Descriptive Inferential

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The First Measured Century

Introduction: Statistics, Data and Statistical Thinking FREC 408 Dr. Tom Ilvento 213 Townsend Hall [email protected] http://www.udel.edu/FREC/ilvento

http://www.pbs.org/fmc/index.htm

Statistics „

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Statistics (Def 1.1 p24) is the science of data It refers to „ Collecting data „ Classifying, summarizing, and organizing data „ Analysis of data „ Interpretation of data

Statistics „ „

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We will focus on two types of statistical applications

Descriptive „ Inferential „

Statistics is both a field of study …and a set of tools used by many disciplines Social Sciences Biological Sciences Physical Sciences

Descriptive Statistics „

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Descriptive statistics uses summary measures, graphs, and measures of association to show relationships in data. The focus is on describing the data With an emphasis on parsimony

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Descriptive Statistics „

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Rather than looking at a set of numbers, 0, 0, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 5, 2, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1, 1, 3, 1, 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12

Descriptive Statistics „

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we want to find summary measures which describe the data adequately and succinctly Be they a „ „ „ „

Descriptive Statistics „

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Descriptive Statistics also involve relationships between variables or sets of variables And they can involve very sophisticated techniques – regression, principle components, factor analysis, Logistic Regression, Probit Analysis

Inferential Statistics „

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Inferential statistics are a powerful tool for research It enables us to make statements about a large group from a much smaller sample. „ We can survey 1,000 people and make statements about 280 million people

Inferential statistics takes it a step further Now we use some of the same techniques to make estimates, decisions, predictions, or generalizations about a population from a smaller subset or sample

Did the public care if George W. Bush used cocaine in his 20s?

Inferential Statistics „

Percentage Average Range from highest to lowest mode

A Time/CNN Poll found:

If Bush did use cocaine in his 20s, should that disqualify him from being President? Yes

11%

100%

No

84%

80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

Yes

No

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Let’s look closer at this survey example

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It was based on a telephone poll of 942 adult Americans taken for Time/CNN on August 19th by Yankelovich Partners, Inc. The sampling error is ± 3.3%

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What does this mean?

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Here’s my interpretation „

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Here’s my interpretation „

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Since the sample was taken randomly, we have a method to estimate the error of our estimate In this case, we are reasonably sure that the true percentage is within ± 3.3% points of our estimate Which means our interval is 7.7% to 14.3%

We need some terms „

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Purpose of the study The units and elements involved Geographic coverage Time frame

A Population (Def 1.6 P29) is the total number of units involved in the research question. The units are the members (or elements) of the population. Populations could be: „ „ „ „ „

People Animals Plants Courses Objects

Population Example

A POPULATION IS DEFINED BY „

The survey is designed to represent adult Americans in August of 1999 Because we are taking a sample, we have some error associated with our estimate.

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If I was interested in understanding current household consumption of chicken in the Mid-Atlantic states, I might define the population as: All households in in the Mid-Atlantic states (DE, MD, PA, NJ, NY) in the Fall of 2002

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The DOW over a One-Year Period (October 2002 to Sept. 2003)

Does time matter for a population? „

The Time/CNN poll asked: Should a

candidate have to answer questions about whether he used cocaine in the past? „ „

June August

60% Yes 48% Yes

Should Candidates Answer about Cocaine Use? 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% June Yes

August No

Sampling

The DOW over a Five-Year Period „

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Why Sample? „ „ „ „

It saves time Money Other resources (computation time) It may actually be impossible to collect information on everyone „ Every corn stalk in a field „ Every dog who suffers from heart worm

When we collect data on all elements in a population, we take a census However, sometimes it is difficult to get information on the entire population So we take a sample of the population A sample (Def 1.8 P30) is a subset of the units or elements of a population

Recent Census Debate „ „ „

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Every 10 years we take a census It is mandated in the Constitution However, the Census Bureau knows that it doesn’t get a complete count - some groups are difficult to contact So, the Census Bureau wants to take a really good sample to estimate the undercount, and then adjust the counts to reflect the missing people

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More on Sample „

Samples are also defined in the terms we used for populations „ „ „ „

purpose of the research, the units and elements involved, the geographic coverage, and the time frame

More on Sampling „

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More Terms „

A random sample (Def 1.11 p41) is when each element or unit has the same chance of being selected „ If we select a random sample of 1,000 from a population of 100,000, „ Each unit has a 1,000/100,000 or th chance of being selected „ 1/100

More Terms „

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Measurement is the process of assigning a number to variables of the individual units „ Some measurement seems relatively straight-forward „ years of age, dollars of income, cholesterol counts, parts per million of a chemical

A variable (Def 1.3 p24) is a characteristic of an individual unit of the population

To be a variable the characteristics must vary „ „

More Terms „

A valuable property of a sample is that is representative of the population. The sample characteristics resemble those possessed by the population Inferential statistics require a sample to be representative of the population, And that can be done through a random process

It can’t all be the same; otherwise, it’s a constant.

Measurement „

Other concepts are more difficult to measure „ Attitudes „ Emotions „ Intelligence „

LOVE

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Measurement „

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The process of measurement is often complex – don’t take it for granted It always comes with some error And perhaps Bias

Measurement „

Types of Data - the Book „

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Quantitative data (Def 1.4 p24) are measures that are recorded on a naturally occurring scale Qualitative data (Def 1.5 p24) does not follow in natural numerical scale and thus are classified into categories

Types of Data „

Levels of Measurement „

Nominal (or categorical) – no implied order or superiority „ „ „

Men and Women Race Species or genuses

With measurement we must also deal with „ Validity – are we measuring what we think we are measuring „ Reliability – is the measuring device consistent

I will use a more elaborate description of levels of measurement „ Nominal „ Ordinal „ Continuous

Levels of Measurement „

Ordinal – an implied order or rank, but the distance between units is not well specified „ Ranking „ Strongly agree to Strongly disagree „ On a scale from one to ten..

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Why consider our level of measurement?

Levels of Measurement „

Continuous (combination of interval and ratio) – data that is measured on a scale where we can say something about the magnitude between numbers „ Age „ Income „ Years of School

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Sources of Data „

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Data from a published source – also known as existing data. Someone else collected it and makes it available to you „ Census of Population „ Current Population Survey „ Sports statistics Caution – data decisions are out of your control

Sources of Data „

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Sources of Data „

Surveys are where a researcher samples a group of people, asks a set of questions, and records the answers „ „ „ „

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A designed Experiment where the researcher has strict control over the units (people, objects and events). „ Treatment and Control Groups „ Randomized designs An experimental design allows you to control more factors and to extract more information from the data

Sources of Data „

Face-to-Face Telephone Mail Internet

Social Surveys are extremely popular today

Because our statistical techniques are predicated on certain levels of measurement. Each technique/formula assumes a certain level is used. Misusing a statistical technique on a variable can lead to results that are biased or misleading.

Observational Studies are when the researcher observes the units in their natural setting and records the variables of interest. „ „

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Animal studies in natural habitats Studies of children’s behaviors

Observational Studies must deal with a number of methodological issues

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Key findings from Hite’s 1988 book

Shere Hite Report Example „

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Shere Hite began her work in 1968 on permissive sexual attitudes in the U.S. Her work tended to be controversial, not only for her topics, but because of her methods of collecting and analyzing data A second report was even more controversial in 1988, Women and Love:

A Cultural Revolution in Progress

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Shere Hite Survey Methodology „

Her survey was a mail survey: „ Mailed to 100,000 women in the U.S. over 7 years „ The mailing list was a combination from a wide variety of organizations which were asked to circulate them to members. The groups tended to over-represent feminist groups and women in troubled circumstances „ Approximately 4,500 people responded, a 4.5% response rate.

Shere Hite Survey „

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Sample was not random or representative of the population of all women Low response rate reflected a bias towards those most angry or eager to answer the survey Encouraging skipping questions would also lead to bias Open ended questions are often difficult to summarize

Hite’s survey used 127 open-ended questions „

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The instructions read: It is not necessary to answer every question! Feel free to skip around and answer those questions that you choose.

The questions involved a complex set of issues with sub-questions and follow-ups

Critical Thinking and Statistics

Statistical Critiques „

84% of woman were not emotionally satisfied with their relationship 95% reported emotional and psychological harassment from their partners 70% of women married for 5 years or more were having extra-martial affairs Only 13% of women married for more than two years were in love.

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Statistics involves making critical decisions and rational thought to how a set of data are: „ Sampled „ Measured „ Collected „ Analyzed „ Interpreted

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Descriptive Inferential

The First Measured Century Introduction: Statistics, Data and Statistical Thinking FREC 408 Dr. Tom Ilvento 213 Townsend Hall [email protected] http:/...

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