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). 2. Provide innovative solutions through intelligent programs of teaching, research, training, consultations and practice in the fields of environment, water and energy.

Objectives of the Institute The objectives of Institute of Environment, Water and Energy are to: 1. Initiate undergraduate and graduate courses related to the institute’s fields of interests 2. Offer intermediate undergraduate degrees. 3. Design graduate programs on environment, water resources and energy resources

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4. Conduct applied interdisciplinary research. 5. Organize innovative training programs. 6. Provide consultancy in environment, water and energy-related areas.

Objectives of the Master program in Groundwater Engineering and Management The objectives of the Master Program in Groundwater Engineering and Management are to: 

Provide an advanced graduate education to students holding Bachelor Degrees in some disciplines of agriculture, science and engineering.



Apply new technologies in groundwater engineering and management, with an emphasis on advanced groundwater extraction and recharge technologies.



Raise students’ awareness of existing groundwater problems and constraints in the Arabian Gulf and Arab region.



Contribute to improvement of current groundwater management policies in the Arab region by introducing advanced practices in groundwater exploitation, augmentation and management.



Improve qualification and skills of program students working as technicians or professionals in groundwater-related areas.



Train students on groundwater exploration, exploitation and monitoring, under direct supervision by highly-qualified experts in groundwater engineering.



Enhance students’ ability to collect, analyze and manage data in order to pursue higher levels of research.

Admission conditions In accordance with the University requirements for graduate degrees, a candidate to be admitted into the MSc. in Groundwater Engineering and Management he/she must fulfill the following minimum requirements: a.

Hold a Bachelor's degree in Engineering, Science, Agriculture, or a related field from a UAE-recognized university with a minimum cumulative CGPA of 3 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent.

b. Students with a CGPA between 2.0 and 2.99 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent or with TOEFL 530 and a CGPA of a minimum 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent may be admitted conditionally. c. A minimum score of 550 on paper based TOEFL or 6 on IELTS (or its equivalent).

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

NB: Refer to section 2.2. general admission condition for Graduate program for more detail Degree Completion Requirements The Master of Science in Ground Engineering and Management includes core courses, elective courses and thesis research. Students are required to successfully complete 36 credit hours distributed as: 15 credit hours of core courses (including Field Training), 15 credit hours of elective courses, and 6 for the thesis credits. The sequence of study is as follows:

Core Courses ( 15 credit hours) Each student should complete successfully the following compulsory 3 credit hours courses.. 12011601

Water Resources Planning and Management

12011602

Hydrogeology

12011603

Environment Water Quality and Methods

12011604

Water Well Technology: Principles

12011605

Field Training

Elective Courses ( 15 credit hours ) Each student should complete successfully 5 courses among the following list of 3 credit hours courses. 12011606

GIS Applications in Water Resources

12011607

Remote Sensing of Water Resources

12011608

Statistical Methods in Water Resources

12011609

Subsurface Microbiology

12011610

Water and Wastewater Treatment

12011611

Desalination and Advanced Water Treatment

12011612

Groundwater Pollution and Contaminant Transport

12011613

Groundwater Modeling

12011614

Hydrology of Arid Regions

12011615

Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

12011616

Water Well Rehabilitation

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Research Thesis ( 6 credit hours)

Training A. Field Training Program 1. Sampling procedures for environment, water and energy studies. 2. Field measurements of environment, water and energy resource parameters. 3. Chemical analyses air, water and soil samples. 4. Bacteriological analyses for environmental and water quality studies. 5. Field sampling for isotope analyses.

B. Training Courses 1. Remote sensing and GIS applications in environmental studies. 2. Remote sensing and GIS applications in water resource investigations. 3. Remote sensing and GIS applications in energy resource investigations. 4. Modeling techniques in water, energy and environmental studies. 5. Applications of environmental isotopes

Learning Outcomes The desired outcomes are that the Master of Science holder in Groundwater Engineering and Management will be able to solve engineering problems at advanced level of engineering analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In addition, the course aims to provide students with: 1. Extensive, advanced, disciplinary knowledge in the basic of groundwater engineering and management, with an emphasis on advanced groundwater exploration, exploitation and monitoring technologies. 2. The ability to conduct engineering design related to groundwater monitoring, exploitation and development, through the involvement highly-qualified experts in advanced technologies 3. The skills necessary for employment in groundwater field in the UAE, Arabian Gulf region and Arab countries

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Course Descriptions 12011 601 Water Resources Planning and Management Pre-requisite: None The aim of the course is inform students of the increasing competition for water quantity as well as water quality, and the need for more efficient use water for human consumption, industry and agriculture. The course contains the elements required to focus on water management from a wide range of perspectives and present them in four sections: water resources and water quality, water suitability, water conservation and technology and reuse of treated water. Students successfully completing this course should have developed the skills to: critically evaluate complex water resources management issues, determine effective methods for addressing water resources management problems and make informed decisions regarding various water supply alternatives.

12011602 Hydrogeology Pre-requisite: None The courses covers: water: definitions, concept of the hydrologic cycle and law of mass conservation, aquifer properties, principles of groundwater flow; soil moisture: soil moisture, unsaturated flow, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and hysteresis, Darcy's law for unsaturated flow, infiltration and groundwater recharge, evaporation, precipitation and stream flow; groundwater geology; regional groundwater flow; well hydraulics; groundwater chemistry, quality and contamination.

12011 603 Environmental Water Quality and Methods Pre-requisite: None This course will teach the basic principles of water chemistry and how to use these principles in precipitation, surface water and groundwater studies. Much of the course will focus on groundwater applications which can be used to; determine the time and source of groundwater recharge, estimate groundwater residence time, identify aquifer mineralogy, examine the degree of mixing between water of various sources and evaluate what types of biological and chemical processes have occurred during the water's journey through the aquifer system.

12011 604 Water Well Technologies: Principles Pre-requisite: None The course covers: detection of groundwater resources, planning of water extraction, well design, planning, drilling, construction, completion, cleaning, development, testing and assessment, operation, monitoring, maintenance, rehabilitation, repair, sealing of aquifers, international technical standards and documentation.

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12011605 Field Training Pre-requisite: 12011604 The course introduces site selection; well drilling; well construction; well completion; well cleaning; well development; water well testing and assessment of vertical water wells. State-of-theart operation of water wells; regular monitoring of wells; well inspection; well check book; maintenance plans; mechanical, hydrometrical and chemical rehabilitation of wells; repair and restoration of water wells; sealing of water wells; international technical standards and documentation.

1211 606 GIS Applications in Water Resources Pre-requisite: 12011 601 The course covers principles of geographic information System (GIS), spatial sciences; Map scale and projections; Global positioning System (GPS), GIS processes; working with database; data analysis and modeling; GIS analysis functions; presentations of Geodata and analysis, networks in GIS; GIS software; ArcGIS desktop; data sources of GIS in water resources; GIS in water resources; examples of GIS applications in the United Arab Emirates and Arabian Gulf region.

12011 607 Remote Sensing of Water Resources Pre-requisite: 12011 601 The course intends to give state-of-the-art of spatial information processing using Geographic Information System (GIS), earth observation techniques and image processing methods, applied to water resources problems. Student's acquisition of practical skills is promoted by computer exercises in GIS analyses and remote sensing processing techniques with different GIS and RS (Remote Sensing) Packages.

12011 608 Statistical Methods in Water Resources Pre-requisite: 12011 604 The learning objective of the course is to give the students a fundamental knowledge and practical understanding of the common techniques for data processing in hydrology and water management. This knowledge and understanding must allow students to select and apply the most appropriate techniques to summarize and organize data. It also gives them an insight on limitations of data collection and the corresponding consequence for water management. More specifically, the consequences to the development and the calibration of mathematical models and other predictive tools are discussed. Also the consequences to the evaluation, the exploitation and the management of the water systems are addressed. The latter water management and research tasks may be based on mathematical modeling or not. The understanding of the data limitations and their consequences are useful in setting up most appropriate data collection programs for specific water management and planning problems. Based on discussions of the different uncertainty sources, also

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

a fundamental insight is given in the general process of mathematical modeling. By using examples from specific water fields (surface hydrology, hydraulics and wastewater treatment) in the lectures and the practical session, this course has important interactions with the other courses.

12011 609 Subsurface Microbiology Pre-requisite: 12011 604 This course provides detailed information about the structure of microorganisms, their growth and genetic basis. The course also provides information about the major groups of bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa. Basic virology including viral structure, taxonomy and classification are also dealt with. The course illustrates the bacterial classification system, nomenclature and methods for the identification.

12011 601 Water and Wastewater Treatment Pre-requisite: 12011 601 and 12011 603 The course covers: water treatment methods: screening, coagulation and flocculating, sedimentation, filtration, aeration, desalination and disinfection. Wastewater treatment methods: primary, secondary and advanced treatment; biological system of treatment; sludge treatment; reuse and disposal. Industrial wastewater treatment (definitions and characteristics); survey and monitoring of industrial wastewater; legislation; guidelines; and standards treatment processes: volume and strength reduction, neutralization and equalization, removal of suspended and colloidal solids; removal of dissolved organics; combined treatment of industrial wastewater with domestic swage; treatment economics.

12011 611 Desalination and Advanced Water Treatment Pre-requisite: 12011 603 The course is designed to provide an up-to-date analysis of desalination technologies. It also provides a practical approach to the design and operation of desalination plants; fundamentals of thermal desalination; fundamentals of membrane desalination; pretreatment with UF/MF and conventional pretreatment. Operation and maintenance of membrane plants; operation and maintenance of thermal plants; corrosion and material selection; scaling and fouling in membrane processes and thermal processes; saline water chemistry; privatization/ contracting: BOO, BOT, BOOT, hybrid desalination processes; instrumentation and control in desalination plants and also presented.

12011 612 Groundwater Pollution and Conterminal Transport Pre-requisite: 12011 602 This course describes solute transport in soils and aquifers. The course material should be of interest to graduate students in both science and engineering. Discussion topics will include a

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description and quantification of solute transport processes (diffusion, dispersion, advection, sorption and transformations). Formulation and solution of solute transport equations, modeling of water flow and solute transport and applications: groundwater contamination; site remediation and nonpoint agricultural pollution sources.

12011 613 Groundwater Modeling Pre-requisite: 12011 601 and 12011 602 Theory and practice of numerical techniques are developed and applied to fluid flow and transport in groundwater flow systems. Governing equations are formulated using FD techniques with appropriate BC’s and IC’s. Additional topics include: model conceptualization and grid design in multidimensional systems: practical applications of numerical models, including calibration, validation and prediction; concepts and techniques of advective, dispersive and reactive transport using MODFLOW, and MT3D with GMS processing software.

12011 614 Hydrogeology of Arid Regions Pre-requisite: 12011 601 The course provides an introduction to water resources in Arabian Peninsula: physical geography of the Arabian Peninsula, geology of the Arabian Peninsula, aquifers and aquiclude systems, hydrogeochmistry, conventional water resources: springs and falajes, non-conventional water resources, desalination and treated wastewater, case studies on the hydrogeology of the Cenozoic aquifer systems in the Arabian Peninsula, the legal basis of groundwater protection in the Gulf States, towards the development of water policy management, numerical modeling of certain aquifer in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.

12011 615 Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring Pre-requisite: 12011 604 This course is an introduction to field and laboratory methods, for characterizing subsurface geological, hydrological, geotechnical and contaminant conditions. It also describes water quality, water chemistry, gaining and extraction of water samples, water analysis, disinfection of wells, bacteriological tests, international quality standards, documentation, water quantity, well monitoring procedures and equipment, well testing procedures and equipment, hydraulic tests, capacity tests, types and removal of well incrustations, well logging and documentation.

12011 616 Water Well Rehabilitation Pre-requisite: 12011 604 The course covers identification and evaluation of existing well capacity and efficiency, hydrochemical analysis of groundwater, e.g. identification or organic inorganic constituents indicating groundwater pollution and/or contamination, heavy metals, radioactive contaminants,

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

chemical and physical analysis of well incrustations, CCTV well inspection, borehole and well logging, step-drawdown and constant pumping test, recovery test, selection of the most suitable mechanical and hydromechanical well rehabilitation method, determination of the most suitable non-toxic, up-to-date chemical well rehabilitation agent, execution of mechanical, hydromechanical and chemical water well rehabilitations, verification and recording of results of well rehabilitation by CCTV camera pump test water analysis geophysical well logging, development of water wells, sterilization of water wells and individual water well rehabilitation plans for cost-efficient operation.

12011 617 Thesis Pre-requisite: 12011 601 6 Credit Hours This course is taken over two semesters (full-time students) or three semesters (part-time students). The course is for all graduate students registered in the program. Students conduct an applied research study in various fields of water science and engineering. Students are expected to carry out their research studies under supervision of theses committees, selected according to thesis subjects. A student must prepare and submit his/her thesis and should be able to defend it.

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Master of Science in Urban Design Offered by The Department of Architecture College of Engineering

Engineering is the profession of applying theories and fundamentals of pure science to solve practical problems and develop new equipment, instruments and techniques to meet the needs of society in a variety of areas such as electrical power, communication, control, IT, architecture, medicine, transportation and agriculture.

Mission of the College In line with the University’s mission, the College of Engineering provides high quality engineering education. College programs focus on teaching students how the fundamental principles of engineering can be applied in real-world situations. Programs place special emphasis on developing the technical as well as generic skills of students so that they are well qualified for immediate employment in their area of specialization and are able to contribute effectively to the advancement of the community. The programs also seek to prepare students for graduate study in their area of specialization.

Objectives of the College The academic programs of the College of Engineering are designed to produce graduates who are: 

Competent engineers with sound knowledge and professional attitude



Capable of applying theoretical knowledge to solve practical problems



Equipped with skills required for productive engineering careers



Able to perform as individuals and team members



Proficient in oral and written communication



Motivated for life-long learning throughout their careers



Capable of pursuing graduate studies

Departments of the College 

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Department of Electrical Engineering

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018



Department of Biomedical Engineering



Department of Architectural Engineering



Department of Interior Design

Programs offered by the College The College of Engineering offers the following programs:

Undergraduate Programs: 1.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (Electronics)

2.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (Communication)

3.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (Instrumentation and Control)

4.

Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering

5.

Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering

6.

Bachelor in Interior Design

Graduate Program:



Master of Science in Urban Design

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Master of Science in Urban Design Mission The mission of the program is to provide the community with qualified architects who can deal with the complex issues of the urban environment and cities.

Objectives The program will: 

Enable graduates to evaluate and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of real-world design proposals for buildings and urban environments.

 Provide students with advanced skills and knowledge to manage and supervise the development and implementation of design and intervention proposals related to the urban environment.  Provide in-depth knowledge of the main subject areas of the urban environment regarding the relationships between built form, space, culture, developmental processes and sustainability in its wide-ranging facets.  Offer the ability to carry out independent study and research.

Program Learning Outcomes The following are the outcomes and the relevant abbreviations, which are used in the course descriptions that follow. Knowledge The program outcomes are to produce professionals who: K1. Are familiar with the main subject areas regarding relationships between built form, space, culture and the developmental processes. K2. Are familiar with sustainability in design proposal for buildings and urban environments. K3. Are knowledgeable in advanced topics related studies and analysis of the urban environment Skills The program outcomes are to produce professionals who:

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

S1. Can implement advanced methods and technique to critically evaluate, measure the success, and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of design proposal for buildings and urban environments. S2. Can apply advanced skills and knowledge to manage and supervise the development of design and intervention proposals related to the urban environment. S3. Can apply advanced skills to implement design proposal related to the urban environment. S4. Can apply advanced skills and knowledge in sustainability to the urban environment. S5. Can instigate and carry out independent study and research. S6. Can use modern techniques and methods such as computers and software S7. Can communicate in clear and effective manner to enhance the job performance. Competencies

Autonomy and responsibility At completion of the masters in Urban Design program, the graduate will be able to; A1. Identify, formulates, and solve urban environment issues A2. Do detailed analysis and studies in urban environment matters A3. Team with multidisciplinary professions engaged in the urban design process. A4. Analysis an urban area in terms of its sustainability Self-Development At completion of the masters in Urban Design program, the graduate will be able to; D1. Recognize the need for life-long learning in field of urban design D2. Professionally compete in the market and play an active role in the community Role in Context R1. Demonstrate professionalism and regard for his fellow professionals. R2. Show good working ethics.

Admission Requirements 

A Bachelor’s degree in Architecture with a minimum CGPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent.



Students with a CGPA between 2.0 and 2.99 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent or with TOEFL 530 and a CGPA of a minimum 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent may be admitted conditionally.



Evidence of proficiency in English: TOEFL score of at least 550 or equivalent.

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Two confidential recommendation letters.

NB: Refer to section 2.2. general admission condition for Graduate program for more detail Career Opportunities Graduates of the MSc. Program can work as designers and construction managers, decision makers for city planning, community agencies or governmental authorities. Graduates can also pursue their studies to gain PhD degree and join academic institutions.

Graduation Requirements To be qualified for graduation, the student must: 

Complete the core and elective courses with a minimum AGPA of 3.0.



Pass the thesis examination with a minimum of 80 percent (B grade).

Degree requirement The Master degree in Architecture in Urban Design requires the completion of 36 Credit Hours classified as follows: Types of courses

Credit hours

Core courses

24

Electives

6

Thesis

6

The study plan for full-time students extends over a two year period (Two semesters for the coursework, and two semesters for the thesis). The study plan for part-time students extends over a four year period.

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Major requirement (30 Credit hours) Course #

Course Title

CH

Pre-requisite

2706010

Studio I

3

-

2706020

Studio II

3

2706010

2706100

History And Theory of Urbanism

3

-

2706110

Sustainability and Energy Saving

3

-

2706120

Real Estate Development

3

-

2706130

Architecture and Urban Environment in the Gulf

3

2706100

2706140

Social & Economic Factors and Built Form

3

-

2706220

Research Methods

3

-

2706300

Thesis

6

All courses

Total

30

Major electives (6 Credit hours) Credit #

Course Title

CH

Pre-requisite

2736020

Housing Design , Planning and Evaluation

3

2706010, 2706100

2736030

Urban Design Regulatory System

3

2706100, 2706110

2736040

Advanced Landscape Design

3

2736050

Project Management

3

Course Descriptions for Master of Science in Urban Design 2706100 History and Theory of urbanism (3,0,0: 3) Pre-requisite: None This course attempts to explore history of urbanism. It aims to provide the basic foundation and understanding of the history and theory of urbanism from ancient times to contemporary trends.

2706110 Sustainability and Energy Saving (2,2,0: 3) Pre-requisite: None The course will examine the role of technology and how it may contribute most effectively to sustainable development. It will consider approaches to integrating and managing technology with particular attention to social, economic, health, and environmental sides.

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2706120 Real Estate Development (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: None This course explores strategies of Real Estate Development (RED) in Gulf Regions with special emphasis on UAE. The course discusses specific contents on the dynamics of creating value in Real Estate Market. This course addresses the strategic growth, opportunities, competitive challenges, and operational imperatives of the Real Estate Market.

2706130 Architecture and Urban Environment in the Gulf Region (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: None This course explores the cultural, economic, environmental and technological issues affecting the spatial disposition, form and character of urban buildings in the region. The aim of this course is to expose students to issues and factors that shape urban architecture of the region.

2706140 Social and Economic Factors and Built Form (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: None This course aims to introduce students to the history and development of urban form, the social and economic factors that contribute to shaping urban form, and sustainability and energy issues associated with urban form.

2706220 Research Methods (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: None The course introduces the student to the research methods used in urban affairs. This includes the basics of data gathering and analysis with special emphasis on site related issues. The course also aims to show them how to write a dissertation and/or technical paper.

2706010 Studio I (1,4,0:3) Pre-requisite: None The course intended to provide postgraduates with appreciation of visual, social, cultural, economic and environmental impact of the uses and architecture of individual buildings within the fabric of the city. The course also considers how the acquired appreciation can be applied in particular context, and especially in the Gulf context. However, the course is designed for students of varying background and not intended to concentrate on the design of spaces and functional relationships within buildings.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

2706020 Studio II (1,4,0:3) Pre-requisite: 270601 This course covers essential aspects of urban design in an open site. It provides an appreciation of the social, economic and environmental challenges urban designers and planners face in a new development, and examines the challenges can be addressed through the use of urban design tools and methods, and finally considers how this understanding can be applied in a particular contexts.

2706300 Thesis (6,0,0: 6) Pre-requisite: Finished all required courses The thesis should reflect the cumulative effort the student has made during his studies. It should offer a relevant view of the contemporary world of urban design, urban development and architecture.

2736020 Housing Design, Planning and Evaluation (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: (2706100) History and Theory of Urbanism. (2706110) Sustainability and Energy Saving This course aims to provide students with a deeper understanding of advanced issues related to housing design, choices, policies and programs, and evaluation. Analysis of the development of housing models and their urban implications represents the core of this course. This course will expose students to issues and questions involved in housing development including the policy environment, financing mechanisms, site selection, site planning and building design processes.

2736030 Urban Design Regulatory Systems (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: : (2706100) History and Theory of Urbanism. (2706110) Sustainability and Energy Saving This course provides students with the concept of architectural and urban design codes and their role in shaping the built environment. The course emphasizes the purpose and field of implementation of the different types of design rules from point of view of the development licensing authority and from the point of view of the developer, while exploring the role of community involvement in the design guidance measures.

2736040 Advanced Landscape Design (2,2,0:3) Pre-requisite: None This course aims to introduce students to specialize in landscape visualization, environmental perception, public land management processes and sustainable landscapes. It includes the

93

theoretical framework of landscape planning and design, relevant theories, methods and techniques for application in the landscape planning process.

2736050 Project Management (3,0,0:3) Pre-requisite: None This course introduces the student to project management of urban projects. This includes roles and environments, the project life cycle and various techniques of work planning, and control and evaluation to achieve project objectives

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry Offered by College of Dentistry

The College of Dentistry (COD) was established in academic year 1997-1998 as the first oral and dental health teaching institution in the United Arab Emirates. The college’s programs are tailored to meet the oral and dental health needs of the UAE community, focusing on the prevention of oral and dental disease. Mission of the College of Dentistry The College of Dentistry (COD) reflects the mission of Ajman University to provide dental educational programs in the UAE, to initiate and develop basic and clinical research and to offer high quality oral healthcare to meet the needs of the region. The College of Dentistry aims to prepare graduates who are highly qualified in dental sciences to deliver compassionate and ethical oral-facial healthcare services.

Goals of the College of Dentistry

The Goals of the College of Dentistry are: 1. To facilitate the development of graduates with contemporary knowledge and clinical skills to work as oral health care practitioners. 2. To develop an academic atmosphere conducive to the development of a high degree of scientific knowledge and clinical skill. 3. To inculcate the philosophy of “Service to Others”, through achieving personal satisfaction from serving the community on the oral healthcare team.

Objectives of the College of Dentistry 1. To educate and train a new generation of oral health professionals, according to worldclass standards, through academic programs leading to the Doctor of Dental Surgery or Master of Science postgraduate degrees.

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2. To implement a comprehensive health care program with emphasis on the prevention of oral and dental diseases. 3. To provide community dentistry services that meet world-class standards. 4. To initiate scientific research in oral healthcare in collaboration with worldwide prestigious dental and medical institutions and companies. Degree Programs offered by the College of Dentistry The College of Dentistry currently offers one undergraduate program and one postgraduate program. These are: 1.

Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree (5 year program)

2. Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry (MSRD) (3 year program)

Facilities The College of Dentistry is equipped to deliver world class dental education. Spacious lecture halls with audio-visual and video conferencing facilities provide students with an exciting learning experience. State-of-the-art laboratories with the latest medical and dental education equipment enhance students’ knowledge and skills. The college’s dental clinics have a contemporary design with modern dental units and x-ray rooms, and are provided with the latest dental materials, instruments and equipment. Free-of-charge comprehensive dental treatment for all patients ensures a regular flow of dental cases for clinical training, skills development and research requirements during the clinical phase of dental education programs.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry (MSRD) Program Introduction: The Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry answers the regional demand for an advanced professional qualification. The University offers this full time postgraduate degree training program which permits the General Dental Practitioner to pursue a training pathway over a minimum of 3 years. The postgraduate degree program reinforces and builds upon basic skills developed during undergraduate dental training, and facilitates continued professional development. It prepares the candidate to work as a specialist in Restorative Dentistry in private practice, the hospital or community services, or to pursue an academic career.

Mission Our mission is to provide a Master educational program in the UAE, in order to graduate highly qualified professionals to deliver compassionate and ethical oro-facial health care services. The mission of the Master of Restorative Dentistry Program supports the Mission of the College of Dentistry at Ajman University.

Goals of the MSRD Program

The goals of this program are; 1. Prepare highly qualified specialist in Restorative Dentistry to deliver compassionate and ethical oral health care services to patients in specialist practice, community hospitals, and/or academic settings. 2. Prepare graduate with critical thinking attitude and foster self-directed lifelong learning convictions. 3. Provide graduates with sound knowledge in the scientific and ethical principles of research to be capable of addressing community oral health needs and contributing to advances in the field of Restorative Dentistry.

MSRD Program Learning Outcomes The learning outcomes of the MSRD program are intended to advance the knowledge, skills and competency of the graduate student to achieve the following:

KNOWLEDGE On successful completion of the program, the graduate will;

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1. Identify and integrate knowledge in the basic and clinical sciences to diagnose and manage patients with complex restorative dentistry needs. 2. Evaluate and debate advanced concepts in Restorative Dentistry for problem solving and formulating innovative ideas. 3. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of research concepts, theories and principles in different domains of restorative dentistry.

SKILLS On successful completion of the program, the graduate will; 1. Use comprehensive approach for management of patients’ oral health needs taking into consideration systemic, psychological, and socio-economic factors into consideration. 2. Perform complex restorative procedures independently and consistently under various difficult situations. 3. Show the ability to appraise and synthesize classical and contemporary restorative dentistry literature as a method of knowledge build up and development. 4. Demonstrate high level of verbal and written communication skills with patients and other health care professionals. 5. Formulate a research proposal, conduct a research project, and analyze results and draw appropriate conclusions compatible with sound scientific and ethical principles of human or laboratory research.

COMPETENCE On successful completion of the program, the graduate will;

Autonomy and Responsibility: 1. Demonstrate professional practice management aptitudes and take responsibility for critical decisions and governance taking into considerations social and cultural norms. 2. Analyze and criticize intricate notions and concepts and be able to discuss them with peers and other professionals.

Role in context: 3. Demonstrate professional leadership qualities and instill values and moral when working with other healthcare professionals. 4. Organize and manage strategic activities for successful completion of tasks in familiar and/or unpredictable contexts.

Self-development: 5. Develop critical thinking and self-directed learning to formulate solutions for complex clinical and/or research issues as part of professional development.

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

6. Manage complex ethical and moral issues without prejudice when working within a team or as a leader.

Admission Requirements In accordance with the University requirements for graduate degrees, a candidate admitted into the MSRD program must fulfill the following minimum requirements:

to

be

1) Hold a Bachelor's degree in Dental surgery from a UAE-recognized university with a minimum Cumulative General Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent. 2) Applicants who have not completed an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution where English is the language of instruction, are required to submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission. 3) Applicants with a CGPA between 2.0 and 2.99 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent or with TOEFL 530 and a CGPA of a minimum of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent may be admitted conditionally.

NB: Refer to section 2.2. General admission condition for Graduate program for more detail. Graduation Requirements The student will be awarded the Master of Science in Restorative Dentistry degree after fulfilling the following requirements; 1. Successfully completing the required 57 credit hours with a cumulative grade point average (C.G.P.A) of not less than 3. 2. Completing the treatment of assigned patients as per the programs’ clinical requirements. 3. Submitting a written research thesis and successfully defending it before an examination committee.

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Study Plan The study plan of the program spans over three full-time years as follows:

FIRST YEAR / FIRST SEMESTER Course Code

Course Delivery / Duration / Credit Hours Course Name

Pre-Requisite

Clinic

Lab

Theory

Cr H

08116100

Dental Basic Science I

32 (2 HPW)*

2

-

08116110

Biomaterials

16 (1HPW)*

1

-

08116120

Esthetic Dentistry

16 (1HPW)*

1

-

08116130

Implantology

16 (1HPW)*

1

-

08116140

Biostatistics

16 (1HPW)*

1

-

08116150

Research Methods

16 (1HPW)*

1

-

08116160

Clinical Practice I

4

-

11

-

128 (2 Clinics PW)** 128 Hours

112 Hours

Total Total Contact Hours = 240 * HPW = Hours per Week. ** Every clinic is 4 hours. “Cr H” indicate Credit Hours.

FIRST YEAR / SECOND SEMESTER Course Code

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Course Delivery / Duration / Credit Hours Course Name

08116200

Dental Basic Science II

08116240

Seminars in Operative Dentistry

08116250

Literature Review

Pre-Requisite

Clinic

Lab

Theory 32 (2 HPW)* 32 (2HPW)* 32 (2HPW)*

Cr H 2

-

2

-

2

-

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

08116260

Clinical Practice II

192

6

(3 Clinics PW)** 192 Hours

96 Hours

08116160

12

Total Total Contact Hours = 288 * HPW = Hours per Week. ** Every clinic is 4 hours. “Cr H” indicate Credit Hours.

SECOND YEAR / FIRST SEMESTER Course Delivery / Duration / Credit Hours

Course Code

Course Name

08117130

Pre-Requisite

Clinic

Lab

Theory

Cr H

New Trends In Restorative Dentistry

32 (2 HPW)*

2

-

08117140

Seminars in Endodontics

32 (2HPW)*

2

-

08117150

Research Proposal

2

08116140 08116150

08117160

Clinical Practice III

6

08116260

192 (3 Clinics PW)** 192 HOURS

Total

64 HOURS

12

Total Contact Hours = 256

* HPW = Hours per Week. ** Every clinic is 4 hours. “Cr H” indicate Credit Hours.

SECOND YEAR / SECOND SEMESTER Course Code

Course Delivery/Duration/ Credit Hours Course Name

08117240

Seminars in Fixed Partial Denture

08117250

Thesis Preparation

08117260

Clinical Practice IV

Total

Pre-Requisite

Clinic

Lab

Theory

Cr H

32 (2 HPW)*

2

192 (3 Clinics PW)** 192 Hours

32 Hours

3

08117150

6

08117160

11

Total Contact Hours = 224 * HPW = Hours per Week. ** Every clinic is 4 hours. “Cr H” indicate Credit Hours.

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THIRD YEAR / FIRST SEMESTER Course Delivery / Duration / Credit Hours

Course Code

Course Name

Pre-Requisite

Clinic

08118150

Thesis Preparation

08118160

Clinical Practice V

Lab

Theory

Cr H 3

08117250

128 (2 Clinics PW)**

4

08117260

128 Hours

7

Total

Total Contact Hours = 128

* HPW = Hours per Week. ** Every clinic is 4 hours. “Cr H” indicate Credit Hours.

THIRD YEAR / SECOND SEMESTER Course Delivery/Duration/ Credit Hours

Course Code

Course Name

Pre-Requisite

Clinic

08118250

Thesis Preparation

No Code

Clinical Teaching *

Lab

Theory

4

Total

Grand Total

Cr H 08118150

4

Total Contact Hours = 1136

832

304

57

* Students participate for 8 hours per week in undergraduate teaching responsibility at the Department of Restorative Dentistry

Curriculum The program consists of three major components namely; 1) Didactic Component; 2) Clinical Practice Component; 3) Research Thesis Component. Didactic Component Courses The didactic component of the MSRD program consists of 12 courses. The following is a description of the didactic courses.

08116100 Dental Basic Science I This course comprised of lectures and discussions designed to aid the student to expand his/her knowledge in occlusion and its relationship to function and dysfunction of the masticatory system. The course starts with description of functional anatomy and physiology of the masticatory

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system followed by fundamental concepts of applied occlusion and concludes with diagnosis and management of functional and related disturbances of the masticatory system. Knowledge gained will provide the student with the opportunity to participate in the evaluation and management of patients with complex restorative needs as well as enhances his/her communication skills with other specialists in a multidisciplinary setting.

Prerequisite: None 08116110 Biomaterials The course is designed to introduce students to the concept that dental materials assume an important role in almost every aspect of restorative dentistry. Furthermore, a successful treatment outcome is often dependent on the ability of the restorative material to withstand the rigors of the oral environment. Knowledge of materials science, testing methodology, properties, and manipulation of dental materials used in restorative dentistry will be attained through lectures and discussions. This will help students in selecting appropriate material for a particular clinical situation for a successful clinical outcome.

Prerequisite: None 08116120 Esthetic Dentistry This course is comprised of lectures and discussions designed to aid the student to expand his/her knowledge in diagnosis and management of patients with esthetic expectations. Knowledge gained will enable student to integrate fundamental concepts of diagnosis and techniques used in esthetic dentistry into the overall patient management to enhance patients’ acceptance and improve the overall success of treatment.

Prerequisite: None 08116130 Implantology This course describes the diagnostic, surgical, and restorative aspects of dental implants in partially edentulous patients. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis, assessment of risk factors, treatment planning, and restorative procedures involved in management of partially edentulous patients. The course helps students become conversant in the surgical aspects of straightforward implant situations, and enhance their ability to assess the need for advanced and complex surgical procedures and refer such cases to the appropriate specialists. Knowledge gained by students will contribute to achieving competency in rendering treatment to partially edentulous patients.

Prerequisite: None 08116140 Biostatistics This course is comprised of lectures designed to aid the student to expand their knowledge of the basic principles of statistics as it applies to the understanding and interpretation of the dental literature. The emphasis of this course is on the application of statistical tests commonly employed

103

in health research and the interpretation of their results. This enables the student to critically evaluate dental and medical research and analyze results of his/her own research project.

Prerequisite: None 08116150 Research Methods The course considers the nature of scientific knowledge and investigates various processes involved in research. Both the quantitative and qualitative approaches will be studied. The course covers the sources of knowledge, the scientific method in research, and the ethics of research. The important steps in planning a research project and measurement tools necessary for conducting a research project will be covered. The course also discusses the considerations involved in writing a research report and critical appraisal of the literature.

Prerequisite: None 08116200 Dental Basic Science II This course focuses on topics of particular interest to restorative dentists in the fields of oral histology, oral pathology, radiology, and periodontology. It is designed to expand student’s knowledge in the etiology and sequelae of diseases of the hard tooth structure namely; caries and tooth wear. In addition, an in depth discussions of the etiology and management of the diseases of supporting tooth structures; namely the periodontium and their inter-relationship with restorative dentistry is provided. Furthermore, principles of advanced radiological techniques are discussed. This will in turn contributes to student’s ability to diagnose and manage patients with complex restorative needs.

Prerequisite: None 08116240 Seminars in Operative Dentistry This course is held once a week during the second semester of the graduate programs’ first year. The course will generally follow a seminar format in which students will discuss specific topics in Operative Dentistry, with emphasis on techniques applied to single tooth direct and indirect intra-coronal restorations. Topics cover selection of materials and techniques used for the management of dental caries, tooth wear and anomalies affecting the structure of teeth along with complications and survival/ success of such restorations. Knowledge gained from this seminar will contribute to proficiency of students during clinical management of patients.

Prerequisite: None 08116250 Literature Review This course follows a seminar format in which students discuss the fundamental concepts and procedures used in fixed prosthodontics. While students are expected to be familiar with such basic procedures, emphasis is placed on gaining an in depth knowledge in established and emerging

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concepts and techniques through appraisal of classical and contemporary literature. This is done to assure that students will become well conversant in such procedures, which will ultimately contributes to improving their proficiency in the clinical management of patients.

Prerequisite: None 08117130 New Trends in Restorative Dentistry This course is comprised of lectures designed to expand students’ knowledge in recent advances in restorative dentistry including operative dentistry, endodontics, and implantology. Knowledge gained by the student will contribute to achieving competency in rendering advanced restorative treatment.

Prerequisite: None 08117140 Seminars in Endodontics This course will be held once a week during the first semester of the second year of the program. It consists of weekly seminars dedicated to review classical and contemporary literature in the field of endodontics. Selected articles covering topics in diagnosis, procedure, and treatment used in endodontics will be appraised and synthesized. The student learns to critically evaluate the scientific evidence that supports endodontic principles and practice. By the end of this course, students will have gained an in depth knowledge essential for diagnosis, techniques and procedures, management, and failures/complications in the clinical practice of non-surgical and surgical endodontic therapy.

Prerequisite: None 08117240 Seminars in Fixed Partial Denture This course follows a seminar format in which students appraise and synthesis classical and contemporary literature in conventional fixed tooth-supported and implant-supported prostheses. Furthermore, students evaluate alternative treatment modalities used in the management of partially edentulous patients. Emphasis is placed on assessing factors affecting the prognosis of teeth and prostheses. In addition, design considerations of different prosthetic treatment modalities used for partially edentulous patients are discussed. This course contributes to students’ proficiency in clinical practice, and enhances their abilities to assist patients make informed decisions regarding their clinical situations.

Prerequisite: None Clinical Component Courses The clinical component of the program consists of 6 clinical courses. The following is a description of the clinical component courses.

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08116160 Clinical Practice I This is the first course of the clinical component of the MSRD program. The course consists of clinical patient management and treatment plan sessions under the guidance of clinical instructors. Each student is assigned a number of patients with a variety of comprehensive complex restorative needs. He/she is required to perform diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning, and management to address patient-mediated and dentist-mediate concerns. As a result of the comprehensive nature of patient management, treatment of patients will continue over more than one semester of the program. By the end of this course, student should be conversant in performing diagnosis and formulating treatment plan of cases requiring comprehensive complex restorative dentistry. In addition, he/she should have started treatment of some of the assigned patients. Students should maintain the records of all treated clinical cases for the portfolio that to be submitted at the end of the clinical practice component of the program.

Prerequisite: None 08116260 Clinical Practice II This is the second course of the clinical component of the MSRD program. Students continue to treat patients and debate treatment plans under the guidance of clinical instructors. Students should have made progress toward completing treatment of some patients with a variety of restorative needs. Students should begin to demonstrate increased level of independence and selfdirected learning. Each student should review the different clinical cases under his/her care with the course coordinator. This is to ensure that he/she has sufficient number and variety of patients to satisfy the graduation requirements. Each student should document and maintain records of all treated clinical cases for the portfolio that to be submitted at the end of the clinical practice component of the program.

Prerequisite: 08116160 08117160 Clinical Practice III This is the third course of the clinical practice component of the program. Student continues to treat patients and debate treatment plans under the guidance of clinical instructors. He/she should demonstrate advanced skills in diagnosis, treatment plan, and management of patients with comprehensive complex restorative needs. Furthermore, he/she should have made progress towards completing treatment of more advanced clinical cases. Each student should review the different clinical cases under his/her care with the course coordinator. This is to ensure that he/she has sufficient number and variety of patients to satisfy the graduation requirements. Student should maintain the records of all treated clinical cases for the portfolio that to be submitted at the end of the clinical practice component of the program.

Prerequisite: 08116260

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08117260 Clinical Practice IV This is the fourth clinical course of the clinical practice component of the program. Student continues to treat patients and debate treatment plans under the guidance of clinical instructors. He/she should demonstrate advanced level of independence and reflective self-directed learning. Each student should have made progress towards completing more clinical cases with complex restorative needs. Each student should review the different clinical cases under his/her care with the course coordinator. This is to ensure that he/she has sufficient number and variety of patients to satisfy the graduation requirements. Student should maintain the records of all treated clinical cases for the portfolio that to be submitted at the end of the clinical practice component of the program.

Prerequisite: 08117160 08118160 Clinical Practice V This is the fifth course of the clinical component of the program. Student continues to treat patients and debate treatment plans under the guidance of clinical instructors. He/she should demonstrate proficiency in clinical management of patients as well as advanced level of independence and reflective self-directed learning. Each student should complete all clinical cases required for graduation and submit a portfolio detailing all clinical cases treated during the five clinical practice courses.

Prerequisite: 08117260 Clinical Teaching The process of information transfer in a clinical teaching setting reflects many aspects of knowledge, skills, and competencies. The role of clinical instructor assumed by student during this course contributes to enforcing his/her ability to organize the transfer of sound scientific knowledge and demonstrating clinical skills. Furthermore, it enriches governance, leadership qualities and taking responsibility for critical decisions. During this, non-credit course, students are assigned teaching sessions for one semester at the undergraduate clinics of the Restorative Dentistry Department, were they will be supervising undergraduate students under the guidance of full time clinical instructors.

Prerequisite: 08117260 Research Thesis Component Courses Research thesis component consists of 4 courses. The following is a description of the research thesis component courses.

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08117150 Research Proposal Research proposal is the initial step in the development of the thesis project. Each student will select to investigate a research topic under the guidance of a supervisor(s) who is a full time staff at the College of Dentistry. The topic of investigation can be chosen by the student and/or the supervisor, however, the topic need to be agreed with the supervising staff before the commencement of the project. Student should formulate a research proposal while observing sound research and ethical principles. The research proposal should demonstrate a contribution to existing knowledge in the field.

Prerequisite: 08116140 and 08116150 08117250 Thesis Preparation This course constitutes the second part of the thesis component of the MSRD program. Student should have obtained ethical approval if required, and conduct the pilot study to confirm the appropriateness of the methods and materials. Challenges faced during the pilot study should be addressed. Amendments to the proposal in light of challenges faced in the pilot study and emerging literature should be justified.

Prerequisite: 08117150 08118150 Thesis Preparation This course constitutes the third part of the thesis component of the MSRD program. Student will conduct the main study, collect, analyze and interpret the data analysis. He/she can begin to draw preliminary conclusions and inferences and develop comparisons of his/her results with findings in the literature. In addition, he/she will begin to evaluate the contributions of his results to the existing literature and suggest future research directions in the topic under investigation.

Prerequisite: 08117250 08118250 Thesis Preparation This is the final course of the thesis component. Student will write the final research thesis observing the scientific and ethical methods of report writing. In the written research thesis he/she describes the investigation in different chapters including literature review, statement of the problem, methods and materials, results, conclusions and references. He/she will then submit the completed written thesis for oral defense. This course will contributes to aspects of knowledge, skills and competencies expected at the graduate level.

Prerequisite: 08118150

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Master of Science in Pharmacy Offered by College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

ceThe College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) was founded in accordance with the university’s policy of establishing an innovative medical environment which embraces health sciences, i.e. dentistry, medical technology, nursing, etc., in addition to pharmacy. The establishment of COPHS is intended to meet the demand for pharmacists in hospitals and community pharmacies, and to provide manpower for the increasing number of private pharmacies and the growing pharmaceutical industry in the UAE and the region.

Mission The mission of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is to create an environment that promotes excellence in pharmaceutical education, practice and research. It is committed to the continuous improvement of its programs to keep abreast with the rapid advances in the profession of pharmacy and the provision of pharmaceutical care. It strives to prepare students to become competent, reliable and ethical health care professionals.

Degree Programs The College offers the following two programs: 1. Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) 2. Master of Science in Pharmacy

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Facilities Laboratory Facilities The college has several laboratories, covering the various branches of pharmaceutical science, which have the latest equipment. These laboratories have the instrumental apparatus which will enable students to gain sound practical skills as well as integrate theoretical study with real practical methods and techniques.

Computer Facilities The college receives full technical support and assistance from the University Computer Center which provides its services round the year to administrators, staff and students. The computer laboratories at the center are well-equipped and are available for use throughout the day; they are administered by trained staff who assist in solving problems and answering queries

Mission of the Program The mission of Ajman University (AU) is to provide the community with competent graduates who can deal with modern technologies and their application in the development programs. The university offers students modernized teaching and learning methodologies adapted and customized to the values, tradition and needs of the society. The degree programs offered by the university aim to prepare graduates for the work environment. It also aims to develop critical thinking and lifelong learning skills among students that enable them to fulfill their personal and professional goals. The MScPharm Program is consistent with university’s mission and aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills that will enhance their competency as health care professionals. The program also promotes the mission of COPHS in raising awareness about current health issues and how to address them both at national and regional levels. In addition, it contributes to improvement of the pharmacy profession in the United Arab Emirates and the Arabian Gulf region by introducing new practices in pharmaceutical sciences.

MScPharm Goals The MSc Pharm is designed to equip pharmacists and other related health professionals with the fundamental knowledge and skills that will give them the expertise to promote the pharmacy profession in it various fields of practice.

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Program Objectives The MScPharm Program is designed for graduates holding a degree in pharmacy or in a related health science. The objectives of the program are:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

acquire in-depth knowledge in applied pharmaceutical sciences. advance skills in drug design, development and control. increase knowledge of pharmacy practice and health care policies. improve life-long learning skills, critical thinking and problem solving abilities. acquire the ability to conduct applied research in the field of health sciences.

Program Learning Outcomes Learning outcomes of the MSc Pharm program are intended to improve knowledge, skill and career of the graduates. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to:

1. apply their in-depth knowledge of the field to promote pharmacy practice. 2. demonstrate that they have gained practical skills in instrumental analysis, clinical testing and quality control of drugs. 3. evaluate therapeutic management of diseases based on knowledge of drug design, pharmacokinetics and pharmacotherapy. 4. demonstrate their ability to solve problems and suggest solutions in health issues related to the local community. 5. demonstrate their ability to conduct healthcare related research. 6. demonstrate that they have gained skills in communication with other health providers and beneficiaries.

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MSc.Pharm (Clinical Pharmacy) learning outcomes in alignment with the QFEmirates Level 9 descriptors.

UAE’s Qualifications Frameworks Learning Outcomes Strands

MSc.Pharm Program (Clinical Pharmacy) learning outcomes

On successful completion of the MSc.Pharm program (Clinical Pharmacy), graduate will be able to:

Knowledge (K)

K1. Demonstrate advanced and up to date knowledge in the area of pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy and biomedical sciences K2. Design, implement and monitor a pharmaceutical care plan considering parent’s health and socioeconomic values. S1. Develop a critical review of medical problems and gain a communication skills with patients and health care providers

Skill (S)

S2. Develop the skill of utilizing evidence-based medicine in the health decision-making process.

Aspects of Competence (C)

S3. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate medical literature and conduct research to promote problem solving skills

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Autonomy responsibility

and

C1. Implements advanced and professional pharmacy practice services

Role in context

C2. Demonstrate their ability to solve problems and suggest solutions in health issues related to the local community

Self-development

C3. Develop advanced skills of self-learning and case presentation

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

MSc.Pharm. (Pharmaceutical Technology) learning outcomes in alignment with the QFEmirates Level 9 descriptors. UAE’s Qualifications Frameworks Learning Outcomes Strands

MSc.Pharm Program (Pharmaceutical Technology), learning outcomes

Skill (S)

Knowledge (K)

On successful completion of the MSc.Pharm program (Pharmaceutical Technology), graduate will be able to: K1. Develop a comprehensive advanced understanding of the field to promote pharmacy practice. S1. Demonstrate advanced knowledge, attitudes and skills required to participate in a multidisciplinary team. S2. Apply critical appraisal of information retrieved from scientific literature including all relevant pharmaceutical information.

Aspects of Competence (C)

S3. Demonstrate advanced problem-solving skills in various pharmaceutical technology disciplines including; quality assurance, novel drug delivery systems, biotechnology, applied instrumental analysis, complementary and alternative medicine and chemistry of natural products. Autonomy and responsibility

C1. Contribute professionally to drug development, drug formulation and new drug registration that contribute to activities in pharmaceutical industry and in research institutes.

Role in context

C2. Conduct pharmaceutical technology related research needed to develop and evaluate drug formulations.

Selfdevelopment

C3. Deliver oral presentations of cases/ topics as part of the arranged tutorials for self-development and learning.

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Admission Requirements In accordance with the University requirements for graduate degrees, a candidate to be admitted into the Master of Science in Pharmacy he/she must fulfill the following minimum requirements: a.

Hold a Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) from a UAE-recognized university with a minimum cumulative CGPA of 3 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent.

b. Students with a CGPA between 2.0 and 2.99 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent or with TOEFL 530 and a CGPA of a minimum 3.0 on a 4.0 scale or equivalent may be admitted conditionally. c. A minimum score of 550 on paper based TOEFL or 6 on IELTS (or its equivalent).

Degree Completion Requirements The MScPharm Program consists of 2 concentration areas (clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical technology) taught in 36 credit hours spread over three semesters (full-time students) to five semesters (part-time students).

These include 15 credit hours core curriculum courses (11 credit hours of college requirements and 4 credit hours of university requirements), 21 credit hours of concentration courses, which includes 6 credit hours for the research thesis.

Curriculum The courses are distributed according to the following study plan:

CORE CURRICULUM COURSES (15 C.H.)

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Cours e ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectu res

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

Typ e*

701622

Biostatistics

2

2

0

Mathematics

UR

701623

Research Methodology

2

2

0

None

UR

701601

Clinical Pharmacokinetics

3

2

1

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacok. II

CR

701606

Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy I

2

2

0

Clinical Pharmacy I & II

CR

701609

Clinical Biochemistry

2

1

1

Biochemistry I &II

CR

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

701617

Pharmacoeconomics

2

2

0

Clinical Pharmacy I & II Pharm. Legislation 701623 Res. Method

701608

Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy II

2

2

0

701606

Total

15

13

2

CR

CR

*UR: University Requirement; CR: College Requirement; CE: Concentration Elective

Study Plan For Concentration in Clinical Pharmacy: Semester 1: (13 CH) Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectur es

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

Typ e*

701622

Biostatistics

2

2

0

Mathematics

UR

701623

Research Methodology

2

2

0

None

UR

701601

Clinical Pharmacokinetics

3

2

1

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacok. II

CR

701606

Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy I

2

2

0

Clinical Pharmacy I & II

CR

701609

Clinical Biochemistry

2

1

1

Biochemistry I &II

CR

College Elective

2

2

0

Total

13

11

2

CE

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Semester 2: (13 CH) Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectur es

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

Type *

701607

Pharmaceutical Care

3

2

1

701606

CR

701608

Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy II

2

2

0

701606

CR

701619

Pharmacovigelance

2

2

0

701601 701606

CR

701620

Drug Abuse

2

2

0

701606

CR

Clinical Pharmacy I & II Pharm. Legislation 701623 Res. Method. 701623

CR

701617

Pharmacoeconomics

2

2

0

College Elective

2

2

0

Total

13

12

1

CE

Semester 3: (10 CH) Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectur es

Tut/ Lab

Prerequisites

Typ e*

701618

Medicine Management and Community Care

4

3

1

701607

CR

701611

Thesis (Research Project)

6

0

6

After earning 26 C.H.

CR

Total

10

College Elective Courses for MSc Students in Clinical Pharmacy Concentration:

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Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectures

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

701610

Clinical Microbiology

2

2

0

701609

701605

Complementary Medicine

2

2

0

Phytochemistry

701621

Practices in Complementary Medicine

2

2

0

Phytochemistry

701616

Application of Radiopharmaceuticals

2

1

1

Medicinal Chemistry I&II

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Study Plan For Concentration in Pharmaceutical Technology: Semester 1: (13 CH) Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectur es

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

Typ e*

701622

Biostatistics

2

2

0

Mathematics

UR

701623

Research Methodology

2

2

0

None

UR

701601

Clinical Pharmacokinetics

3

2

1

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacok. II

CR

701606

Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy I

2

2

0

Clinical Pharmacy I & II

CR

701609

Clinical Biochemistry

2

1

1

Biochemistry I &II

CR

College Elective

2

2

0

Total

13

11

2

CE

Semester 2: (13 CH) Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectur es

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

Type *

701608

Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy II

2

2

0

701606

CR

701613

Products of Biotechnology

2

2

0

701609

CR

701616

Application of Radiopharmaceuticals

2

1

1

Medicinal Chemistry I&II

CE

701603

Applied Instrumental Analysis

2

2

0

Instrumental Analysis I&II

CR

701615

Chemistry of Natural Products

1

1

0

Phytochemistry

CE

Clinical Pharmacy I & II Pharm. Legislation 701623 Res. Method. 701623

CR

701617

Pharmacoeconomics

2

2

0

College Elective

2

2

0

Total

13

12

1

CE

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Semester 3: (10 CH) Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lecture s

Tut/ Lab

Prerequisites

Type *

701602

Novel Drug Delivery Systems

2

2

0

701601

CR

701612

Advances in Pharmaceutical Technology

2

2

0

701601

CR

701611

Thesis (Research Project)

6

0

6

After earning 26 C.H.

CR

Total

10

4

6

College Elective Courses for MSc Students in Pharmaceutical Technology Concentration:

118

Course ID

Course Title

Total CH

Lectures

Tut/ Lab

Pre-requisites

701610

Clinical Microbiology

2

2

0

701609

701605

Complementary Medicine

2

2

0

Phytochemistry

701619

Pharmacovigelance

2

2

0

701601 701606

701621

Practices in Compl. Med

2

2

0

Phytochemistry

701614

Chemistry of Heterocycles

2

2

0

Medicinal Chemistry I&II

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Course Descriptions: 701601

Clinical Pharmacokinetics (2-2-3)

This course is designed to provide students with various important aspects of basic concepts & principles of pharmacokinetics with special emphasis on clinical applications. The course shall focus on the application of compartmental & non-compartmental models to determine various pharmacokinetic parameters including; absorption, distribution, apparent volume of distribution and elimination, following single and multiple IV and oral doses. The course shall provide students with concepts of non-linear pharmacokinetic models and their clinical applications. Principles of clinical pharmacokinetics will be thoroughly covered with special emphasis on pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenomics variability, therapeutic drug monitoring, individualization of drug therapy, kinetics of drug interaction and pharmacokinetic approach to new drug discovery.

Pre-requisites: Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics I and II (700311 & 700312) 701602

Novel Drug Delivery Systems

(2-0-2)

The development of novel drug delivery systems has improved the efficacy and safety of many important therapeutic agents. Understanding the release characteristics of drugs from these dosage forms is essential for their optimal use. This course is designed to cover basic principles & concepts of controlled release drug delivery systems including extended release, delayed release & targeted release drug products for oral, trans-mucosal, trans-dermal, intra-ocular, intra-vaginal, intra-uterine & parenteral administration. The course includes potential advantages & limitations as well as drugs candidates for oral controlled release drug products. The course will also describe advanced concepts applied in the design, formulation & development of controlled release products; including principle of design, excipients used, biopharmaceutical factors influencing design strategy, dosage form selection & drug release mechanisms. In addition, the course will describe the concept of drug targeting & its therapeutic importance. The course shall also discuss various biopharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic & clinical aspects of controlled release products as well as official in-vivo & in-vitro tests used to evaluate controlled release drug delivery systems. The course will also cover liposomes as potential tools for drug delivery.

Pre-requisite: Clinical Pharmacokinetics (701601) 701603

Applied Instrumental Analysis

(2-0-2)

The course presents a comprehensive overview of the field of instrumental analysis as practiced today. The course reviews the major methods available covering the basic principles, advantages and disadvantages, limitations and applicability of each method. The course will introduce the students to the current instrumental methods of analysis and to cultivate sound experimental techniques covering electrochemical methods, absorption and emission spectroscopy UV-Vis spectrophotometery, fluorimetry and phosphometry ,

119

atomic emission spectroscopy Raman spectroscopy, X ray methods, radiochemical methods chromatographic methods, NMR, IR and mass spectrometry

Pre-requisites: Instrumental Analysis I & II (700422 & 700425) 701605

Complementary Medicine (2-0-2)

In this course the student is acknowledged of the various types of Medicine which are practiced nowadays, and the main differences between these types with more emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Medicine ( CAM ). In this course CAM is classified into SIX Systems, based on different philosophies : 1- Alternative Medical Systems. 2-Mind-Body System. 3- Biological-Based System. 4Manipulative Body-Based System 5- Energy System. 6- Blood Cupping. This in addition to Iridology as a diagnostic technique. Each of these systems include different Therapies which are instructed in details, including definition, philosophy, techniques, indications, and contraindications for each therapy.

Pre-requisite: Phytochemistry (700321) 701606

Pathophysiology & Pharmacotherapy I (2-0-2)

The course deals with a compressive over view in the field of Pharmacology and therapeutics as commonly practice today. The course covering: 1- The study in depth the mechanism of action of drugs that mimic or antagonize the sympathetic, parasympathetic nervous systems and neuromuscular junction. Concepts of receptor activation and neurohumoral transmission will be discussed. 2- Advanced knowledge in pharmacological aspects and therapeutic applications of drugs acting on cardiovascular, urinary, heamatologic, respiratory, gastrointestinal systems. It gives emphasis on molecular pharmacology of these drugs as well as aspects of clinical usefulness such as contraindications, interactions and unwanted effects. Also the concept of nitric oxide. 3- Detailed neuropharmacological aspects and therapeutic uses with emphasis on biochemical defects underlying the diseases of the new drugs used in treatment of neurological, behavior disorders. Also drugs for inflammatory and related disorders will also be discussed. 4- The rationale for the choice of certain drugs in the treatment of specified disease states. More emphasis will directed towards the mechanism of action, adverse effects and contraindications of chosen drugs. Use drugs in special cases such as pregnancy, lactation, elderly patients will be discussed. 5- Various toxicological aspects of the most commonly used drugs and toxic agents. Also its potential abuse and addiction will be discussed. 6- Rational drug use and misuse of antibiotics.

Pre-requisites: Clinical Pharmacy I & II (700442 & 700443) 701607

Pharmaceutical Care (2-1-3)

The graduates will be equipped with knowledge, skills, and practice capabilities to perform a clinical evaluation of the usage of medications in the hospital, also evaluation of drug

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AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

safety and efficacy, evaluation of prescribing habits. This subject will establish the knowledge of medical research, expose students to different types of studies including descriptive and comparative, observational and interventional.

Pre-requisites: Pathophysiology & Pharmacotherapy (701606) 701608

Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy – II (2-0-2)

Pharmacotherapy is a crucial part of medicines management (or pharmaceutical care) for patients. This pharmacotherapy course starts with the introduction to pharmacotherapy, clinical calculations, pharmacokinetics and diagnostic tests and procedures in each of the selected diseases. The disease processes in common clinical conditions will be studied, including introduction to relevant pathology, the rationale underlying the management of these conditions and the choice of drug therapy for individual patients.

Pre-requisites: Pathophysiology & Pharmacotherapy I (701606) 701609

Clinical Biochemistry (1-1-2)

1. Advanced enzyme kinetics and regulation of enzyme activities. Applied enzymology. Immobilized enzymes. Enzyme mechanism. Biotransformation. 2. Fundamental Aspects of structure-function relationships of proteins and overall coverage of intermediary metabolism. Protein Folding. Protein Engineering. Plasma Proteins and immunoglobulins. Homeostasis and thrombosis. Intracellular Traffic and Sorting of Proteins. The Extracelluler matrix. 3. The Diversity of the Endocrine system. Hormones, structure & function of biomicromoleculer Hormone Action & Signal Transduction. 4. Drug Metabolism. Drug Discovery. Antibiotics. Biomedical Biochemistry Receptors

Pre-requisites: Biochemistry I & II ( 700231 & 700232) 701610

Clinical Microbiology

(2-0-2)

Clinical Microbiology is an important part of drug management for patients with infectious diseases. This course focuses on pathophysiology of infectious diseases, diagnosis, management, prevention and control. The course is primarily intended to provide a firm ground in the understanding of infectious diseases, its management and control.

Pre-requisite: Clinical Biochemistry (701609) 701611

Research Thesis

(0-6-6)

The thesis forms an extremely important component of the MSc Program since it will bring together many aspects of the skills and knowledge acquired during the study period. Each student will undertake an individual project on a topic related to the concentration area of his study. Topics investigated may be chosen by the student or suggested by the faculty. The area of research should be approved by the supervising faculty before commencement of the project. The research need not be on an original topic but should increase knowledge in the chosen area. It must be conducted according to the accepted

121

methods of scientific investigation, and be presented bound in the standard university format, by the end of the course.

Pre-requisite: Completion of 26 C.H. 701612

Advances in Pharmaceutical Technology

(2-0-2)

This course is designed to provide students with various important aspects of process validation and CGMP; including regulatory and quality compliance as applied to the pharmaceutical industries. Upon completion, students will have acquired an in-depth knowledge in the organization and operation of the major departments of pharmaceutical companies, as well as ways of dealing with regulatory and compliance issues. Additionally, the course will provide background information on the drug development process from discovery to the marketplace. Other essential topics in advanced pharmaceutical technology will also be covered; including production management, production planning, production capacities, production organization, economic policy, manufacturing economics and production lines. In addition, various designing criteria needed to manufacture some sterile and non-sterile products shall also be discussed. The course will also include process automation in pharmaceutical manufacturing, pilot plant and scale up techniques as well as the design and development of packaging units including recent advances in packaging techniques.

Pre-requisite: Clinical Pharmacokinetics (701601) 701613

Products of Biotechnology (2-0-2)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the field of biotechnology. Topics will include a history of biotechnology, the drug discovery and development processes, and a description of current biotechnology products. Biotechnological techniques, such as cloning of DNA, expression of cloned DNA, manipulation of DNA sequence information, new biological targets for drug development, novel drug screening strategies, novel biological agents, antibodies, antisense, oligo-nucleotide therapy and gene therapy will be thoroughly covered. The course also entails the different methods adopted for preparation of biotechnology products and their evaluation, handling and storage. Issues that impact both the industry and the general population, such as stem cell research and bioethics shall be discussed as part of other topics introduced in the course. In addition, future prospects for new biotechnology products shall be discussed.

Pre-requisite: Clinical Biochemistry (701609)

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701614

Chemistry of Heterocycles (2-0-2)

This course deals with the application of structure and theory to the study of organic heterocyclic compounds and their nomenclature, preparation and reaction mechanisms.

Pre-requisites: Pharmaceutical Medicinal Chemistry I & II (700323 & 700324) 701615

Chemistry of Natural Products (1-0-1)

Chemistry of Natural Products is a college elective course. It deals with the historical and contemporary role of secondary natural products in health care and commerce. The course covers the classification of natural products according to their biosynthetic origins and chemical properties. A special emphasis will be placed on how chemical structure affects the physiological function of various natural products. These "structure activity relationships" help us learn about the interaction of small molecules in living systems and pharmacology of drugs.

Pre-requisite: Phytochemistry (700321) 701616

Application of Radiopharmaceuticals (1-1-2)

This course covers the fundamentals of nuclear pharmacy, radiopharmaceuticals compounding, stability prediction, packaging as well as uses and applications of radiopharmaceuticals as a diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The nuclear pharmacy practice guideline of APHA Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APHA-APPM) will be discussed to cover the responsibility of pharmacist in maintaining quality of radiopharma-ceuticals, safety of coworkers and environments and providing pharmaceutical care to patient with optimal outcome.

Pre-requisites: Pharmaceutical Medicinal Chemistry I & II (700323 & 700324)

701617

Pharmacoeconomics (2-0-2)

Basic and applied concepts of economic efficiency, pharmacoeconomics methods, and drug therapy outcome measures are presented with an emphasis on the practical application of such principles.

Pre-requisites: Clinical Pharmacy I & II (700442 & 700443), Research Methodology (701623) Pharm. Legislation (700416) 701618 Medicine Management and Community Care

(3-1-4)

The course offer students an insight into pharmacy and medicines management with the emphasis on evidence-based practice. Students will be introduced to the concepts of

123

pharmacy practice, pharmacoeconomics, risk assessment, health promotion and clinical governance. course comprises the following unit: 1. international pharmacy practice; 2. Evidence based medicine and critical appraisal 3. Clinical practice and formularies guidelines 4. Pharmacy management 5. Prescribing with the view of patient’s age (elderly, paediatrics), patient’s clinical situation (pregnancy, liver or renal disease) and morbidity or adverse drug reactions. 6. Public health and health promotion

Pre-requisites: Pharmaceutical Care (701607) 701619

Pharmacovigilance

(2-0-2)

The monitoring of drug safety is becoming more important as the number of drugs on the market, drug usage, and number of recalls all increase. Furthermore, Post-marketing pharmacovigilance studies are needed to further define the safety profile of a drug product. For such purposes the pharmacovigilance was developed and promoted in the medical and pharmaceutical sciences. Pharmacovigilance is the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding, and prevention of adverse effects or any other drugrelated problems. This course is designed to provide the students with an introduction to the fundamental elements of pre- and post-marketing pharmacovigilance. A good portion of the course will cover the medication safety as it related to the prescribing, dispensing and administration of all medications. The global harmonisation of pharmacovigilance data is also will be highlighted throughout the course. Teaching consists of lectures and workshop activities in small groups and takes into account real world situations. There are opportunities for sharing experiences and networking which contributes to the development of your knowledge and understanding of pharmacovigilance issues.

Pre-requisites: Clinical Pharmacokinetics (701601) and Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherpy I (701606) 701620

Drug Abuse (2-0-2)

This course provides an overview of the fundamental concepts in drug/substance abuse. The course contents will help to introduce participants to terminologies used in drug/substance abuse as well as their definitions. Participants will be provided with a comprehensive overview of the drugs of abuse that are most commonly used, in addition to their adverse effects on human health and society. Methods of treatment and client education will also be addressed. Laws and regulations concerning drug/substance abuse will be covered.

Pre-requisite: Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapy I (701606) 701621

Practices in Complementary Medicine (2-0-2)

This course instructs the student on the necessary aspects required to acquire a full understanding knowledge on Herbal Medicine. The course starts by the historical development of Herbal Medicine, its advantages,

124

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

drawbacks, and regulatory issues. An advanced instruction on how medicinal plants work, their Pharmacodynamic effects, and Pharmacokinetic routes of their main active constituents is illustrated. The major part of the course concentrates on full Monographs on Medicinal Plants used in Herbal Medicine. An approach to some clinical studies on medicinal plants followed by case discussion are presented in Tutorial classes. Some illustrations on Research and Development in the field of Medicinal Plants, are given.

Pre-requisite

: Phytochemistry (700321)

701622

Biostatistics

(2-0-2)

This course is comprised of lectures designed to aid the student to expand their knowledge in specific biostatistics relevant to the medical and pharmaceutical fields in addition to adequate knowledge of study design in medical and health research. This enables the student to critically evaluate pharmaceutical and medical research.

Pre-requisite: Statistics (30130) 701623

Research Methodology

(2-0-2)

The course includes the following topics: the thinking process and manner of establishing human knowledge, science and scientific method, the research process, types of research methodologies pertinent to different fields of knowledge, steps of performing research from the first step of defining the research problem until the final step of writing the research article or report. The course involves studying samples selection, data collection, data processing and data displaying. Finally, the course stresses upon case studies extracted from the pharmaceutical and other fields and we end up the course with ethical considerations involved in the field of pharmacy.

Pre-requisite: Statistics (30130)

125

Academic Calendar for all Semester Academic Year 2017 - 2018

Day

Date

Description Faculty members report to work 11:00: Deans welcome the new students

Sunday

August 20, 2017

12:00-13:00: Tour of the campus 13:00-14:00: Tutorial session on course registration Course registration for continuing & new students

SundayThursday

August 20 - 24, Examinations for incomplete removal 2017 Period for accepting credit transfer requests Period for accepting changing major requests

Sunday

August 27, 2017

Beginning of classes

SundayThursday

August 27 - 31, 2017

Add & drop period

Thursday

August 31, 2017

Last date for dropping courses or registration suspension with 100% refund

Thursday Sunday

August. 31– Sep. 3, 2017

Arafat Day ,Eid Al-Adha Holiday

Sunday Thursday

September 3 - 14, 2017

Period suspension of registration with 50% refund

Thursday

September 21, 2017

Last date for dropping courses

Friday

September 22, 2017

Al Hijra holiday

SundayThursday

October 15 - 26, 2017

Mid-term examinations period

October 29 , 2017

Beginning of admission period for spring semester 2017-2018

Sunday

126

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Thursday

November 16, 2017

Last date for withdrawal Period for course evaluation

SundayThursday

November 19 - 30, 2017

Early registration for spring semester 20172018

Thursday

November 30, 2017

UAE Martyr’s Day Al Mawlid Al Nabawi holiday

Saturday Sunday

December 2 - 3, 2017

UAE National Day holiday

Saturday Tuesday

December 9 - 19, 2017

Final examinations period Last date for requesting incomplete

Thursday

December 21, 2017

10:00 : Colleges Council meeting 15:00 Council for Academic Affairs meeting Announcement of final examinations results

SundayThursday

Dec. 24, 2017 Jan. 4, 2018

Fall-Semester vacation

Islamic holidays are determined after sighting the moon. Thus, actual dates may not coincide with the dates in this calender.

127

Academic Calendar for Spring Semester Academic Year 2017 – 2018

Day

Date

Description 11:00: Deans welcome the new students 12:00-13:00: Tour of the campus 13:00-14:00: Tutorial session on course registration

SundayThursday

January 7 - 11, 2018

Course registration for continuing & new students Examinations for incomplete removal Period for accepting credit transfer requests Period for accepting changing major requests

128

Sunday

January 14, 2018 Beginning of classes

SundayThursday

January 14 - 18, 2018

Add & drop period

Thursday

January 18, 2018

Last date for dropping courses or registration suspension with 100% refund

SundayThursday

Jan. 21 - Feb. 1, 2018

period for suspension of registration with 50% refund

Monday – Tuesday

February 5 - 6, 2018

Graduation Ceremony for the fall semester 2017-2018

Thursday

February 8, 2018 Last date for dropping courses

SundayThursday

March 4 - 15, 2018

Mid-term examinations period

SundayThursday

March 25 - April 5, 2018

Spring semester vacation

Sunday

April 8, 2018

Beginning of admission period for Fall Semester 2018-2019

Friday

April 13, 2018

Al Isra’a Wal Mi’raj holiday

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Period for course evaluation SundayThursday

April 15 -26, 2018

Early registration for Summer Semester 20172018

Thursday

April 19, 2018

Last date for withdrawal

Sunday – Thursday

April 29 - May 10, 2018

Early registration for Fall Semester 2018-2019

Saturday – Thursday

May 12 -24, 2018

Final examinations period Last date for requesting incomplete

Tuesday

Thursday Sunday

May 29, 2018 May 31 , 2018 June 3, 2018

10:00 : Colleges Council meeting 15:00 Council for Academic Affairs meeting Announcement of final examinations results Beginning of Summer vacation

Islamic holidays are determined after sighting the moon. Thus, actual dates may not coincide with the dates in this calender.

129

Academic Calendar for Summer-1 Semester Academic Year 2017 – 2018

Day

Date

Description

Wdnesday – Thursday

June 6 - 7, 2018

Course registeration

Sunday

June 10, 2018

Beginning of classes

Sunday-Monday

June 10 - 11, 2018

Add & drop period

Thursday – Sunday

June 14 - 17 , 2018

30 Ramadan, Eid Al-Fitr holiday

Sunday

June 24, 2018

Beginning of mid-term examinations

Thursday

June 28, 2018

Last date for withdrawal

Wednesday – Thursday

July 18 - 19, 2018

Final examinations period

Monday

July 23 , 2018

N.B: 2 hours per class session.

130

13:00 Council for Academic Affairs meeting Announcement of final examinations results

AU GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018

Academic Calendar for Summer-2 Semester ( Field training) Academic Year 2017 – 2018

Day

Date

Description

Sunday

July 22 , 2018

Beginning of training

Monday Thursday

Augest 20-23 2018

Arafat Day, Eid Al-Adha holiday

Thursday

August 30, 2018

End of 6 weeks training

Sunday

September 9 , 2018

Announcement of 6 weeks training results

Thursday

September 13, 2018

End of 8 weeks training

Sunday

September 23, 2018

Announcement of 8 weeks training results

Islamic holidays are determined after sighting the moon. Thus, actual dates may not coincide with the dates in this calender.

Important Note:

Field training for students expected to graduate in summer 2 of Academic Year 20172018.

Office of Admissions & Registration

University Registrar

131

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graduate - Ajman University

GRADUATE STUDENT CATALOG 2017-2018 Ajman Campus Tel.: 971-6-7466666 Fax: 971-6-7468888 P.O. Box: 346 United Arab Emirates Toll Free: 800 2878 ajman...

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