D&D Attack Wing - Wizkids

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COMPONENT LIST • 1 Full Rulebook • 1 Quick-Start Rules Booklet

GAME OVERVIEW Welcome to D&D ® Attack Wing, an exciting, fast-paced miniatures battle game set in the world of Dungeons & Dragons®. In D&D Attack Wing, 2 or more players control dragons, giants, siege engines, elves, wizards, troops of hobgoblins, and many more creatures and heroes from the Forgotten Realms® universe. The player who destroys all of his opponent’s creatures wins the game! The game box includes all of the components necessary for 2 - 3 players to get started, as well as two adventures that offer unique victory conditions. If you have played Fantasy Flight Games’ FLIGHTPATHTM system and/or WizKids’ Star Trek: Attack Wing, then you will be familiar with many of the mechanics already. You should still review for new rules and new ways to play that are unique to D&D: Attack Wing.

• 3 Painted Dragon Miniatures – Balagos (Red Dragon) – Eshaedra (Blue Dragon) – Galadaeros (Copper Dragon) • 3 Transparent Plastic Bases with 12 Pegs • 3 Creature Tokens (double-sided) • 6 HeroClix™ Maneuver Dials (each consisting of a faceplate, a dial, and a pair of plastic connectors) • 13 Maneuver Templates, consisting of: – 3 Turns – 4 Banks – 6 Straights • 9 Action Tokens, consisting of: – 3 Dodge Tokens – 3 Target Tokens – 2 Concentrate Tokens – 1 Charge Token • 6 Altitude Tokens, consisting of: – 3 Swoop Tokens – 3 Ground Tokens • 6 Armor Tokens (double-sided) • 1 Initiative Token

HOW TO USE THIS RULEBOOK This rulebook is written assuming that players are using only the three dragons included in this game box. After players are more experienced with the game, they can implement the advanced rules, which allow players to build custom legions and participate in adventures as part of an extended storyline campaign (see pages 28 — 38). If this is your first game, set this rulebook aside and use the introductory rules explained on the included quick-start rules booklet before reading this rulebook.

• 3 Pivot Tokens • 20 Duration Tokens • 1 Permanent Duration Token • 13 Effect Tokens • 3 Critical Hit Tokens • 3 Exhaustion Tokens • 3 “No Attack” Tokens • 6 Disabled Upgrade Tokens • 12 Adventure Tokens • 12 Objective Tokens • 6 Creature Cards • 3 Maneuver Cards (double-sided) • 20 Upgrade Cards • 3 Campaign Artifact Upgrade Cards • 33 Damage Cards • 6 Red Attack Dice • 6 Green Defense Dice • 1 Range Ruler

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COMPONENT OVERVIEW

air). Ground Tokens mark flying creatures who have landed and are now using ground movement.

This section describes the components in detail.

ARMOR TOKENS These tokens track how strong a creature’s Armor is. These tokens are double-sided: one side shows Full Armor and the other side shows Shattered Armor. Although Armor can deflect normal damage every turn without being Shattered, there are certain effects in the game that can cause Armor Tokens to flip over to their Shattered sides, which means that the tokens can no longer be used to deflect damage.

CREATURES, BASES & PEGS These pre-painted models represent creatures in the game. The pegs securely attach the creatures to their bases. Each base also holds a Creature Token that identifies the creature by name. CREATURE TOKENS These tokens identify the creature’s name and display information about the creature’s capabilities. One token is placed in each creature’s base to identify the creature. Each token is double-sided, with one side representing the unique version of the creature and one side representing the non-unique version. MANEUVER DIALS Each creature has a corresponding dial that allows the players to secretly plan maneuvers for them. Each flying creature has two different Maneuver Dials: one for ground movement and one for flight. Ground creatures only have one Maneuver Dial. To assemble your Maneuver Dials, see “Maneuver Dial Assembly” on page 4. MANEUVER TEMPLATES These templates correspond to possible maneuvers on the creatures’ Maneuver Dials. They are used when physically moving creatures around the play area. ACTION TOKENS These tokens mark creatures performing specific types of actions, such as Dodging, Targeting, Concentrating, or Charging. ALTITUDE TOKENS Swoop Tokens mark creatures who are flying at a low altitude (allowing them to use melee attacks against creatures on both the ground and in the

INITIATIVE TOKEN This token helps players keep track of initiative (see page 24), which allows players to determine which creatures of the same Level have a temporary advantage. PIVOT TOKENS These tokens mark creatures (usually on the ground) who have chosen the Pivot Maneuver, which allows them to hold their positions and, if desired, rotate 90º or 180º. DURATION TOKENS Many powerful abilities, such as Breath Weapons and Spells, cannot be used every turn. Duration Tokens are placed on top of Upgrade Cards to help players keep track of how long it takes these abilities to recharge, as well as the duration of their effects. PERMANENT DURATION TOKENS These tokens mark Upgrades which have an effect that lasts until it is dispelled by a special ability. EFFECT TOKENS These special tokens mark creatures who are under the influence of a Continuous Effect, usually as the result of a spell or other powerful ability. Green Effect Tokens designate a positive effect. Red Effect Tokens designate a negative effect. CRITICAL HIT TOKENS These tokens mark creatures that are suffering from the effects of a critical hit and remind players to consult their Damage Cards for more information.

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EXHAUSTION TOKENS These tokens mark creatures that have exerted themselves to perform a difficult maneuver or execute a powerful ability. “NO ATTACK” TOKENS These tokens mark creatures who are unable to perform an attack for any reason. Players can use these as reminders whenever such an effect occurs. DISABLED UPGRADE TOKENS These tokens are placed on top of powerful Upgrades that require some preparation to be used again by a particular creature. ADVENTURE & OBJECTIVE TOKENS These tokens are primarily used during Adventures (see pages 34 - 38). CREATURE CARDS These cards list a creature’s statistics and special ability, the Actions it can perform, the Upgrades it can equip, and its point cost when building Legions. The cards also define the creature’s Alignment, Uniqueness, Energy Type, and Primary Weapons. MANEUVER CARDS These cards reference each creature’s full list of maneuvers. The Maneuver Cards act as a guide to players as they decide which maneuver to choose on their Maneuver Dials each round. Maneuver Cards are double-sided, with one side representing the creature’s Ground Maneuvers and the other side representing the creature’s Flight Maneuvers (if applicable). UPGRADE CARDS These cards represent different Upgrades with which players can equip their creatures. Different categories of Upgrades include Dragon Upgrades, Monster Upgrades, Heroic Upgrades, Equipment Upgrades, Arcane Upgrades, and Divine Upgrades.

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CAMPAIGN ARTIFACT UPGRADE CARDS These powerful Upgrade cards are awarded to players who successfully complete certain Adventures during Campaign play (see pages 34 - 35). Players can later equip one (and only one) Campaign Artifact that they have earned when playing a future Adventure. Players can also choose to include Campaign Artifacts in standard play, but with the same restriction of one Campaign Artifact per player (or team). DAMAGE CARDS These cards track how much damage a creature has suffered and describe special penalties that occur when a creature suffers critical damage. CUSTOM DICE These custom eight-sided dice are used to resolve combat and ability checks during the game. There are two different types of dice: attack dice (red) and defense dice (green). RANGE RULER This cardboard ruler is used to measure various distances during the game. There are four different Range increments (1 - 4).

SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED MANEUVER DIAL ASSEMBLY Before playing, assemble each dial as shown. Connect each dial to its corresponding faceplate. Each dragon possesses two corresponding Maneuver Dials (“Ground” and “Flight”).

CREATURE ASSEMBLY FLYING CREATURE To assemble a flying creature (with pegs to simulate height), follow these steps: 1. Place the chosen Creature Token in the base with its Forward Attack Arc (the Attack Arc displaying the creature’s Level) over the chevron, which points

to the front of the base. 2. Insert one peg into the tower of the base. 3. Insert the second peg into the first peg. 4. Insert the small peg on the bottom of the plastic creature into the second peg. Note: Some figures’ wings are large and extend beyond their plastic bases. Players should add or remove pegs at the start of the game in order to minimize the amount of times that the figures will overlap one another during the course of the game. GROUND CREATURE To assemble a ground creature (without pegs), follow these steps: 1. Place the chosen Creature Token in the base with its Forward Attack Arc (the Attack Arc displaying the creature’s Level) over the chevron, which points to the front of the base. 2. Insert the plastic connector into the tower of the base as shown. 3. Slide the ground figure’s black round base into the plastic connector.

From this point forward in the rulebook, the term “creature” refers to a fully assembled creature, complete with plastic figure, pegs (or connector), base, and Creature Token.

NOTE: Sometimes a player will want to play with multiple copies of the same nonunique creature, or perhaps two opposing players will want to play with the same creature. Players can distinguish these creatures however they see fit, including the use of multi-colored bases (sold separately).

SET-UP Before playing, set up the game as follows: 1. CHOOSE A DRAGON: When playing with a single Starter Set, players agree on which dragon each player will control. If players cannot agree, randomly assign a dragon to each player. All components belonging to one player (or team) are considered friendly, and all components belonging to an opponent are considered enemy. 2. GATHER FORCES: Each player chooses his Creature Card and Upgrade Cards. If players are not using the Legion Building Rules (see pages 28 - 29), then players should gather the following cards: RED DRAGON Creature Card: Balagos Maneuver Card: Adult Red Dragon Upgrade Cards: Fire Breath, Haste BLUE DRAGON Creature Card: Eshaedra Maneuver Card: Adult Blue Dragon Upgrade Cards: Lightning Breath, Devotrix of Tiamat, Prayer of Healing

CREATURE CARD ANATOMY 1. Legion Cost (with Gold Ring if Unique) 2. Upgrade Banner 3. Primary Weapon Value 4. Agility Value 5. Health Value 6. Armor Value 7. Alignment 8. Energy Type 9. Level 10. Creature Name 11. Creature Class 12. Creature Special Ability 13. Action Icons 14. Primary Weapon Banner

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COPPER DRAGON Creature Card: Galadaeros Maneuver Card: Adult Copper Dragon Upgrade Cards: Acid Breath, Slow Breath, Trickster, Shield (Spell), Magic Missile After the first game or two, it is strongly recommended that players customize their own creature configurations using the Legion Building Rules on pages 28 - 29. 3. ASSEMBLE CREATURES: Each player finds the plastic creature and Creature Token that match his chosen Creature Card. Players assemble their creatures as shown in the “Creature Assembly” diagrams on pages 4 - 5. 4. ESTABLISH PLAY AREA: Choose a play area on a table or other flat surface. Players may use a playmat, a tablecloth, or some other means to mark the edges of the play area (see “The Play Area”). 2 Players: Players sit opposite from each other across the play area. The side of the play area closest to each player is referred to as his “starting edge.” See “2-Player Set-Up Diagram” on page 7. 3 Players: One player sits toward the center of one edge of the play area, and each of the remaining players sits at one of the corners on the opposite side of the play area; each player is then assigned a 6” X 6” rectangular space called his “starting area.” When playing with more creatures (such as in a 100+ Legion Point Build), this starting area can be expanded to 9” X 9”. See “3-Player Set-Up Diagram” on page 8. 5. CONFER INITIATIVE TOKEN: If two or more players possess creatures of the same Level (as indicated on each Creature Card), then one of those players at random begins the game with the Initiative Token. If no players possess creatures of the same Level, then the Initiative Token is not needed for this game. For example, in a 3 player game, Player 1 & Player 2 each have a Level 5 creature, but Player 3 does not have a creature that is the same Level as an opponent’s creature. In this case, either Player 1 or Player 2 begins the game with the Initiative Token. 6. PLACE FORCES: Place each creature in the play area in order of Level (which is printed in the Forward Attack Arc of each Creature Token), from lowest to highest (i.e. the creature with the lowest Level is placed first; the creature with the highest Level is placed last). If multiple creatures share the same Level, the creatures with initiative are placed last (see “Initiative” on page 24). 2 Players: To place a creature, its owner lays the Range Ruler straight out from (i.e., perpendicular to) the edge of the play area and places the creature anywhere such that its creature base is entirely within the Range 1 - 2 sections, facing any direction (see “2-Player Set-Up Diagram” on page 7).

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3 Players: To place a creature, its owner starts by measuring out his 6” X 6” starting area (or 9” X 9” starting area when playing with 100 or more Legion Points) as shown on the “3-Player Set-Up Diagram” on page 8. The creature’s owner places his creature anywhere such that its creature base is entirely within his starting area, facing any direction. Please note that each segment on the Range Ruler is 3” long, so this will be a guide to players as they measure out their starting areas. 7. PREPARE GATHERED CARDS & EFFECT TOKENS: Each player takes the cards matching his forces and places them face up outside the play area in view of all the players. If any of a player’s Upgrade Cards have corresponding Effect Tokens, he places those Effect Tokens on top of their corresponding Upgrade Cards for easy access during the game. If a particular Effect Token is double-sided (green and red), it always starts the game with its green side face up. 8. PREPARE ARMOR: Place a number of Armor Tokens above each Creature Card equal to the creature’s Armor Value (blue number). A creature cannot have more Armor Tokens than its Armor Value. Make sure each Armor Token is placed face up so that it displays its Full Armor side, as opposed to its Shattered side (the side that looks damaged). 9. PREPARE OTHER COMPONENTS: Shuffle the Damage Deck and place it face down outside the play area within reach of all the players. Place the other components outside the play area within reach of all the players (see Set-Up Diagrams on pages 7 - 8).

THE PLAY AREA Attack Wing is not played on a board. Instead, it is played on any flat surface with at least 3’ X 3’ of space. Players may want to use a felt or cloth surface, which provides a bit of friction and helps to prevent players from accidentally bumping or moving the creatures. Experienced players should feel free to experiment with different play area sizes.

2-PLAYER SET-UP DIAGRAM

1. Play Area (suggested 3’ X 3’)

9. Dice

2. Range Ruler (measuring out the start area)

10. Damage Deck (shuffled, face down)

3. Player 1 Starting Area

11. Maneuver Templates

4. Player 1 Starting Edge

12. Action & Altitude Token Supply

5. Player 1 Creature Card (with Armor Tokens)

13. Duration Token Supply

6. Player 1 Maneuver Card (for reference)

14. Miscellaneous Token Supply

7. Player 1 Upgrade Cards (with any corresponding Effect Tokens)

15. Player 2’s Area (Same as Player 1)

8. Player 1 Maneuver Dials (“Flight” & “Ground”)

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3-PLAYER SET-UP DIAGRAM

1. Play Area (suggested 3ʼ X 3ʼ) 2. Range Ruler (measuring out the start area)

8. Player 2 Creature Area (with Creature Card, Armor Tokens, Maneuver Card, Upgrade Cards with any corresponding Effect Tokens, and Maneuver Dials - see previous page for details)

3. P  layer 1 Starting Area (6” X 6” centered on the southern edge of the play area)

9. Player 3 Starting Area (6” X 6” corner)

4. Player 1 Starting Edge

10. Player 3 Starting Edge

5. Player 1 Creature Area (with Creature Card, Armor Tokens, Maneuver Card, Upgrade Cards with any corresponding Effect Tokens, and Maneuver Dials - see previous page for details)

11. Player 3 Creature Area (with Creature Card, Armor Tokens, Maneuver Card, Upgrade Cards with any corresponding Effect Tokens, and Maneuver Dials - see previous page for details)

6. Player 2 Starting Area (6” X 6” corner)

12. Game Accessories (see previous page for details)

7. Player 2 Starting Edge

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THE GAME ROUND

PLANNING PHASE

Attack Wing is played over a series of game rounds. During each game round, players perform the following four phases in order:

During this phase, each player uses his Maneuver Dial to secretly choose one maneuver for each of his creatures. The selection on the dial dictates how his creatures move during the next Activation Phase. Players must assign a dial to each creature. After all creatures have been assigned Maneuver Dials, continue to the Activation Phase.

1. Planning Phase: Each player secretly chooses one maneuver for each of his creatures by using that creatureʼs Maneuver Dial. 2. A  ctivation Phase: Each creature moves and performs one Action. In ascending order of Level, reveal each creatureʼs Maneuver Dial and execute its chosen maneuver. Immediately after performing its chosen maneuver, each creature may change altitude and then perform one Action. 3. Combat Phase: Each creature may perform one attack. In descending order of Level, each creature may attack one creature that is inside its Attack Arc and within Range. 4. End Phase: Players perform the following end of round activities in order: • Trigger all Effects that occur “during the End Phase.” • All creatures that have sustained lethal damage are defeated and removed from the play area. • Remove all unused Action Tokens (Dodge, Target, Concentrate, and Charge). Remove all Pivot Tokens as well. Do not remove Altitude Tokens or any other tokens in the play area unless those tokens represent something that specifically lasts until the end of the round. • Remove 1 Duration Token from every Upgrade Card and face up Damage Card that has one. • If the last Duration Token is removed from an Upgrade Card, remove its corresponding Effect Token from the play area and place it back on top of its Upgrade Card. • Pass the Initiative Token to the next player (or team) to the left that still owns a creature that is tied for the same Level as an opponentʼs creature. If no players have tied creatures remaining, remove the Initiative Token from the game. After resolving the End Phase, a new game round begins starting with the Planning Phase. This continues until one player destroys all of his opponentsʼ creatures. Each of these phases is discussed in greater detail over the next few pages.

NOTE: Players should consult their creaturesʼ Maneuver Cards for a full list of the maneuvers that their creatures are capable of performing.

FLYING CREATURES VS. GROUND CREATURES Creatures that are attached to their bases with transparent plastic pegs are considered to be flying by default. Most flying creatures are also capable of landing and moving on the ground. On the first turn of the game, each flying creature uses its “Flight” Maneuver Dial. After a flying creature moves, it can choose to land; the creature will be marked with a Ground Altitude Token until it decides to take off again. While a flying creature is on the ground, it flips its Maneuver Card over to the “Ground” side and uses its “Ground” Maneuver Dial during the Planning Phase. Note: You donʼt need to remove the figureʼs plastic pegs when it lands; the Ground Token is sufficient to identify it as being on the ground. Creatures attached to their bases with the plastic connector are considered to be on the ground by default. Most ground creatures only possess one Maneuver Dial, although it is possible for ground creatures to gain the ability to fly during the course of the game (such as from the Fly spell). When this occurs, the creature receives a Flight Altitude Token (included in later expansion sets) and also acquires a “Flight” Maneuver Card and a “Flight” Maneuver Dial.

CHOOSING A MANEUVER To choose a maneuver, the player rotates the faceplate of the creatureʼs Maneuver Dial until the window shows only the desired maneuver. He then assigns the maneuver to one of his creatures by placing the dial face down near its corresponding creature inside the play area. A player may look at his own face down Maneuver Dials at any time, but he cannot look at any other playerʼs face down dials. A player controlling more than one creature may assign maneuvers to his creatures in any order. Each selection on the Maneuver Dial has a corresponding Maneuver Template that measures the creatureʼs movement during the Activation Phase. During the Planning Phase, the

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players cannot use Maneuver Templates in order to “test” where creatures will end up. Instead, they must plan their maneuvers by estimating their creaturesʼ movement in their heads. NOTE: Since different types of creatures in Dungeons & Dragons vary in their maximum speed and maneuverability, the dial for each type of creature is usually unique. Thus, not all creatures are capable of using every Maneuver Template included in the game, and some creatures can execute maneuvers that others cannot. TYPES OF MANEUVERS Each maneuver consists of three elements: the bearing (arrow), the speed (number), and the difficulty (arrow color).

DIFFICULTY Some maneuvers are more difficult to execute than others. The color of the bearing arrow indicates each maneuverʼs difficulty. Most arrows are white, which represents a standard maneuver. Some arrows are red or green, which represents that the maneuver is either difficult for the creature to perform (red) or extremely simple (green). During the Activation Phase, creatures may receive or remove Exhaustion Tokens based on the color of the maneuver executed (see “Exhaustion” on page 26). NOTE: Some maneuvers may be modified or restricted by other factors, such as an Exhaustion Token or the text on a face up Damage Card. Planning Phase Example

BEARING Bearing is indicated by the arrows on the Maneuver Dial. Creatures can travel in eight possible bearings, depending on the options available on their dials:

Straight: Advances the creature straight ahead, without changing its facing.

Bank: Allows the creature to execute a shallow curve that advances the creature ahead, slightly to one side, and changes its facing by 45º. Turn: Allows the creature to execute a tight curve that advances the creature ahead, sharply to one side, and changes its facing by 90º. Wingover/Turnabout: Advances the creature straight ahead, changing its facing by 180º.

Fall Back: Moves the creature straight backward, without changing its facing.

Pivot: Allows the creature to stay in place and, if desired, spin 90º or 180º.

SPEED Speed is indicated by the numbers on the Maneuver Dial and varies between “0” and “6,” depending on the options available on the dial. The higher the speed, the more distance the creature travels during its maneuver.

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The players simultaneously choose one maneuver for each of their creatures: 1. The Copper Dragon player rotates the Copper Dragon “Flight” Maneuver Dial to the [ ] 3 Maneuver and then places the dial face down near the Copper Dragon figure. 2. At the same time, the Red Dragon player rotates the Red Dragon “Flight” Maneuver Dial to the [ ] 2 Maneuver and then places the dial face down near the Red Dragon figure. 3. Also at the same time, the Blue Dragon player rotates the Blue Dragon “Flight” ] 2 Maneuver and Maneuver Dial to the [ then places the dial face down near the Blue Dragon figure.

ACTIVATION PHASE During this phase, each creature is activated one at a time. Starting with the creature with the lowest Level, resolve the following steps in order: 1. Reveal Dial: Reveal the active creatureʼs Maneuver Dial by flipping it face up. 2. Set Template: Take the Maneuver Template that matches the chosen maneuver on the dial and place that template snugly against the front of that creatureʼs base between the front guides. Insert the template fully into the guides so that the end of the template is flush against the base. 3. Execute Maneuver: Holding the template firmly in place, grip the side walls of the creature base and lift the creature off the play surface. Then place the creature at the opposite end of the template, sliding the rear guides of the creature into the opposite end of the template. EXCEPTIONS: To execute a [ ] Maneuver, see “Wingover/Turnabout” below. To execute a [ ] Maneuver, see “Fall Back” below. If the creature has any tokens assigned to it (such as Action Tokens or Exhaustion Tokens), move these tokens along with the creature. NOTE: If a creature executes a maneuver that causes either its base or the Maneuver Template in use to physically overlap another creature base, see “Moving Through a Creature” and “Overlapping Other Creatures” on pages 26 - 27. 4. Check for Exhaustion: If the creature just executed a Red Maneuver, place 1 Exhaustion Token beside the creature. If the creature just executed a Green Maneuver, remove 1 Exhaustion Token from the creature (if any) and return the token to the miscellaneous token supply (see “Exhaustion” on page 26). 5. Clean Up: Return the used template to the pile of Maneuver Templates. Place the revealed dial outside the play area, near the creatureʼs corresponding Creature Card. 6. Change Altitude: If the creature is in the air, it may choose to land or swoop. If the creature was already swooping, it may choose to stop swooping. If the creature was on the ground and capable of flight, it can choose to take off. See “Change Altitude” on pages 12 - 13 for more details. 7. Perform Action: The creature may perform one Action. Actions provide a wide range of benefits and are described on pages 13 - 15. A creature with one or more Exhaustion Tokens cannot perform Actions (see “Exhaustion” on page 26).

The creature currently resolving a phase is known as the active creature. After the active creature resolves the final step, the creature with the next lowest Level becomes the active creature and resolves these same steps. Players continue activating creatures in order of ascending Level until each creature has activated.

BREAKING TIES When two creatures owned by different players share the same Level, the creature that does not have initiative must activate first. Having initiative essentially allows one creature to be considered a slightly higher Level during a tiebreak. The creatures belonging to the player with the Initiative Token have initiative over any opposing creatures of the same Level. If two players have creatures of the same Level but neither of those players has the Initiative Token, the creatures belonging to the player sitting closest to the left of the player with the Initiative Token are considered to have initiative. See page 24 for more details about initiative. If a single player owns multiple creatures of the same Level, he may activate those creatures in the order of his choosing.

MANEUVER TEMPLATES Maneuver Templates precisely measure distance and angle to ensure that all creature movements are consistent. The ends of a Maneuver Template display one arrow (the bearing) and one number (the speed). After a player reveals his dial during the Activation Phase, he finds the template matching the bearing and speed of the revealed maneuver and uses that template to move his creature. NOTE: Creatures must bank or turn using the exact same maneuver chosen on their dial. In other words, if a player reveals [ ] 3, he cannot rotate the template to execute a [ ] 3. WINGOVER / TURNABOUT The Wingover Maneuver [ ] (called “Turnabout” when used on the ground) uses the same movement template as a Straight Maneuver [ ]. The only difference between these maneuvers is that after executing a [ ] Maneuver, the player rotates his creature 180º (so that the guides on the front of the creatureʼs base fit securely with the Maneuver Template). FALL BACK The Fall Back Maneuver [ ] uses the same movement template as a Straight Maneuver [ ]. To execute this move, place the appropriate [ ] template on the back of the creatureʼs base and then move the creature so that the front

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of the creature is placed on the other end of the Maneuver Template. PIVOT The Pivot Maneuver [ ] allows the creature to stay in place. A creature who chooses the Pivot Maneuver does not move forward, and may choose either to stay facing the same way OR to spin in place 90º in either direction OR to spin around a full 180º. The creature gets to choose which way it will spin when it is time for it to move. The player must declare the creatureʼs new facing before actually spinning the creature; he cannot spin the creature multiple times in order to determine the best facing. Once the player has announced how far the creature will spin (if at all), place a [ ] 1 Maneuver Template flush against any corner of the creature base to mark the creatureʼs current position, and then spin the creature so that it faces its new direction. If a creatureʼs base cannot spin without overlapping another creatureʼs base in its final position, then the creature must stay facing in its original direction. After performing a Pivot Maneuver, place a Pivot Token beside the creature (regardless of whether or not it chose to spin). A creature with a Pivot Token cannot perform an Action for the rest of the round. As an additional penalty for standing still, all enemies attacking that creature roll +1 attack die for the rest of the round. Movement Example

to the opposite end of the template, and slides the rear guides of the creature into the template.

CHANGE ALTITUDE After a flying creature moves, it may indicate that it is changing altitude through the use of Altitude Tokens (Ground, Swoop, and Flight).

After moving a creature that is in the air, the player may indicate that the creature is now landing (which means that a Ground Token is placed beside it) or swooping (which means that a Swoop Token is placed beside it). A flying creature that lands is considered to be on the ground and must use its Ground Maneuver Dial during the next Planning Phase. A creature that is swooping is still considered to be in the air, but it now has the ability to make melee attacks against all creatures, regardless of their play level (air or ground). However, a swooping creature can also be the target of melee attacks from all creatures, regardless of their play level (see “Play Level” on page 15 and “Melee Attacks vs. Ranged Attacks” on page 16). For example, after the Red Dragon moves, it declares that it is “swooping” and a Swoop Token is placed beside it. It can now make melee attacks against any creature on the ground or in the air, but it can also be the target of melee attacks from all creatures on the ground or in the air.

1. The Blue Dragon player flips her dial to reveal her chosen maneuver: [ ] 2. 2. The Blue Dragon player takes the [ ]2 Maneuver Template and sets it between her creatureʼs front guides. 3. Then the Blue Dragon player holds the template in place, moves the creature

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The next time that a creature with a Swoop Token moves, it may choose to keep swooping OR remove the Swoop Token OR replace the Swoop Token with a Ground Token in order to land. After a flying creature with a Ground Token moves, it may declare that it is taking off, which means its Ground Token is removed; since the figure is already mounted on pegs, you don’t need to place a Flight Token beside it. A ground creature that receives the ability to fly (such as from the “Fly” Spell) can choose to take off as well, in which case a Flight Token is placed beside it. NOTE: Flight Tokens are not needed in the Starter Set but will be included in future expansion sets. A creature can perform one (and only one) altitude change each round (that is, a flying creature cannot take off and swoop during the same round). A crea-

ture can change altitude even if it is Exhausted and/ or performed a Pivot Maneuver during that round. Altitude Tokens are not removed during the End Phase. Creatures who have landed or who have started swooping continue to do so until the next time they decide to change altitude during the Activation Phase.

ACTIONS During the Activation Phase, the active creature may perform one Action after moving. A creature may perform any Action shown among the Action Icons listed on its Creature Card. Additionally, certain Creature Cards, Upgrade Cards, Damage Cards, or Adventures may allow creatures to perform other Actions. Each of the possible Actions is described in detail over the next few pages. If an ability allows a creature to perform a “free Action,” this Action does not count as the one Action allowed during the “Perform Action” step. However, a creature cannot perform the same Action more than once during a single game round (not even when the Action is a “free Action”). DODGE [ ] Creatures with the [ ] icon on their Creature Card may perform the Dodge Action. To perform this Action, place one [ ] Token near the creatureʼs figure in the play area. The player can spend the [ ] Token later during the Combat Phase to cancel 1 hit rolled by the attacker (see “Spending a Dodge Token” on page 20). Unspent [ ] Tokens are removed from all creatures during the End Phase. CHARGE [ ] Creatures with the [ ] icon on their Creature Card may perform the Charge Action. To perform this Action, place one [ ] Token near the creatureʼs figure in the play area. The player can spend the [ ] Token later during the Combat Phase to move forward before performing a melee attack (see “Spend Charge Token” on page 16). Unspent [ ] Tokens are removed from all creatures during the End Phase. CONCENTRATE [ ] Creatures with the [ ] icon on their Creature Card may perform the Concentrate Action. To perform this Action, place one [ ] Token near the creatureʼs figure in the play area. The player can spend the [ ] Token later during the Combat Phase to increase his chances of hitting when attacking or decrease his chances of getting hit when defending (see “Spending a Concentrate Token” on page 20). Unspent [ ] Tokens are removed from all creatures during the End Phase.

TARGET [ ] Creatures with the [ ] icon on their Creature Card may perform the Target Action to attempt to place a[ ] Token beside their creatureʼs figure in the play area. The player can choose to spend the ] Token later during the Combat Phase to [ increase his chances of hitting an enemy creature (see “Spending a Target Token” on page 19). To succeed at the Target Action, there must be at least 1 enemy creature within Range 1 - 4 of the active creature. To check to see if there is an enemy creature within Range, follow these steps: 1. Indicate any 1 enemy creature in the play area. Afterwards, determine if the enemy creature is within Range by taking the Range Ruler and measuring the distance from any point on the active creatureʼs base to any point on the enemy creatureʼs base. 2. If the enemy creature is at Range 1, 2, 3, or 4, the Target Action is successful and the active creature receives a [ ] Token. 3. If the enemy creature is not within Range 1 - 4 of the active creature, the Target Action fails and

RANGE RULER The Range Ruler is divided into four sections, and each section is labeled with a number (1, 2, 3, or 4). When the rules instruct a player to “measure the distance,” always orient the Range Ruler so that the Range 1 section touches the point of origin (usually the active creatureʼs base) and the Range 4 section points toward (or touches) the intended target (usually an enemy creatureʼs base). When the rules refer to a creature being “at Range 2,” it means that the closest part of the intended targetʼs base must fall under the “Range 2” section of the Range Ruler. When the rules refer to a creature being “at Range 1-4,” it means that the intended targetʼs base must fall under any section of the Range Ruler. Note that only the actual bases matter during these measurements. Ignore the actual figure itself, as it may be overlapping its base. Unlike previous Attack Wing games, players cannot pre-measure anything with the Range Ruler during a game of D&D: Attack Wing. Players must declare their intended targets before verifying distances with the Range Ruler, which may result in lost Actions during the Activation Phase or lost attacks during the Combat Phase.

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the creatureʼs Action is wasted for this round; the player cannot choose a different enemy creature afterwards. When measuring the Range during the Target Action, the player may measure 360º from the active creature. The active player cannot measure to see if the enemy creature is within Range before committing to this Action. The player can choose any enemy creature, not just the creature that appears to be closest in the play area. Some players may choose a creature that is a bit further away so that they can discover precisely how far away that creature actually is; this information may prove helpful during the Combat Phase. During the Combat Phase, it is not necessary to spend the Target Token against the original enemy creature that was measured during the Activation Phase. Conceptually, the targeting creature is alert and ready to target any creature within Range, assuming there was at least one creature within Range when the Action was taken. Some Upgrade Attacks, such as Magic Missile, can only be used if the active creature “spends” its Target Token by discarding it from the play area. Unspent [ ] Tokens are removed from all creatures during the End Phase. Target Example

1. After the Blue Dragon moves, she attempts to perform the Target Action. She must demonstrate that one enemy creature of her choice is within Range 1 - 4. 2. The Blue Dragon player decides not to indicate the Copper Dragon, who seems to be out of Range. 3. The Blue Dragon player indicates the Red Dragon, and then extends the Range Ruler from its base to the Red Dragonʼs base. Since the Red Dragon is within Range 1 - 4, the Action is successful and the Blue Dragon player places a Target Token beside the Blue Dragon figure in the play area. The Blue Dragon player can later spend this token against any creature (not just the Red Dragon).

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FEINT [ ] Creatures with the [ ] icon on their Creature Card may perform the Feint Action. Performing a Feint Action signifies that the creature has darted swiftly to the side at the last possible moment, positioning itself to better strike and avoid being struck by its opponent. To perform a Feint Action, follow these steps: 1. Place one end of the [ ] 1 template against either the left or right side of the creatureʼs base. The template may be placed anywhere along the side of the creatureʼs base as long as no part of the template goes beyond the front or back edge of the base. 2. Holding the template firmly in place, lift the creature off the play surface. Then place the creature at the opposite end of the template, making sure no part of the template goes beyond the front or back edge of the base. The front of the creature must face the same direction it was facing when it started the Feint Action. 3. Place an Exhaustion Token beside the creature afterwards to represent the effort involved by this swift movement. A creature cannot perform a Feint if this would cause its base to overlap another creature or similar obstruction. The player cannot pre-measure to see if his creature can perform a Feint before committing to this Action. Once he places the [ ] 1 Maneuver Template on a particular side, he must Feint in that direction, although he can still slide the template back and forth along the baseʼs edge before deciding to lift up the figure. Once the player lifts the figure off the play area, he cannot readjust the [ ] 1 Maneuver Template. However, after placing the creature on the other side of the template, the player can slide the creature base back and forth until the player is satisfied with its final position. If the active creature cannot be placed on the other side of the Maneuver Template without its base overlapping another creatureʼs base or an Obstacle, the Feint Action fails and the creature cannot perform another Action; the creature still receives an Exhaustion Token from the attempt. If the creature was physically lifted off the play area, it is returned as best as possible to its original position.

Feint Example

can only be declared against creatures on the same play level (ground or air), unless either the attacker or defender is swooping. 3. Roll Attack Dice: The attacker rolls a number of attack dice equal to his Primary Weapon Value (the number inside the red field on his Creature Card). 4. Modify Attack Dice: Players can spend Action Tokens and resolve abilities that re-roll or otherwise modify attack dice results. 5. R  oll Defense Dice: The defender rolls a number of defense dice equal to his Agility Value (the number inside the green field on his Creature Card).

The Copper Dragon performs a Feint Action, hoping to move outside the Red Dragonʼs Forward Attack Arc.

6. Modify Defense Dice: Players can spend Action Tokens and resolve abilities that re-roll or otherwise modify defense dice results.

1. The Copper Dragon player wants to shift the Copper Dragon to the right, so he takes the [ ] 1 Maneuver Template and sets it along the right wall of the creatureʼs base.

7. Compare Results: Players compare the final attack and defense dice results to determine if the defending creature was hit.

2. Then he takes the Copper Dragon and moves it to the other side of the template so that the template touches the left wall of the creatureʼs base. Finally, he places an Exhaustion Token beside the Copper Dragon.


8. Deflect Hits (Armor): If the defending creature was hit, it may deflect a number of uncanceled [ ] results equal to its Armor Value. Armor cannot deflect [ ] results or attacks that penetrate Armor. 9. D  eal Damage: The defender receives a number of Damage Cards equal to the number of remain-

PASS A creature may pass, choosing not to perform any Action. OTHER ACTIONS Some card abilities include the “Action:” header. A creature may resolve this ability during its “Perform Action” step. This counts as that creatureʼs Action for the round. Card abilities without the “Action:” header may be resolved when specified on the card and do not count as the creatureʼs Action.

COMBAT PHASE During this phase, each creature may perform one attack against one creature that is inside its Forward or Rear Attack Arc and within Range. Some Upgrade Attacks are capable of hitting multiple targets (see “Area Attacks” on page 18). Starting with the creature with the highest Level, players resolve the following combat steps in order: 1. S  pend Charge Token: If the attacker has a [ Token, he must decide whether he wants to spend it to charge forward.

]

PLAY LEVEL There are two different play levels in Attack Wing: ground and air. A ground creature (or a flying creature with a Ground Token) is considered to be on the ground. A flying creature (even one with a Swoop Token) is considered to be in the air. A creatureʼs play level defines which Maneuver Dial it uses during the Planning Phase, and also dictates which creatures it can initiate melee attacks against (see “Melee Attacks vs. Ranged Attacks” on page 16). In addition, many area attacks (such as Line, Cone, and Burst attacks) use the phrase “ground or air” in their card text. This means that the player initiating the attack must declare which play level the attack is directed at. For example, a Fireball Spell may set off a burst that engulfs several different creatures in the play area. However, if some of those creatures are in the air and the rest are on the ground, the attacker must specify which play level will be affected by the attack.

2. D  eclare Target: The attacker chooses which creature he wishes to attack. Melee attacks

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ing [

] and [

] results.

After resolving the final step, the creature with the next highest Level resolves these same steps. Players continue resolving combat for creatures in order of Level, from highest to lowest, until all creatures have had the opportunity to perform one attack. If multiple creatures have the same Level, the creature with initiative resolves its combat steps first (see “Initiative” on page 24). If a single player owns multiple creatures with the same Level, he may resolve their attacks in the order of his choosing. NOTE: Each creature may attack only once per round, unless a special ability allows otherwise. The nine steps of combat are described in detail over the next few pages.

MELEE ATTACKS VS. RANGED ATTACKS All attacks in D&D: Attack Wing are defined as melee attacks or ranged attacks. A melee attack is a close combat attack like a dragonʼs bite or a sword thrust. A ranged attack is a distance attack like a dragonʼs breath weapon, a magic arrow, or the Command spell. Creatures can initiate ranged attacks against one another even if they are on different play levels, but creatures can only initiate melee attacks against one another if they are on the same play level. An important exception to this rule is that a creature that is swooping has the ability to make melee attacks against all creatures, regardless of their play level. However, a swooping creature can also be the target of melee attacks from all creatures, regardless of their play level.

1. SPEND CHARGE TOKEN (OPTIONAL) Before declaring a target, a creature with a [ ] Token may choose to spend the token to immediately move forward using the [ ] 1 Maneuver Template. Unlike a creature who feints, a charging creature can overlap another creatureʼs base during this charge (see “Overlapping Other Creatures” on page 27). After charging, the creature can only initiate melee attacks (not ranged attacks) for the rest of the round, but the creature rolls +1 attack die each time it initiates a melee attack against a creature in its forward arc for the rest of the

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round. A creature that has charged forward can instead choose to initiate a melee attack against a creature in its rear arc (if applicable) without this +1 bonus. NOTE: A creature can choose not to spend its [ ] Token during this step, which allows it to attack normally, including with ranged attacks.

2. DECLARE TARGET During this step, the attacker (the active creature) must declare his target (the creature he wishes to attack), as well as the form of attack that the attacker will employ. The target creature must be inside the attackerʼs relevant Attack Arc and within Range. A player cannot measure to verify that these conditions are met until after he has declared his target. If the target ends up being completely outside the attackerʼs Attack Arc or Range, then the attack fails and the attacking creature cannot choose a different target. Once the target creature is declared and successfully measured, the target creature is now the defender and players proceed to the “Roll Attack Dice” step.

ATTACK ARC At the front of each Creature Token is a wedge shape called the Forward Attack Arc. This area shows the angle from which the creatureʼs forward attacks originate. An enemy creature is inside the active creatureʼs Attack Arc if any part of the enemy creatureʼs base falls inside the angle defined by the wedge shape (see “Attack Arc and Range Example” on page 17). Some creatures also have a Rear Attack Arc outlined on their creature bases. An attacking creatureʼs rear attacks (such as tail strikes) are initiated from this arc.

Range Range is measured using the Range Ruler. The Range Ruler is divided into four sections: Range 1 (touch), Range 2 (close), Range 3 (medium), and Range 4 (long). Some weapons and abilities provide bonuses or are restricted based on the Range (distance) from another creature. To measure Range, place the Range 1 end of the Range Ruler so that it touches the closest part of the attackerʼs base. Then point the ruler toward the closest part of the target creatureʼs base that is inside the attackerʼs chosen Attack Arc (forward or rear). The lowest section (1, 2, 3, or 4) of the ruler that overlaps the target creatureʼs base is considered the Range between the creatures. Remember that only the creaturesʼ bases matter for these measurements; ignore the actual figures mounted on the bases for these purposes.

Attack Arc and Range Example

1. The Copper Dragon is at Range 1, but outside of the Blue Dragonʼs Attack Arc. 2. The Red Dragon is at Range 4 and inside the Blue Dragonʼs Attack Arc. 3. The Blue Dragon is at Range 1 and inside the Red Dragonʼs Attack Arc.

If the ruler is not long enough to reach the target creature, the creature is considered out of Range and cannot be targeted. The target creature may be within Range, but still fall outside the attacking creatureʼs Attack Arc.

Defensive Combat Bonus If the defending creature is at Range 4 from the attacker, the defender rolls an additional defense die during the attack (see “Roll Defense Dice” on page 20). This Defensive Combat Bonus occurs regardless of whether the attacking creature is striking with his Primary Weapon or with an Upgrade Attack (see below).

PRIMARY WEAPONS VS. UPGRADE ATTACKS Each creatureʼs Primary Weapons are defined on its Creature Card in the lower right corner (see the Primary Weapon Banner section of the “Creature Card Anatomy” on page 5). Each Primary Weapon is identified by name and specifies whether it is a melee attack or a ranged attack. In addition, the direction of the Range Icon (see right) indicates whether the attack can be directed from the creatureʼs Forward Attack Arc [ ] or Rear Attack Arc [ ]. The number inside the Range icon indicates the maximum Range of each Primary Weapon; the Primary Weapon can be used against any creature at this Range or closer. Regardless of their Range, all Primary Weapons utilize a number of attack dice equal to the creatureʼs Primary Weapon Value (the number in the red field on the Creature Card). Many Upgrade Cards equipped by creatures feature abilities preceded by the word “Attack:”. These are considered Upgrade Attacks and function similarly to Primary Weapon Attacks, although Upgrade Attacks do not usually

Attacking Through Other Creatures A flying creature can freely attack through all other creatures without penalty. A ground creature can freely attack through flying creatures, even when attacking other ground creatures. A ground creature attacking a flying creature can freely attack through all other creatures as well, including other ground creatures. Thematically, this represents that creatures can attack above or below each other in 3D space. However, if a ground creature wishes to make a normal attack against another ground creature, then the defending creature rolls +1 defense die for each interposing ground creature, friend or foe; this applies to both melee and ranged attacks. Remember that for a normal attack, Range is always

Balagos has two Primary Weapons, his Bite (with a maximum Forward Range of 2) and his Tail (with a maximum Rear Range of 2). When attacking with one of these weapons, Balagos rolls 5 attack dice (his Primary Weapon Value). Balagos can still only initiate one attack during each Combat Phase, even though he has two Primary Weapons to choose from.

employ the creatureʼs Primary Weapon Value to determine the number of attack dice rolled. An Upgrade Attackʼs text specifies the number of attack dice rolled, as well as the attackʼs Range and Attack Arc. Each creature can only initiate one attack per round, regardless of whether it initiates a Primary Weapon Attack or an Upgrade Attack. See “Upgrades” on page 24 for more details on how to use Upgrades.

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measured as the shortest distance between the two creaturesʼ bases that falls inside the attacking creatureʼs Attack Arc. The attacker cannot attempt to measure a Range to a different part of a base in order to avoid interposing creatures. If the ground creatureʼs attack is an area attack, however, then the defending creature does not roll +1 defense die for each interposing ground creature (see “Area Attacks” below).

MELEE COMBAT IN D&D: ATTACK WING In Attack Wing, many creatures can perform melee attacks at a good distance from their creature bases. Depending on their size, some creatures can make melee attacks against enemy creatures that are up to Range 2 or even Range 3 away. Conceptually, this represents not only the size of the attacking creature, but also its ability to step forward, lunge, or lash out at its enemy. During the Combat Phase, it is assumed that creatures in melee combat are dodging, weaving, and moving back and forth, even in mid-air, and this is accounted for by the longer melee attack ranges on some creatures.

AREA ATTACKS (LINE, CONE, & BURST) Some Upgrade cards feature area attacks (Line, Cone, and Burst Attacks) that are different from normal attacks because they are capable of hitting multiple targets. The attacking creature makes a full, separate attack against each creature caught in the area attack, including friendly creatures. Go through the attack process (steps 3 - 9) separately for each such creature. The attacker chooses the order in which each such attack is resolved. Most area attacks specify “ground or air.” When initiating such an area attack, the attacking creature must specify which play level will be affected. All creatures caught within the area attack that are not on the designated play level are completely unaffected. LINE ATTACKS [ ]: A Line Attack is a special attack (like a Lightning Bolt) that can hit multiple creatures in a single line. A player whose creature is initiating such an attack only has to declare the Line Attack itself; he does not have to designate a particular target. Afterwards, the player places the Range Ruler anywhere that is touching the attacking creature’s base and completely inside its Attack Arc; it does not have to measure the shortest distance between the attacker and one target as with a normal attack.

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The player can shift and move the Range Ruler however he likes within the Attack Arc until he is satisfied. Once the player has decided on the final position of the Range Ruler, he makes a separate attack against each and every creature (including friendly creatures) that the Range Ruler is touching, assuming that those creatures fall within the attackʼs specified Range. ]: A Cone Attack is a special CONE ATTACKS [ attack (like a Red Dragonʼs Fire Breath) that can hit multiple creatures in a wide area. A player whose creature is initiating such an attack only has to declare the Cone Attack itself; he does not have to designate a particular target. The Range Ruler is then used to measure out the entire width of the creatureʼs Attack Arc. The attacker makes a separate attack against each and every creature (including friendly creatures) that is within the attacking creatureʼs Attack Arc, assuming that the creatures fall within the attackʼs specified Range. BURST ATTACKS [ ]: A Burst Attack is a special attack (like a Fireball) that uses the Burst Token (see right); the Burst Token is not included in the Starter Set but will be included in future expansion sets that make use of it. A player whose creature is initiating such an attack has to place the Burst Token without the benefit of the Range Ruler. The Burst Token cannot be placed so that it is overlapping a creatureʼs base, although it may be touching a creatureʼs base. After the Burst Token has been placed, the attacker must use the Range Ruler to demonstrate that the Burst Token was placed entirely within the attackʼs specified Range and Attack Arc. If any part of the Burst Token falls outside of the specified Range or Attack Arc, even by a fraction, then the attack fails, although any associated costs (Disabled Tokens, Duration Tokens, etc.) still apply. Remove the Burst Token in this case. If the Burst Token was placed successfully, the attacking player measures the attackʼs specified Range from the Burst Token itself, as specified by the corresponding Upgrade card. The player then makes a separate attack against each and every creature (including friendly creatures and the attacking creature itself!) that falls within the specified Range of the Burst Token. Note that it is possible for a creature to be affected by a Burst Attack even if the creature falls outside of the attacking creatureʼs Attack Arc. It is only important that the Burst Token itself be inside the Attack Arc; once that is verified, all creatures within the specified Range of the Burst Token are affected. Once the Burst Attack ends, remove the Burst Token from the play area.

NOTE: Some Burst Attacks (such as Ice Storm) do not trigger until the End Phase, and their effects may last for multiple rounds. In this case, leave the Burst Token in the play area until the effect expires. A creature may move on top of the Burst Token in this case, but that creature and all creatures within Range are still affected by the Burst Token as normal.

OTHER AREA ATTACKS: Some Upgrade Attacks (like an Elf Troopʼs Line Formation) are capable of attacking every creature within a certain area. These are also considered area attacks, even though they are not specifically identified as Line, Cone, or Burst Attacks. Any attack that affects all creatures in a single specified area is considered an area attack for card text purposes. Note that this is not the same thing as a special ability that simply allows a creature to perform multiple attacks during the same round (like the Haste Spell). An area attack is specifically an attack that targets every creature within a certain area one time each.

3. ROLL ATTACK DICE During this step, the attacker calculates how many attack dice to use and then rolls the dice. A creature attacking with one of his Primary Weapons rolls a number of attack dice equal to his Primary Weapon Value (the number shown in the red field on the Creature Card and Creature Token). Instead of attacking with one of his Primary Weapons, the attacker may have chosen to use an Upgrade Attack listed on one of his equipped Upgrade Cards. These cards usually specify the number of attack dice to roll.

After calculating the number of attack dice, the attacker takes that number of red attack dice and rolls them.

4. MODIFY ATTACK DICE During this step, players may resolve abilities and spend tokens that allow them to modify attack dice. This includes adding die results, converting die results, and re-rolling dice (see “Modifying Dice Results” below). If a player wants to resolve multiple modifying abilities, he resolves them in the order of his choosing. If the attacker and defender both have abilities that modify attack dice, the defender resolves all of his abilities before the attacker.

Spending a Target Token If the attacker has a Target Token, he may return his Target Token to the Action Token supply to choose any number of attack dice and re-roll them once (see “Combat Phase Example” on pages 21 - 22).

MODIFYING DICE RESULTS When players roll dice during combat, these dice are rolled into a common area. The face up side of each die is considered the result. Dice in this common area may be modified in a variety of ways, and their final results determine how much damage the target creature suffers (if any).

If the attacker spent a Charge Token to move forward this round, then he rolls +1 attack die against each creature he attacks in his Forward Attack Arc this round. Remember that a charging creature can only perform melee attacks (not ranged attacks).

Add: Some effects add a specific result to the combat. To resolve this, the player places a token or unused die displaying this result into the common area.

If the defender has a Pivot Token beside him, the attacker rolls +1 attack die. The attacker resolves any other card abilities that allow him to roll additional (or fewer) dice.

Convert: Some effects convert one die result to a different result. To resolve this, the player physically picks up the die from the common area and rotates the die so that its face up side displays the new result.

COMBAT BONUSES There are several factors that may modify a creatureʼs attack or defense. All dice modifiers are cumulative. If modifiers would reduce the attackerʼs dice to zero or less, then the attack causes no damage. If modifiers would reduce the defenderʼs dice to zero or less, then the defender rolls 0 defense dice.

Re-roll: Some effects allow players to re-roll certain dice. To resolve this, the player picks up the appropriate number of dice from the common area and rolls those dice again. IMPORTANT: When a die is converted or rerolled, ignore its original result and apply only the new result. This new result may be modified by other effects; however, a die that has already been re-rolled cannot be re-rolled again during this attack unless a card effect specifically says that the die can be re-rolled more than once.

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Spending a Concentrate Token

7. COMPARE RESULTS

If the attacker has a Concentrate Token, he may return it to the Action Token supply to convert all [ ] ] results on the attack dice to [ results.

During this step, players compare their dice results to determine whether the defender was hit.

5. ROLL DEFENSE DICE During this step, the defender calculates how many defense dice to use and then rolls the dice.

To determine whether the defender was hit, compare the number of [ ], [ ], and [ ] results in the common area. For each [ ] result, cancel (remove) 1 [ ] or [ ] result from the ] results must be canceled attack roll. All [ before any [ ] results may be canceled.

The defender rolls a number of defense dice equal to his Agility Value (the number shown inside the green field on the Creature Card and Creature Token).

If there is at least one uncanceled [ ] or ] result remaining, the defender is considered [ hit. If all [ ] and [ ] results are canceled, the attack misses and the defender does not suffer any damage.

If the defender is targeted at Range 4, he rolls +1 defense die.

Canceling Dice

The defender also resolves any card abilities that allow him to roll additional (or fewer) dice. After calculating the number of defense dice, the defender takes that number of green defense dice and rolls them.

6. MODIFY DEFENSE DICE During this step, players may resolve abilities and spend tokens that allow them to modify defense dice. This includes adding die results, converting die results, and re-rolling dice (see “Modifying Dice Results” on page 19). If a player wants to resolve multiple modifying abilities, he resolves them in the order of his choosing. If the attacker and defender both have abilities that can modify defense dice, the attacker resolves all of his abilities before the defender.

Spending a Dodge Token If the defender has a Dodge Token, he may return it to the Action Token supply to add one additional [ ] result to his defense roll (see “Combat Phase Example” on pages 21 - 22).

Spending a Concentrate Token If the defender has a Concentrate Token, he may return it to the Action Token supply during this step to ] results into [ ] convert all [ results.

Each time a die result is canceled, a player takes 1 die displaying the canceled result and physically removes the die from the common area. Players ignore all canceled results during this attack. All abilities that allow players to cancel dice must be resolved at the start of the “Compare Results” step.

8. DEFLECT HITS (ARMOR) During this step, the defender may deflect a number of uncanceled [ ] results equal to his Armor Value, which is represented by the number of face up Armor Tokens beside his Creature Card. Deflect] results does not damage the Armor in any ing [ way. The Armor Tokens remain face up and can be used each time the creature is hit. Uncanceled [ ] results ignore Armor. Even if all normal [ ] results have been canceled, the ] results. defenderʼs Armor cannot deflect any [ Some special abilities and critical effects can damage Armor Tokens, flipping them over to their face down Shattered sides. If an Armor Token has been Shattered, it cannot be used to deflect [ ] results until it has been repaired by a special ability. NOTE: Many Upgrade Attacks specify that they penetrate Armor. These attacks completely ignore the defenderʼs Armor Tokens. If the defender is hit by such an attack, skip this step and go directly to the “Deal Damage” step.

9. DEAL DAMAGE

Energy Resistance

Creatures that have been hit suffer damage based ] results that were not deflectupon uncanceled [ ed by Armor, as well as uncanceled [ ] results.

If the defender shares the same Energy Type as an Upgrade Attack directed against him, he automatically adds 1 [ ] result. Primary Weapon Attacks, however, do not trigger this effect, regardless of the attacking creatureʼs Energy Type (see “Energy Type” on page 29).

The hit creature suffers 1 normal damage for each uncanceled, undeflected [ ] result, and then suffers 1 critical damage for each uncanceled [ ] result. For each point of damage received, the creature must receive 1 Damage Card (see “Suffering Damage” on page 23).

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During the End Phase, if the number of Damage Cards dealt to a creature equals or exceeds its Health Value (the number in the yellow field on the Creature Card and Creature Token), that creature is defeated (see “End Phase” on page 23). After resolving the final step of combat, if the attacker was in the midst of attacking multiple creatures with an area attack, the attacker returns

to step 3 and rolls attack dice against the next creature. Otherwise, the creature with the next highest Level takes its turn resolving the combat steps. After each creature has had the opportunity to attack, the Combat Phase ends and the players proceed to the End Phase.

COMBAT PHASE EXAMPLE

1. The creatures end the Activation Phase in this position, and the Combat Phase begins. Of all the remaining creatures in the game, the Blue Dragon has the highest Level (“9”), so she resolves her combat steps first. 2. The Red Dragon is within the the Blue Dragonʼs Forward Attack Arc and at Range 2, so the Blue Dragon attacks with her Bite Attack (a Primary Weapon melee attack with a maximum Range of 2). 3. The Blue Dragon rolls 4 attack dice (due to her Primary Weapon Value of 4). The Blue Dragon obtains the following results: [ ], [ ], blank, and blank.

4. The Blue Dragon chooses to spend her Target Token to re-roll the two blank results, obtaining a [ ] and a [ ] result. 5. The Red Dragon rolls one defense die since he has an Agility Value of 1, and obtains 1 [ ] result. 6. The Red Dragon chooses to spend his [ ] Token to add one additional [ ] result to the defense roll. 7. The two [ ] results cancel two [ ] results, but one [ ] result and one [ ] result remain. The Red Dragon is hit!

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COMBAT PHASE EXAMPLE (continued)

8. The Red Dragon has 2 Armor, so he is able to deflect the uncanceled [ ] result with no problem. His Armor is unable to deflect the [ ] result, however. 9. T  he Red Dragon now suffers one critical damage from the [ ] result. The Blue Dragon player deals one Damage Card face up next to the Red Dragonʼs Creature Card. This face up Damage Cardʼs text has an ongoing effect that applies during each Activation Phase. The Blue Dragon player places one Critical Hit Token near the Red Dragonʼs figure to remind his opponent of this Damage Cardʼs effect. The Red Dragon will not be defeated by this attack because his Health Value (6) is greater than his total number of Damage Cards (1). 10. T  he creature with the next highest Level is the Red Dragon (“8”), so he resolves combat next. The Red Dragon chooses to target the Blue Dragon, which is at Range 2, with his own Bite Attack.

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11. T  he Red Dragon rolls 6 attack dice (five dice from his Primary Weapon Value of 5, and one additional die from a special ability that allows him to roll +1 attack die against a creature that possesses fewer Damage Cards than he does), and obtains the following results: [ ], [ ], [ ], [ ], blank, and blank. The [ ] result will have no effect for this attack. 12. T  he Blue Dragon rolls 1 defense die (from her Agility Value of 1). Unfortunately, she rolls a blank which will not cancel any of the Red Dragonʼs [ ] results. The Blue Dragon is hit! 13. T  he Blue Dragon has 2 Armor, so she is able to deflect 2 of the [ ] results. The last [ ] result goes through, however, so the Red Dragon player deals one Damage Card face down next to the Blue Dragonʼs Creature Card. Since the Blue Dragon has a Health Value of 5, she can sustain 4 more damage before she is defeated.

END PHASE

ADDITIONAL RULES

During this phase, the players perform the following steps in order. Although the players can usually perform each of these steps at the same time, any player can request that the creatures resolve a particular step one by one in ascending order of Level. If two or more creatures share the same Level, then the creatures without initiative perform that step first.

This section explains all rules not previously addressed.

• Trigger all Effects that occur “during the End Phase.” • All creatures that have received a number of Damage Cards equal to or greater than their Health Values are defeated and removed from the play area (see “Defeating Creatures” below). • Remove all unused Action Tokens (Dodge, Target, Concentrate, and Charge). Remove all Pivot Tokens as well. Do not remove Altitude Tokens or any other tokens in the play area unless those tokens represent something that specifically lasts until the end of the round. • Remove 1 Duration Token from every Upgrade Card and face up Damage Card that has one (see “Duration Tokens” on page 24). • If the last Duration Token is removed from an Upgrade Card, remove its corresponding Effect Token from the play area and place it back on top of its Upgrade Card (see “Continuous Effects and Effect Tokens” on page 25). • Pass the Initiative Token to the next player or team to the left that still owns a creature that is tied for the same Level as an opponentʼs creature. If no players have tied creatures remaining, remove the Initiative Token from the game.

After completing the End Phase, the round is over. If more than one player has a creature remaining, a new round begins, starting with the Planning Phase. NOTE: In a 3-Player game, if a player has lost all of his creatures, he is eliminated from the game.

WINNING THE GAME After completing the End Phase, if only one player has creatures remaining in the play area, the game ends and that player wins. If playing an Adventure, refer to its victory conditions. In the event that all remaining creatures are defeated during the same End Phase, the player who owns the highest Level creature that was defeated during the final round wins the game. If more than one defeated creature is tied for the highest Level, the tied creature that had initiative when the creatures were removed from play is considered the highest Level.

SUFFERING DAMAGE Creatures can suffer damage from different sources, such as being hit during combat or by an effect or card ability. Damage Cards track how much damage each creature has suffered and are used to determine if the creature has been defeated (see “Defeating Creatures” below). When a creature suffers normal damage or critical damage, it suffers them one at a time. The creature must suffer all normal damage before suffering any critical damage. Deal one Damage Card to the creature based on the type of damage it suffered. If the creature suffered normal damage (such as from a [ ] result), place the Damage Card face down beside its Creature Card. If the creature suffered critical damage (such ] result), place the Damage Card face as from a [ up next to its Creature Card (see “Critical Damage” below). NOTE: If the Damage Deck runs out, shuffle the discard pile to form a new deck.

CRITICAL DAMAGE When a creature suffers normal damage, players deal the Damage Card face down and ignore the cardʼs text. However, when a creature suffers critical damage, players deal the Damage Card face up. The text on face up Damage Cards is resolved as instructed on the card. When a creature is dealt a Damage Card face up, place a Critical Hit Token near the creature. This token reminds players that this creature is affected by an ongoing effect. If a creature somehow manages to remove the ongoing effect (e.g. by flipping that card face down, by discarding that card, etc.), return the Critical Hit Token to the supply. Many Damage Cards specify a new Action that can be undertaken by that creature, usually in an attempt to flip the Damage Card face down. A creature may perform this Action instead of its normal Action for that round.

DEFEATING CREATURES During the End Phase, when the number of Damage Cards dealt beside a Creature Card is equal to or greater than the creatureʼs Health Value, the creature is defeated (face up and face down cards count toward this total). Remove the defeated creature from the play area, discard all of its Damage Cards to a face up discard pile next to the Damage Deck, and return all of its tokens to

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their respective supplies. Any Continuous Effects originating from the defeated creatureʼs Upgrades, however, remain in effect. Continue to remove [ ]s from these Upgrades during the End Phase (see “Upgrades” below). NOTE: Because creatures are not defeated until the End Phase, creatures who have sustained lethal damage still have the opportunity to attack during the Combat Phase, assuming a critical effect hasnʼt stopped them from doing so. Creatures with lethal damage can also be attacked (in order, for example, to achieve additional critical effects against that creature).

RESOLVING CONFLICTS INITIATIVE When different creatures in the play area share the same Level, they use initiative to resolve timing conflicts. At the start of the game, one player begins the game with the Initiative Token. This player must own at least one creature that is the same Level as an opponentʼs creature. Choose this player randomly from among all players with tied creatures (unless you are playing with the Legion Building Rules; see “Initiative When Legion Building” on page 28). During each End Phase, the player with the Initiative Token passes it to the next player to his left who also has a creature with a tied Level. If at any time there are no players with tied creatures remaining, the Initiative Token is removed from play. If a tie ever reemerges while the Initiative Token is out of play (for example, if a new creature enters the game), then the player owning the creature who brought about the new tie receives the Initiative Token. The creatures belonging to the player who currently holds the Initiative Token are considered to be a higher Level than opposing creatures with the same printed Level.

For example, if Player 1 holds the Initiative Token and owns a Level 5 Red Dragon, his dragon is considered a higher Level than an opponentʼs Level 5 Dragon. In a multiplayer game, if there is a timing conflict between two opposing creatures and neither creatureʼs owner holds the Initiative Token, then the creature belonging to the player sitting closest to the left of the player with the Initiative Token is considered to have initiative.

For example, if Player 1 holds the Initiative Token and there is a timing conflict between Player 2 and Player 3, then Player 2ʼs tied creature is considered to have initiative.

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During the Activation Phase, when opposing creatures of equal Level are activated, the creature with initiative activates last (that is, as if he were a higher level). Initiative also applies during the Combat Phase; the creature with initiative resolves its combat steps before an opponentʼs creature of the same Level. If a single player owns multiple creatures of the same Level, he may activate those creatures and resolve their attacks in the order of his choosing.

BREAKING THE RULES Some abilities on cards conflict with the general rules. In case of a conflict, card text overrides the general rules. If one card ability forbids an effect, while another ability allows it, the effect is forbidden.

RESOLVING RULES DISPUTES Situations may arise that are too close to call (such as a creature being within a certain Range, etc.) If players cannot agree on the correct ruling, follow these steps: 1. One player takes five attack dice while the other player takes five defense dice. 2. Both players roll. The player who obtains ] results wins the dispute. the most [ The player who wins the dispute determines the correct ruling for this situation. If this situation arises again during this game, apply the same ruling. Remember that what is most important when playing a game of Attack Wing is having fun!

UPGRADES DURATION TOKENS Many Upgrades instruct a player to place a certain number of Duration Tokens [ ] on them. The player places that many [ ]s on the Upgrade and cannot activate that Upgrade again until after all of its [ ]s have expired. During the End Phase, the player removes 1 [ ] from each of his Upgrades. For example, a dragon who uses a breath weapon places 3 [ ]s on it. This means that the dragon will not be able to initiate that attack again until after all the [ ]s have been removed. Some Upgrades instruct a player to place a Permanent Duration Token [ ] on them. A[

] is not removed during the End Phase.

CONTINUOUS EFFECTS AND EFFECT TOKENS Many Upgrades feature Continuous Effects, which are tracked through the use of Effect Tokens. Effect Tokens bear the same name as their corresponding Upgrade Cards. Some Continuous Effects are beneficial (featuring a green Effect Token) and others are detrimental (featuring a red Effect Token). During Set-Up, players place all of their Upgradesʼ Effect Tokens on top of their corresponding Upgrade Cards so that they are always near at hand. When a Continuous Effect is activated, its corresponding Effect Token(s) are placed in the play area beside the Effectʼs recipient(s) (or on top of the recipient{s}ʼ bases if there is room so that the token will travel with the creatures more easily during movement). Whenever an Upgrade with a Continuous Effect instructs a player to place [ ]s on it, the Continuous Effect begins. If the Upgrade does not specify the recipient of the Continuous Effect, then the Continuous Effect affects the owner. For example, the Shield spell features the text “Action: Place 2 [ ]s on this Upgrade” followed by a Continuous Effect that describes how the Shield spell works. When a player activates this Upgrade, he places 2 [ ]s on the Upgrade and places the Shield Effect Token beside his creatureʼs figure. During the End Phase (or at any other time), if an Upgrade loses its last [ ], the Continuous Effect ends and the corresponding Effect Token(s) are removed from the play area and placed back on top of their corresponding Upgrade Card. If an Effect Token is ever removed from the play area prematurely due to a special ability (such as a Dispel Magic spell), then the Effect ends immediately and the Effect Token is returned to its Upgrade Card. Any remaining [ ]s stay on the Upgrade Card, however, prohibiting the creature from activating the Upgrade again until after the [ ]s expire.

DISABLING / DISCARDING UPGRADES Some abilities may instruct you to “disable” an Upgrade Card. When instructed to disable an Upgrade, place a Disabled Upgrade Token on that Upgrade Card. While an Upgrade Card is disabled, a player cannot activate or make use of its card text (but see “Exception for Continuous Effects” below). An Upgrade Card with a Disabled Upgrade Token on it cannot be disabled again until after the token is removed.

During the Activation Phase, a creature can spend its Action to remove a Disabled Upgrade Token from one of its Upgrade Cards. That Upgrade is no longer considered disabled. Some abilities may require the player to “discard” an Upgrade Card. Return discarded Upgrade Cards to the game box; they cannot be used for the remainder of the game. EXCEPTION FOR CONTINUOUS EFFECTS: If an Upgrade with [ ]s is disabled or discarded, then its [ ]s remain on the card and any of its Continuous Effects that were already active remain in effect until the duration expires. This also applies to Upgrades belonging to a defeated creature. For example, if a player disables an opponentʼs “Bestow Curse” spell, then the opponent will not be able to cast “Bestow Curse” again until he spends an Action to remove the Disabled Token. However, if the opponent had previously cast “Bestow Curse” on an enemy creature, the enemy creature still suffers the effects of that spell.

UPGRADE ATTACKS Many Upgrades feature the word “Attack:”, which means that the Upgradeʼs ability can be used instead of one of the creatureʼs Primary Weapon Attacks. The Upgrade will specify which Attack Arc to employ, the attackʼs Range, and the number of attack dice to roll. For example, the Fireball spell specifies that the creature “makes a 3 Dice Attack,” which means to roll 3 attack dice. Some Upgrade Attacks, such as Breath Weapons, instruct the creature to use its Primary Weapon Value to make the attack. In this case, the player rolls a number of attack dice equal to the creatureʼs Primary Weapon Value. However, for all game purposes, this is still considered an Upgrade Attack, not a Primary Weapon Attack (see “Primary Weapons vs. Upgrade Attacks” on page 17). Some Upgrade Attacks specify other requirements to initiate the attack, such as spending a Target Token or a Concentrate Token. A player can only initiate such an attack if the requisite token is already beside the creature, and only if the creature spends the token to initiate the attack. The spent token will no longer be available for the creature to use during the remaining combat sequence.

UPGRADES AND RANGE Some Upgrade abilities specify their Range but do not specify that they originate from a particular Attack Arc. If this is the case, the ability can target a creature in any direction, regardless of Attack Arc.

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UPGRADE CARD ANATOMY

After a creature executes a Green Maneuver, remove one (and only one) Exhaustion Token from it (see Step 4 on page 11). It is possible through various circumstances for a creature to acquire multiple Exhaustion Tokens.

FLEEING THE BATTLEFIELD If a creature executes a maneuver that causes any part of its base to go outside the play area (beyond the edge), then that creature has fled the battlefield. Unless specified otherwise by the Adventure Overview, creatures that flee the battlefield are immediately defeated. Note that only the creatureʼs base matters for these purposes. If only the Maneuver Template or the overlapping figure goes outside the battlefield, the creature remains in play.

MOVING THROUGH A CREATURE

1. UPGRADE COST (see “Legion Building” on page 28) 2. UPGRADE ICON (see “Upgrade Cards” on page 29) 3. ENERGY TYPE (see page 29) 4. MINIMUM LEVEL (SPELLS ONLY) (see “Arcane & Divine Spells” on page 30) 5. UPGRADE TITLE 6. UPGRADE CLASS 7. UPGRADE RANGE & ATTACK ARC 8. UPGRADE TEXT

MOVEMENT RULES EXHAUSTION There are several factors that can force a creature to become Exhausted, such as executing a Red Maneuver (see Step 4 on page 11). When this occurs, place an Exhaustion Token beside the creature. While a creature has at least one Exhaustion Token, it cannot execute Red Maneuvers or perform any Actions (even free Actions).

If a creature already has an Exhaustion Token assigned to it and the creature reveals a Red Maneuver during the Activation Phase, the opposing player chooses any non-Red Maneuver on that creatureʼs dial for the creature to execute.

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A flying creature can freely move through space occupied by other creatures without penalty; it is assumed the creatures have sufficient time and room to maneuver around each other in 3D space. A creature on the ground can freely move through flying creatures or friendly ground creatures. To execute a maneuver through another creature, the player should hold the Maneuver Template above the creatures and make his best estimation of where the creature should end its movement. Then he picks up his creature and moves it to its final location. Both players must agree on the creatureʼs final position and facing. A ground creature attempting to move completely through an opposing ground creature must make an Overrun Check if its Maneuver Template overlaps the other ground creature. Both creatures roll a number of attack dice depending on their size (1 die for a small base, 2 dice for a large base). For these purposes, 1 [ ] result is equal to 2 [ ] results. If the moving creature equals or exceeds the number ] results rolled by the standing creature, of [ then it passes freely through to the other side. If ] results, it the moving creature acquires fewer [ must end its movement when it touches the enemy creatureʼs base. Creatures do not sustain actual damage during this check. If a ground creature attempts to move through multiple opposing ground creatures, it must make a separate Overrun Check against each such creature (one at a time in the order that they are encountered). If the moving creature fails its check against any of the opposing creatures, it must stop when it touches the very first creature. When moving through a ground Troop, an opposing ground creature must roll against each soldier that it is moving through. When a ground Troop itself moves through opposing ground creatures, only make an Overrun Check against those creatures

that are overlapped by the Point Soldierʼs Maneuver Template (see “Troop Rules” on page 30).

NOTE: A ground creature capable of moving completely through an enemy ground creature must attempt an Overrun Check. The moving creature cannot choose to automatically fail the Overrun Check and stop moving when it touches the first enemy creature.

OVERLAPPING OTHER CREATURES There are a few situations that may arise where creatures overlap other creatures, and they are explained below.

Plastic Bases Overlapping If a creature executes a maneuver that would cause the final position of its base to physically overlap another creatureʼs base (even partially), perform the following procedure: From the opposite end of the template, move the active creature backward along the top of the template until it no longer overlaps another creature. While moving the creature, adjust it so that the template remains centered between both the sets of guides on the creatureʼs base. Place the creature so that the bases of both creatures are touching. There is no other penalty for bumping into another creatureʼs base in this way. The bumping creature can still perform Actions and attack as normal. IMPORTANT: If the active creature is executing a [ ] Maneuver that causes it to overlap another creature, instead treat its maneuver as a [ ] Maneuver with the same speed and color revealed on the dial.

If the creature is executing a [ ] Maneuver that causes it to overlap another creature, then from the opposite end of the template, move the active creature forward along the top of the template until it no longer overlaps another creature.

Flight vs. Ground Overlapping Advantage If a creature in the air executes a maneuver that would cause the final position of its base to physically overlap the base of a creature on the ground, then the flying creature can choose either to remain in front of or move past the other figure (still touching it on the other side). If moving past the other figure, use one of the [ ] Maneuver Templates to continue the flying creatureʼs move past the other figure, even if it was using a [ ] or [ ] when it bumped the ground figure. If a creature in the air is executing a [ ] Maneuver when it bumps a creature on the ground, it may choose whether or not to turn around 180º. It may make this choice regardless of whether it chose to remain in front of or move past the other figure. It may be the case that a creature in the air cannot move past a ground creature because another flying creature is on the other side. In such situations, the creature moving through the air must end its movement in front of the ground creature. However, if a flying creature chooses to move past a ground creature and this results in the flying creatureʼs base falling outside the play area, the flying creature is considered defeated as per the rules on page 26.

Plastic Figures Overlapping Some creature figures extend beyond the edge of their base. If this part of the figure would touch another figure or obstruct its movement, simply

Overlapping Other Creatures Example 1. The Red Dragon is executing a maneuver that appears to cause it to overlap the Blue Dragon. 2. While trying to execute the maneuver, the player discovers that the Red Dragon does in fact overlap the Blue Dragon. 3. The player moves the Red Dragon backwards along the template, but now the Red Dragon is overlapping the Copper Dragon. 4. The player moves the Red Dragon backwards along the template, and places it so that it is touching the Copper Dragon.

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add or remove pegs from the base to prevent this situation and continue moving as normal. When playing with figures with particularly large models, players should add pegs at the start of the match to help minimize the amount of bumping that will occur.

IMPORTANT: No single creature can ever equip two or more copies of the same Upgrade, even if that Upgrade is not unique. For example, Player 1 has chosen two copies of Magic Missile for his Legion. He must assign each Magic Missile Upgrade to a different creature.

VARIANT FOR CASUAL PLAY: If everyone agrees, the players can choose to allow the plastic figures themselves to affect gameplay. In other words, if two creatures bump into each other in any way (including if just their figures impede each other), treat this in the same way as if the plastic bases were overlapping in the normal rules.

After all players are satisfied with their choices, they simultaneously reveal their chosen Creature Cards and Upgrade Cards. Players then resume the steps of Set-Up, continuing with the “Assemble Creatures” step (see page 6).

ADVANCED RULES This section explains advanced rules that enhance the Attack Wing experience. Before starting a game, players must agree which advanced rules they would like to use during the game (if any).

LEGION BUILDING Although Attack Wing is fast and fun using only the creatures found in this game box, the gameplay is even more exciting and tactical with more creatures. After players have a firm grasp on the core gameplay, they can add the rules explained in this section. To best use the Legion Building rules, players will need more than the three creatures found in this game box. Additional creatures are sold separately in expansion packs. All Creature Cards and Upgrade Cards display a number in the upper left corner. This lists the Legion Point Cost of the creature or Upgrade. During the “Gather Forces” step of Set-Up, all players must first agree on a number of Legion Points per player. It is recommended that each player play with either 120 or 200 Legion Points, although players are welcome to choose any point total. If players only own the three creatures found in this game box, each player should field 60 points. NOTE: If playing with more than 120 Legion Points per player, be sure to check the “Component Limitations” section on page 32. After choosing a point total, all players secretly and simultaneously build their Legions. They do this by choosing Creature Cards and Upgrade Cards with combined Legion Points equal to or lower than the agreed-upon total.

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Initiative When Legion Building When using the Legion Building rules, the player with the lowest point total decides which player begins the game with the Initiative Token during the “Confer Initiative Token” step of Set-Up; the token must be given to one of the players who owns a creature that has the same Level as an opponentʼs creature. If there is a tie for the lowest point total, then randomly determine which player among those tied gets to make this decision.

Adjusting the Play Area If playing with more than 120 Legion Points per player, players may wish to expand the size of their play area beyond 3ʼ X 3ʼ. Players are free to use any play area size that they agree on.

Unique Names Many of the Creature Cards and Upgrades in D&D: Attack Wing represent creatures and powers that are one-of-a-kind (or extremely rare). Each such card has a unique name which cannot appear more than once in your Legion. Cards that represent something unique have a gold ring surrounding their Legion Costs (see right). A single player cannot field two or more cards that share the same unique name in his Legion, even if there are two different cards with the same name (for example, there may be two different aspects of the same character, but you cannot field them both). Note that this also means that you cannot equip two copies of the same unique Upgrade in your Legion, even if you wish to equip them on different creatures. In a team game, this limit applies to each team (see “Team Play Rules” on page 32). No matter how many players are on a particular team, only one copy of each unique card can be fielded by that teamʼs Legion. Two different players, however, can use the same unique card as long as they are not on the same team.

Example: On the “Galadaeros” Creature Card, there is a gold ring surrounding the Legion Cost, and this means that his name is unique. A single player or team can only field one copy of Galadaeros (although an opponent can still field Galadaeros if he desires). There is no gold ring surrounding the cost of the “Copper Dragon” card, however, so a single player could field as many Copper Dragons as he wants (within the Legion Point limit).

inflict damage of a particular Energy Type. Only Upgrade Attacks that feature Energy Types are considered to inflict damage of that type. For example, a Copper Dragon features the Acid Energy Type, but his Primary Weapons (Bite & Tail) do not inflict Acid Damage. However, a Copper Dragonʼs “Acid Breath” Upgrade does inflict Acid Damage.

UPGRADE CARDS CARD ABILITIES Many card abilities use the word “you” to specifically reference that Creature Card. Abilities on Creature Cards cannot affect other creatures unless explicitly specified by the ability. Likewise, Upgrade Cards and Damage Cards only affect the creature to which they are assigned, unless otherwise specified. Example: The “Prayer of Healing” spell includes the phrase “You cannot attack this round.” This only applies to the creature who cast the spell, not to any of his allies. A card ability is only considered optional if it uses the word “may” OR has an “Action:” or “Attack:” header OR requires its owner to disable or discard the corresponding card (or add [ ]s to it) in order to activate the ability. In all other circumstances, the card ability is mandatory and must be followed.

Alignment All creatures feature an Alignment in the lower left corner of their Creature Cards (Good [ ], ], or Evil [ ]). This is a keyword that Neutral [ may trigger card text. A player may freely mix creatures of different Alignments in his Legion.

Energy Type Many creatures feature an Elemental Energy Type in the upper right corners of their Creature Cards ], (Fire [ ], Cold [ ], Acid [ ], Lightning [ Thunder [ ], Positive Energy [ ], Negative Energy [ ], Poison [ ], or Disease [ ]). This Energy Type is referenced on Upgrade Cards, and often allows the creature to equip certain Upgrade Cards without a penalty (see “Upgrade Cards” below). In addition, during the Combat Phase, a creature automatically receives 1 [ ] result against an Upgrade Attack of its own Energy Type. For example, a Frost Giant features [ ] which identifies it as a “Cold Creature.” Whenever an Upgrade Attack with [ ] is directed at the Frost Giant, he receives 1 automatic [ ] result during the Modify Defense Dice step of the Combat Phase.

There are different ways to customize a creature, such as adding an Arcane Spell Upgrade or Equipment Upgrade. However, each creature is limited in which Upgrades and how many of each Upgrade it can equip. The Upgrade Banner in the upper left of the Creature Card displays Upgrade Icons that represent which Upgrades the creature can equip. For each icon shown in the creatureʼs Upgrade Banner, the creature can equip one Upgrade Card that features the matching Upgrade Icon (see “Upgrade Card Anatomy” on page 26). Upgrade Icons that appear in a creatureʼs Upgrade Banner include Dragon [ ], Equipment [ ], ], Monster [ ], Heroic [ Arcane [ ], and Divine [ ] Upgrades.

Eshaedra has three Dragon Icons, one Arcane icon, and one Divine icon on her Upgrade Banner. During Set-Up, she may equip up to three Dragon Upgrades, one Arcane Upgrade, and one Divine Upgrade, provided that she has sufficient Legion Points available.

Equip Restrictions / Legion Cost Penalties Some Upgrades have Equip Restrictions or Legion Cost Penalties printed in bold at the bottom of their card text. Equip Restrictions prohibit certain creatures from equipping the Upgrade, even if they have the appropriate Upgrade Icon in their Upgrade Banner. For example, the Blackguardʼs Mail Equipment Upgrade can only be equipped by an Evil creature (see “Alignment” above) and prohibits the creature from equipping another Upgrade with the “Armor” keyword listed in its Upgrade Class. Legion Cost Penalties apply when certain creatures equip the Upgrade. For example, the Fire Breath Dragon Upgrade costs +5 Legion Points to equip if the Dragon is not of the Fire Element (see “Energy Type” above).

A creatureʼs Primary Weapons, however, do not

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Arcane & Divine Spells Spell Upgrades function the same as normal Upgrades. However, in order to equip a Spell Upgrade, a creature must also be of a certain minimum Level or higher (see “Upgrade Card Anatomy” on page 26).

TROOP RULES Troops are a special form of creature that are comprised of several different figures. Each figure in the Troop is called a soldier. During a normal attack (i.e., a non-area attack), each soldier must be attacked separately, as if it were a separate creature. A player can choose to field a Troop with anywhere from 1 - 6 soldiers. If fielding only 1 soldier, the player uses the Creature Card as printed (with no Troop Tokens). For each additional soldier, the player stacks a corresponding Troop Token on top of the Creature Card (see right). The Troop Tokens must be stacked from bottom to top in ascending order (Token #2, then Token #3, etc.) The total Legion Point Cost for the Troop is the number that appears on the top Troop Token. Whenever you include at least 2 soldiers, you only pay the Legion Cost on the top Troop Token (not on the Creature Card). When playing with a Troop, the number of soldiers in your troop is always represented by the number of figures still in the Troop. For example, if you decide to field a Troop with 3 soldiers, you would represent that Troop in the play area with 3 figures. Each time a soldier in the Troop is defeated, you remove 1 figure from the play area. There must always be one soldier designated as the current Point Soldier. Players can represent this soldier as the figure that is painted in an alternate paint scheme. If this soldier dies, another soldier will take his place as the new Point Soldier, so the player can replace one of the generic soldier figures with the alternate paint figure, using a [ ] 1 Maneuver Template to mark the position of the replaced soldier so that the alternate paint figure may be placed in the same exact position. Alternatively, if a player does not wish to switch his figures around each time the current Point Soldier is defeated, he can use a Point Soldier Token (included with each Troop Expansion) and transfer that to one of the remaining soldiers to designate him as the new Point Soldier (see “Defeated Point Soldier” on page 31).

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During Set-Up, the player first places the Point Soldier in his starting area, and then arranges the other soldiers around the Point Soldier in formation. New soldiers can be placed to the right, left, front, or back of a soldier already in formation, but each soldier must be placed such that it is touching and completely flush from end to end with a soldier that is already in formation. No soldier can be placed so that it is forward of the Point Soldier or more than two places to the right or left of the Point Soldier. A soldier may, however, be placed as far back in formation as the player desires. All soldiers must be placed facing the same direction as the Point Soldier. Here are some sample formations that are both legal and illegal:

During the Planning Phase, the player chooses one maneuver on the Maneuver Dial for the whole Troop. After the player reveals the Maneuver Dial during the Activation Phase, the Point Soldier performs the chosen maneuver. If the Troop is performing the Pivot Maneuver, the player moves the other soldiers out of the way before spinning the Point Soldier. After performing the chosen maneuver, the Point Soldier performs the Troopʼs Action (including movement actions like Feint). Finally, the player places the rest of the soldiers in whatever legal formation around the Point Soldier that he chooses. Each soldier is placed one at a time. The player cannot measure or “check” the new placement first; once a player says a soldier is going into a position, it must go there. If the soldier does not fit into the new position without overlapping another creature or Obstacle, the soldier is considered “pressed” (see below).

PRESSED SOLDIERS If a soldier cannot fit into the playerʼs chosen position without overlapping another creature or Obstacle, that soldier is considered “pressed” and is temporarily removed from the play area; place it beside the Troop Creature Card. It is possible for multiple figures to become pressed if the Point Soldier has moved into a position that is surrounded by other creatures and Obstacles. For each pressed soldier in a Troop, that Troop rolls -1 attack die and -1 defense die in combat. Whenever a soldier in the Troop is defeated (or flees due to a failed Morale Check; see below), the player must remove a pressed soldier from the game instead of a figure in the play area. The next time the Troop moves, all remaining pressed soldiers can re-enter the play area and join the new formation if there is room.

EFFECT TOKENS AND TROOPS If any soldier receives an Effect Token, the Continuous Effect applies to the entire Troop. For example, if the Troop casts the Shield Spell, every soldier receives the Shield effect. If any member of the Troop is hit by Sleep Breath, the entire Troop falls asleep.

TROOPS IN COMBAT During the Combat Phase, the Troop makes a single attack using the Forward Attack Arc of the Point Soldier. If the Troop spends a Charge token, the Point Soldier moves forward and the Troop reforms using the standard rules for Troop movement above, and then initiates its melee attack.

Opposing creatures making a normal attack against a Troop may target any soldier in the Troop, although attacking through one soldier to get to another may grant the target soldier an extra defense die (see “Attacking Through Other Creatures” on page 17). ] results against a Troop penetrate Although [ the Troopʼs Armor as normal, Troops do not receive critical damage effects. All Damage Cards sustained by a Troop are placed face down. If a single soldier sustains enough Damage Cards to equal or exceed the Troopʼs Health Rating, that soldier is immediately defeated; do not wait until the End Phase. Remove the figure from the play area, remove the top Troop Token from the Creature Card, and remove all Damage Cards from the Troop. The damage does not carry over to the rest of the Troop. It is okay if a gap is temporarily created in the Troop formation due to a defeated soldier; separated soldiers can rejoin the Troop formation after the next movement. A Troop with only 1 soldier left is treated like a normal creature; if the last soldier sustains lethal damage, do not remove it until the End Phase.

DEFEATED POINT SOLDIER (MORALE CHECK) If the Point Soldier is defeated, the owner must roll 1 attack die for each remaining soldier in the Troop. The dice are rolled all at once, and for each [ ] result, the owner must immediately remove 1 additional soldier of his choice (as well as a corresponding Troop Token). This could result in the entire Troop fleeing, in which case the Troop will not be able to attack that round. After making the Morale Check, the owner of the Troop transfers the Point Soldier Token to a new soldier of his choice in the front line. It is okay if this transfer creates a temporarily illegal formation. The front line includes the creatures that were in the same row as the defeated Point Soldier; if the Point Soldier was the only creature in the front line, then the row behind him becomes the new front line. If a Troop features a Leader Upgrade, roll to see if the Leader is discarded (as per its card text) after completing the Morale Check.

TROOPS VS. AREA ATTACKS If two or more soldiers are caught in an area attack that can damage multiple creatures, then it is possible for the Troop to lose multiple soldiers, although any soldiers not in the area of effect will be safe. Area attacks include Line, Cone, and Burst Attacks, as well as any attacks that specify that they attack every creature within a particular area.

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When executing an area attack against a Troop, the attacking creature rolls its attack dice once against the whole Troop; he does not make a separate attack against each soldier. The Troop then rolls its defense dice once (and only once) for the whole Troop, canceling [ ] results and [ ] results as normal. The Troop then deflects any remaining ] results with Armor one time (unless the [ attack penetrates Armor). Afterwards, any resulting damage is applied to the Troop one soldier at a time; the defender chooses the order that the soldiers face the damage, but each soldier must continue to sustain damage until it is defeated. Damage applied to one defeated soldier reduces the amount of damage that is applied to the next soldier, and so on. If all the soldiers caught in the area of effect are defeated, then the remaining damage is ignored; it does not carry over to the soldiers who were outside the area of effect. For example, a Red Dragon breathes a cone of fire that engulfs 3 soldiers in a Troop of Elves. The Red Dragon rolls 4 [ ] results, and the Troop of Elves rolls 2 [ ] results. The 2 [ ] results cancel 2 of the [ ] results, and the first uncanceled [ ] defeats the first soldier since the Troop only has a Health Rating of 1. The second uncanceled [ ] defeats the second soldier. Since there are no remaining [ ] results, the third soldier is safe. Since two soldiers were defeated, two Troop Tokens are removed from the Creature Card. Remember that “pressed” soldiers are always defeated first, so it is possible for a Troop to lose all of its pressed soldiers from an area attack, as well as the soldiers caught in the area of effect. For example, a Wizard casts a Fireball but places the Burst Token such that it only catches 1 soldier in the Elf Troop. Unfortunately, the Troop has 2 pressed figures that have been temporarily placed outside the play area. The Wizard rolls 3 [ ] results, and the Troop rolls no [ ] results. In this case, both pressed soldiers are defeated (soaking up 2 damage) before the soldier in the play area receives the last point of damage and is defeated. When a Troop sustains damage during an area attack, perform the following steps in order: a) The defender removes all Troops defeated during the area attack. b) If the Point Soldier was one of the soldiers defeated during the area attack, perform a Morale Check, removing any soldiers that flee. c) If the Troop featured a Leader Upgrade, the defender rolls 1 attack die for each defeated troop to see if the Upgrade is discarded (as per the Leader Upgradeʼs text). IMPORTANT: Remember that each time a soldier is defeated, you must remove the top Troop Token from the Troopʼs Creature Card. If the last

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soldier in the Troop is defeated, it is not removed until the End Phase (unless it was removed from a failed Morale Check, in which case it is removed from play immediately).

COMPONENT LIMITATIONS Objective Tokens, all cards, plastic figures, bases, connectors, and pegs are limited by the quantities included in this game box. If players run out of any other tokens, they may use a suitable replacement (such as a coin or bead) as a substitute. If players would roll more dice than the maximum number they have available, keep track of the results showing and re-roll the dice necessary to equal the total number of dice the player would have rolled all at once. Note that these dice are not considered re-rolled for the purposes of modifying dice (see “Modifying Dice Results” on page 19). In the unlikely event that there are no Damage Cards remaining in the deck or discard pile, change all [ ] results rolled to [ ] results. Use a suitable replacement to track additional damage until the deck is replenished.

TEAM PLAY RULES It is possible to play Attack Wing with two or more teams. It is recommended that players use the Legion Building rules when playing with teams (see page 28). Each team receives the same number of Legion Points regardless of the number of actual players assigned to each team. Each player takes ownership over a number of creatures on his team, as agreed upon by the other players on his team. Each player plans maneuvers for his own creatures and makes all decisions for his creaturesʼ Actions and attacks. Abilities that affect friendly creatures affect all creatures on that team, regardless of who the owner is. The Initiative Token is held by the whole team (not a single player). During the End Phase, the team with the Initiative Token passes it to the next team to the left that owns at least one creature with the same Level as an opposing teamʼs creature. If two or more players on the same team have creatures who share the same Level, those players may decide which of their creatures will activate first and which will attack first each round.

Players win (and lose) together as a team. It is possible for all of one playerʼs creatures to be defeated, but for his team to win if his teammates manage to defeat all of the opposing teamsʼ creatures.

SHARING INFORMATION Players on the same team may strategize against their opponent(s). Players are free to discuss any information with teammates (and opponents), but all discussion must take place in public (i.e. their opponent[s] must be able to hear all discussion). Also, teammates cannot show each other the maneuvers chosen on their dials.

OBSTACLES Battlefields contains many hazards including traps, geysers, and enemy towers. Some Adventures call for Ground Obstacles, Air Obstacles, or “Ground / Air Obstacles” (which affect creatures on both play levels). Players can also use Obstacles to add variety to the standard game. The game box includes 12 Objective Tokens that sometimes represent abstract positions on the map that do not act as Obstacles, but other times represent physical objects that do act as Obstacles. Individual Adventures will specify whether or not an Objective Token acts as an Obstacle.

ADDING OBSTACLES TO A STANDARD GAME During Set-Up, before the “Place Forces” step, the players can agree to use Obstacles for the standard game. The bottom side of each Objective Token features a number that the players can use to identify different Obstacles of their choice. For example, the players can specify that Objective Tokens 1 - 6 represent Ground Obstacles, Objective Tokens 7 - 9 represent Ground / Air Obstacles (affecting both play levels), and tokens 10 - 12 represent only mist that dissipates (and is discarded) as soon as it is revealed. Once the players decide on the number of Objective Tokens to be included, shuffle all the Objective Tokens together and then give each player the same number of tokens face down so that no one can see the bottom sides of the tokens. The players must then decide if they will each be able to examine some, all, or none of their Objective Tokens. Afterwards, starting with the player whose creature is the highest Level and then continuing clockwise around the table, each player takes a turn placing one Objective Token face down inside the play area. Use initiative (see page 24) to resolve ties if two or more players possess the creature with the highest Level. Once a token is placed face down, no one may examine it, including the player who placed it.

Objective Tokens cannot be placed within Range 1-3 of any edge of the play area or within Range 1 of another Objective Token. Players may agree to increase the size of the play area to account for these extra elements.

MOVING INTO AND THROUGH OBSTACLES When a creature executes a maneuver in which either the Maneuver Template or the creatureʼs base physically overlaps an Obstacle, follow these steps: 1. If the Objective Token is face down, flip the token face up and leave it face up for the rest of the game. 2. If the Objective Token represents a Ground Obstacle or an Air Obstacle, it only affects a creature moving through the appropriate play level. If the Objective Token represents a “Ground / Air Obstacle,” it affects all creatures moving through it. 3. If the Objective Token matches the creatureʼs play level, execute the maneuver as normal, but skip the “Perform Action” step; that creature cannot perform any Actions for the rest of the round. In addition, the player rolls one attack die. The creature then suffers any normal damage or critical damage rolled (see “Suffering Damage” on page 23). Unless otherwise specified, Air Obstacles and Ground / Air Obstacles penetrate Armor. NOTE: Ground creatures can pass through Obstacles without making an Overrun Check, but they still suffer the normal penalties for doing so (loss of Actions and receipt of potential damage). Conceptually, they are making their away around the Obstacle, although they may be injured in their haste. IMPORTANT: When overlapping an Obstacle, the creature stays where it lands (on top of the token). When the creature moves the next turn, it may separate from the Obstacle without a penalty. A creature that is overlapping an Obstacle during the Combat Phase suffers the same penalties that other creatures do when attacking through Obstacles (see below).

ATTACKING THROUGH OBSTACLES (NON-AREA ATTACKS) Obstacles represent features that are difficult to attack through with normal, non-area attacks. When measuring Range during a normal attack, if any part of the Range Ruler between the two creatures overlaps an Obstacle and if either creature is on the same play level as the Obstacle, the attack is considered obstructed; this applies to both melee attacks and ranged attacks. If neither

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creature is on the same play level as the Obstacle, the attack is not considered obstructed. If the attack is considered obstructed, the defender rolls one additional defense die for each such obstruction during the “Roll Defense Dice” step of this attack. Remember that for a non-area attack, Range is always measured as the shortest distance between the two creaturesʼ bases that falls inside the attacking creatureʼs Attack Arc. The attacker cannot attempt to measure Range to a different part of a base in order to avoid obstructing Obstacles. During an area attack (such as a Line, Cone, or Burst Attack), obstructions do not provide the defender with bonus defense dice.

ADVENTURES Adventures are special ways of playing the game that change the victory conditions and offer some unique rules and objectives for the game session. After learning the basics of Attack Wing, players can play Adventures to add variety and unique objectives to the game. Before following the standard steps for Set-Up, players resolve the following steps:

When playing an Adventure, the size of the playing surface is crucial to the overall balance of the game. These Adventures play best with a play area of 3ʼ X 3ʼ.

ADVENTURE OVERVIEWS The rules for each Adventure are described in three major sections: Adventure Set-Up, Special Rules, and Objectives. Each sectionʼs purpose is explained below: Adventure Set-Up: This section identifies the number of players recommended for this Adventure, as well as any special components that are required. It also defines the number of Legion Points allocated to each player and identifies specific creatures and other cards that must be used by particular players during the Adventure. If a particular player is not ordered to use specific cards, then that player can use any creatures and cards that he pleases. This section also provides detailed instructions for how to place creatures and special tokens during Set-Up. Special Rules: This section describes the unique rules that players must follow during this Adventure. These rules override all other rules and abilities.

1. Choose Adventure: Players must all agree on which Adventure to play. There are two Adventures included in this rulebook (see pages 35 - 38). Expansion sets will include additional Adventures. Players should also feel free to create their own Adventures.

Objectives: This section describes what each player needs to do in order to win the game. A player can only win by fulfilling his specified Objective. Players cannot win by defeating all enemy creatures unless this is stated in the “Objectives” section.

2. Choose Creatures: Both players choose their own creatures using the Legion Building rules (see “Legion Building in Adventures” below). These creatures are used during the “Gather Forces” step of Set-Up.

LEGION BUILDING IN ADVENTURES

Then players perform the Set-Up steps listed on pages 5 - 6 with the following exception: Instead of performing the “Place Forces” step, players follow the rules in the “Adventure Set-Up” section of the Adventure Overview. After setting up the game, review the Adventureʼs “Special Rules” and “Objectives.” Then players are ready to begin the game.

PLAYING AN ADVENTURE When playing an Adventure, players follow all standard rules found in this rulebook in addition to any special rules that apply to that specific Adventure. Players resolve game rounds as normal until one player has fulfilled his Objective (see “Adventure Overviews” below).

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ADVENTURE PLAY AREA SIZE

Players choose Creature Cards and Upgrade Cards with total Legion Points equal to or less than the number specified in the Adventure Set-Up. Some players must include certain cards as specified in the Adventure. When playing Adventures, use the normal initiative rules for “Initiative When Legion Building” (see page 28).

CAMPAIGN STORYLINES The Adventures presented in this rulebook introduce the Primordial Graveyard campaign storyline, which is continued through the first 19 expansion sets for D&D: Attack Wing. Players can play the Adventures individually as Scenarios, or collectively as part of a larger Campaign. When playing a Campaign, the players do not portray a single character, but instead portray many different creatures throughout the epic storyline. At the start of each Adventure, each player chooses a side to portray and attempts to earn Experience

Points (XP) and Campaign Artifacts to use in future Adventures. Each Adventure details the XP and Artifacts that can be won by the players who are successful during that particular Adventure. Players should keep an Adventure Log to record how many XP each player has earned and which Campaign Artifacts have been awarded to each player during the course of the Campaign.

AFTER THE BATTLE PARAGRAPHS The Objectives will direct the players to read particular paragraphs after the Adventure ends, depending upon which side was victorious. These paragraphs describe the rewards earned by the players during Campaign play, and also describe the post-battle interactions of the characters who won that Adventure, giving players a sense of how that chapter fits into the broader story arc.

EXPERIENCE POINTS As players succeed at individual Adventures, they earn XP, which they record in their Adventure Log. Each time the players begin a new Adventure, they can spend their total XP in different ways. Players do not permanently lose XP by spending them in this way. Each time the players play a new Adventure, they can spend their total accumulated XP however they see fit. The first way to spend XP is to purchase additional Legion Points (1 XP = 1 LP). For example, if a particular Adventure allows a player to field 90 Legion Points, a player who has earned 4 XP can spend those XP to field a total of 94 Legion Points during that Adventure. The player will be able to spend the same 4 XP (plus any new XP he earns) each time he starts a new Adventure. Alternatively, a player can choose to spend some of his XP to purchase new Upgrade slots for some of his creatures. Each new Upgrade slot costs 2 XP; a player cannot add more than 1 Upgrade slot to the same creature. The new Upgrade slot must replicate one of the existing Upgrade Icons on that creatureʼs Upgrade Banner. For example, a player who has earned 6 XP during the campaign decides to purchase two Upgrade slots for a total of 4 XP; each Upgrade slot must be added to a different creature and must replicate one of that creatureʼs existing Upgrade Icons. The player can choose to convert the remaining 2 XP into 2 Legion Points for that Adventure. Sometimes players will want to play the same Adventure multiple times in order to discover different outcomes. Each player should only be able to spend his XP during one session of a particular Adventure. This allows the players with fewer XP to have a chance to catch up. Also, each player should only be able to earn XP and Campaign Artifacts one time for each Adventure, even if the players decide to replay that Adventure multiple times.

CAMPAIGN ARTIFACTS This Starter Set comes with 3 Campaign Artifact Upgrades, and more Artifacts will become available in future expansion sets. To add to the flavor of the storyline, players should not equip these Upgrades until after they have earned them during a particular Adventure (see “After the Battle Paragraphs” above). Players who have won a particular Artifact should record this in the Adventure Log. During a future Adventure, that player can choose to include one (and only one) Campaign Artifact that he has earned, but he must pay the Legion Point Cost for that Upgrade as normal. When playing the same Adventure multiple times, a player should not be able to use the same Artifact in more than one session of that particular Adventure. This encourages players to try different Artifacts that they have earned when playing the same Adventure multiple times. Players who have earned Campaign Artifacts are encouraged to equip them in standard games as well, although players are always restricted to a maximum of 1 Campaign Artifact per Legion. This restriction also applies to team play: only 1 Campaign Artifact can be equipped by each team (see “Team Play Rules” on pages 32 - 33).

WINNING THE CAMPAIGN At the end of the Campaign, the player who has earned the most total XP is considered the winner. Experienced players are encouraged to relive the campaign again, taking different sides each time they experience an Adventure!

ADVENTURE #1: IN FOR A PENNY, IN FOR A POUNDING The red dragon Balagos is known to work for hire, so the blue dragon Eshaedra has made arrangements, through several minions, to lure him out of his volcanic lair with a job offer that will not, alas, pan out. The wily blue dragon intends to take the occasion of the red dragon’s absence to rummage quickly through his hoard, since his lair happens to be on the blue dragonʼs way back from the demesne of her sometime mate. Unbeknownst to the blue dragon, the copper dragon Galadaeros has kept a watchful eye on his red neighborʼs comings and goings, and great minds think alike. Each has carefully snuck in and now that the blue dragon has walked in on Galadaeros as he shops, her plan has changed; she will tell the red dragon that she spotted the copper dragon while traveling, followed him in and killed him, and then claim a reward. For his part, Galadaeros canʼt afford to let Eshaedra follow him home, even if he can get past her and out of the cavern. Still, it would be a shame to have come all this way and not pick up a nice thing or two for his trouble.

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ADVENTURE SET-UP

N

Number of players: 2 Special Components: 5 Objective Tokens Legion Points:

W

E

Galadaeros: 50 Eshaedra: 50 Objective Tokens numS bered 1 - 5 are placed Objective Tokens = Treasure Piles number side down and Galadaeros Starting Area scrambled by Galadaeros. Eshaedra Starting Area Walls Then Eshaedra, without examining any of the tokens, places one of them dead center in the play area, and each of the four remaining tokens six inches from it in such a way that each is equidistant from the others (forming an X as in the diagram). Each player places his dragon in his own starting area, which is a 6” X 6” area in one of the two corners, as outlined in the diagram.

SPECIAL RULES Except for Eshaedraʼs starting area, the edges of the play area represent the walls of the lair. If a dragon ends his movement outside the play area, he is not defeated, but must place himself anywhere within Range 1 of where he hit the wall, facing the dead center of the play area; that dragon cannot perform any Actions that round and rolls -2 defense dice against each attack for the rest of the round. When either dragon exits the play area through Eshaedraʼs starting area, the game ends and the Adventure Objectives are consulted to determine the winner. When either dragon is within Range 1 of an Objective Token, he or she may perform the following Action. ACTION: Flip over the targeted Objective Token. If it is not Objective Token 5, pick it up and place it on your card; it has been snatched up and is in your possession. No more than two items may be in your possession in this way. If it is Objective Token 5, you have triggered a fire trap; roll 3 red dice and receive damage for each [ ] and [ ] as normal, rolling defense dice as normal but ignoring Armor. Then remove the Objective Token from the play area. Objective Token 1 represents the Aerobat Amulet (see corresponding Upgrade Card), which the dragon immediately acquires and can use for free, even if he does not have an Upgrade slot available to support it. Objective Token 2 represents the Iron Tail Spike (see corresponding Upgrade Card), which the dragon immediately acquires and can use for free, even if he does not have an Upgrade slot available to support it. Objective Tokens 3 & 4 represent treasure chests that have no immediate effect on gameplay. Without spending an Action, either dragon may choose to drop a snatched object after his or her normal movement; place the Objective Token directly behind the creature base. Furthermore, any dragon sustaining 2 or more damage from one source in a single turn MUST drop one token of his or her choice if he or she possesses one. A dropped object may be snatched again on a subsequent turn, but only one Objective Token can be acquired per Action. If Objective Token 1 or 2 is dropped, the dragon discards the corresponding Upgrade Card.

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OBJECTIVES Blue Dragon: Eshaedra wins if she defeats Galadaeros (Read After the Battle 1), or if she has at least 3 Health remaining when the copper dragon escapes the lairʼs treasure room (Read After the Battle 2). If at any time Eshaedra exits through her own starting area, she immediately fails the Adventure (Read After the Battle 3). Copper Dragon: Galadaeros wins if he escapes the play area while Eshaedra has 1 or 2 Health (Read After the Battle 4). If he utterly defeats the blue dragon, he is also victorious (Read After the Battle 5). If he leaves the play area when Eshaedra has 3 health or more, he is defeated, and loses any Upgrades he may have picked up. If both dragons are defeated, the battle ends in a draw and neither earns an Upgrade Card. The players should re-play this Adventure before proceeding to the next one.

AFTER THE BATTLE: After the Battle 1 Eshaedra nudged the body of her opponent. “Thank Tiamat, that went pretty well, all things considered,” she thought. Now she could rest in the main chamber and await her chance to claim a reward. As she drifted off to sleep, a few drops of acid dripped from her opponent Galadaerosʼs upper fangs onto a small vial of vermilion liquid, melting the vial. Out poured a healing potion, onto the near-dead copper dragonʼs lolling tongue. Quietly, he stirred. Eshaedra never saw the injured mouse limping past her out of the lair. When she awoke, and noticed the copper dragon missing, she took one small shiny thing for herself and flew away. Eshaedra earns 1 XP and her choice of either the Aerobat Amulet or the Iron Tail Spike to use in future Adventures.

After the Battle 2 Eshaedra heard the copper dragon trip the heavy boulder trap in the main chamber. She found him there, pinned under the heavy weight, struggling helplessly, and took a moment to savor his distress. She would finish him, but not before looking around for a reward in the treasure chamber. Using all his strength, Galadaeros heaved the boulder off of himself in a way that would block the entrance to the treasure chamber. Then he fled as fast as his injuries allowed.

By the time Eshaedra unjammed the boulder, she knew the other trespasser was long gone. Berating herself, she took the trinket she’d found and departed. Eshaedra earns 1 XP and her choice of either the Aerobat Amulet or the Iron Tail Spike to use in future Adventures.

After the Battle 3 As the copper dragon heard the boulder fall, and the blue dragon cry out, Galadaeros realized that his opponent had tripped the trap in the lairʼs central chamber. Following, he saw that it had fallen and crushed the blue dragon’s head, so he grabbed an item that had caught his interest and left. The boulder began to rock, and finally Eshaedra managed to unseat it. Thanking the Mother Goddess for the giant bones and horn that had partially protected her aching head, she slowly made her way out of the lair, and gingerly flew home. Galadaeros earns 1 XP and his choice of either the Aerobat Amulet or the Iron Tail Spike to use in future Adventures.

After the Battle 4 Galadaeros flew out of the treasure chamber, tripping the boulder trap as he went. The giant stone fell, but too slow to hit him, and now it would slow his opponent. Satisfied and confident, he flew out into the night.

Artifact Upgrade from the IN FOR A PENNY, IN FOR A POUNDING Adventure, then he or she may choose to equip that Upgrade at full cost. If either the Aerobat Amulet or Iron Tail Spike remained in Balagosʼs lair after that adventure, the red dragon may likewise equip one of them of his choice.

Eshaedra was so grateful to be alive that she neglected to look around for anything she could take with her. Best to cut her losses and be long gone when the red master returned.

Place 1 Adventure Token in the dead center of the play area as a Center Marker. This token cannot be covered by an Objective Token during Set-up (see below).

Galadaeros earns 1 XP and, if he acquired one of the two artifacts, he may keep one of his choice to use in future Adventures.

After the Battle 5 Galadaeros nudged the blue dragon, and if she wasnʼt dead yet, it was but a matter of time. He grabbed some trinkets on his way out. Eshaedra awoke as the copper dragon was leaving, and whispered a prayer to the Mother. A flickering orange nimbus and the smell of sulfur surrounded her, and she felt just well enough to drag herself out of the lair. Galadaeros earns 1 XP and his choice of either the Aerobat Amulet or the Iron Tail Spike to use in future Adventures.

ADVENTURE #2: AMBUSH IN THE VALLEY It has taken some time, but the red dragon Balagos has discovered the identities of the dragons who invaded his lair. He has coerced the blue dragon Eshaedra into joining him today, for the purpose of punishing the copper dragon Galadaeros for his trespassing. They have learned that the copper dragon intends to meet a pair of older metallic dragons to trade information in this geyser field, located in the caldera of a long dormant volcano, after the sun passes over a certain peak, and they know Galadaeros will arrive early out of respect for his elders. Balagos intends to kill Galadaeros, and if Eshaedra happens to be killed in the process, so much the better. Eshaedra intends to kill Galadaeros, but she would happily settle for the death of Balagos instead, since the red dragon has learned the location of her lair and threatened her newlaid clutch. The blue dragon is no fool, however, and will not attack the red dragon unless he first attacks her, or is fairly certain that she can finish him off. Galadaeros has only one real chance: to remain here and stay alive long enough for the promised arrival of his allies. What none of the dragons realize is that just before sunset in the caldera, the dormant geysers tend to erupt unexpectedly, and then calm down when darkness falls.

ADVENTURE SET-UP

W

E

Legion Points:

Balagos: 55 Eshaedra: 55

Galadaeros: 55 If either Eshaedra or Galadaeros earned a Campaign

Each dragon is then placed as per the standard Set-Up rules for 3 players, with Galadaeros in the position of Player 1 (see diagram).

SPECIAL RULES As per the normal rules for Fleeing the Battlefield, any dragon that ends its movement off the edge of the play area is defeated (unless it has first completed its Adventure Objectives; see below), with the exception of the Western edge (opposite Galadaeros; see diagram), which represents a high, sheer cliff. Ending oneʼs movement off that edge results in the forfeiture of all Actions for the remainder of the round, and the player must re-orient his dragon facing toward the dead center of the playing area in a position within Range 1 of the point of contact with the edge. In addition, that dragon rolls -2 defense dice against each attack for the rest of the round. During each End Phase, the player whose dragon is closest to the dead center of the play area chooses an Objective Token to remove from play; if the two closest dragons are equally close, the third player chooses (even if he is defeated). If there are 2 or more Objective Tokens still left in the play area, then an attack die is rolled for each of the Dormant Geysers, and those for which a [ ] result is rolled are now active and flipped over. Treat them as Ground / Air Obstacles like the others. Should a Dormant Geyser become active while a dragon is in contact with the token representing it, that dragon immediately sustains 1 point of normal damage (which penetrates Armor) and also receives an Exhaustion Token. If there is now only 1 Objective Token left in the play area, the dragons that Galadaeros is here to meet have arrived and the Adventure ends. Check Adventure Objectives below for results. IMPORTANT: Eshaedra cannot attack Balagos unless Balagos attacks her first OR Balagos is reduced to 3 or fewer Health OR there are 7 or fewer Objective Tokens remaining in the play area.

N

Number of Players: 3 Special Components: 12 Objective Tokens, 1 Adventure Token

Next, in order of Level from highest to lowest, the players take turns placing the 12 Objective Tokens, representing geysers, one at a time in the play area, keeping in mind that each new placement must be at least 6” from the edges of the play area and 3” from any previously placed Objective Tokens. As each Objective Token is placed, roll an attack die; on a [ ] result, the Geyser is active and represents an Obstacle to both ground and air; any damage inflicted by the Geyser penetrates Armor. Carefully flip such tokens to the numbered side; the rest are placed face down and represent Dormant Geysers which are not yet considered Obstacles.

S Western Border of Play Area = Cliff Wall Balagos Starting Area Eshaedra Starting Area Galadaeros Starting Area Objective Tokens = Geysers (see rules to place) Adventure Token to mark the center of Play Area

OBJECTIVES Red Dragon: Balagos achieves a total victory if both other dragons are defeated and he leaves the play area through any of the three open sides (N, S, or E) before the Adventure ends (Read After the Battle 1). He receives a partial victory if only Galadaeros is defeated and he leaves the play area before the Adventure ends (Read After the Battle 2). Whatever else happens, if he is still in the play area when time expires, or leaves before

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Galadaeros is killed, then Balagos is defeated and loses the Adventure. Blue Dragon: Eshaedra achieves a total victory if both of the other dragons are defeated and she leaves the play area before the Adventure ends (Read After the Battle 3). She receives a partial victory if she leaves the play area after EITHER of the others is defeated but before the Adventure ends (Read After the Battle 2 if itʼs Galadaeros or After the Battle 4 if itʼs Balagos). Otherwise, she is defeated and loses the Adventure. Copper Dragon: Galadaeros achieves total victory if Eshaedra is defeated or still in the play area and he himself remains alive when help arrives (Read After the Battle 5). He achieves a partial victory if he survives and only Balagos is defeated (Read After the Battle 4) or, even in defeat, if BOTH other dragons are defeated by any means according to their Adventure Objectives (Read After the Battle 6). Otherwise, he loses the Adventure.

Note: It is possible for more than 1 Dragon to achieve a partial victory.

AFTER THE BATTLE: After the Battle 1 His revenge complete, Balagos sighed contentedly. Now he could pick through Eshaedraʼs hoard at his leisure, and then send minions to collect the rest. A pity that he had never learned the location of the copper trespasserʼs lair, but Balagos had time; he’d find that treasure as well. Having escaped the main geyser field with but moments to spare, he hadnʼt had the time to investigate a curious glint that he had noticed from one of the spouts. He could afford to wait quietly until the metallic dragons left to do so, however, and he certainly would. Balagos gains 2 XP and the Ring of Swift Breath Upgrade to use in future Adventures.

After the Battle 2 Eshaedra and Balagos eyed each other warily as they flew in silence from the battleground. “I could still kill her,” the red dragon thought. One look at her told him she was thinking the same about him. Finally, he nodded, a signal to her that her debt was paid. They parted, keeping eyes on each other until each was but a speck in the distance. Both Eshaedra and Balagos gain 1 XP.

After the Battle 3 “May the Glory be yours, Great Goddess,” Eshaedra prayed quietly, having left the geyser field with little time to spare. “That pestilential copper dead, and my tormentor with him, and a precious magical gift to boot! Oh, mighty Tiamat, you overflow with blessings upon your Favored Ones.” She giggled like a Wyrmling, but quietly, and looked down at the shiny thing which a geyser had pitched up at her, no, to her, during the battle, a Ring of hematite carved into the semblance of a burst of air. Eshaedra gains 2 XP and the Ring of Swift Breath Upgrade to use in future Adventures.

After the Battle 4 “Thanks be to You, Great Goddess Tiamat,” Eshaedra prayed quietly, “for saving your lowly servant from one who threatened my precious eggs. Their lives will be, as mine ever is, dedicated to your service. I will tell your lesser servants in the Cult where they might find Balagosʼs hoard, knowing that you shall put it to best purpose.”

38

Back on the field of geysers, Galadaeros was gesturing semi-frantically in the direction in which she had fled, telling his metallic elders of the blue dragon that was getting away, but they had more pressing news to impart. Both Eshaedra and Galadaeros gain 1 XP. Now read After the Battle 7.

After the Battle 5 Galadaeros was experiencing the exhaustion and shivering that can follow an adrenaline rush. Heʼd survived when heʼd been pretty certain that he wouldnʼt. “Well done, child,” said Quelindritar, an enormous bronze dragon. She was easily the oldest dragon Galadaeros had ever seen. “Let my friend here tend to you while we chat. First, your heroism deserves a reward…” Galadaeros gains 2 XP and the Ring of Swift Breath Upgrade to use in future Adventures. Now read After the Battle 7.

After the Battle 6 For the sake of the old gold dragon now tending to Galadaeros’s wounds, the ancient bronze dragon Quelindritar made certain that the blue and red dragons were only severely maimed. They would live, if only to regret this ambush. She hoped that she wouldn’t regret indulging her gold companion’s tender heart. On to more important matters. When the copper dragon awoke, the powerful bronze dragon provided him with a mission. Galadaeros gains 1 XP. Now read After the Battle 7.

After the Battle 7 “Through our agents,” the bronze dragon continued, “we have received reports of sinister efforts by our sworn enemies to pillage and desecrate the Primordial Graveyard, a place sacred to our kind. In times long forgotten, our ancestors chose that place as their final departure from this world. They also chose to store their most sacred relics there, in the hope that these precious objects would remain forever untouched by evil.” “A raid by evil dragons against the Primordial Graveyard?” exclaimed Galadaeros. “Is such a thing even possible?” “We believe it might be,” Quelindritar continued. “There can be no doubt that our enemies believe it is. Yet even we have no concept of where this Graveyard lies, or if it still exists. But if our foes, who pay lip service to Tiamat, succeed, they will defile that place. And worse, they will wield the power of the relics interred therein.” “And do not forget what else lies there...” started her gold companion. “Enough!” interrupted the bronze dragon. “We call upon you, Galadaeros, the ʻSunset Flame,ʼ to investigate this matter further. We must win the race to find this sacred Graveyard, but we must do so entirely in secret, lest our enemies thwart us. “Find the Graveyard. Protect the Relics. The fates of our races, and the world, depend on it.”

INDEX Actions..................................11, 13 Activation Phase.......................... 11 Adding Obstacles to a Standard Game........................33

Duration Tokens...........................24

Pivot...........................................12

Effect Tokens...............................25

Planning Phase............................. 9

Energy Type................................29

Plastic Bases Overlapping........... 27

Equip Restrictions.........................29

Plastic Figures Overlapping......... 27

Exhaustion..................................26

Play Area......................... 6, 28, 34

Advanced Rules...........................28

Experience Points........................35

Play Level...................................15

Adventure Overviews.................. 34

Fall Back..................................... 11

Point Soldier..........................30, 31

Adventure Play Area................... 34

Feint...........................................14

Pressed Soldiers..........................31

Adventures................................. 34

Fleeing the Battlefield...................26

Primary Weapons....... 17, 19, 25, 29

Alignment...................................29

Forward Attack Arc............... 16, 17

Range........................ 4 , 13, 25, 34

Area Attacks......................... 15, 18

Full Armor.................................... 3

Ranged Attack................. 16, 17, 33

Armor Tokens..........................3, 20

The Game Round.......................... 9

Rear Attack Arc..................... 16, 17

Attack Arc..................................16

Initiative......................................24

Set-Up.............................5, 7, 8, 34

Attacking Through Obstacles (Non-Area Attacks)......................33

Initiative When Legion Building...........................28

Sharing Information.....................33

Breaking Ties.............................. 11

Ground Creatures......................... 9

Burst Attack.................................18

Legion Building...........................28

Campaign Artifacts.....................35

Legion Building in Adventures...... 34

Campaign Storylines.................. 34

Legion Cost Penalties...................29

Concentrate Token............. 13, 20

Canceling Dice...........................20

Line Attack..................................18

Dodge Token.....................13, 20

Change Altitude..........................12

Maneuver Templates.................... 11

Target Token............... 13, 14, 19

Charge.......................................13

Melee Attack..............................16

Swoop...............................3, 11, 12

Choosing a Maneuver.................. 9

Modifying Dice Results.................19

Take Off............................ 9, 11, 12

Combat Phase.............................15

Morale Check.............................31

Target Action........................ 13, 14

Concentrate................................13

Moving Into and Through Obstacles......................33

Cone Attack................................18 Continuous Effects.......................25 Critical Damage..........................23 Damage Cards........................4, 23 Defeating Creatures.....................23 Defensive Combat Bonus..............17 Disabling Upgrades.....................25 Discarding Upgrades...................25 Dodge........................................13

Moving Through A Creature.........26 Normal Damage...................20, 23 Obstacles...................................33 Other Actions..............................15 Overlapping Other Creatures...... 27 Overrun Check............................26 Penetrate (Armor)........................20 Permanent Duration.....................24

CREDITS FLIGHTPATH™ GAME SYSTEM: Fantasy Flight Games GAME DESIGN: Andrew Parks, Manny OʼDonnell COVER ARTIST: Raymond Swanland ADDITIONAL GAME DEVELOPMENT: Benjamin Cheung, Michael Gradin, Christopher Guild, Chuck Kleinberg, Robert Lardiere, Christopher Parks, Bill Reeves, Catherine Weresow PLAYTESTING: Kyle B. Anglesey, Bill Crosbie, Scott

Shattered Armor........................... 3 Soldier.................................26, 30 Spending: Charge Token..............13, 15, 16

Troops............................ 30, 31, 32 Turnabout............................. 10, 11 Types of Maneuvers.....................10 Unique Names............................28 Upgrade Attacks...17, 19, 20, 25, 29 Upgrade Banner................... 29, 35 Upgrade Cards...... 4 , 6, 24-26 & 29 Wingover Maneuver.............. 10, 11 Winning the Game......................23

DʼAgostino, Bas Debbink, Clifford Field, Norman Hill, Eric Horn, Elizabeth Jonach, Ken Jonach, Rich Kopacz, Michael Kornytchuk, Mike Linkowski, Juha Niittynen, Philip T. Parker, Allison Payne, Corey Perez, Chris Resotka, Steven Still, Ada Terrizzi, Ben Torcivia, Alejandro Valdes, Kyle Volker EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Justin Ziran, Bryan Kinsella PROJECT MANAGEMENT: Kyle Payne, Scott D’Agostino GRAPHIC DESIGN: John Camacho TYPESETTING & LAYOUT: Patricia Verano

39

QUICK REFERENCE THE GAME ROUND 1. Planning Phase: Each player secretly plans his creaturesʼ maneuvers by assigning face down Maneuver Dials to those creatures.

LIST OF ACTIONS Dodge: Place 1 [ ] Token beside the active creature. During the Combat Phase, spent it to add 1 [ ] result to the defense roll.

2. Activation Phase: Each creature moves and performs one Action. In ascending order of Level, each creature reveals its Maneuver Dial, executes the chosen maneuver, changes altitude (if desired), and then immediately performs one Action.

] Token beside the Charge: Place 1 [ active creature. During the Combat Phase, spend it before attacking to move forward [ ] 1. May only initiate a melee attack afterwards; roll +1 attack die if attacking a creature in your Forward Attack Arc.

3. Combat Phase: Each creature may perform one attack. In descending order of Level, each creature can attack one creature that is inside its Attack Arc and within Range.

Concentrate: Place 1 [ ] Token beside the active creature. During the Combat ] Phase, spend it to change all [ results to [ ] results (when attacking) or all [ ] results to [ ] results (when defending).

4. End Phase: Remove defeated creatures from the play area, remove all unused Action Tokens, remove all Pivot Tokens, remove 1 [ ] from each card, return expired Effect Tokens to their Upgrade Cards, and pass the Initiative Token.

ACTIVATION PHASE OVERVIEW 1. Reveal Dial 2. Set Template 3. Execute Maneuver

Target: Target 1 enemy creature. If the target is within Range 1 - 4, place 1 Target Token beside the active creature. During the Combat Phase, spend it to re-roll as many attack dice as you choose. Feint: Take the [ ] 1 template and move sideways (either right or left), facing the same direction. Afterwards, receive an Exhaustion Token.

4. Check for Exhaustion 5. Clean Up

EXHAUSTION

6. Change Altitude

When a creature executes a Red Maneuver, place 1 Exhaustion Token beside it. While a creature has at least 1 Exhaustion Token, it cannot execute Red Maneuvers or perform any Actions (not even free Actions).

7. Perform Action

COMBAT PHASE OVERVIEW 1. Spend Charge Token (Optional) 2. Declare Target 3. Roll Attack Dice 4. Modify Attack Dice

When a creature executes a Green Maneuver, remove 1 Exhaustion Token from it. If the creature has zero Exhaustion Tokens, it can perform an Action this round.

5. Roll Defense Dice 6. Modify Defense Dice 7. Compare Results 8. Deflect Hits (Armor) 9. Deal Damage

DEFENSIVE COMBAT BONUS Range 4: Add

40

© 2014 WizKids/NECA, LLC. WIZKIDS, HEROCLIX, and COMBAT DIAL are trademarks of WizKids/NECA, LLC. All rights reserved. © 2014 Wizards of the Coast LLC All Rights Reserved. Dungeons & Dragons, Wizards of the Coast, D&D, Forgotten Realms, and their respective logos are trademarks of Wizards of the Coast LLC in the U.S.A. and other countries, and are used with permission. FLIGHTPATH is a trademark, and FANTASY FLIGHT GAMES is a registered trademark of Fantasy Flight Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

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D&D Attack Wing - Wizkids

COMPONENT LIST • 1 Full Rulebook • 1 Quick-Start Rules Booklet GAME OVERVIEW Welcome to D&D ® Attack Wing, an exciting, fast-paced miniatures battle...

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